National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for area electric utilities

  1. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on electric utility systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T.D.; Portante, E.C.; Koritarov, V.

    1995-03-01

    This technical memorandum estimates the effects of alternative contractual commitments that may be initiated by the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. It also studies hydropower operational restrictions at the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects in combination with these alternatives. Power marketing and hydropower operational effects are estimated in support of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Electricity production and capacity expansion for utility systems that will be directly affected by alternatives specified in the EIS are simulated. Cost estimates are presented by utility type and for various activities such as capacity expansion, generation, long-term firm purchases and sales, fixed operation and maintenance expenses, and spot market activities. Operational changes at hydropower facilities are also investigated.

  2. Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) For The Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Lonnie J.

    2015-08-01

    This Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Manufacturing Development Facility (MDF) technical collaboration project was conducted in two phases as a CRADA with Local Motors Inc. Phase 1 was previously reported as Advanced Manufacturing of Complex Cyber Mechanical Devices through Community Engagement and Micro-manufacturing and demonstrated the integration of components onto a prototype body part for a vehicle. Phase 2 was reported as Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for the Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles and demonstrated the high profile live printing of an all-electric vehicle using ONRL s Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology. This demonstration generated considerable national attention and successfully demonstrated the capabilities of the BAAM system as developed by ORNL and Cincinnati, Inc. and the feasibility of additive manufacturing of a full scale electric vehicle as envisioned by the CRADA partner Local Motors, Inc.

  3. Electrical utilities relay settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HACHE, J.M.

    1999-02-24

    This document contains the Hanford transmission and distribution system relay settings that are under the control of Electrical Utilities.

  4. Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Timothy C.; Wham, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

  5. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  6. Electrical Utility Materials Handler

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest. The Electrical Utility Material Handler (EUMH)...

  7. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

    1995-03-01

    Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Optimal Electric Utility Expansion

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1989-10-10

    SAGE-WASP is designed to find the optimal generation expansion policy for an electrical utility system. New units can be automatically selected from a user-supplied list of expansion candidates which can include hydroelectric and pumped storage projects. The existing system is modeled. The calculational procedure takes into account user restrictions to limit generation configurations to an area of economic interest. The optimization program reports whether the restrictions acted as a constraint on the solution. All expansionmore » configurations considered are required to pass a user supplied reliability criterion. The discount rate and escalation rate are treated separately for each expansion candidate and for each fuel type. All expenditures are separated into local and foreign accounts, and a weighting factor can be applied to foreign expenditures.« less

  9. Rural Utilities Service Electric Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rural Utilities Service Electric Program’s loans and loan guarantees finance the construction of electric distribution, transmission, and generation facilities, including system improvements...

  10. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

  11. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies ...

  12. Tipton Municipal Electric Util | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Util Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tipton Municipal Electric Util Address: P.O. Box 288 Place: Tipton, Indiana Zip: 46072 Service Territory: Indiana Phone Number:...

  13. Wonewoc Electric & Water Util | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wonewoc Electric & Water Util Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wonewoc Electric & Water Util Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: (608) 464-3114 Website: www.wonewocwisc.compublicwor...

  14. Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policies- Public Meeting Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities ...

  15. Power Sales to Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-02-01

    The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

  16. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978...

  17. Columbia Utilities Electricity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Name: Columbia Utilities Electricity Place: New York Phone Number: (877) 726-5862 Website: www.columbiautilities.com Twitter:...

  18. Page Electric Utility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Electric Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name: Page Electric Utility Place: Arizona Phone Number: (928) 645-2419 Website: pageutility.com Outage Hotline: (928) 645-2419...

  19. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    August 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority for August 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales...

  20. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    December 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility...

  1. Lodi Electric Utility- PV Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Lodi Electric Utility accepted applications for program year 2015 from January 2 - 30, 2015. The program is fully subscribed for 2015.  

  2. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound ...

  3. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound ...

  4. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound ...

  5. Table N13.3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" " Level: National and ... area that produces andor delivers electricity" "and is legally obligated to provide ...

  6. Electric Utility Industry Experience with Geomagnetic Disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as a few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration.

  7. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W.; Taylor, E.R. Jr.; Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  8. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. ); Taylor, E.R. Jr. ); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  9. Category:Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Jump to: navigation, search Category for Monthly Electric Utility Revenue and Sales Information. Pages in category "Monthly Electric...

  10. Galena Electric Utility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Galena Electric Utility Place: Alaska Phone Number: (907) 656-1301 Website: www.ci.galena.ak.usindex.asp? Outage Hotline: (907) 656-1503 AFTER HOURS References: EIA Form...

  11. Tatitlek Electric Utility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Utility Place: Alaska Phone Number: 907-562-4155 or 1-800-478-4155 - toll free in Alaska Website: www.chugachmiut.orgtribestat Outage Hotline: 907-562-4155 or...

  12. Farmington Electric Utility System- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Farmington Electric, a municipal utility, offers net metering to residential customers with systems up to 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. This option is available for photovoltaic (PV), wind, hydro...

  13. Electric Utility Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Electric Utility Energy Efficiency Programs This presentation discusses national trends in electric utility energy efficiency programs for industrial customers, insights from investor-owned utilities, and national trends/developments among electric cooperatives. PDF icon Electric Utility Energy Efficiency Programs (October 5, 2010) More Documents & Publications CX-004355: Categorical Exclusion Determination Industrial Customer Perspectives on

  14. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    March 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority for March 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and...

  15. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    July 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority for July 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and...

  16. An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 The U.S. ...

  17. DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 The DOE New Madrid...

  18. Electrical utilities model for determining electrical distribution capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, R. L.

    1997-09-03

    In its simplest form, this model was to obtain meaningful data on the current state of the Site`s electrical transmission and distribution assets, and turn this vast collection of data into useful information. The resulting product is an Electrical Utilities Model for Determining Electrical Distribution Capacity which provides: current state of the electrical transmission and distribution systems; critical Hanford Site needs based on outyear planning documents; decision factor model. This model will enable Electrical Utilities management to improve forecasting requirements for service levels, budget, schedule, scope, and staffing, and recommend the best path forward to satisfy customer demands at the minimum risk and least cost to the government. A dynamic document, the model will be updated annually to reflect changes in Hanford Site activities.

  19. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  20. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and Sales - April 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin Electric...

  1. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and Sales - May 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin Electric...

  2. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and Sales - June 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin Electric...

  3. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin Electric...

  4. High slot utilization systems for electric machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S

    2009-06-23

    Two new High Slot Utilization (HSU) Systems for electric machines enable the use of form wound coils that have the highest fill factor and the best use of magnetic materials. The epoxy/resin/curing treatment ensures the mechanical strength of the assembly of teeth, core, and coils. In addition, the first HSU system allows the coil layers to be moved inside the slots for the assembly purpose. The second system uses the slided-in teeth instead of the plugged-in teeth. The power density of the electric machine that uses either system can reach its highest limit.

  5. AUTOMATED UTILITY SERVICE AREA ASSESSMENT UNDER EMERGENCY CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. TOOLE; S. LINGER

    2001-01-01

    All electric utilities serve power to their customers through a variety of functional levels, notably substations. The majority of these components consist of distribution substations operating at lower voltages while a small fraction are transmission substations. There is an associated geographical area that encompasses customers who are served, defined as the service area. Analysis of substation service areas is greatly complicated by several factors: distribution networks are often highly interconnected which allows a multitude of possible switching operations; also, utilities dynamically alter the network topology in order to respond to emergency events. As a result, the service area for a substation can change radically. A utility will generally attempt to minimize the number of customers outaged by switching effected loads to alternate substations. In this manner, all or a portion of a disabled substation's load may be served by one or more adjacent substations. This paper describes a suite of analytical tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), which address the problem of determining how a utility might respond to such emergency events. The estimated outage areas derived using the tools are overlaid onto other geographical and electrical layers in a geographic information system (GIS) software application. The effects of a power outage on a population, other infrastructures, or other physical features, can be inferred by the proximity of these features to the estimated outage area.

  6. Electric Market and Utility Operation Terminology (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    This fact sheet is a list of electric market and utility operation terminology for a series of three electricity fact sheets.

  7. Electric Market and Utility Operation Terminology (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-05-03

    This fact sheet is a list of electric market and utility operation terminology for a series of three electricity fact sheets.

  8. The distributed utility: A new electric utility planning and pricing paradigm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feinstein, C.D.; Orans, R.; Chapel, S.W.

    1997-12-31

    The distributed utility concept provides an alternate approach to guide electric utility expansion. The fundamental idea within the distributed utility concept is that particular local load increases can be satisfied at least cost by avoiding or delaying the more traditional investments in central generation capacity, bulk transmission expansion, and local transmission and distribution upgrades. Instead of these investments, the distributed utility concept suggests that investments in local generation, local storage, and local demand-side management technologies can be designed to satisfy increasing local demand at lower total cost. Critical to installation of distributed assets is knowledge of a utility system`s area- and time-specific costs. This review introduces the distributed utility concept, describes an application of ATS costs to investment planning, discusses the various motivations for further study of the concept, and reviews relevant literature. Future research directions are discussed.

  9. New London Electric&Water Util | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric&Water Util Jump to: navigation, search Name: New London Electric&Water Util Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: (920) 982-8516 Website: newlondonutilities.org Outage Hotline:...

  10. Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Final issue of this report. Provides detailed statistics on existing generating units operated by electric utilities as of December 31, 2000, and certain summary statistics about new generators planned for operation by electric utilities during the next 5 years.

  11. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and Sales - November 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin...

  12. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin...

  13. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin...

  14. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin...

  15. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and Sales - October 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin...

  16. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin...

  17. DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 2010 | Department of Energy New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 The DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utilities Workshop, held in Memphis, TN, in July 2010 for the electric utilities in the seismic zone was a chance to bring together a diverse set of industry partners to discuss the potential effects of an earthquake in the New Madrid and Wabash Valley

  18. Financial statistics of major publicly owned electric utilities, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-31

    The Financial Statistics of Major Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes relating to publicly owned electric utility issues.

  19. Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Section 1101 of the U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT)1 calls for a report on the current trends in the workforce of (A) skilled technical personnel that support energy technology industries, and (B) electric power and transmission engineers. It also requests that the Secretary make recommendations (as appropriate) to meet the future labor requirements. PDF icon Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility

  20. Electric Utility Sales and Revenue - EIA-826 detailed data file

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    826 detailed data Find detailed data at right for: net metering | advanced metering | solar (PV) estimates | sales and revenue | green pricing The Form EIA-826 "Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions" collects sales of electricity and associated revenue, each month, from a statistically chosen sample of electric utilities in the United States. The respondents to the Form EIA-826 are chosen from the Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility

  1. Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Smart Grid Policies- Public Meeting | Department of Energy Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policies- Public Meeting Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policies- Public Meeting Transcript of public meeting on Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policies PDF icon Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric

  2. Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) For The Rapid Manufacture

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Customized Electric Vehicles (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) For The Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) For The Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles This Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Manufacturing Development Facility (MDF) technical collaboration project was conducted in two phases as a CRADA with Local

  3. Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-15

    This publication presents 5 years (1990--94) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented. Composite tables present: Aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, financial indicators, electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data.

  4. NREL: Technology Deployment - Electric Utility Assistance and Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Utility Assistance and Support NREL provides data-driven support, assistance, and tools to electric utilities to help further the integration of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies into the electric grid. Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative The Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative aims to share knowledge on distributed photovoltaic interconnection practices and innovation. The collaborative hosts monthly informational meetings on

  5. Financial statistics of selected investor-owned electric utilities, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Financial Statistics of Selected Investor-Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the investor-owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide the Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to investor-owned electric utility issues.

  6. Lodi Electric Utility- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lodi Electric Utility provides an on-bill financing program for the commercial and industrial customers. To participate, the customer must receive a rebate through the utility's rebate program, and...

  7. Lodi Electric Utility- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lodi Electric Utility (LEU) offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible commercial and multifamily residential customers. More information regarding the rebate programs, including application...

  8. PPL Electric Utilities - Custom Energy Efficiency Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0.08 per projected first year kWh savings Summary Prospective applicants should contact their PPL Electric Utilities Key Account Manager before beginning any project. If...

  9. Orange and Rockland Utilities (Electric)- Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Orange and Rockland Utilities offers electric energy efficiency program that provides rebates to replace various appliances. To apply for rebate, submit rebate application form along with required...

  10. Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Approaches...

  11. U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Final issue of this report. - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

  12. Lodi Electric Utility- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lodi Electric Utility (LEU) offers several residential energy efficiency programs, including the Appliance Rebate Program and the Home Improvement Rebate Program. 

  13. Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The 1993 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents five years (1989 to 1993) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, the Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities, filed on a fiscal basis.

  14. Annual Electric Utility Data - Form EIA-906 Database

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Detailed data files > Historic Form EIA-906 Historic Form EIA-906 Detailed Data with previous form data (EIA-759) Historic electric utility data files include information on net ...

  15. An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 2010 | Department of Energy An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability monitors changes, threats, and risks to the energy infrastructure in the United States. This report updates a previously published report on copper wire theft. The combined efforts of electric

  16. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 | Department of Energy 8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility. PDF icon "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) More

  17. PPL Electric Utilities Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 14715 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt...

  18. Ashland Electric Utility - Photovoltaic Rebate Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The City of Ashland Conservation Division offers electric customers installing photovoltaic systems a rebate of either 0.50 per watt (residential) or 0.75 per watt...

  19. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology | Department of Energy 3 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Inc. PDF icon 2003_deer_algrain.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology An Engine System Approach to Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery

  20. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology | Department of Energy 4 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Caterpillar/U.S. Department of Energy PDF icon 2004_deer_hopmann.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Caterpillar, Inc., June 2011

  1. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology | Department of Energy Caterpillar Inc. PDF icon 2002_deer_hopmann.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology An Engine System Approach to Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery

  2. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised | Department of Energy 6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility.

  3. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 | Department of Energy 9 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility

  4. Knoxville Area Transit: Propane Hybrid Electric Trolleys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-04-01

    A 2-page fact sheet summarizing the evaluation done by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity on the Knoxville Area Transit's use of propane hybrid electric trolleys.

  5. Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-02

    This publication presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

  6. Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-14

    This document presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. Purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate, timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

  7. Dublin Municipal Electric Util | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility...

  8. Sustainable Electric Utility (SEU)- SREC Purchase Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SREC purchase program is a joint incentive of Delaware Division of Energy and Climate (DNREC) and the state’s Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU). The program offers a standard onetime payment of $450...

  9. Financial statistics of major US investor-owned electric utilities 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-28

    The Financial Statistics of Major US Investor-Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the investor-owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to investor-owned electric utility issues. The Financial Statistics of Major US Investor-Owned Electric Utilities publication provides information about the financial results of operations of investor-owned electric utilities for use by government, industry, electric utilities, financial organizations and educational institutions in energy planning. In the private sector, the readers of this publication are researchers and analysts associated with the financial markets, the policymaking and decisionmaking members of electric utility companies, and economic development organizations. Other organizations that may be interested in the data presented in this publication include manufacturers of electric power equipment and marketing organizations. In the public sector, the readers of this publication include analysts, researchers, statisticians, and other professionals engaged in regulatory, policy, and program areas. These individuals are generally associated with the Congress, other legislative bodies, State public utility commissions, universities, and national strategic planning organizations.

  10. Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.; Levene, J.; Harrison, K.; Sen, P.K.; Novachek, F.

    2006-09-01

    Recent advancements in hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications show promise for economical near- to mid-term conversion to a hydrogen-based economy. As the use of hydrogen for the electric utility and transportation sectors of the U.S. economy unfolds, electric power utilities need to understand the potential benefits and impacts. This report provides a historical perspective of hydrogen, discusses the process of electrolysis for hydrogen production (especially from solar and wind technologies), and describes the opportunities for electric power utilities.

  11. Working With Industry and Utilities to Promote Electric Vehicles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Working With Industry and Utilities to Promote Electric Vehicles Working With Industry and Utilities to Promote Electric Vehicles June 10, 2015 - 10:45am Addthis Tom Kuhn, President of EEI and Secretary Moniz at the MOU signing on Monday, June 8, at Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Annual Convention in New Orleans, LA. | Photo courtesy of EEI Tom Kuhn, President of EEI and Secretary Moniz at the MOU signing on Monday, June 8, at Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Annual

  12. UGI Utilities Electric Division | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    360 Place: Reading, Pennsylvania Zip: 19605 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.ugi.comelectricindex.htm...

  13. Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The 1992 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major US Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 4 years (1989 through 1992) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. Four years of summary financial data are provided. Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, {open_quotes}Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities.{close_quotes} Public electric utilities file this survey on a fiscal year, rather than a calendar year basis, in conformance with their recordkeeping practices. In previous editions of this publication, data were aggregated by the two most commonly reported fiscal years, June 30 and December 31. This omitted approximately 20 percent of the respondents who operate on fiscal years ending in other months. Accordingly, the EIA undertook a review of the Form EIA-412 submissions to determine if alternative classifications of publicly owned electric utilities would permit the inclusion of all respondents.

  14. U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

  15. City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility- PV Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility is providing rebates to their customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV) systems. The rebate levels will decrease annually over the life of the program. ...

  16. Wholesale service obligation of electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, F.L. IV; Spivak, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    The basic concepts of public utility status and utility regulation intertwine the obligation to provide service to the public as reasonably demanded with rate regulation and shielding from competitive interference. While a common law service obligation was not part of the Federal Power Act, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has taken the position that service, once commenced, may not be terminated without its approval. This view of Commission authority may not be supported by the legislative history of the Federal Power Act or by judicial precedent. The requirement to serve apart from recognition of a right to serve may result in increased rates in the near term and insufficient capacity, or both, in the long run. A review by the Commission and the courts is examining ways to introduce competition and shift risks from ratepayers to shareholders.

  17. Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and

  18. Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.; Schaffhauser, A.

    1994-04-01

    This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

  19. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2006 Area Maps

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric Transmission National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Congestion Study Congestion Area Maps Congestion Area Maps U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy...

  20. Market Implications of Synergism Between Low Drag Area and Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implications of Synergism Between Low Drag Area and Electric Drive Fuel Savings Market Implications of Synergism Between Low Drag Area and Electric Drive Fuel Savings Presented at ...

  1. Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning John Sterling Solar Electric Power Association Joyce McLaren National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mike Taylor Solar Electric Power Association Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-60047 October 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is

  2. A model for IPP sales to electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, G.L.; Anderson, R.W.

    1996-11-01

    This paper shows several constraints that an unregulated plant would encounter. Florida Power Corporation has built a plant that has the characteristics of an IPP operating in the future deregulated electricity market. This plant, the University of Florida Cogeneration Plant undergoes the same conditions experienced in an IPP selling energy to the electric utilities when its contractual electric customer was unable to take the energy. It is a model of the future deregulated IPP.

  3. U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it related to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

  4. Financial statistics major US publicly owned electric utilities 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    The 1996 edition of The Financial Statistics of Major US Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 5 years (1992 through 1996) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. Five years of summary financial data are provided. Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. 2 figs., 32 tabs.

  5. Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the

  6. Positioning the electric utility to build information infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    In two particular respects (briefly investigated in this study from a lawyer`s perspective), electric utilities appear uniquely well-positioned to contribute to the National Information Infrastructure (NII). First of all, utilities have legal powers derived from their charters and operating authorities, confirmed in their rights-of-way, to carry out activities and functions necessary for delivering electric service. These activities and functions include building telecommunications facilities and undertaking information services that have become essential to managing electricity demand and supply. The economic value of the efficiencies made possible by telecommunications and information could be substantial. How great remains to be established, but by many estimates electric utility applications could fund a significant share of the capital costs of building the NII. Though utilities` legal powers to pursue such efficiencies through telecommunications and information appear beyond dispute, it is likely that the effort to do so will produce substantial excess capacity. Who will benefit from this excess capacity is a potentially contentious political question that demands early resolution. Will this windfall go to the utility, the customer, or no one (because of political paralysis), or will there be some equitable and practical split? A second aspect of inquiry here points to another contemporary issue of very great societal importance that could very well become the platform on which the first question can be resolved fortuitously-how to achieve universal telecommunications service. In the effort to fashion the NII that will now continue, ways and means to maximize the unique potential contribution of electric utilities to meeting important social and economic needs--in particular, universal service--merit priority attention.

  7. Flowing Electrical Conductivity At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flowing Electrical Conductivity At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flowing Electrical Conductivity At...

  8. Consumer's Guide to the economics of electric-utility ratemaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This guide deals primarily with the economics of electric utilities, although certain legal and organizational aspects of utilities are discussed. Each of the seven chapters addresses a particular facet of public-utility ratemaking. Chapter One contains a discussion of the evolution of the public-utility concept, as well as the legal and economic justification for public utilities. The second chapter sets forth an analytical economic model which provides the basis for the next four chapters. These chapters contain a detailed examination of total operating costs, the rate base, the rate of return, and the rate structure. The final chapter discusses a number of current issues regarding electric utilities, mainly factors related to fuel-adjustment costs, advertising, taxes, construction work in progress, and lifeline rates. Some of the examples used in the Guide are from particular states, such as Illinois and California. These examples are used to illustrate specific points. Consumers in other states can generalize them to their states and not change the meaning or significance of the points. 27 references, 8 tables.

  9. Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

    1997-10-15

    This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

  10. Electric-utility DSM programs: Terminology and reporting formats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E. ); Sabo, C. )

    1991-10-01

    The number, scope, effects, and costs of electric-utility demand-site management programs are growing rapidly in the United States. Utilities, their regulators, and energy policy makers need reliable information on the costs of, participation in, and energy and load effects of these programs to make informed decisions. In particular, information is needed on the ability of these programs to cost-effectively provide energy and capacity resources that are alternatives to power plants. This handbook addresses the need for additional and better information in two ways. First, it discusses the key concepts associated with DSM-program types, participation, energy and load effects, and costs. Second, the handbook offers definitions and a sample reporting form for utility DSM programs. The primary purpose in developing these definitions and this form is to encourage consistency in the collection and reporting of data on DSM programs. To ensure that the discussions, reporting formats, and definitions will be useful and used, development of this handbook was managed by a committee, with membership from electric utilities, state regulatory commissions, and the US Department of Energy. Also, this data-collection form was pretested by seven people from six utilities, who completed the form for nine DSM programs.

  11. Electrical Resistivity At Coso Geothermal Area (1972) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Electrical Resistivity At Coso Geothermal Area (1972) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  12. Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0.17 0.13 0.23 0.23 0.29 0.60 0.53 2000's 0.81 1.29 1.98 1.68 2.14 1.79 2.34 2.57 2.46 3.30 2010's 3.81 4.53 4.40 4.08 4.23 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016

  13. A primer on incentive regulation for electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.J.

    1995-10-01

    In contemplating a regulatory approach, the challenge for regulators is to develop a model that provides incentives for utilities to engage in socially desirable behavior. In this primer, we provide guidance on this process by discussing (1) various models of economic regulation, (2) problems implementing these models, and (3) the types of incentives that various models of regulation provide electric utilities. We address five regulatory models in depth. They include cost-of-service regulation in which prudently incurred costs are reflected dollar-for-dollar in rates and four performance-based models: (1) price-cap regulation, in which ceilings are placed on the average price that a utility can charge its customers; (2) revenue-cap regulation, in which a ceiling is placed on revenues; (3) rate-of-return bandwidth regulation, in which a utility`s rates are adjusted if earnings fall outside a {open_quotes}band{close_quotes} around equity returns; and (4) targeted incentives, in which a utility is given incentives to improve specific components of its operations. The primary difference between cost-of-service and performance-based approaches is the latter sever the tie between costs and prices. A sixth, {open_quotes}mixed approach{close_quotes} combines two or more of the five basic ones. In the recent past, a common mixed approach has been to combine targeted incentives with cost-of-service regulation. A common example is utilities that are subject to cost-of-service regulation are given added incentives to increase the efficiency of troubled electric-generating units.

  14. A knowledge based model of electric utility operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-08-11

    This report consists of an appendix to provide a documentation and help capability for an analyst using the developed expert system of electric utility operations running in CLIPS. This capability is provided through a separate package running under the WINDOWS Operating System and keyed to provide displays of text, graphics and mixed text and graphics that explain and elaborate on the specific decisions being made within the knowledge based expert system.

  15. Homeostatic control: the utility/customer marketplace for electric power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweppe, F.C.; Tabors, R.D.; Kirtley, J.L.

    1981-09-01

    A load management system is proposed in which the electric utility customer controls his on-site power demand to coincide with the lowest possible cost of power generation. Called Homeostatic Control, this method is founded on feedback between the customer and the utility and on customer independence. The utility has no control beyond the customer's meter. Computers located at the customer's site are continuously fed data on weather conditions, utility generating costs, and demand requirements for space conditioning, lighting, and appliances. The customer then directs the computer to schedule and control the power allotted for these functions. On-site generation by the customer can be incorporated in the system. It is argued that homeostatic control is technically feasible, that the level of control equipment sophistication can be adapted to the benefits received by the customer, that such a system would encourage the use of customer-site energy storage and energy conservation equipment, and that it represents a realistic method for allowing the customer to decide how he will use electric power during an era of increasing costs for power generation. (LCL)

  16. Factors that affect electric-utility stranded commitments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.; Baxter, L.

    1996-07-01

    Estimates of stranded commitments for U.S. investor-owned utilities range widely, with many falling in the range of $100 to $200 billion. These potential losses exist because some utility-owned power plants, long-term power-purchase contracts and fuel-supply contracts, regulatory assets, and expenses for public-policy programs have book values that exceed their expected market values under full competition. This report quantifies the sensitivity of stranded- commitment estimates to the various factors that lead to these above- market-value estimates. The purpose of these sensitivity analyses is to improve understanding on the part of state and federal regulators, utilities, customers, and other electric-industry participants about the relative importance of the factors that affect stranded- commitment amounts.

  17. Electric Market and Utility Operation Terminology (Fact Sheet), Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet is a list of electric market and utility operation terminology for a series of three electricity fact sheets.

  18. Table 11.6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; Level: National and ... Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 11.6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility ...

  19. Cyber Security Challenges in Using Cloud Computing in the Electric Utility Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akyol, Bora A.

    2012-09-01

    This document contains introductory material that discusses cyber security challenges in using cloud computing in the electric utility industry.

  20. Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    1996 - Final issue. Presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the investor-owned electric utilities.

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utility Initiatives Foster Plug-In Electric

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Vehicle Charging at Home and Work Utility Initiatives Foster Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging at Home and Work to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utility Initiatives Foster Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging at Home and Work on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utility Initiatives Foster Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging at Home and Work on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utility Initiatives Foster Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging at

  2. Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

    2009-12-01

    The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

  3. FERC must fix its electric utility merger policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grankena, M.

    1996-10-01

    In evaluating mergers, FERC should adopt the approach of the federal antitrust agencies to prevent firms from gaining and exercising market power. Doing so will require changes in everything from how FERC defines product and geographic markets, and how market concentration, entry conditions and cost saving are evaluated, to how discovery is conducted - in short, to virtually every aspect of how FERC reaches a merger decision. Reliance on competition to benefit consumers carries with it the necessity to preserve competition that is threatened by mergers or other structural changes. Faced with numerous mergers of large and medium-size electric utilities and the expectation of more to come, in January 1996 the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission requested comments on how it should evaluate mergers. This paper addresses that need. Section I explains how FERC and the federal antitrust agencies have responded to the competitive issues raised by utility mergers during the past decade. Section II introduces the analytical approach used by the antitrust agencies to evaluate mergers. Section III highlights features of the electric power industry that make analysis of market power unusually complex. Section IV evaluates FERC`s past reliance on comparable open access transmission as a sufficient remedy for competitive concerns relating to the availability, reliability and pricing of transmission service. Section V suggests changes to FERC`s merger policy that would make it consistent with antitrust principles and FERC`s public interest responsibilities. The final section draws conclusions.

  4. Financial statistics of selected publicly owned electric utilities 1989. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-06

    The Financial Statistics of Selected Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide the Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes relating to publicly owned electric utility issues. 21 tabs.

  5. Electric Utility Company Assigned to a Zip Code? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Utility Company Assigned to a Zip Code? Home I have found an error in the utility company assigned to a zip code. I am not sure if the "assigned" utility company covers...

  6. Electric utilities sales and revenue monthly report (EIA-826), 1987. Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, J.; Wilkins, S.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of Form EI-826 formerly FERC-5, Electric Utility Company Monthly Statement, is to collect data necessary to fulfill regulatory responsibility; identify near-term trends in energy use; and contingency analysis. The form is filed monthly by approximately 150 electric utilities. All privately owned electric utilities with annual electric operating revenues of $100,000,000 or more must respond. In addition, the sample includes other selected electric utilities. The reported data is expanded by factors, calculated using annual data from a previous period, to give electric sales data by state and sector. Other information collected includes data gathered on depreciation, construction, net income before taxes, and extraordinary items.

  7. Electric Utilities Monthly Sales and Revenue Report (EIA-826), current. Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Form EI-826, formerly FERC-5, Electric Utility Company Monthly Statement, collects data necessary to fulfill regulatory responsibility; identify near-term trends in energy use; and contingency analysis. The form is filed monthly by approximately 150 electric utilities. All privately owned electric utilities with annual electric operating revenues of $100,000,000 or more must respond. In addition, the sample includes other selected electric utilities. The reported data is expanded by factors, calculated using annual data from a previous period, to give electric sales data by state and sector. Other information collected includes data gathered on depreciation, construction, net income before taxes, and extraordinary items.

  8. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Kevin M. Kolevar today announced the Department's designation of two National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors (National Corridors) -- the Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridor, and the Southwest Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridor. These corridors include areas in two of the Nation's most populous regions with growing electricity congestion problems. The Department based its designations on data and analysis showing that persistent transmission congestion exists in these two areas.

  9. Applying electrical utility least-cost approach to transportation planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, G.A.; Growdon, K.; Lagerberg, B.

    1994-09-01

    Members of the energy and environmental communities believe that parallels exist between electrical utility least-cost planning and transportation planning. In particular, the Washington State Energy Strategy Committee believes that an integrated and comprehensive transportation planning process should be developed to fairly evaluate the costs of both demand-side and supply-side transportation options, establish competition between different travel modes, and select the mix of options designed to meet system goals at the lowest cost to society. Comparisons between travel modes are also required under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA). ISTEA calls for the development of procedures to compare demand management against infrastructure investment solutions and requires the consideration of efficiency, socioeconomic and environmental factors in the evaluation process. Several of the techniques and approaches used in energy least-cost planning and utility peak demand management can be incorporated into a least-cost transportation planning methodology. The concepts of avoided plants, expressing avoidable costs in levelized nominal dollars to compare projects with different on-line dates and service lives, the supply curve, and the resource stack can be directly adapted from the energy sector.

  10. Financial impacts of nonutility power purchases on investor-owned electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    To assist in its these responsibilities in the area of electric power, EIA has prepared this report, Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities. The primary purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities. The existing concern in this area is manifest in the provisions of Section 712 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which required State regulatory commissions to evaluate various aspects of long-term power purchase contracts, including their impact on investor-owned utilities` cost of capital and rates charged to customers. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of the deliberations by both public and private decision-makers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

  11. Annual Public Electric Utility data - EIA-412 data file

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    412 Archive Data (The EIA-412 survey has been terminated.) The EIA-412 "Annual Electric Industry Financial Report" collected information such as income statements, balance sheets, sales and purchases, and transmission line data. Form EIA-412 data Schedules Year 2 Electric Balance Sheet 3 Electric Income Statement 4 Electric Plant 5 Taxes, Tax Equivalents, Contributions, and Services During Year 6 Sales of Electricity for Resale (Account 447) 7 Electric Operation and Maintenance

  12. Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Loan | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Type Loan Program Summary The City of Ashland Conservation Division offers a solar water heating program to residential electric customers who currently use an electric...

  13. Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    commercial location per year, 5,000 per industrial location per year Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Austin Utilities Website http:www.austinutilities.compages...

  14. Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Coal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project | Department of Energy Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Coal Project Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Coal Project January 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative clean coal technology project in Texas will supply electricity to the largest municipally owned utility in the United States under a recently signed Power Purchase Agreement, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today. Under the

  15. Financial statistics of major U.S. investor-owned electric utilities 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Financial Statistics of Major US Investor-Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the investor-owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to investor-owned electric utility issues.

  16. Central Wind Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities: Revised Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

    2011-03-01

    The report and accompanying table addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America. The first part of the table focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that have central wind power forecasting in place; the second part focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that plan to adopt central wind power forecasting in 2010. This is an update of the December 2009 report, NREL/SR-550-46763.

  17. Financial statistics of major US investor-owned electric utilities 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the investor-owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State Governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for making policy and decisions relating to investor-owned electric utility issues.

  18. Energy data report: Sales, Revenue, and Income of Electric Utilities. Monthly report, October 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, T.F.

    1982-01-19

    This is the last issue of Sales, Revenue, and Income of Electric Utilities. The data contained in this report are being published in Section 10 of the Electric Power Monthly.

  19. Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    2000 - Final issue. Presents summary financial data for 1994 through 2000 and detailed financial data for 2000 on major publicly owned electric utilities.

  20. Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Rebate |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    average 800 to 1,000) Summary The City of Ashland Conservation Division offers a solar water heating program to its residential electric customers who currently use an electric...

  1. Integration of distributed resources in electric utility systems: Current interconnection practice and unified approach. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, P.; Leskan, T.; Zaininger, H.; Smith, D.

    1998-11-01

    Deregulation of the electric utility industry, new state and federal programs, and technology developments are making distributed resources (DR) an increasingly utilized option to provide capacity for growing or heavily loaded electric power systems. Optimal DR placement near loads provides benefits not attainable from bulk generation system additions. These include reduced loading of the T and D system, reduced losses, voltage support, and T and D equipment upgrade deferments. The purpose of this document is to review existing interconnection practices and present interconnection guidelines are relevant to the protection, control, and data acquisition requirements for the interconnection of distributed resources to the utility system. This is to include protection performance requirements, data collection and reporting requirements, on-line communication requirements, and ongoing periodic documentation requirements. This document also provides guidelines for the practical placement and sizing of resources as pertinent to determining the interconnection equipment and system control requirements. The material contained herein has been organized into 4 sections dealing with application issues, existing practices, a unified interconnection approach, and future work. Section 2 of the report discusses the application issues associated with distributed resources and deals with various engineering issues such as overcurrent protection, voltage regulation, and islanding. Section 3 summarizes the existing utility interconnection practices and guidelines as determined from the documents provided by participating utilities. Section 4 presents a unified interconnection approach that is intended to serve as a guide for interconnection of distributed resources to the utility system. And finally, Section 5 outlines possible future areas of study to expand upon the topics discussed in this report.

  2. Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockway, N.

    2001-05-21

    As the electric industry goes through a transformation to a more market-driven model, traditional grounds for utility energy efficiency have come under fire, undermining the existing mechanisms to fund and deliver such services. The challenge, then, is to understand why the electric industry should sustain investments in helping low-income Americans use electricity efficiently, how such investments should be made, and how these policies can become part of the new electric industry structure. This report analyzes the opportunities and barriers to leveraging electric utility energy efficiency assistance to low-income customers during the transition of the electric industry to greater competition.

  3. Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.; Sterling, J.; Taylor, M.; McLaren, J.

    2014-01-01

    Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. Through interviews and a questionnaire, the authors gathered information on utility supply planning and how solar is represented. Utilities were asked to provide their resource planning process details, key assumptions (e.g. whether DG is represented as supply or negative load), modeling methodology (e.g. type of risk analytics and candidate portfolio development), capacity expansion and production simulation model software, and solar project representation (project size, capacity value and integration cost adder). This presentation aims to begin the exchange of information between utilities, regulators and other stakeholders by capturing utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

  4. Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Industry Change Industry Change David K. Owens Executive Vice President Edison Electric Institute 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis April 7, 2008 EIA Key to Policy Development and EIA Key to Policy Development and Advocacy Activities Advocacy Activities EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving Energy Industry Energy Industry n EIA clearly provides more with less budgetary support l 1979: $347 million l 2007:

  5. Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    The current and future projected cost and performance characteristics of new electric generating capacity are a critical input into the development of energy projections and analyses.

  6. Black Hills/Colorado Electric Utility Co. Smart Grid Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermostats Targeted Benefits Reduced Meter Reading Costs Improved Electric Service Reliability Reduced Ancillary Service Cost Reduced Truck Fleet Fuel Usage Reduced Greenhouse...

  7. Specific systems studies of battery energy storage for electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhil, A.A.; Lachenmeyer, L.; Jabbour, S.J.; Clark, H.K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. As a part of this program, four utility-specific systems studies were conducted to identify potential battery energy storage applications within each utility network and estimate the related benefits. This report contains the results of these systems studies.

  8. Electric utilities monthly sales and revenue report (EIA-826), current (on magnetic tape). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-12-31

    Data regarding electricity sales (megawatthours) and associated revenue (thousand dollars) are submitted to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) by selected electric utilities on the Form EIA-826, `Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions.` The Form EIA-826 survey is a statistical sample drawn from the respondents to the Form EIA-861, `Annual Electric Utility Report.` The monthly survey consists of the utilities with the largest sales within each state and a stratified random sample of the remaining utilities. The Form EIA-826 is designed to facilitate the estimation of electricity sales and associated revenue at the National Census Division, and state level, by class of consumer. These estimates in turn, can be used to calculate average revenue per milowatthour and estimates of sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour coefficients of variation.

  9. Sustainable Energy Utility (Electric & Gas)- Business Energy Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The District of Columbia's Sustainable Energy Utility (DCSEU) administers the Business Energy Rebate Program. Rebates are available to businesses and institutions for the installation of energy...

  10. Norwich Public Utilities (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Norwich Public Utilities (NPU) provides residential customers with rebates on the ENERGY STAR-qualified appliances and energy efficient HVAC equipment. Eligible appliance purchases include...

  11. Liberty Utilities (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liberty Utilities offers incentives and technical support to help customers implement energy efficiency upgrades to existing homes or build an ENERGY STAR certified home. Eligible equipment...

  12. New Ulm Public Utilities- Solar Electric Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Ulm Public Utilities provides solar photovoltaic (PV) rebates for residential, commercial, and industrial customers. Rebates are for $1 per nameplate watt, and customers must sign a net...

  13. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopman, Ulrich,; Kruiswyk, Richard W.

    2005-07-05

    Caterpillar's Technology & Solutions Division conceived, designed, built and tested an electric turbocompound system for an on-highway heavy-duty truck engine. The heart of the system is a unique turbochargerr with an electric motor/generator mounted on the shaft between turbine and compressor wheels. When the power produced by the turbocharger turbine exceeds the power of the compressor, the excess power is converted to electrical power by the generator on the turbo shaft; that power is then used to help turn the crankshaft via an electric motor mounted in the engine flywheel housing. The net result is an improvement in engine fuel economy. The electric turbocompound system provides added control flexibility because it is capable of varying the amount of power extracted from the exhaust gases, thus allowing for control of engine boost. The system configuration and design, turbocharger features, control system development, and test results are presented.

  14. Financial statistics of major U.S. publicly owned electric utilities 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The 1997 edition of the ``Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities`` publication presents 5 years (1993 through 1997) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator (Tables 3 through 11) and nongenerator (Tables 12 through 20) summaries are presented in this publication. Five years of summary financial data are provided (Tables 5 through 11 and 14 through 20). Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided in Appendix C. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, operating revenue, and electric energy account data. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, ``Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities.`` Public electric utilities file this survey on a fiscal year basis, in conformance with their recordkeeping practices. The EIA undertook a review of the Form EIA-412 submissions to determine if alternative classifications of publicly owned electric utilities would permit the inclusion of all respondents. The review indicated that financial indicators differ most according to whether or not a publicly owned electric utility generates electricity. Therefore, the main body of the report provides summary information in generator/nongenerator classifications. 2 figs., 101 tabs.

  15. Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, J.; McLaren, J.; Taylor, M.; Cory, K.

    2013-10-01

    Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV 'ownership' are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies (especially PV); however, solar introduces myriad new variables into the utility resource planning decision. Most, but not all, utility planners have less experience analyzing solar than conventional generation as part of capacity planning, portfolio evaluation, and resource procurement decisions. To begin to build this knowledge, utility staff expressed interest in one effort: utility exchanges regarding data, methods, challenges, and solutions for incorporating solar in the planning process. Through interviews and a questionnaire, this report aims to begin this exchange of information and capture utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

  16. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Frank G.

    2001-08-05

    This cooperative program between the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology and Caterpillar, Inc. is aimed at demonstrating electric turbocompound technology on a Class 8 truck engine. This is a lab demonstration program, with no provision for on-truck testing of the system. The goal is to demonstrate the level of fuel efficiency improvement attainable with the electric turbocompound system. Also, electric turbocompounding adds an additional level of control to the air supply which could be a component in an emissions control strategy.

  17. Do You Buy Clean Electricity From Your Utility?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    If you can't set up a small renewable energy system of your own, buying clean electricity is a great way to support the use of renewable energy.

  18. Liberty Utilities (Electric)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liberty Utilities offers qualified commercial customers zero interest financing for energy efficiency improvements. Customers may borrow up to $50,000 per project and up to $150,000 per year. Loans...

  19. Orange and Rockland Utilities (Electric)- Commercial Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Orange and Rockland Utilities (O&R) offers energy efficiency program for both small business and large commercial and industrial customers to install high-efficiency equipment in eligible...

  20. An Examination of Temporal Trends in Electricity Reliability Based on Reports from U.S. Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Larsen, Peter; Todd, Annika; Fisher, Emily

    2012-01-06

    Since the 1960s, the U.S. electric power system has experienced a major blackout about once every 10 years. Each has been a vivid reminder of the importance society places on the continuous availability of electricity and has led to calls for changes to enhance reliability. At the root of these calls are judgments about what reliability is worth and how much should be paid to ensure it. In principle, comprehensive information on the actual reliability of the electric power system and on how proposed changes would affect reliability ought to help inform these judgments. Yet, comprehensive, national-scale information on the reliability of the U.S. electric power system is lacking. This report helps to address this information gap by assessing trends in U.S. electricity reliability based on information reported by electric utilities on power interruptions experienced by their customers. Our research augments prior investigations, which focused only on power interruptions originating in the bulk power system, by considering interruptions originating both from the bulk power system and from within local distribution systems. Our research also accounts for differences among utility reliability reporting practices by employing statistical techniques that remove the influence of these differences on the trends that we identify. The research analyzes up to 10 years of electricity reliability information collected from 155 U.S. electric utilities, which together account for roughly 50% of total U.S. electricity sales. The questions analyzed include: 1. Are there trends in reported electricity reliability over time? 2. How are trends in reported electricity reliability affected by the installation or upgrade of an automated outage management system? 3. How are trends in reported electricity reliability affected by the use of IEEE Standard 1366-2003?

  1. Electric and gas utility marketing of residential energy conservation case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-05-01

    The objective of this research was to obtain information about utility conservation marketing techniques from companies actively engaged in performing residential conservation services. Many utilities currently are offering comprehensive services (audits, listing of contractors and lenders, post-installation inspection, advertising, and performing consumer research). Activities are reported for the following utilities: Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation; Tampa Electric Company; Memphis Light, Gas, and Water Division; Northern States Power-Wisconsin; Public Service Company of Colorado; Arizona Public Service Company; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Sacramento Municipal Utility District; and Pacific Power and Light Company.

  2. Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Tables May 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Cost

  3. City of Statesville Electric Utility Department- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Statesville Electric Utility Department offers rebates to its residential customers for installing new, energy efficient water heaters and heat pumps. To qualify for the heat pump...

  4. Electric utilities monthly sales and revenue report (EIA-826), current (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-08-01

    Data regarding electricity sales (megawatthours) and associated revenue (thousand dollars) are submitted to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) by selected electric utilities on the Form EIA-826, `Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions.` The monthly survey consists of the utilities with the largest sales within each state and a stratified random sample of the remaining utilities. The Form EIA-826 is designed to facilitate the estimation of electricity sales and associated revenue at the National Census Division, and state level, by class of consumer. These estimates in turn, can be used to calculate average revenue per milowatthour and estimates of sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour coefficients of variation.

  5. User's guide to SERICPAC: A computer program for calculating electric-utility avoided costs rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirtshafter, R.; Abrash, M.; Koved, M.; Feldman, S.

    1982-05-01

    SERICPAC is a computer program developed to calculate average avoided cost rates for decentralized power producers and cogenerators that sell electricity to electric utilities. SERICPAC works in tandem with SERICOST, a program to calculate avoided costs, and determines the appropriate rates for buying and selling of electricity from electric utilities to qualifying facilities (QF) as stipulated under Section 210 of PURA. SERICPAC contains simulation models for eight technologies including wind, hydro, biogas, and cogeneration. The simulations are converted in a diversified utility production which can be either gross production or net production, which accounts for an internal electricity usage by the QF. The program allows for adjustments to the production to be made for scheduled and forced outages. The final output of the model is a technology-specific average annual rate. The report contains a description of the technologies and the simulations as well as complete user's guide to SERICPAC.

  6. Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    The Acid Rain Program is divided into two time periods; Phase I, from 1995 through 1999, and Phase II, starting in 2000. Phase I mostly affects power plants that are the largest sources of SO2 and NOx . Phase II affects virtually all electric power producers, including utilities and nonutilities. This report is a study of the effects of compliance with Phase I regulations on the costs and operations of electric utilities, but does not address any Phase II impacts.

  7. A Quantitative Assessment of Utility Reporting Practices for Reporting Electric Power Distribution Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamachi La Commare, Kristina

    2011-11-11

    Metrics for reliability, such as the frequency and duration of power interruptions, have been reported by electric utilities for many years. This study examines current utility practices for collecting and reporting electricity reliability information and discusses challenges that arise in assessing reliability because of differences among these practices. The study is based on reliability information for year 2006 reported by 123 utilities in 37 states representing over 60percent of total U.S. electricity sales. We quantify the effects that inconsistencies among current utility reporting practices have on comparisons of System Average Interruption Duration Index (SAIDI) and System Average Interruption Frequency Index (SAIFI) reported by utilities. We recommend immediate adoption of IEEE Std. 1366-2003 as a consistent method for measuring and reporting reliability statistics.

  8. Capacity utilization and fuel consumption in the electric power industry, 1970-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    This report updates the 1980 Energy Information Administration (EIA) publication entitled Trends in the Capacity Utilization and Fuel Consumption of Electric Utility Powerplants, 1970-1978, DOE/EIA-184/32. The analysis covers the period from 1970 through 1981, and examines trends during the period prior to the 1973 Arab oil embargo (1970-1973), after the embargo (1974-1977), and during the immediate past (1978-1981). The report also addresses other factors affecting the electric utility industry since the oil embargo: the reduction in foreign oil supplies as a result of the 1979 Iranian crisis, the 1977 drought in the western United States, the 1978 coal strike by the United Mine Workers Union, and the shutdown of nuclear plants in response to the accident at Three Mile Island. Annual data on electric utility generating capacity, net generation, and fuel consumption are provided to identify changes in patterns of power plant capacity utilization and dispatching.

  9. Economic and Technical Feasibility Study of Utility-Scale Wind Generation for the New York Buffalo River and South Buffalo Brownfield Opportunity Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2014-04-01

    Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic and technical feasibility of utilizing contaminated lands in the Buffalo, New York, area for utility-scale wind development is explored. The study found that there is available land, electrical infrastructure, wind resource, and local interest to support a commercial wind project; however, economies of scale and local electrical markets may need further investigation before significant investment is made into developing a wind project at the Buffalo Reuse Authority site.

  10. Tool Helps Utilities Assess Readiness for Electric Vehicle Charging (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    NREL research helps answer a fundamental question regarding electric vehicles: Is the grid ready to handle them? Environmental, economic and security concerns regarding oil consumption make electrifying the transportation sector a high national priority. NREL's Center for Transportation Technologies & Systems (CTTS) has developed a framework for utilities to evaluate the plug-in vehicle (PEV) readiness of distribution transformers. Combining a wealth of vehicle performance statistics with load data from partner utilities including the Hawaiian Electric Company and Xcel Energy, NREL analyzed the thermal loading characteristics of distribution transformers due to vehicle charging. After running millions of simulations replicating varying climates and conditions, NREL is now able to predict aging rates for transformers when PEVs are added to existing building loads. With the NREL tool, users define simulation parameters by inputting vehicle trip and weather data; transformer load profiles and ratings; PEV penetration, charging rates and battery sizes; utility rates; the number of houses on each transformer; and public charging availability. Transformer load profiles, drive cycles, and ambient temperature data are then run through the thermal model to produce a one-year timeseries of the hotspot temperature. Annual temperature durations are calculated to help determine the annual aging rate. Annual aging rate results are grouped by independent variables. The most useful measure is transformer mileage, a measure of how many electrically-driven miles must be supplied by the transformer. Once the spectrum analysis has been conducted for an area or utility, the outputs can be used to help determine if more detailed evaluation is necessary, or if transformer replacement is required. In the majority of scenarios, transformers have enough excess capacity to charge PEVs. Only in extreme cases does vehicle charging have negative long-term impact on transformers. In those cases, upgrades to larger transformers would be recommended. NREL analysis also showed opportunity for newly-installed smart grids to offset distribution demands by time-shifting the charging loads. Most importantly, the model demonstrated synergies between PEVs and distributed renewables, not only providing clean renewable energy for vehicles, but also reducing demand on the entire distribution infrastructure by supplying loads at the point of consumption.

  11. Statistical recoupling: A new way to break the link between electric-utility sales and revenues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.

    1993-09-01

    In 1991, US electric utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on demand-side management (DSM) programs. These programs cut peak demands 5% and reduced electricity sales 1% that year. Utility projections suggest that these reductions will increase to 9% and 3%, respectively, by the year 2001. However, utility DSM efforts vary enormously across the country, concentrated in a few states along the east and west coasts and the upper midwest. To some extent, this concentration is a function of regulatory reforms that remove disincentives to utility shareholders for investments in DSM programs. A key component of these reforms is recovery of the net lost revenues caused by utility DSM programs. These lost revenues occur between rate cases when a utility encourages its customers to improve energy efficiency and cut demand. The reduction in sales means that the utility has less revenue to cover its fixed costs. This report describes a new method, statistical recoupling (SR), that addresses this net-lost-revenue problem. Like other decoupling approaches, SR breaks the link between electric-utility revenues and sales. Unlike other approaches, SR minimizes changes from traditional regulation. In particular, the risks of revenue swings associated with year-to-year changes in weather and the economy remain with the utility under SR. Statistical recoupling uses statistical models, based on historical data, that explain retail electricity sales as functions of the number of utility customers, winter and summer weather, the condition of the local economy, electricity price, and perhaps a few other key variables. These models, along with the actual values of the explanatory variables, are then used to estimate ``allowed`` electricity sales and revenues in future years.

  12. Table E13.3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,"Total of",,,"RSE" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Transfers

  13. Electric utility antitrust issues in an era of bulk power market competition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.G.; Bouknight, J.A. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    The electric utility industry is facing a new spectrum of antitrust issues reflecting its transformation from an industry that is fully regulated to one that is partly regulated, partly competitive. There are two principal antitrust issues: claims of price squeezes and claims by municipal and cooperative utilities that their traditional utility supplier is refusing to wheel power from other suppliers. This article discusses the following related topics: new antitrust issues; regional transmission groups and other joint ventures; mergers.

  14. Financial statistics of major U.S. publicly owned electric utilities 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    The 1995 Edition of the Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 5 years (1991 through 1995) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator (Tables 3 through 11) and nongenerator (Tables 12 through 20) summaries are presented in this publication. Five years of summary financial data are provided (Tables 5 through 11 and 14 through 20). Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided in Appendix C. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. 9 figs., 87 tabs.

  15. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix B : Local Generation Evaluation : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The information and data contained in this Appendix was extracted from numerous sources. The principle sources used for technical data were Bonneville Power Administration's 1990 Resource Program along with its technical appendix, and Chapter 8 of the Draft 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan. All cost data is reported 1988 dollars unless otherwise noted. This information was supplemented by other data developed by Puget Sound utilities who participated on the Local Generation Team. Identifying generating resources available to the Puget Sound area involved a five step process: (1) listing all possible resources that might contribute power to the Puget Sound area, (2) characterizing the technology/resource status, cost and operating characteristics of these resources, (3) identifying exclusion criteria based on the needs of the overall Puget Sound Electric Reliability Plan study, (4) applying these criteria to the list of resources, and (5) summarizing of the costs and characteristics of the final list of resources. 15 refs., 20 tabs.

  16. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-04-01

    A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, and during certain conditions, there is more demand for power in the Puget Sound area than the transmission system and existing generation can reliably supply. This high demand, called peak demand occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both.

  17. An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

    2004-06-01

    This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

  18. Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-25

    In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

  19. Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables August 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position

  20. Annual Electric Utility Data - EIA-906/920/923 Data File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    923 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-906/920) The survey Form EIA-923 collects detailed electric power data -- monthly and annually -- on electricity generation, fuel consumption, fossil fuel stocks, and receipts at the power plant and prime mover level. Specific survey information provided: Schedule 2 - fuel receipts and costs Schedules 3A & 5A - generator data including generation, fuel consumption and stocks Schedule 4 - fossil fuel stocks Schedules 6 & 7 - non-utility

  1. Table A31. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers by Census Region," " Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,"RSE" " "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United

  2. Assessment of potential and existing problems concerning interface between electric utilities and cogenerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The potential and existing problems concerning the interface between US electric utilities and cogenerators are considered by region. Also considered are regulatory barriers, rates and contracts, economic feasibility, and impact on system planning. Finally, the impact of the National Energy Act on the marketability potential of cogeneration is reviewed. The three appendixes summarize the utility meetings on cogeneration held in Washington, DC, Los Angeles, and Chicago.

  3. Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Palmintier, B.; Barrows, C.; Ibanez, E.; Bird, L.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-09-01

    This report outlines the methods, data, and tools that could be used at different levels of sophistication and effort to estimate the benefits and costs of DGPV. In so doing, we identify the gaps in current benefit-cost-analysis methods, which we hope will inform the ongoing research agenda in this area. The focus of this report is primarily on benefits and costs from the utility or electricity generation system perspective. It is intended to provide useful background information to utility and regulatory decision makers and their staff, who are often being asked to use or evaluate estimates of the benefits and cost of DGPV in regulatory proceedings. Understanding the technical rigor of the range of methods and how they might need to evolve as DGPV becomes a more significant contributor of energy to the electricity system will help them be better consumers of this type of information. This report is also intended to provide information to utilities, policy makers, PV technology developers, and other stakeholders, which might help them maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of integrating DGPV into a changing electricity system.

  4. A Primer on Electric Utilities, Deregulation, and Restructuring of U.S. Electricity Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warwick, William M.

    2002-06-03

    This primer is offered as an introduction to utility restructuring to better prepare readers for ongoing changes in public utilities and associated energy markets. It is written for use by individuals with responsibility for the management of facilities that use energy, including energy managers, procurement staff, and managers with responsibility for facility operations and budgets. The primer was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under sponsorship from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Federal Energy Management Program. The impetus for this primer originally came from the Government Services Administration who supported its initial development.

  5. Performance-based ratemaking for electric utilities: Review of plans and analysis of economic and resource-planning issues. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comnes, G.A.; Stoft, S.; Greene, N.; Hill, L.J. |

    1995-11-01

    Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) is a form of utility regulation that strengthens the financial incentives to lower rates, lower costs, or improve nonprice performance relative traditional regulation, which the authors call cost-of-service, rate-of-return (COS/ROR) regulation. Although the electric utility industry has considerable experience with incentive mechanisms that target specific areas of performance, implementation of mechanisms that cover a comprehensive set of utility costs or services is relatively rare. In recent years, interest in PBR has increased as a result of growing dissatisfaction with COS/ROR and as a result of economic and technological trends that are leading to more competition in certain segments of the electricity industry. In addition, incentive regulation has been used with some success in other public utility industries, most notably telecommunications in the US and telecommunications, energy, and water in the United Kingdom. In this report, the authors analyze comprehensive PBR mechanisms for electric utilities in four ways: (1) they describe different types of PBR mechanisms, (2) they review a sample of actual PBR plans, (3) they consider the interaction of PBR and utility-funded energy efficiency programs, and (4) they examine how PBR interacts with electric utility resource planning and industry restructuring. The report should be of interest to technical staff of utilities and regulatory commissions that are actively considering or designing PBR mechanisms. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

  6. Electrical Systems And Safety Oversight Functional Area Qualification...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... fundamentals * Protection device fundamentals DOE-STD-1170-2007 38 38. Electrical ... Electrical Safety Handbook; and 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program. ...

  7. Wide-area situation awareness in electric power grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2010-04-28

    Two primary elements of the US energy policy are demand management and efficiency and renewable sources. Major objectives are clean energy transmission and integration, reliable energy transmission, and grid cyber security. Development of the Smart Grid seeks to achieve these goals by lowering energy costs for consumers, achieving energy independence and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The Smart Grid is expected to enable real time wide-area situation awareness (SA) for operators. Requirements for wide-area SA have been identified among interoperability standards proposed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the National Institute of Standards and Technology to ensure smart-grid functionality. Wide-area SA and enhanced decision support and visualization tools are key elements in the transformation to the Smart Grid. This paper discusses human factors research to promote SA in the electric power grid and the Smart Grid. Topics that will be discussed include the role of human factors in meeting US energy policy goals, the impact and challenges for Smart Grid development, and cyber security challenges.

  8. Rate impacts and key design elements of gas and electric utility decoupling: a comprehensive review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesh, Pamela G.

    2009-10-15

    Opponents of decoupling worry that customers will experience frequent and significant rate increases as a result of its adoption, but a review of 28 natural gas and 17 electric utilities suggests that decoupling adjustments are both refunds to customers as well as charges and tend to be small. (author)

  9. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C.

    1994-06-01

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

  10. Tribal Authority Process Case Studies: The Conversion of On-Reservation Electric Utilities to Tribal Ownership and Operation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Three case studies documenting the processes followed by Indian tribes when they took over ownership and operation of their electric utilities.

  11. Benchmarking for electric utilities, tree trimming benchmarking, service line installation to single family residence, and distribution revenue meter testing and repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harder, J.

    1994-12-31

    An American Public Power Association (APPA) task force study on benchmarking for electric utilities is presented. Benchmark studies were made of three activities: (1) Tree trimming; (2) Service line installation to single family residence; (3) Distribution revenue meter testing and repair criteria. The results of the study areas are summarized for 15 utilities. The methodologies used for data collection and analysis are discussed. 28 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Collaborative jurisdiction in the regulation of electric utilities: A new look at jurisdictional boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-12-31

    This conference is one of several activities initiated by FERC, DOE and NARUC to improve the dialogue between Federal and State regulators and policymakers. I am pleased to be here to participate in this conference and to address, with you, electricity issues of truly national significance. I would like to commend Ashley Brown and the NARUC Electricity Committee for its foresight in devising a conference on these issues at this critical juncture in the regulation of the electric utility industry. I also would like to commend Chairman Allday and the FERC for their efforts to improve communication between Federal and State electricity regulators; both through FERC`s Public Conference on Electricity Issues that was held last June, and through the FERC/NARUC workshops that are scheduled to follow this conference. These collaborative efforts are important and necessary steps in addressing successfully the many issues facing the electric utility industry those who regulate it, and those who depend upon it - in other words, about everyone.

  13. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1989 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1989 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1989, and also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1989 time period. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell to consumers annually. Data is provided on each retail customer sector: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. The data specifically supports forecasting activities, rate development, conservation and market assessments, and conservation and market program development and delivery. All of these activities require a detailed look at electricity use. 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  14. Different approaches to estimating transition costs in the electric- utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-10-01

    The term ``transition costs`` describes the potential revenue shortfall (or welfare loss) a utility (or other actor) may experience through government-initiated deregulation of electricity generation. The potential for transition costs arises whenever a regulated industry is subject to competitive market forces as a result of explicit government action. Federal and state proposals to deregulate electricity generation sparked a national debate on transition costs in the electric-utility industry. Industry-wide transition cost estimates range from about $20 billion to $500 billion. Such disparate estimates raise important questions on estimation methods for decision makers. This report examines different approaches to estimating transition costs. The study has three objectives. First, we discuss the concept of transition cost. Second, we identify the major cost categories included in transition cost estimates and summarize the current debate on which specific costs are appropriately included in these estimates. Finally, we identify general and specific estimation approaches and assess their strengths and weaknesses. We relied primarily on the evidentiary records established at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission to identify major cost categories and specific estimation approaches. We also contacted regulatory commission staffs in ten states to ascertain estimation activities in each of these states. We refined a classification framework to describe and assess general estimation options. We subsequently developed and applied criteria to describe and assess specific estimation approaches proposed by federal regulators, state regulators, utilities, independent power companies, and consultants.

  15. The revenue requirement approach to analysis of alternative technologies in the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohrasbi, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The advancement of coal-based power generation technology is of primary interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The interests are well-founded due to increasing costs for premium fuels and, more importantly, the establishment of energy independence to promote national security. One of DOE's current goals is to promote the development of coal-fired technology for the electric utility industry. This paper is concerned with the economic comparison of two alternative technologies: the coal gasification-combined cycle (GCC) and the coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-combined cycle. The revenue requirement analysis was used for the economic evaluation of engineering alternatives in the electric utility industry. The results were compared based on year-by-year revenue requirement analysis. A computer program was written in Fortran to perform the calculations.

  16. Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 1: FGD process design. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-04

    Part 1 of the Electric Utility Engineer`s Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Manual emphasizes the chemical and physical processes that form the basis for design and operation of lime- and limestone-based FGD systems applied to coal- or oil-fired steam electric generating stations. The objectives of Part 1 are: to provide a description of the chemical and physical design basis for lime- and limestone-based wet FGD systems; to identify and discuss the various process design parameters and process options that must be considered in developing a specification for a new FGD system; and to provide utility engineers with process knowledge useful for operating and optimizing a lime- or limestone-based wet FGD system.

  17. Electric utilities monthly sales and revenue report with state distributions, 1991-1992 (EIA-826H). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-12-31

    Data regarding electricity sales (megawatthours) and associated revenue (thousand dollars) are submitted to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) by selected electric utilities on the Form EIA-826, Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions. The Form EIA-826 survey is a statistical sample drawn from the respondents to the Form EIA-861, Annual Electric Utility Report. The monthly survey consists of the utilities with the largest sales within each state and a stratified random sample of the remaining utilities. The form EIA-826 is designed to facilitate the estimation of electricity sales and associated revenue at the National Census Division, and state level, by class of consumer. These estimates in turn, can be used to calculate average revenue per milowatthour and estimates of sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour coefficients of variation.

  18. Electric utilities monthly sales and revenue report with state distributions, 1991-1992 (EIA-826H). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Data regarding electricity sales (megawatthours) and associated revenue (thousand dollars) are submitted to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) by selected electric utilities on the Form EIA-826, Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions. The Form EIA-826 survey is a statistical sample drawn from the respondents to the Form EIA-861, Annual Electric Utility Report. The monthly survey consists of the utilities with the largest sales within each state and a stratified random sample of the remaining utilities. The form EIA-826 is designed to facilitate the estimation of electricity sales and associated revenue at the National Census Division, and state level, by class of consumer. These estimates in turn, can be used to calculate average revenue per milowatthour and estimates of sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour coefficients of variation.

  19. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1990 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1990 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. The report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1990 time period, and gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1990. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell annually to four sectors. Data is provided on each retail customer sector and also on the customers Bonneville serves directly: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. 21 figs., 40 tabs.

  20. Renewable Electricity Benefits Quantification Methodology: A Request for Technical Assistance from the California Public Utilities Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2009-07-01

    The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) requested assistance in identifying methodological alternatives for quantifying the benefits of renewable electricity. The context is the CPUC's analysis of a 33% renewable portfolio standard (RPS) in California--one element of California's Climate Change Scoping Plan. The information would be used to support development of an analytic plan to augment the cost analysis of this RPS (which recently was completed). NREL has responded to this request by developing a high-level survey of renewable electricity effects, quantification alternatives, and considerations for selection of analytic methods. This report addresses economic effects and health and environmental effects, and provides an overview of related analytic tools. Economic effects include jobs, earnings, gross state product, and electricity rate and fuel price hedging. Health and environmental effects include air quality and related public-health effects, solid and hazardous wastes, and effects on water resources.

  1. Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Results of Electric Survey in...

  2. EPA programs to reduce NO{sub x} and particulate matter emissions from electric utility sources and the possible impact of deregulation on those EPA programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, A.B.

    1997-12-31

    At the same time that the electric utility industry is in the midst of deregulation, it could be hit with numerous additional regulatory burdens. For example, EPA now plans to decide by July 1997 whether to make major changes to the current ozone and particulate matter ambient standards -- changes which could force utilities to reduce significantly both their nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions. Even if EPA does not adopt new ambient standards, though, many electric utilities still face the prospect of making additional NO{sub x} reductions if they are found to be contributing to ozone levels in areas that are not meeting the current ozone ambient standards. Several multi-state groups -- notably the Ozone Transport Assessment Group (OTAG) and the Northeast Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) -- are evaluating programs that could lead to calls for additional NO{sub x} reductions from power plants in ozone nonattainment areas and from plants located outside the nonattainment areas but found to be contributing to ozone levels in those areas. And these multi-state groups are motivated not only by pollution levels they see now, but also by what they fear will be increased pollution levels as a result of deregulation. This paper examines the status of the major rulemakings now underway that could force substantial additional reductions in electric utility NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions. It also discusses the impacts that deregulation could have in those rulemakings.

  3. Survey and analysis of selected jointly owned large-scale electric utility storage projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine and document the issues surrounding the curtailment in commercialization of large-scale electric storage projects. It was sensed that if these issues could be uncovered, then efforts might be directed toward clearing away these barriers and allowing these technologies to penetrate the market to their maximum potential. Joint-ownership of these projects was seen as a possible solution to overcoming the major barriers, particularly economic barriers, of commercializaton. Therefore, discussions with partners involved in four pumped storage projects took place to identify the difficulties and advantages of joint-ownership agreements. The four plants surveyed included Yards Creek (Public Service Electric and Gas and Jersey Central Power and Light); Seneca (Pennsylvania Electric and Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company); Ludington (Consumers Power and Detroit Edison, and Bath County (Virginia Electric Power Company and Allegheny Power System, Inc.). Also investigated were several pumped storage projects which were never completed. These included Blue Ridge (American Electric Power); Cornwall (Consolidated Edison); Davis (Allegheny Power System, Inc.) and Kttatiny Mountain (General Public Utilities). Institutional, regulatory, technical, environmental, economic, and special issues at each project were investgated, and the conclusions relative to each issue are presented. The major barriers preventing the growth of energy storage are the high cost of these systems in times of extremely high cost of capital, diminishing load growth and regulatory influences which will not allow the building of large-scale storage systems due to environmental objections or other reasons. However, the future for energy storage looks viable despite difficult economic times for the utility industry. Joint-ownership can ease some of the economic hardships for utilites which demonstrate a need for energy storage.

  4. Electricity-producing heating apparatus utilizing a turbine generator in a semi-closed brayton cycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Labinov, Solomon D.; Christian, Jeffrey E.

    2003-10-07

    The present invention provides apparatus and methods for producing both heat and electrical energy by burning fuels in a stove or boiler using a novel arrangement of a surface heat exchanger and microturbine-powered generator and novel surface heat exchanger. The equipment is particularly suited for use in rural and relatively undeveloped areas, especially in cold regions and highlands.

  5. Effects of federal income taxes on the cash flow, operating revenue, and net income of electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    The idea to do this research was suggested by the efforts of some consumer groups and others to seek passage of a law in the United States to exempt investor-owned electric utilities from federal income taxes. The goal of the consumer groups is to reduce the charges to utility customers (which is measured in this study by the amount of the operating revenues of the utilities) while not causing any harm to the utilities. The population of interest consisted of all investor-owned electric utilities included on a current Compustat utility tape. In the analysis of the data, the changes in cash flow, operating revenue, and net income were summarized by the 89 utilities as a total group and by the division of the utilities into smaller groups or combinations which used the same accounting methods during the test period. The results of this research suggest the following conclusions concerning the change to a situation in which electric utilities are not subject to federal income taxes: (1) as a group, the decrease in cash flow would be significant, (2) as a group, the decrease in operating revenue (charges to customers) would not be significant, (3) as a group, the increase in net income would be significant, and (4) in analyzing the effects of any financial adjustments or changes on electric utilities, the accounting policies used to the utilities are an important factor.

  6. Nitrogen oxides emission control options for coal-fired electric utility boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravi K. Srivastava; Robert E. Hall; Sikander Khan; Kevin Culligan; Bruce W. Lani

    2005-09-01

    Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increasingly important to implement state-of-the-art NOx control technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NOx control options for these boilers. It discusses the established commercial primary and secondary control technologies and examines what is being done to use them more effectively. Furthermore, the paper discusses recent developments in NOx controls. The popular primary control technologies in use in the United States are low-NOx burners and overfire air. Data reflect that average NOx reductions for specific primary controls have ranged from 35% to 63% from 1995 emissions levels. The secondary NOx control technologies applied on U.S. coal-fired utility boilers include reburning, selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR), and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Thirty-six U.S. coal-fired utility boilers have installed SNCR, and reported NOx reductions achieved at these applications ranged from 15% to 66%. Recently, SCR has been installed at 150 U.S. coal-fired utility boilers. Data on the performance of 20 SCR systems operating in the United States with low-NOx emissions reflect that in 2003, these units achieved NOx emission rates between 0.04 and 0.07 lb/106 Btu. 106 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 U.S. Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Coal Steam Other Fossil Combine Cycle Combustion Turbine Nuclear Pumped Total 1980 0.0 1981 0.0 1982 0.0 1983 0.0 1984 0.0 1985 0.0 1986 0.0 1987 0.0 1988 0.0 1989 18.1 1990 19.5 1991 18.4 1992 21.2 1993 21.1 1994 21.2 1995 21.4 1996 21.1 1997 19.3 1998 19.5 1999 19.6 2000 19.5 2001 19.7 2002 20.4 2003 20.5 2004 20.8 2005 21.3 2006 21.5 2007 21.9 2008 21.9 2009 22.2 2010 22.2 2011 22.2 2012 22.2 2013 22.2 2014

  8. Estimated Value of Service Reliability for Electric Utility Customers in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, M.J.; Mercurio, Matthew; Schellenberg, Josh

    2009-06-01

    Information on the value of reliable electricity service can be used to assess the economic efficiency of investments in generation, transmission and distribution systems, to strategically target investments to customer segments that receive the most benefit from system improvements, and to numerically quantify the risk associated with different operating, planning and investment strategies. This paper summarizes research designed to provide estimates of the value of service reliability for electricity customers in the US. These estimates were obtained by analyzing the results from 28 customer value of service reliability studies conducted by 10 major US electric utilities over the 16 year period from 1989 to 2005. Because these studies used nearly identical interruption cost estimation or willingness-to-pay/accept methods it was possible to integrate their results into a single meta-database describing the value of electric service reliability observed in all of them. Once the datasets from the various studies were combined, a two-part regression model was used to estimate customer damage functions that can be generally applied to calculate customer interruption costs per event by season, time of day, day of week, and geographical regions within the US for industrial, commercial, and residential customers. Estimated interruption costs for different types of customers and of different duration are provided. Finally, additional research and development designed to expand the usefulness of this powerful database and analysis are suggested.

  9. Expectations models of electric utilities' forecasts: a case study of econometric estimation with influential data points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vellutini, R. de A.S.; Mount, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    This study develops an econometric model for explaining how electric utilities revise their forecasts of future electricity demand each year. The model specification is developed from the adaptive expectations hypothesis and it relates forecasted growth rates to actual lagged growth rates of electricity demand. Unlike other studies of the expectation phenomenon, expectations of future demand levels constitute an observable variable and thus can be incorporated explicitly into the model. The data used for the analysis were derived from the published forecasts of the nine National Electric Reliability Councils in the US for the years 1974 to 1980. Three alternative statistical methods are used for estimation purposes: ordinary least-squares, robust regression and a diagnostic analysis to identify influential observations. The results obtained with the first two methods are very similar, but are both inconsistent with the underlying economic logic of the model. The estimated model obtained from the diagnostics approach after deleting two aberrant observations is consistent with economic logic, and supports the hypothesis that the low growth demand experienced immediately following the oil embargo in 1973 were disregarded by the industry for forecasting purposes. The model includes transitory effects associated with the oil embargo that gradually disappear over time, the estimated coefficients for the lagged values of actual growth approach a structure with declining positive weights. The general shape of this asymptotic structure is similar to the findings in many economic applications using distributed lag models.

  10. Ocala Utility Services- Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ocala Utility Services Electric and Telecommunications is a community owned utility that serves around 50,000 customers in Ocala and Marion County area. Ocala Utility Services offers rebates on A/C...

  11. Electric utilities monthly sales and revenue report (EIA-826), current (for microcomputers) (January 1991-August 1992). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Data regarding electricity sales (megawatthours) and associated revenue (thousand dollars) are submitted to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) by selected electric utilities on the Form EIA-826, Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions. The monthly survey consists of the utilities with the largest sales within each state and a stratified random sample of the remaining utilities. The Form EIA-826 is designed to facilitate the estimation of electricity sales and associated revenue at the National Census Division, and state level, by class of consumer. These estimates in turn, can be used to calculate average revenue per milowatthour and estimates of sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour coefficients of variation.

  12. Evaluation of Utility System Impacts and Benefits of Optimally Dispatched Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Short, W.

    2006-10-01

    Hybrid electric vehicles with the capability of being recharged from the grid may provide a significant decrease in oil consumption. These ''plug-in'' hybrids (PHEVs) will affect utility operations, adding additional electricity demand. Because many individual vehicles may be charged in the extended overnight period, and because the cost of wireless communication has decreased, there is a unique opportunity for utilities to directly control the charging of these vehicles at the precise times when normal electricity demand is at a minimum. This report evaluates the effects of optimal PHEV charging, under the assumption that utilities will indirectly or directly control when charging takes place, providing consumers with the absolute lowest cost of driving energy. By using low-cost off-peak electricity, PHEVs owners could purchase the drive energy equivalent to a gallon of gasoline for under 75 cents, assuming current national average residential electricity prices.

  13. Evaluation of the electrical contact area in contact-mode scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celano, Umberto E-mail: u.celano@gmail.com; Chintala, Ravi Chandra; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Hantschel, Thomas; Giammaria, Guido; Conard, Thierry; Bender, Hugo

    2015-06-07

    The tunneling current through an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip is used to evaluate the effective electrical contact area, which exists between tip and sample in contact-AFM electrical measurements. A simple procedure for the evaluation of the effective electrical contact area is described using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) in combination with a thin dielectric. We characterize the electrical contact area for coated metal and doped-diamond tips operated at low force (<200 nN) in contact mode. In both cases, we observe that only a small fraction (<10?nm{sup 2}) of the physical contact (?100?nm{sup 2}) is effectively contributing to the transport phenomena. Assuming this reduced area is confined to the central area of the physical contact, these results explain the sub-10?nm electrical resolution observed in C-AFM measurements.

  14. The market potential for SMES in electric utility applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is an emerging technology with features that are potentially attractive in electric utility applications. This study evaluates the potential for SMES technology in the generation, transmission, distribution, and use of electric energy; the time frame of the assessment is through the year 2030. Comparisons are made with other technology options, including both commercially available and advanced systems such as various peaking generation technologies, transmission stability improvement technologies, and power quality enhancement devices. The methodology used for this study focused on the needs of the market place, the capabilities of S and the characteristics of the competing technologies. There is widespread interest within utilities for the development of SMES technology, but there is no general consensus regarding the most attractive size. Considerable uncertainty exists regarding the eventual costs and benefits of commercial SMES systems, but general trends have been developed based on current industry knowledge. Results of this analysis indicate that as storage capacity increases, cost increases at a rate faster than benefits. Transmission system applications requiring dynamic storage appear to have the most attractive economics. Customer service applications may be economic in the near term, but improved ride-through capability of end-use equipment may limit the size of this market over time. Other applications requiring greater storage capacity appear to be only marginally economic at best.

  15. Penetration and air-emission-reduction benefits of solar technologies in the electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a study of four solar energy technologies and the electric utility industry are reported. The purpose of the study was to estimate the penetration by federal region of four solar technologies - wind, biomass, phtovoltaics, and solar thermal - in terms of installed capacity and power generated. The penetration by these technologies occurs at the expense of coal and nuclear power. The displacement of coal plants implies a displacement of their air emissions, such as sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, and particulate matter. The main conclusion of this study is that solar thermal, photovoltaics, and biomass fail to penetrate significantly by the end of this century in any federal region. Wind energy penetrates the electric utility industry in several regions during the 1990s. Displaced coal and nuclear generation are also estimated by region, as are the corresponding reductions in air emissions. The small-scale penetration by the solar technologies necessarily limits the amount of conventional fuels displaced and the reduction in air emissions. A moderate displacement of sulfur dioxide and the oxides of nitrogen is estimated to occur by the end of this century, and significant lowering of these emissions should occur in the early part of the next century.

  16. Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water & Electricity Utilities and their Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The water and energy sectors have traditionally been studied independently, regulated by separate oversight agencies, and delivered to customers by separate utilities. Yet it is undeniable that there are strong interdependencies between the sectors. Water, in its many forms, has a direct relationship with energy production. Conversely, it takes energy to treat, convey, and purify water. Mapping out the potential next steps for California and the southwestern U.S. to respond to this dynamic was the primary focus of the joint University of California/Department of Energy Water-Energy Workshop, held on May 28-29, 2015 at the University of California, Irvine. This workshop brought together experts including university researchers, utility providers, state agency representatives from California and the southwestern states, and Federal energy advisors to discuss pressing issues regarding the interactions between water and energy sustainability, with a particular focus on water and electric utilities and related policymaking. This report summarizes discussion at the workshop and provides additional contextual information and discussion.

  17. Electric utility transmission and distribution upgrade deferral benefits from modular electricity storage : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyer, James M.

    2009-06-01

    The work documented in this report was undertaken as part of an ongoing investigation of innovative and potentially attractive value propositions for electricity storage by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Electricity Storage Systems (ESS) Program. This study characterizes one especially attractive value proposition for modular electricity storage (MES): electric utility transmission and distribution (T&D) upgrade deferral. The T&D deferral benefit is characterized in detail. Also presented is a generalized framework for estimating the benefit. Other important and complementary (to T&D deferral) elements of possible value propositions involving MES are also characterized.

  18. EIS-0160: Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental and socioeconomic implications of potential solutions to address a power system problem in the Puget Sound area of Washington State.

  19. Reduction in tribological energy losses in the transportation and electric utilities sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkus, O.; Wilcock, D.F.; Levinson, T.M.

    1985-09-01

    This report is part of a study of ways and means of advancing the national energy conservation effort, particularly with regard to oil, via progress in the technology of tribology. The report is confined to two economic sectors: transportation, where the scope embraces primarily the highway fleets, and electric utilities. Together these two sectors account for half of the US energy consumption. Goal of the study is to ascertain the energy sinks attributable to tribological components and processes and to recommend long-range research and development (R and D) programs aimed at reducing these losses. In addition to the obvious tribological machine components such as bearings, piston rings, transmissions and so on, the study also extends to processes which are linked to tribology indirectly such as wear of machine parts, coatings of blades, high temperature materials leading to higher cycle efficiencies, attenuation of vibration, and other cycle improvements.

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 U.S. Renewable Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Conv. Hydropower Geothermal Municipal Solid Waste Biomass Solar Thermal Solar PV Wind 1980 81.7 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. N.A. 1981 82.4 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1982 83.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1983 83.9 1.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1984 85.3 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1985 88.9 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1986 89.3 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1987 89.7 1.5 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1988 90.3 1.7 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0

  1. Hot dry rock geothermal energy for U.S. electric utilities. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    In order to bring an electric utility component into the study of hot dry rock geothermal energy called for in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), EPRI organized a one-day conference in Philadelphia on January 14,1993. The conference was planned as the first day of a two-day sequence, by coordinating with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These two federal agencies were charged under EPAct with the development of a report on the potential for hot dry rock geothermal energy production in the US, especially the eastern US. The USGS was given lead responsibility for a report to be done in association with DOE. The EPRI conference emphasized first the status of technology development and testing in the U.S. and abroad, i.e., in western Europe, Russia and Japan. The conference went on to address the extent of knowledge regarding the resource base in the US, especially in the eastern half of the country, and then to address some practical business aspects of organizing projects or industries that could bring these resources into use, either for thermal applications or for electric power generation.

  2. Utilizing Electric Vehicles to Assist Integration of Large Penetrations of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Gowri, Krishnan

    2012-11-30

    Executive Summary Introduction and Motivation This analysis provides the first insights into the leveraging potential of distributed photovoltaic (PV) technologies on rooftop and electric vehicle (EV) charging. Either of the two technologies by themselves - at some high penetrations may cause some voltage control challenges or overloading problems, respectively. But when combined, there at least intuitively could be synergistic effects, whereby one technology mitigates the negative impacts of the other. High penetration of EV charging may overload existing distribution system components, most prominently the secondary transformer. If PV technology is installed at residential premises or anywhere downstream of the secondary transformer, it will provide another electricity source thus, relieving the loading on the transformers. Another synergetic or mitigating effect could be envisioned when high PV penetration reverts the power flow upward in the distribution system (from the homes upstream into the distribution system). Protection schemes may then no longer work and voltage violation (exceeding the voltage upper limited of the ANSI voltage range) may occur. In this particular situation, EV charging could absorb the electricity from the PV, such that the reversal of power flow can be reduced or alleviated. Given these potential mutual synergistic behaviors of PV and EV technologies, this project attempted to quantify the benefits of combining the two technologies. Furthermore, of interest was how advanced EV control strategies may influence the outcome of the synergy between EV charging and distributed PV installations. Particularly, Californian utility companies with high penetration of the distributed PV technology, who have experienced voltage control problems, are interested how intelligent EV charging could support or affect the voltage control

  3. A utility survey and market assessment on repowering in the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klara, J.M.; Weinstein, R.E.; Wherley, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    Section 1 of this report provides a background about the DOE High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) program. There are two kinds of HIPPS cycles under development. One team is led by the Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, the other team is led by the United Technologies Research Center. These cycles are described. Section 2 summarizes the feedback from the survey of the repowering needs of ten electric utility companies. The survey verified that the utility company planners favor a repowering for a first-of-a-kind demonstration of a new technology rather than an all-new-site application. These planners list the major factor in considering a unit as a repowering candidate as plant age: they identify plants built between 1955 and 1965 as the most likely candidates. Other important factors include the following: the need to reduce operating costs; the need to perform major maintenance/replacement of the boiler; and the need to reduce emissions. Section 3 reports the results of the market assessment. Using the size and age preferences identified in the survey, a market assessment was conducted (with the aid of a power plant data base) to estimate the number and characteristics of US generating units which constitute the current, primary potential market for coal-based repowering. Nearly 250 units in the US meet the criteria determined to be the potential repowering market.

  4. Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on the Economics of Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Doris, E.

    2010-06-01

    This analysis uses simulated building data, simulated solar photovoltaic (PV) data, and actual electric utility tariff data from 25 cities to understand better the impacts of different commercial rate structures on the value of solar PV systems. By analyzing and comparing 55 unique rate structures across the United States, this study seeks to identify the rate components that have the greatest effect on the value of PV systems. Understanding the beneficial components of utility tariffs can both assist decision makers in choosing appropriate rate structures and influence the development of rates that favor the deployment of PV systems. Results from this analysis show that a PV system's value decreases with increasing demand charges. Findings also indicate that time-of-use rate structures with peaks coincident with PV production and wide ranges between on- and off-peak prices most benefit the types of buildings and PV systems simulated. By analyzing a broad set of rate structures from across the United States, this analysis provides an insight into the range of impacts that current U.S. rate structures have on PV systems.

  5. Increases in electric rates in rural areas. Hearing before the Committee on Agriculture, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session, June 4, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Seven witnesses representing rural electric utilities and cooperatives spoke at a June 4, 1980 hearing to discuss which inflationary factors are increasing rural electric rates. The Committee recognized that the problem is not unique to rural systems. In their testimony, the witnesses noted increasing urbanization of rural areas; the cost of generating plant construction, fuel, and operating expenses; general economic factors of inflation and high interest rates; and regulations as major contributing factors to utility requests for rate increases. The hearing record includes their testimony, additional material submitted for the record, and responses to questions from the subcommittee. (DCK)

  6. Techniques of analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-08-01

    This bibliography provides documentation for use by state public utility commissions and major nonregulated utilities in evaluating the applicability of a wide range of electric utility rate design and regulatory concepts in light of certain regulatory objectives. Part I, Utility Regulatory Objectives, contains 2084 citations on conservation of energy and capital; efficient use of facilities and resources; and equitable rates to electricity consumers. Part II, Rate Design Concepts, contains 1238 citations on time-of-day rates; seasonally-varying rates; cost-of-service rates; interruptible rates (including the accompanying use of load management techniques); declining block rates; and lifeline rates. Part III, Regulatory Concepts, contains 1282 references on restrictions on master metering; procedures for review of automatic adjustment clauses; prohibitions of rate or regulatory discrimination against solar, wind, or other small energy systems; treatment of advertising expenses; and procedures to protect ratepayers from abrupt termination of service.

  7. Annual Electric Utility Data - EIA-906/920/923 Data File

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    923 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-906920) The survey Form EIA-923 collects detailed electric power data -- monthly and annually -- on electricity generation, fuel...

  8. EIS-0150: Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration prepared this environmental impact statement to analyze the environmental impacts of its proposal to establish the level of its commitment (sales) of long- term firm electrical capacity and energy from the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects hydroelectric power plants.

  9. The state of energy storage in electric utility systems and its effect on renewable energy resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rau, N.S.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the state of the art of electric energy storage technologies and discusses how adding intermittent renewable energy technologies (IRETs) to a utility network affects the benefits from storage dispatch. Load leveling was the mode of storage dispatch examined in the study. However, the report recommended that other modes be examined in the future for kilowatt and kilowatt-hour optimization of storage. The motivation to install storage with IRET generation can arise from two considerations: reliability and enhancement of the value of energy. Because adding storage increases cost, reliability-related storage is attractive only if the accruing benefits exceed the cost of storage installation. The study revealed that the operation of storage should not be guided by the output of the IRET but rather by system marginal costs. Consequently, in planning studies to quantify benefits, storage should not be considered as an entity belonging to the system and not as a component of IRETS. The study also indicted that because the infusion of IRET energy tends to reduce system marginal cost, the benefits from load leveling (value of energy) would be reduced. However, if a system has storage, particularly if the storage is underutilized, its dispatch can be reoriented to enhance the benefits of IRET integration.

  10. Mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, and applications for market-based rates in a deregulating electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, A.J.

    1999-05-01

    In this article, the author reviews FERC's current procedures for undertaking competitive analysis. The current procedure for evaluating the competitive impact of transactions in the electric utility industry is described in Order 592, in particular Appendix A. These procedures effectively revised criteria that had been laid out in Commonwealth Edison and brought its merger policy in line with the EPAct and the provisions of Order 888. Order 592 was an attempt to provide more certainty and expedition in handling mergers. It established three criteria that had to be satisfied for a merger to be approved: Post-merger market power must be within acceptable thresholds or be satisfactorily mitigated, acceptable customer protections must be in place (to ensure that rates will not go up as a result of increased costs) and any adverse effect on regulation must be addressed. FERC states that its Order 592 Merger Policy Statement is based upon the Horizontal Merger Guidelines issued jointly by the Federal Trade Commission and the Antitrust Division Department of Justice (FTC/DOJ Merger Guidelines). While it borrows much of the language and basic concepts of the Merger Guidelines, FERC's procedures have been criticized as not following the methodology closely enough, leaving open the possibility of mistakes in market definition.

  11. Area of Interest 1. Interregional Electricity Reliability Issue and Assessment Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2015-07-01

    In 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in separate contracts, to provide coordinated technical support to the electricity industry for two national electricity reliability initiatives. The first initiative focused on improving the frequency response of each of the three North American interconnections. The second initiative focused on improving industry understanding of the causes and consequences of fault-induced delayed voltage recovery, which has been observed in all three interconnections. Both initiatives were conducted in close coordination with the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the Western Electric Coordination Council (WECC) and involved the participation of leading utilities from across the United States. This is the final report on LBNL’s activities. It consists of summaries of each activity, including references to published documents that were prepared through the course of the project. (Activities under taken by PNNL are reported on in a separate report.)

  12. Effects of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 on Electric Utilities: An Update, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Describes the strategies used to comply with the Acid Rain Program in 1995, the effect of compliance on SO2 emissions levels, the cost of compliance, and the effects of the program on coal supply and demand. It updates and expands the EIA report, Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.

  13. Regional economic impacts of changes in electricity rates resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, T.; Griffes, P.; Edwards, B.K.

    1995-03-01

    This technical memorandum describes an analysis of regional economic impacts resulting from changes in retail electricity rates due to six power marketing programs proposed by Western Area Power Administration (Western). Regional economic impacts of changes in rates are estimated in terms of five key regional economic variables: population, gross regional product, disposable income, employment, and household income. The REMI (Regional Impact Models, Inc.) and IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning) models simulate economic impacts in nine subregions in the area in which Western power is sold for the years 1993, 2000, and 2008. Estimates show that impacts on aggregate economic activity in any of the subregions or years would be minimal for three reasons. First, the utilities that buy power from Western sell only a relatively small proportion of the total electricity sold in any of the subregions. Second, reliance of Western customers on Western power is fairly low in each subregion. Finally, electricity is not a significant input cost for any industry or for households in any subregion.

  14. Quantifying the Effect of Fast Charger Deployments on Electric Vehicle Utility and Travel Patterns via Advanced Simulation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Burton, E.

    2015-02-01

    The disparate characteristics between conventional (CVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs) in terms of driving range, refill/recharge time, and availability of refuel/recharge infrastructure inherently limit the relative utility of BEVs when benchmarked against traditional driver travel patterns. However, given a high penetration of high-power public charging combined with driver tolerance for rerouting travel to facilitate charging on long-distance trips, the difference in utility between CVs and BEVs could be marginalized. We quantify the relationships between BEV utility, the deployment of fast chargers, and driver tolerance for rerouting travel and extending travel durations by simulating BEVs operated over real-world travel patterns using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool for Vehicles (BLAST-V). With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office, BLAST-V has been developed to include algorithms for estimating the available range of BEVs prior to the start of trips, for rerouting baseline travel to utilize public charging infrastructure when necessary, and for making driver travel decisions for those trips in the presence of available public charging infrastructure, all while conducting advanced vehicle simulations that account for battery electrical, thermal, and degradation response. Results from BLAST-V simulations on vehicle utility, frequency of inserted stops, duration of charging events, and additional time and distance necessary for rerouting travel are presented to illustrate how BEV utility and travel patterns can be affected by various fast charge deployments.

  15. Table A21. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,"RSE" " "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Economic ...

  16. NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their resource planning processes.

  17. A Framework for Organizing Current and Future Electric Utility Regulatory and Business Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this report, we will present a descriptive and organizational framework for incremental and fundamental changes to regulatory and utility business models in the context of clean energy public policy goals. We will also discuss the regulated utility's role in providing value-added services that relate to distributed energy resources, identify the "openness" of customer information and utility networks necessary to facilitate change, and discuss the relative risks, and the shifting of risks, for utilities and customers.

  18. The effects of Title IV of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 on electric utilities: An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This report presents data and analyses related to Phase I implementation of the Clean Air Act Amendment by electric utilities. It describes the strategies used to comply with the Acid Rain Program in 1995, the effect of compliance on sulfur dioxide emissions levels, the cost of compliance, and the effects of the program on coal supply and demand. The first year of Phase I demonstrated that the market-based sulfur dioxide emissions control system could achieve significant reductions in emissions at lower than expected costs. Some utilities reduced aggregate emissions below legal requirements due to economic incentives; other utilities purchased additional allowances to avoid noncompliance. More than half of the utilities switched to or blended with lower sulfur coal, due to price reductions in the coal market which were partially due to the allowance trading program. 21 figs., 20 tabs.

  19. Kentucky Utilities Company and Louisville Gas & Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     Kentucky Utilities Company's Home Energy Rebate program provides incentives for residential customers to upgrade to energy efficiency home appliances and heat and air conditioning equipment. ...

  20. Table 11.6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kilowatthours." ,"Total of",,,"RSE" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row... the Census," "data files for the '2002 Economic Census, Manufacturing - Industry ...

  1. December 2011 Electrical Safety Occurrences

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and they provided no indication that the secondary 120V electrical line was in the area. Pre-job utility locates were performed by the LANL Utility Mapping (UMAP) team. Two...

  2. Regional versus global? -- Will strategies for reduction of sulfur dioxide emissions from electric utilities increase carbon dioxide emissions?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, J.C.; Dolsak, N.

    1996-12-31

    Electric utilities, which are dependent on high-sulfur coal are expected to reduce their SO{sub 2} emissions. The strategies for reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions may result in increased CO{sub 2} emissions. Thereby decrease of regional pollution may cause increase of global pollution. Environmental, political, moral, and economic consequences of the two types of pollution differ significantly. Midwestern electric utilities, USA, which are dependent on high-sulfur coal, are analyzed in the paper. However, the same problem is relevant for some European coal fueled power plants. Strategies for reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions, employed by Midwestern electric utilities to comply with the clean Air Act amendments (CAAA) of 1990 and their possible affects on CO{sub 2} emissions, are presented. The paper focuses on two general strategies for reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions. First is coal-switching or blending with a low-sulfur coal. Second is construction and use of flue-gas desulfurization devices (scrubbers). A combination of both strategies is also a viable option. Switching to low-sulfur coal may result in larger CO{sub 2} emissions because that coal has different characteristics and has to be transported much greater distances. Scrubbers require significant amounts of energy for their operation which requires burning more coal. This increases the level of CO{sub 2} emissions.

  3. Identification, definition and evaluation of potential impacts facing the US electric utility industry over the next decade. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grainger, J.J.; Lee, S.S.H.

    1993-11-26

    There are numerous conditions of the generation system that may ultimately develop into system states affecting system reliability and security. Such generation system conditions should also be considered when evaluating the potential impacts on system operations. The following five issues have been identified to impact system reliability and security to the greatest extent: transmission access/retail wheeling; non-utility generators and independent power producers; integration of dispersed storage and generation into utility distribution systems; EMF and right-of-way limitations; Clean Air Act Amendments. Strictly speaking, some issues are interrelated and one issue cannot be completely dissociated from the others. However, this report addresses individual issues separately in order to determine all major aspects of bulk power system operations affected by each issue. The impacts of the five issues on power system reliability and security are summarized. This report examines the five critical issues that the US electric utility industry will be facing over the next decade. The investigation of their impacts on utility industry will be facing over the next decade. The investigation of their impacts on utility system reliability and security is limited to the system operation viewpoint. Those five issues will undoubtedly influence various planning aspects of the bulk transmission system. However, those subjects are beyond the scope of this report. While the issues will also influence the restructure and business of the utility industry politically, sociologically, environmentally, and economically, all discussion included in the report are focused only on technical ramifications.

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 U.S. Electric Power Sector Cumulative Power Plant Additions Needed to Meet Future Electricity Demand (1) Typical New Number of New Power Plants to Meet Demand Electric Generator Plant Capacity (MW) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Coal Steam 1,300 7 8 8 8 8 Combined Cycle 540 28 29 43 79 130 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 148 62 105 174 250 284 Nuclear Power 2,236 1 3 3 3 4 Pumped Storage 147 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 Fuel Cells 10 0 0 0 0 0 Conventional Hydropower 20 (2) 20 47 81 125 185 Geothermal 50 9 26 41 62 81

  5. Kentucky Utilities Company and Louisville Gas & Electric- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Utilities Company (KU) offers rebates to all commercial customers who pay a DSM charge on monthly bills. Rebates are available on lighting measures, sensors, air conditioners, heat pumps,...

  6. Energy Department Works with Sacramento Municipal Utility District on Renewable Electricity Generation and Delivery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) in Sacramento, California, is looking to local renewable resources to help meet its aggressive goal of supplying 37% of its power from renewables in 2020.

  7. Property:PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from utility-scale PV in urban areas of a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy...

  8. Development and utilization of new and renewable energy with Stirling engine system for electricity in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, W.; Abenavoli, R.I.; Carlini, M.

    1996-12-31

    China is the largest developing country in the world. Self-supporting and self-sustaining energy supply is the only solution for development. Recently, fast economic development exposed gradually increasing pressure of energy demand and environment concern. In order to increase the production of electricity of China, the Stirling engine system should be developed. This paper provides an investigation of energy production and consumption in China. The main features of the energy consumption and the development objectives of China`s electric power industry are also described. The necessity and possibility of development of Stirling engine system is discussed.

  9. Electricity from coal and utilization of coal combustion by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demirbas, A.

    2008-07-01

    Most electricity in the world is conventionally generated using coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear energy, or hydropower. Due to environmental concerns, there is a growing interest in alternative energy sources for heat and electricity production. The major by-products obtained from coal combustion are fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials. The solid wastes produced in coal-fired power plants create problems for both power-generating industries and environmentalists. The coal fly ash and bottom ash samples may be used as cementitious materials.

  10. EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed modifications to the allowable land uses, utility infrastructure, and Natural Area management responsibility for Parcel ED-1. The purpose of the modifications is to enhance the development potential of the Horizon Center business/industrial park, while ensuring protection of the adjacent Natural Area. The area addressed by the proposed action was evaluated for various industrial/business uses in the Environmental Assessment Addendum for the Proposed Title Transfer of Parcel ED-1, DOE/EA-1113-A.

  11. Renewable Electricity Generation and Delivery at the Sacramento Municipal Utility District

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) in Sacramento, California, is looking to local renewable resources to help meet its aggressive goal of supplying 37% of its power from renewables by 2020. To help achieve this goal, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided more than $5 million in funding for several SMUD Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CommRE) projects.

  12. Techniques for analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-08-01

    This document, Glossary, is the first in a series of reports to identify, describe, and apply techniques for analyzing the impacts of certain electric utility concepts. This report was developed with a focus on the currently evolving issues of ratemaking, especially as they might be expected to arise under Sections 101, 111, 113, 114, 131, 132, and 210 of the P.U.R.P.A. of 1978. Because the evolutionary process of ratemaking has led to multiple proceedings and changes of inference in some terms, the glossary attempts to delineate these changes where appropriate. Definitions not uniquely related to ratemaking are included if they are likely to be used in ratemaking proceedings. To avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and expense, the compilers relied heavily on previously developed, publicly available glossaries and definitions developed by organizations such as Edison Electric Institute, the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Existing definitions were revised and new ones were developed as appropriate.

  13. High-voltage electrical apparatus utilizing an insulating gas of sulfur hexafluoride and helium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wootton, Roy E.

    1980-01-01

    High-voltage electrical apparatus includes an outer housing at low potential, an inner electrode disposed within the outer housing at high potential with respect thereto, and support means for insulatably supporting the inner electrode within the outer housing. Conducting particles contaminate the interior of the outer housing, and an insulating gas electrically insulates the inner electrode from the outer housing even in the presence of the conducting particles. The insulating gas is comprised of sulfur hexafluoride at a partial pressure of from about 2.9 to about 3.4 atmospheres absolute, and helium at a partial pressure from about 1.1 to about 11.4 atmospheres absolute. The sulfur hexafluoride comprises between 20 and 65 volume percent of the insulating gas.

  14. High-surface-area nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide for electric double-layer capacitors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Youn, Hee-Chang; Bak, Seong-Min; Kim, Myeong-Seong; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Lee, Chang-Wook; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2015-06-08

    A two-step method consisting of solid-state microwave irradiation and heat treatment under NH₃ gas was used to prepare nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) with a high specific surface area (1007m²g⁻¹), high electrical conductivity (1532S m⁻¹), and low oxygen content (1.5 wt%) for electric double-layer capacitor applications. The specific capacitance of N-RGO was 291 Fg⁻¹ at a current density of 1 A g⁻¹, and a capacitance of 261 F g⁻¹ was retained at 50 A g⁻¹, indicating a very good rate capability. N-RGO also showed excellent cycling stability, preserving 96% of the initial specific capacitance after 100,000 cycles. Near-edge X-ray absorptionmore » fine-structure spectroscopy evidenced the recover of π-conjugation in the carbon networks with the removal of oxygenated groups and revealed the chemical bonding of the nitrogen atoms in N-RGO. The good electrochemical performance of N-RGO is attributed to its high surface area, high electrical conductivity, and low oxygen content.« less

  15. High-surface-area nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide for electric double-layer capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youn, Hee-Chang; Bak, Seong-Min; Kim, Myeong-Seong; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Lee, Chang-Wook; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2015-06-08

    A two-step method consisting of solid-state microwave irradiation and heat treatment under NH₃ gas was used to prepare nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) with a high specific surface area (1007m²g⁻¹), high electrical conductivity (1532S m⁻¹), and low oxygen content (1.5 wt%) for electric double-layer capacitor applications. The specific capacitance of N-RGO was 291 Fg⁻¹ at a current density of 1 A g⁻¹, and a capacitance of 261 F g⁻¹ was retained at 50 A g⁻¹, indicating a very good rate capability. N-RGO also showed excellent cycling stability, preserving 96% of the initial specific capacitance after 100,000 cycles. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy evidenced the recover of π-conjugation in the carbon networks with the removal of oxygenated groups and revealed the chemical bonding of the nitrogen atoms in N-RGO. The good electrochemical performance of N-RGO is attributed to its high surface area, high electrical conductivity, and low oxygen content.

  16. Knoxville Area Transit: Propane Hybrid ElectricTrolleys; Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service, Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (Fact Sheet)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    website and in print publications. TESTING ADVANCED VEHICLES KNOXVILLE AREA TRANSIT ◆ PROPANE HYBRID ELECTRIC TROLLEYS Knoxville Area Transit PROPANE HYBRID ELECTRIC TROLLEYS NREL/PIX 13795 KNOXVILLE AREA TRANSIT (KAT) is recognized nationally for its exceptional service to the City of Knoxville, Tennessee. KAT received the American Public Transportation Associa- tion's prestigious Outstanding Achievement Award in 2004. Award-winning accomplishments included KAT's increase in annual ridership

  17. Tracking the Reliability of the U.S. Electric Power System: An Assessment of Publicly Available Information Reported to State Public Utility Commissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina H.; Eto, Joseph H.

    2008-10-10

    Large blackouts, such as the August 14-15, 2003 blackout in the northeasternUnited States and Canada, focus attention on the importance of reliable electric service. As public and private efforts are undertaken to improve reliability and prevent power interruptions, it is appropriate to assess their effectiveness. Measures of reliability, such as the frequency and duration of power interruptions, have been reported by electric utilities to state public utility commissions for many years. This study examines current state and utility practices for collecting and reporting electricity reliability information and discusses challenges that arise in assessing reliability because of differences among these practices. The study is based primarily on reliability information for 2006 reported by 123 utilities to 37 state public utility commissions.

  18. Performance-based ratemaking for electric utilities: Review of plans and analysis of economic and resource-planning issues. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comnes, G.A.; Stoft, S.; Greene, N.; Hill, L.J.

    1995-11-01

    This document contains summaries of the electric utilities performance-based rate plans for the following companies: Alabama Power Company; Central Maine Power Company; Consolidated Edison of New York; Mississippi Power Company; New York State Electric and Gas Corporation; Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation; PacifiCorp; Pacific Gas and Electric; Southern California Edison; San Diego Gas & Electric; and Tucson Electric Power. In addition, this document also contains information about LBNL`s Power Index and Incentive Properties of a Hybrid Cap and Long-Run Demand Elasticity.

  19. Utilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utilities Utilities Below are resources for Tribes about utilities. The Economics of Electric System Municipalization Looks at the economic environment in California to determine ...

  20. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 1, Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams) are influenced by Western`s power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Western`s firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action altemative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption/Sales (Percent) Buildings Delivered Total | Total Industry Transportation Total (10^15 Btu) 1980 | 60.9% 38.9% 0.2% 100% | 7.15 1981 | 61.4% 38.5% 0.1% 100% | 7.33 1982 | 64.1% 35.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.12 1983 | 63.8% 36.1% 0.2% 100% | 7.34 1984 | 63.2% 36.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.80 1985 | 63.8% 36.0% 0.2% 100% | 7.93 1986 | 64.8% 35.1% 0.2% 100% | 8.08 1987 | 64.9% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 8.38 1988 | 65.0% 34.8% 0.2% 100% | 8.80 1989 | 64.8% 35.0% 0.2% 100% |

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 U.S. Electricity Net Generation, by Plant Type (Billion kWh) Renewables Growth Rate Hydr(1) Oth(2) Total CHP (3) Tot.(4) 2010-year 1980 276 6 282 N.A. 1981 261 6 267 N.A. 1982 309 5 314 N.A. 1983 332 6 339 N.A. 1984 321 9 330 N.A. 1985 281 11 292 N.A. 1986 291 12 302 N.A. 1987 250 12 262 N.A. 1988 223 12 235 N.A. 1989 269 28 297 42 1990 290 35 324 61 1991 286 38 324 72 1992 250 40 290 91 1993 278 42 320 108 1994 254 42 296 123 1995 305 39 345 141 1996 341 41 382 147 1997 351 41 392 148 1998

  3. Electrically heated ex-reactor pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) simulations utilizing irradiated Zircaloy cladding. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barner, J.O.; Fitzsimmons, D.E.

    1985-02-01

    In a program sponsored by the Fuel Systems Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a series of six electrically heated fuel rod simulation tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of these tests was to determine the susceptibility of irradiated pressurized-water reactor (PWR) Zircaloy-4 cladding to failures caused by pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). A secondary objective was to acquire kinetic data (e.g., ridge growth or relaxation rates) that might be helpful in the interpretation of in-reactor performance results and/or the modeling of PCMI. No cladding failures attributable to PCMI occurred during the six tests. This report describes the testing methods, testing apparatus, fuel rod diametral strain-measuring device, and test matrix. Test results are presented and discussed.

  4. Market power in electric utility mergers: Access, energy, and the guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaels, R.J. |

    1996-12-31

    All mergers affect competition, some by creating superior competitors and others by creating potential monopolists. The Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 requires prescreening of proposed mergers to identify those that are likely to affect competition adversely. To implement that law, the US Department of Justice`s merger guidelines contain prescreening procedures that attempt a compromise between theoretical rigor, limited data, expeditious processing and consistency. This article discusses the following topics: the guidelines and their relevence, the problems encountered in applying them to electricity markets; FERC`s merger policy and deemphasizing antitrust markets for capacity and energy; critique of capacity and energy markets; general considerations of antitrust activism; general conclusions on the relationship between regulation and antitrust.

  5. Annual Power Electric

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Annual Update / Revision Data for 2014 updated: February 16, 2016 February 16, 2016 Table update: The following tables are being withheld pending the availability of additional data: Table 8.5. Revenue and Expense Statistics for U.S. Cooperative Borrower-Owned Electric Utilities Table 8.6.A. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, Actual Table 8.6.B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Shares (Percent) Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 1980 15.7% 10.8% 50.2% 11.8% 0.2% 12.1% 11.3% (1) 100% 1981 15.4% 9.0% 51.8% 11.2% 0.3% 11.4% 12.3% (1) 100% 1982 13.9% 6.6% 52.6% 13.6% 0.2% 13.8% 13.1% (1) 100% 1983 12.2% 6.3% 53.9% 14.3% 0.3% 14.6% 13.1% (1) 100% 1984 12.6% 5.1% 54.9% 13.2% 0.4% 13.5% 14.0% (1) 100% 1985 12.1% 4.2% 56.2% 11.3% 0.4% 11.8% 15.7% (1) 100% 1986 10.2% 5.6% 55.3% 11.7% 0.5%

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88

  8. JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Laumb; John Kay; Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Nicholas Lentz; Donald McCollor; Kevin Galbreath

    2009-03-29

    The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.

  9. Biomass Energy for Transport and Electricity: Large scale utilization under low CO2 concentration scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-01-25

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. The costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are also incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the dominant source. A key finding of this paper is the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies coupled with commercial biomass energy can play in meeting stringent emissions targets. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, the resulting negative emissions used in combination with biomass are a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels and shows that both technologies are important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics. Through application of the GCAM integrated assessment model, it becomes clear that, given CCS availability, bioenergy will be used both in electricity and transportation.

  10. ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Jean Bustard; Kenneth E. Baldrey; Richard Schlager

    2000-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions has begun a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the flyash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. Preliminary testing has identified a class of common deliquescent salts that effectively control flyash resistivity on a variety of coals. A method to evaluate cohesive properties of flyash in the laboratory has been selected and construction of an electrostatic tensiometer test fixture is underway. Preliminary selection of a variety of chemicals that will be screened for effect on flyash cohesion has been completed.

  11. The Nuclear Material Focus Area Roadmapping Process Utilizing Environmental Management Complex-Wide Nuclear Material Disposition Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sala, D. R.; Furhman, P.; Smith, J. D.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the process that the Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) has developed and utilizes in working with individual Department of Energy (DOE) sites to identify, address, and prioritize research and development efforts in the stabilization, disposition, and storage of nuclear materials. By associating site technology needs with nuclear disposition pathways and integrating those with site schedules, the NMFA is developing a complex wide roadmap for nuclear material technology development. This approach will leverage technology needs and opportunities at multiple sites and assist the NMFA in building a defensible research and development program to address the nuclear material technology needs across the complex.

  12. Bridging the Gaps on Prepaid Utility Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prepaid utility service — which is an alternative payment option in which consumers buy a dollar amount of electricity, and utilities deduct energy usage from that balance as it is used — is one area where these changes converge. The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability’s report entitled “Bridging the Gaps on Prepaid Utility Service” examines utilities’ and consumers’ experiences with prepay.

  13. ,"Table 2. Noncoincident Peak Load, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Noncoincident Peak Load, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area," ,"1990-2010 Actual, 2011-2015 Projected" ,"(Megawatts)" ,"Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area","Summer" ,,,"Actual",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Projected"

  14. A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

    2003-11-01

    A clear understanding of the monetary value that customers place on reliability and the factors that give rise to higher and lower values is an essential tool in determining investment in the grid. The recent National Transmission Grid Study recognizes the need for this information as one of growing importance for both public and private decision makers. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy has undertaken this study, as a first step toward addressing the current absence of consistent data needed to support better estimates of the economic value of electricity reliability. Twenty-four studies, conducted by eight electric utilities between 1989 and 2002 representing residential and commercial/industrial (small, medium and large) customer groups, were chosen for analysis. The studies cover virtually all of the Southeast, most of the western United States, including California, rural Washington and Oregon, and the Midwest south and east of Chicago. All variables were standardized to a consistent metric and dollar amounts were adjusted to the 2002 CPI. The data were then incorporated into a meta-database in which each outage scenario (e.g., the lost of electric service for one hour on a weekday summer afternoon) is treated as an independent case or record both to permit comparisons between outage characteristics and to increase the statistical power of analysis results. Unadjusted average outage costs and Tobit models that estimate customer damage functions are presented. The customer damage functions express customer outage costs for a given outage scenario and customer class as a function of location, time of day, consumption, and business type. One can use the damage functions to calculate outage costs for specific customer types. For example, using the customer damage functions, the cost experienced by an ''average'' customer resulting from a 1 hour summer afternoon outage is estimated to be approximately $3 for a residential customer, $1,200 for small-medium commercial and industrial customer, and $82,000 for large commercial and industrial customer. Future work to improve the quality and coverage of information on the value of electricity reliability to customers is described.

  15. Electrical resistivity and magnetic investigations of the geothermal systems in the Rotorua area, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibby, H.M. ); Dawson, G.B.; Rayner, H.H.; Bennie, S.L.; Bromley, C.J. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports that electrical and magnetic data are used in an investigation of a 450 km{sup 2} region in order to delineate the Rotorua City Geothermal system and determine its relationship with other geothermal systems in the region. Three distinct regions of low ({lt}30 Omega m) apparent resistivity are delineated. The southern of these outlines the Rotorua City Geothermal System which has an area of about 18 km{sup 2}, with the northern third covered by Lake Rotorua. The boundary of the system is characterized by a rapid lateral change in apparent resistivity which can be modeled as a single, near vertical zone in which the distance between hot and cold water is very narrow. Magnetic properties also change in the vicinity of the discontinuity in some areas, consistent with hydrothermal alteration having destroyed the magnetite in the rocks of the geothermal system. Hot water is believed to be rising, driven by buoyancy forces across the whole of the low resistivity region. There is some indication, particularly in the south, that the boundary between hot and cold fluids dips away from the field. A second low resistivity zone (the East Lake Rotorua anomaly) with an area of about 8 km{sup 2}, is believed to outline a second independent geothermal system, with surface manifestations on Mokoia Island, and on the eastern shore of the lake. High heat flow in lake bottom sediments, and a reduction in magnetic signature over this region supports this conclusion. A third resistivity low under the west of Lake Rotorua has no associated thermal features and is believed to be a fossil hydrothermal system. There is no apparent relationship between the location of the geothermal systems and the Rotorua caldera. The aeromagnetic measurements have delineated several highly magnetic bodies which cannot be linked with surface geology. These are believed to be caused by buried rhyolite dome complexes at shallow depth.

  16. Transmission Planning Process and Opportunities for Utility-Scale Solar Engagement within the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hein, J.; Hurlbut, D.; Milligan, M.; Coles, L.; Green, B.

    2011-11-01

    This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. Market barriers unrelated to technology often limit the expansion of utility-scale solar power, even in areas with exceptional resource potential. Many of these non-technical barriers have to do with policy, regulation, and planning, and hardly ever do they resolve themselves in a timely fashion. In most cases, pre-emptive intervention by interested stakeholders is the easiest way to remove/address such barriers, but it requires knowing how to navigate the institutional waters of the relevant agencies and boards. This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. It focuses on the Western Interconnection (WI), primarily because the quality of solar resources in the Southwest makes utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics (PV) economically feasible, and because the relevant institutions have evolved in a way that has opened up opportunities for removing non-technical market barriers. Developers will find in this report a high-level field manual to identify the venues for mitigating and possibly eliminating systemic market obstacles and ensuring that the economic playing field is reasonably level. Project-specific issues such as siting for transmission and generation resources are beyond the scope of this report. Instead, the aim is to examine issues that pervasively affect all utility-scale PV and CSP in the region regardless of where the project may be. While the focus is on the WI, many of the institutions described here also have their counterparts in the Eastern and the Texas interconnections. Specifically, this report suggests a number of critical engagement points relating to generation and transmission planning.

  17. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be developed and sold to the wholesale electricity market. • Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

  18. $18.8 Million Award for Power Systems Engineering Research Center Continues Collaboration of 13 Universities and 35 Utilities for Electric Power Research, Building the Nation's Energy Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy awarded a cooperative agreement on January 16, 2009, to the Arizona State University (ASU) Board of Regents to operate the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). PSERC is a collaboration of 13 universities with 35 electricity industry member organizations including utilities, transmission companies, vendors and research organizations.

  19. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Appendix E, Transmission Reinforcement Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this appendix to the draft environmental impact statement (EIS) report is to provide an update of the latest study work done on transmission system options for the Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Also included in the attachments to the EIS are 2 reports analyzing the voltage stability of the Puget Sound transmission system and a review by Power Technologies, Inc. of the BPA voltage stability analysis and reactive options. Five transmission line options and several reactive options are presently being considered as possible solutions to the PSAFRP by the Transmission Team. The first two line options would be built on new rights-of way adjacent (as much as possible) to existing corridors. The reactive options would optimize the existing transmission system capability by adding new stations for series capacitors and/or switchgear. The other three line options are rebuilds or upgrades of existing cross mountain transmission lines. These options are listed below and include a preliminary assessment of the additional transmission system reinforcement required to integrate the new facilities into the existing transmission system. Plans were designed to provide at least 500 MVAR reactive margin.

  20. DOE-STD-1170-2003; Electrical Systems Functional Area Qualification...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... knowledge of safety and health fundamentals related to electrical systems and components. ... * Low-voltage circuit breaker fundamentals * Ground-fault protection fundamentals ...

  1. Wiregrass Electric Cooperative- H2O Plus Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wiregrass Electric Cooperative is a consumer-owned electric utility serving over 20,000 consumers in the "Wiregrass" area of southeast Alabama.  They currently offer a water heater rebate program...

  2. Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

  3. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY

  4. The Utility Battery Storage Systems Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    Utility battery energy storage allows a utility or customer to store electrical energy for dispatch at a time when its use is more economical, strategic, or efficient. The UBS program sponsors systems analyses, technology development of subsystems and systems integration, laboratory and field evaluation, and industry outreach. Achievements and planned activities in each area are discussed.

  5. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  6. Apparatus and method for selective area deposition of thin films on electrically biased substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuhr, Raymond A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Tony E. (Knoxville, TN); Golanski, Andrzej (Cheylas, FR)

    1994-01-01

    An ion beam deposition process for selective area deposition on a polarized substrate uses a potential applied to the substrate which allows the ionized particles to reach into selected areas for film deposition. Areas of the substrate to be left uncoated are held at a potential that repells the ionized particles.

  7. Apparatus and method for selective area deposition of thin films on electrically biased substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuhr, R.A.; Haynes, T.E.; Golanski, A.

    1999-06-08

    An ion beam deposition process for selective area deposition on a polarized substrate uses a potential applied to the substrate which allows the ionized particles to reach into selected areas for film deposition. Areas of the substrate to be left uncoated are held at a potential that repels the ionized particles. 3 figs.

  8. Apparatus and method for selective area deposition of thin films on electrically biased substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuhr, Raymond A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Tony E. (Knoxville, TN); Golanski, Andrzej (Le Cheylas, FR)

    1999-01-01

    An ion beam deposition process for selective area deposition on a polarized substrate uses a potential applied to the substrate which allows the ionized particles to reach into selected areas for film deposition. Areas of the substrate to be left uncoated are held at a potential that repells the ionized particles.

  9. Techniques for analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Regulatory laws and policies. [State by state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-08-01

    This report is a legal study prepared to provide a review of the substantive and procedural laws of each regulatory jurisdiction that may affect implementation of the PURPA standards, and to summarize the current state of consideration and implementation of policies and rate designs similar or identical to the PURPA standards by state regulatory agencies and nonregulated utilities. This report is divided into three sections. The first section, the Introduction, summarizes the standards promulgated by PURPA and the results of the legal study. The second section, State Regulatory Law and Procedure, summarizes for each state or other ratemaking jurisdiction: (1) general constitutional and statutory provisions affecting utility rates and conditions of service; (2) specific laws or decisions affecting policy or rate design issues covered by PURPA standards; and (3) statutes and decisions governing administrative procedures, including judicial review. A chart showing actions taken on the policy and rate design issues addressed by PURPA is also included for each jurisdiction, and citations to relevant authorities are presented for each standard. State statutes or decisions that specifically define a state standard similar or identical to a PURPA standard, or that refer to one of the three PURPA objectives, are noted. The third section, Nonregulated Electric Utilities, summarizes information available on nonregulated utilities, i.e., publicly or cooperatively owned utilities which are specifically exempted from state regulation by state law.

  10. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  11. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 4, Appendixes B-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  12. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 3, Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  13. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 2, Sections 1-16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  14. Utilities Offering Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Utilities Offering Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts Utilities Offering Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (codified as 42 USC Section 8256 (c) Utility Incentive Programs) authorizes and encourages agencies to participate in generally available utility programs to increase energy efficiency; conserve water; or manage electricity demand conducted by gas, water, or electric utilities. The following maps show utility service territories

  15. Electric Vehicle Preparedness Task 3: Detailed Assessment of Target Electrification Vehicles at Joint Base Lewis McChord Utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-08-01

    Task 2 involved identifying daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and initiating data logging of vehicle movements in order to characterize the vehicle’s mission. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to PEV adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements and provides observations related to placement of PEV charging infrastructure. This report provides the results of the data analysis and observations related to the replacement of current vehicles with PEVs. This fulfills part of the Task 3 requirements. Task 3 also includes an assessment of charging infrastructure required to support this replacement. That is the subject of a separate report.

  16. Area of Interest 4.Technical Interest to Electric Infrastructure Planners on Other Subjects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2015-07-01

    In 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided $60M in funding to five regional entities to conduct interregional transmission planning activities: the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC); the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC); the Transmission Expansion Planning and Policy Committee (TEPPC); the State Provincial Steering Committee (SPSC);and the Electricity Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). DOE also provided funding to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to support aspects of these interregional transmission planning activities. LBNL’s support involved both technical assistance to DOE in its oversight of the activities conducted by the five regional entities and the preparation of six, standalone technical studies that were conducted in direct support for specific entities. This is the final report on LBNL’s activities. It consists of summaries of each activity; references are provided to each of the stand-alone studies.

  17. Minnkota Power Cooperative (17 Utilities) - PowerSavers Commercial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric Cooperative Roseau Municipal Utilities Fosston Municipal Utilities City of Stephen Municipal Utilities Halstad Municipal Utilities Thief River Falls Municipal Utilities...

  18. Utility Partnerships Webinar Series: Electric Utility Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Re-commissioning is a two step process Step 1 - Diagnosis * BHE-COE will fund up to 50% of the cost not to exceed 4,800. * Customer selects their own contractor or can choose one ...

  19. Utilize Available Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project | Department of Energy Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Coal Project Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Coal Project January 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative clean coal technology project in Texas will supply electricity to the largest municipally owned utility in the United States under a recently signed Power Purchase Agreement, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today. Under the

  20. Electrically switchable polymer liquid crystal and polymer birefringent flake in fluid host systems and optical devices utilizing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Kenneth L.; Kosc, Tanya Z.; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Faris, Sadeg M.; Li, Le

    2003-12-16

    Flakes or platelets of polymer liquid crystals (PLC) or other birefringent polymers (BP) suspended in a fluid host medium constitute a system that can function as the active element in an electrically switchable optical device when the suspension is either contained between a pair of rigid substrates bearing transparent conductive coatings or dispersed as microcapsules within the body of a flexible host polymer. Optical properties of these flake materials include large effective optical path length, different polarization states and high angular sensitivity in their selective reflection or birefringence. The flakes or platelets of these devices need only a 3-20.degree. rotation about the normal to the cell surface to achieve switching characteristics obtainable with prior devices using particle rotation or translation.

  1. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Scoping Summary Report - Part B Preliminary Technical Analysis Appendix A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes in general terms the nature of the voltage instability problem facing the Puget Sound area. The following two chapters cover the technical aspects of the problem. It deals with load growth, the root cause of the problem. Also addressed is the capacity of the current power system and the criteria for future system planning. It also explains the technical results of transmission system modeling which confirm the system's vulnerability to voltage instability, the principal symptom of the problem. The results of the scoping process in each of the four measure categories are presented. Included are lists of all options identified, a discussion of the screening criteria, and descriptions of the measures that survived the screening process and are proposed for further evaluation in Phase 2. We discuss the evaluation methodology which will be used to refine the analyses. The next steps in the planning process are outlined. It also describes the short term operational agreements that will assure continued reliable service until a long term solution is in place. 8 figs., 22 tabs.

  2. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix E: Transmission Reinforcement Analysis : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    Five transmission line options and several reactive (voltage support) options are presently being considered as possible solutions to the PSAERP by the Transmission Team. The first two line options would be built on new rights-of way adjacent (as much as possible) to existing corridors. The reactive options would optimize the existing transmission system capability by adding new stations for series capacitors and/or switchgear. The other three line options are rebuilds or upgrades of existing cross mountain transmission lines. These options are listed below and include a preliminary assessment of the additional transmission system reinforcement required to integrate the new facilities into the existing transmission system. These options were derived from earlier study work that was summarized in Puget Sound Reinforcement Transmission Options'' and New Cross Mountain Transmission Line Alternative: The Crosstie'', which are attached. The initial Transmission Options study report recognized the value to system performance of adding an entirely new circuit rather than rebuilding an existing one. However, siting realities require that rebuild options be considered. Typically, the most attractive rebuild options would be the lowest capacity (lowest voltage) circuits. But because of corridor location, length and terminal proximity, the rebuild options listed below appear to be the most promising. Schematic diagrams and QV Curves of each option are also attached. It should be noted that Snoqualmie and Echo Lake refer to the same station east of Puget Sound and Naneum and Kittitas refer to the same station in the Ellensburg area. 100 figs., 20 tabs.

  3. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO{sub 2} take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry`s response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  4. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO[sub 2] take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry's response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  5. Utility Partnership Program Utility Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Partners Utility Partnership Program Utility Partners Utility Partnership Program utility partners are eager to work closely with federal agencies to help achieve energy management goals. If a serving utility is not listed below, utilities and agencies can contact the Federal Energy Management Program to discuss launching a utility energy service contract program. Organization Contact States Served American Electric Power Bud Clark Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Ohio,

  6. Edison Electric Institute Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the current electricity landscape.

  7. Electrical Resistivity Correlation to Vadose Zone Sediment and Pore-Water Composition for the BC Cribs and Trenches Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Ward, Anderson L.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Rucker, Dale F.; Lanigan, David C.; Benecke, Mark W.

    2009-06-01

    This technical report documents the results of geochemical and soil resistivity characterization of sediment obtained from four boreholes drilled in the BC Cribs and Trench area. Vadose zone sediment samples were obtained at a frequency of about every 2.5 ft from approximately 5 ft bgs to borehole total depth. In total, 505 grab samples and 39 six-inch long cores were obtained for characterization. The pore-water chemical composition data, laboratory-scale soil resistivity and other ancillary physical and hydrologic measurements and analyses described in this report are designed to provide a crucial link between direct measurements on sediments and the surface-based electrical-resistivity information obtained via field surveys. A second goal of the sediment characterization was to measure the total and water-leachable concentrations of key contaminants of concern as a function of depth and distance from the footprints of inactive disposal facilities. The total and water-leachable concentrations of key contaminants will be used to update contaminant distribution conceptual models and to provide more data for improving base-line risk predictions and remedial alternative selections. The ERC “ground truthing” exercise for the individual boreholes showed mixed results. In general, the high concentrations of dissolved salts in the pore waters of sediments from C5923, C5924 and C4191 produced a low resistivity “target” in the processed resistivity field surveys, and variability could be seen in the resistivity data that could relate to the variability in pore- water concentrations but the correlations (regression R2 were mediocre ranging from 0.2 to 0.7 at best; where perfect correlation is 1.0). The field-based geophysical data also seemed to suffer from a sort of vertigo, where looking down from the ground surface, the target (e.g., maximum pore-water salt concentration) depth was difficult to resolve. The best correlations between the field electrical resistivity surveys and borehole pore water data sets were obtained when focusing on areal extent of the salt plume. Lateral resolution of the geophysical field data is best conducted by comparing an aggregated set of geophysical data on all boreholes together. When assembling the pore-water data for all four boreholes in an aerial view, the field ERC data produce a reasonable aerial picture of where high salt plumes exist below the BC Cribs and Trenches area. Future work that relies on more laboratory soil resistivity and incorporation of other field data (spectral gamma, neutron moisture and soil density logs) and physical and hydraulic measurements on samples obtained from the boreholes will used develop a more detailed petrophysical model of the sediments below BC Cribs and Trenches. This more detailed model can be used as a more realistic “earth model” in the inversion process to better manipulate the raw field survey data. It is also recommended that one more borehole be drilled after a thorough vetting of the current data with geophysics experts and other Hanford stakeholder to optimize where to place the borehole, what electrical and other geophysical surveys should be conducted , where to take sediment samples and what parameters should be measured on the sediments to attempt one more “ground truthing” exercise.

  8. Electric Efficiency Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2009, the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission's (IURC) ordered utilities to establish demand-side management (DSM) electric savings goals leading to 2.0% reduction of electricity sa...

  9. ,"Table 3A.1. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assesment Area,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A.1. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assesment Area," ,"1996-2010 Actual, 2011-2012 Projected" ,"(Megawatts)" ,"January","NERC Regional Assesment Area" ,,,"Actual",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Projected" ,,,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"2011E","2012E" ,"Eastern

  10. Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

  11. Small Wind Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Electric Systems Small Wind Electric Systems Wind power is the fastest growing source of energy in the world -- efficient, cost effective, and non-polluting. If you have enough wind resource in your area and the situation is right, small wind electric systems are one of the most cost-effective home-based renewable energy systems -- with zero emissions and pollution. Small wind electric systems can: Lower your electricity bills by 50%-90% Help you avoid the high costs of having utility power

  12. Small Wind Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Electric Systems Small Wind Electric Systems Wind power is the fastest growing source of energy in the world -- efficient, cost effective, and non-polluting. If you have enough wind resource in your area and the situation is right, small wind electric systems are one of the most cost-effective home-based renewable energy systems -- with zero emissions and pollution. Small wind electric systems can: Lower your electricity bills by 50%-90% Help you avoid the high costs of having utility power

  13. Utility Service Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any upgrade to utility service provides an opportunity to revisit a Federal building's electrical loads and costs, but it also may provide an economic way to bundle the upgrade with an onsite renewable electricity project during renovation. Upgrading utility service to the site may involve improving or adding a transformer, upgrading utility meters, or otherwise modifying the interconnection equipment or services with the utility. In some cases, the upgrade may change the tariff structure for the facility and may qualify the property for a different structure with lower overall costs. In all cases, the implementation of renewable energy technologies should be identified during the design phase.

  14. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is to encourage: (1) conservation of energy supplied by electric utilities; (2) the optimization of the efficiency of use of facilities and resources by electric utilities; and (3)...

  15. Hawaii electric system reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

    2012-09-01

    This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

  16. Class 1 overview of cultural resources for the Western Area Power Administration Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects electric power marketing environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, K.L.; Malinowski, L.M.; Hoffecker, J.F.; Walitschek, D.A.; Shogren, L.; Mathews, J.E.; Verhaaren, B.T.

    1993-11-01

    Argonne National Laboratory conducted an inventory of known archaeological and historic sites in areas that could be affected by the hydropower operation alternatives under analysis in the power marketing environmental impact statement for the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects. The study areas included portions of the Green River (Flaming Gorge Dam to Cub Creek) in Utah and Colorado and the Gunnison River (Blue Mesa Reservoir to Crystal Dam) in Colorado. All previous archaeological surveys and previously recorded prehistoric and historic sites, structures, and features were inventoried and plotted on maps (only survey area maps are included in this report). The surveys were classified by their level of intensity, and the sites were classified according to their age, type, and contents. These data (presented here in tabular form) permit a general assessment of the character and distribution of archaeological remains in the study areas, as well as an indication of the sampling basis for such an assessment. To provide an adequate context for the descriptions of the archaeological and historic sites, this report also presents overviews of the environmental setting and the regional prehistory, history, and ethnography for each study area.

  17. Training and Certification Requirements for Personnel Utilizing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements for Personnel Utilizing ETA Procedures Prepared by Electric ... ... Donald B. Karner Procedure ETA-GAC005 Revision 1 2 2006 Electric ...

  18. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    September 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for September 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales...

  19. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    November 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for November 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and...

  20. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    December 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and...

  1. A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - September...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    September 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for September 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and...

  2. A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - November...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    November 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for November 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue...

  3. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    January 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for January 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and...

  4. A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - December...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    December 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue...

  5. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    February 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for February 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and...

  6. A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - February...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    February 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for February 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue...

  7. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    October 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for October 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and...

  8. A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - October...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    October 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for October 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue...

  9. A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - September...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    September 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for September 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and...

  10. Hualapai Tribal Utility Project

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hualapai Tribal Utility Project Tribal Utility Project DOE First Steps Program DOE First Steps Program Jack Ehrhardt Jack Ehrhardt - - Hualapai Planning Director Hualapai Planning Director WHO WE ARE WHO WE ARE ~1 MILLION ACRES IN ~1 MILLION ACRES IN NW ARIZONA NW ARIZONA 108 MILES OF THE 108 MILES OF THE GRAND CANYON GRAND CANYON 2500 Members 2500 Members Peach Springs Peach Springs Community Community ~240 electric customers ~240 electric customers ECONOMIC SITUATION ECONOMIC SITUATION Very

  11. DEMEC Member Utilities- Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Delaware's municipal utilities provide incentives for solar photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, wind, geothermal, and fuel cell systems installed by their electric customers. Eligibility is limited...

  12. Central Lincoln People's Utility District - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    electric Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Central Lincoln People(tm)s Utility District Website http:clpud.orgrebate-information State Oregon Program Type...

  13. Utility Data Accessibility Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    utility company to see your electricity data access options. Select the Benchmarking or Demand ResponseEnergy Efficiency map to find out whether your utility provides sufficient...

  14. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beginning January 1, 2002, each electric utility must inform its customers on a quarterly basis of the voluntary option to purchase green power. The details of each utility's program must be...

  15. ,"Table 3B.1. FRCC Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assesment Area,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B.1. FRCC Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assesment Area," ,"1996-2010 Actual, 2011-2012 Projected" ,"(Megawatts)" ,"FRCC","Year","January","February","March","April","May","June","July","August","September","October","November","December"

  16. COMPLEAT (Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies): A planning tool for publicly owned electric utilities. [Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies (Compleat)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    COMPLEAT takes its name, as an acronym, from Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies. It is an electric utility planning model designed for use principally by publicly owned electric utilities and agencies serving such utilities. As a model, COMPLEAT is significantly more full-featured and complex than called out in APPA's original plan and proposal to DOE. The additional complexity grew out of a series of discussions early in the development schedule, in which it became clear to APPA staff and advisors that the simplicity characterizing the original plan, while highly desirable in terms of utility applications, was not achievable if practical utility problems were to be addressed. The project teams settled on Energy 20/20, an existing model developed by Dr. George Backus of Policy Assessment Associates, as the best candidate for the kinds of modifications and extensions that would be required. The remainder of the project effort was devoted to designing specific input data files, output files, and user screens and to writing and testing the compute programs that would properly implement the desired features around Energy 20/20 as a core program. This report presents in outline form, the features and user interface of COMPLEAT.

  17. ,"Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area," ,"1990-2010 Actual, 2011-2015 Projected" ,"(Thousands of Megawatthours)" ,"Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area" ,,,1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"2011E","2012E","2013E","2014E","2015E" ,"Eastern

  18. Large-Scale Utilization of Biomass Energy and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the Transport and Electricity Sectors under Stringent CO2 Concentration Limit Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-08-05

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to meet atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm by the end of the century. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. A key aspect of the research presented here is that the costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are explicitly incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced globally by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the majority source, along with growing utilization of waste-to-energy. The ability to draw on a diverse set of biomass based feedstocks helps to reduce the pressure for drastic large-scale changes in land use and the attendant environmental, ecological, and economic consequences those changes would unleash. In terms of the conversion of bioenergy feedstocks into value added energy, this paper demonstrates that biomass is and will continue to be used to generate electricity as well as liquid transportation fuels. A particular focus of this paper is to show how climate policies and technology assumptions - especially the availability of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies - affect the decisions made about where the biomass is used in the energy system. The potential for net-negative electric sector emissions through the use of CCS with biomass feedstocks provides an attractive part of the solution for meeting stringent emissions constraints; we find that at carbon prices above 150$/tCO2, over 90% of biomass in the energy system is used in combination with CCS. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, it is a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. CCS is also used heavily with other fuels such as coal and natural gas, and by 2095 a total of 1530 GtCO2 has been stored in deep geologic reservoirs. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels as two representative conversion processes and shows that both technologies may be important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics.

  19. ELECTRIC INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGY, TRAINING, AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TREMEL, CHARLES L

    2007-06-28

    The objective of this Electric Infrastructure Technology, Training and Assessment Program was to enhance the reliability of electricity delivery through engineering integration of real-time technologies for wide-area applications enabling timely monitoring and management of grid operations. The technologies developed, integrated, tested and demonstrated will be incorporated into grid operations to assist in the implementation of performance-based protection/preventive measures into the existing electric utility infrastructure. This proactive approach will provide benefits of reduced cost and improved reliability over the typical schedule-based and as needed maintenance programs currently performed by utilities. Historically, utilities have relied on maintenance and inspection programs to diagnose equipment failures and have used the limited circuit isolation devices, such as distribution main circuit breakers to identify abnormal system performance. With respect to reliable problem identification, customer calls to utility service centers are often the sole means for utilities to identify problem occurrences and determine restoration methodologies. Furthermore, monitoring and control functions of equipment and circuits are lacking; thus preventing timely detection and response to customer outages. Finally, the two-way flow of real-time system information is deficient, depriving decision makers of key information required to effectively manage and control current electric grid demands to provide reliable customer service in abnormal situations. This Program focused on advancing technologies and the engineering integration required to incorporate them into the electric grid operations to enhance electrical system reliability and reduce utility operating costs.

  20. Utility Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utility Partnerships 7/10/12. Provides an overview of LEAP's (Charlottesville, VA) partnership with local utilities.

  1. Nashville Electric Service NES | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Service (NES) Place: Nashville, Tennessee Zip: 37246 Product: Nashville Electric Service (NES), the 12th largest public utility in the US, distributes electrical energy to...

  2. NREL: Technology Deployment - New DG Collaborative Brings Utilities and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Industry Professionals Together on Interconnection Issues New DG Collaborative Brings Utilities and Energy Industry Professionals Together on Interconnection Issues Sponsors U.S. DOE SunShot Initiative Key Partners Solar Electric Power Association Electric Power Research Institute Western Area Power Administration Contact Kristen Ardani, 303-384-6461 A photo of two men installing solar panels on a home While advancements in solar technology have significantly lowered hardware costs,

  3. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  4. Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 2: Major mechanical equipment; FGD proposal evaluations; Use of FGDPRISM in FGD system modification, proposal, evaluation, and design; FGD system case study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-04

    Part 2 of this manual provides the electric utility engineer with detailed technical information on some of the major mechanical equipment used in the FGD system. The objectives of Part 2 are the following: to provide the electric utility engineer with information on equipment that may be unfamiliar to him, including ball mills, vacuum filters, and mist eliminators; and to identify the unique technique considerations imposed by an FGD system on more familiar electric utility equipment such as fans, gas dampers, piping, valves, and pumps. Part 3 provides an overview of the recommended procedures for evaluating proposals received from FGD system vendors. The objectives are to provide procedures for evaluating the technical aspects of proposals, and to provide procedures for determining the total costs of proposals considering both initial capital costs and annual operating and maintenance costs. The primary objective of Part 4 of this manual is to provide the utility engineer who has a special interest in the capabilities of FGDPRISM [Flue Gas Desulfurization PRocess Integration and Simulation Model] with more detailed discussions of its uses, requirements, and limitations. Part 5 is a case study in using this manual in the preparation of a purchase specification and in the evaluation of proposals received from vendors. The objectives are to demonstrate how the information contained in Parts 1 and 2 can be used to improve the technical content of an FGD system purchase specification; to demonstrate how the techniques presented in Part 3 can be used to evaluate proposals received in response to the purchase specification; and to illustrate how the FGDPRISM computer program can be used to establish design parameters for the specification and evaluate vendor designs.

  5. Office of Electricity Delivery And Energy Reliability To Hold Technical Conference On The Design Of Future Electric Transmission

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 4, 2009, the Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) will conduct a technical conference in the Washington, DC area to discuss the design of future electric transmission. The technical conference will discuss the likely demand for future electric transmission and whether the development of conceptual alternative extra high voltage (EHV) systems would assist generation developers, State energy policy officials, utility planners, and other stakeholders.

  6. WINDExchange: Utility-Scale Wind

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Utility-Scale Wind Photo of two people standing on top of the nacelle of a utility-scale wind turbine. Wind is an important source of affordable, renewable energy, currently supplying nearly 5% of our nation's electricity demand. By generating electricity from wind turbines, the United States can reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, diversify its energy supply, provide cost-competitive electricity to key coastal regions, and help revitalize key sectors of its economy, including manufacturing.

  7. National Utility Rate Database: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

    2012-08-01

    When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

  8. Chemicals, fuels and electricity from coal. A proposed tri-generation concept for utilization of CO{sub 2} from power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, C.

    1999-07-01

    A tri-generation concept is proposed for the 21st century for making liquid fuels and chemicals along with electricity using CO{sub 2} from flue gases of coal-based electric power plants. The CO{sub 2} from flue gas in the power plant can be converted with CH{sub 4} (natural gas) to form synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2} mixture) using the waste heat in the power plant. The H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} in the flue gas will be used as co-reactants and need not be separated from the flue gas. The hot synthesis gas can be used as feedstock for fuel cells for electricity generation (such as MCFC and SOFC). The hot synthesis gas can also be used for gas turbines to generate electricity. The synthesis gas at moderate temperature can be converted into chemicals and fuels, e.g., methanol and mixed alcohols for chemical and fuel uses, dimethylether (DME) and mixed ethers for diesel fuel, dimethyl carbonate and acetic acid for chemicals. The fuels thus produced may be used either for conventional IC engines or in fuel cell-driven vehicles. This concept could also be applied, in principle, for natural gas-based power plants and IGCC power plants.

  9. Electricity Transmission, A Primer

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Biomass plants are best built near their source of fuel for ... the transmission grid by an authorized scheduling utility. ... Power Pool: Two or more inter- connected electric systems ...

  10. Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders U.S. Utilities, Grid Operators, Others Come Together in National Effort to Tackle Important New Electricity Area PDF icon Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders More Documents & Publications SEAD-Fact-Sheet.pdf The International CHP/DHC Collaborative - Advancing Near-Term Low Carbon Technologies, July 2008 2011

  11. Electric sales and revenue 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1996. 16 figs., 20 tabs.

  12. Estimating electricity storage power rating and discharge duration for utility transmission and distribution deferral :a study for the DOE energy storage program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Butler, Paul Charles; Iannucci, Joseph J., Jr.

    2005-11-01

    This report describes a methodology for estimating the power and energy capacities for electricity energy storage systems that can be used to defer costly upgrades to fully overloaded, or nearly overloaded, transmission and distribution (T&D) nodes. This ''sizing'' methodology may be used to estimate the amount of storage needed so that T&D upgrades may be deferred for one year. The same methodology can also be used to estimate the characteristics of storage needed for subsequent years of deferral.

  13. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  14. Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Alaska Electric Light&Power Co for February 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name...

  15. Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Alaska Electric Light&Power Co for January 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name...

  16. Electricity Power Monthly with data for March 2016

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Photovoltaic SUN PV 2016 1 7977 City of Hamilton - (OH) Electric Utility Meldahl ... Hydroelectric WAT HY 2016 2 7977 City of Hamilton - (OH) Electric Utility Meldahl ...

  17. Labview utilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-09-30

    The software package provides several utilities written in LabView. These utilities don't form independent programs, but rather can be used as a library or controls in other labview programs. The utilities include several new controls (xcontrols), VIs for input and output routines, as well as other 'helper'-functions not provided in the standard LabView environment.

  18. Electric power annual 1995. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

  19. Utility Security & Resiliency: Working Together

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses Edison Electric Institute (EEI), including its key security objectives, key activities, cybersecurity activities, and spare transformer equipment program (STEP).

  20. PP-40 Citizens Utilities Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Citizens Utilities Company PP-40 Citizens Utilities Company Presidential Permit authorizing Citizens Utilities Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Mexico Border. PDF icon PP-40 Citizens Utilities Company More Documents & Publications PP-66 Citizens Utilities Company PP-48-3 El Paso Eelctric Company PP-76 The Vermont Electric Transmission

  1. EA-66-B Citizens Utilities Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Order authorizing Citizens Utilities Company to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon EA-66-B Citizens Utilities Company More Documents & Publications EA-211 DTE Energy Trading...

  2. Aligning Utility Incentives with Investment in Energy Efficiency...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: MandatesTargets This report assists gas and electric utilities as well as utility regulators with the implementation of the...

  3. City of Aurelia, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Aurelia, Iowa (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Aurelia Municipal Electric Utility Place: Iowa Phone Number: 712-434-2025 Website: www.aureliaia.com...

  4. City of Callender, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Callender, Iowa (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Callender ElectricWater Utilities Place: Iowa Phone Number: (515) 548-3859 Outage Hotline: (515) 548-3859...

  5. Smart Grid Ready PV Inverters with Utility Communication | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Smart Grid Ready PV Inverters with Utility Communication Smart Grid Ready PV Inverters with Utility Communication EPRI logo.jpg -- This project is inactive -- Electric Power ...

  6. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2007 Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Nevada. This project: * Provides renewable utility service from a contractor-owned photovoltaic array to the Nellis AFB electrical distribution system. * Utilizes a UESC. *...

  7. Smart-Grid Ready PV Inverters with Utility Communication

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INTEGRATION Smart-Grid Ready PV Inverters with Utility Communication Electric Power ... required utility communication links to capture the full value of distributed PV plants. ...

  8. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mandatory Utility Green Power Option New Mexico Utility Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Fuel Cells Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Hydrogen Landfill Gas Photovoltaics...

  9. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Investor-owned electric utility industry members of the Edison Electric Institute pledge to assist Federal agencies in achieving energy-saving goals. These goals are set in the Energy Policy Act of...

  10. Use of Electrical Imaging and Distributed Temperature Sensing Methods to Characterize Surface Water-Groundwater Exchange Regulating Uranium Transport at the Hanford 300 Area, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Carole D.; Lane, John W.

    2010-10-31

    A critical challenge in advancing prediction of solute transport between contaminated aquifers and rivers is improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along river corridors. Here, we explored the use of waterborne geoelectrical imaging, in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS) monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for uranium transport within the hyporheic corridor at the Hanford 300 Area. We first inverted waterborne geoelectrical (resistivity and induced polarization) datasets for distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units was reconstructed. Variations in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, were resolved along ~3 km of the river corridor centered on the 300 Area. Polarizability images were translated into lithologic images using established relationships between polarizability and surface area normalized to pore volume (Spor). The spatial variability captured in the geoelectrical datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and point probing overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. The DTS data recorded on 1. 5 km of cable with a 1 m spatial resolution and 5 minute sampling interval revealed sub-reaches showing (1) high temperature anomalies and, (2) a strong negative correlation between temperature and river stage, both indicative of groundwater influxes during winter months. The DTS datasets confirm the hydrologic significance of the variability identified in the geoelectrical imaging and reveal a pattern of highly focused hyporheic exchange, with exchange concentrated at springs where the Hanford formation is thick, and coinciding with a paleochannel identified in ground penetrating radar surveys at one location. No evidence for focused hyporheic exchange is observed in the DTS data where the Ringold unit is in contact with the riverbed. Our findings illustrate how the combination of waterborne geoelectrical imaging and DTS technologies can characterize hyporheic exchange in a complex, coupled river-aquifer system.

  11. Connections to Electricity Use Data and Information | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Connections to Electricity Use Data and Information Jump to: navigation, search Different electric utilities provide different kinds of data to their customers. Why is electricity...

  12. Anoka Electric Coop (Minnesota) EIA Revenue and Sales - February...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anoka Electric Coop (Minnesota) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Anoka Electric Coop for...

  13. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - August 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric...

  14. Anoka Electric Coop (Minnesota) EIA Revenue and Sales - August...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anoka Electric Coop (Minnesota) EIA Revenue and Sales - August 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Anoka Electric Coop for...

  15. Anoka Electric Coop (Minnesota) EIA Revenue and Sales - February...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anoka Electric Coop (Minnesota) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Anoka Electric Coop for...

  16. Anoka Electric Coop (Minnesota) EIA Revenue and Sales - April...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anoka Electric Coop (Minnesota) EIA Revenue and Sales - April 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Anoka Electric Coop for April...

  17. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric...

  18. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - April 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric...

  19. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - July 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric...

  20. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric...

  1. Electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Jr., John S.; Wilson, James R.; McDonald, Jr., Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  2. PROJECT PROFILE: UtilityAPI (Incubator 10)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    UtilityAPI is automating the process of authorizing, collecting, and cleaning electricity data from utilities. Access to standardized data means a larger sales funnel, a frictionless customer journey, and easy data verification for financing for solar.

  3. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rate Home > Utility Rate > Posts by term > Utility Rate Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: electric load data Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon...

  4. Property:UtilityLocation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + true + Agway Energy Services, LLC + true + Aiken Electric Coop Inc + true + Aitkin Public Utilities Comm + true + Ajo Improvement Co + true + (previous 25) (next 25)...

  5. TVA Partner Utilities- eScore Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in partnership with local electric utilities offers eScore program, which provides homeowners financial incentives to increase the energy efficiency of existing...

  6. Florida Public Utilities- Residential HVAC Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida Public Utilities offers rebates to electric residential customers who improve the efficiency of homes. Central air conditioners and heat pumps which meet program requirements are eligible...

  7. Setting Energy Savings Targets for Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    Helps policymakers understand how electric and natural gas utilities can achieve greater efficiency by establishing numeric energy savings targets and goals for energy efficiency programs.

  8. Utility Rebate Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    utilities and electric cooperatives; these programs commonly provide funding for solar water heating andor photovoltaic (PV) systems. Most rebate programs that support energy...

  9. DEMEC Member Utilities- Green Energy Program Incentives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Delaware's municipal utilities provide incentives for solar photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, wind, geothermal, and fuel cell systems installed by their electric customers. Eligibility is limited...

  10. Oregon Public Utility Commission | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Smart Grid Request for Information (RFI). PDF icon Oregon Public Utility Commission More Documents & Publications ... Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Regulatory Burden ...

  11. Electric Transmission Siting | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OtherOther: Electric Transmission SitingLegal Abstract Brief overview of the California Public Utilities Commission's process for siting of electric transmission lines. Published...

  12. Renewable Electricity Purchases: History and Recent Developments

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of prices of renewable-based electricity that utilities have paid to nonutilities, the primary generators of renewable electricity.

  13. Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Version 1.1, which allows electric utilities and grid operators to assess their cybersecurity...

  14. Halla Electric Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Halla Electric Co Ltd Place: Daegu, Korea (Republic) Sector: Solar Product: A Korean utility company based in Daegu but...

  15. Saudi Electricity Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Saudi Electricity Company Place: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Zip: 11416 Sector: Solar Product: Riyahd-based utility, 80% state-owned...

  16. Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc Place: Aiken, South Carolina Zip: 29802 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Renewable Energy Product: A utility that provides electricity from renewable sources...

  17. Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    REU for Commercial Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Redding Electric Utility Website http:www2.reupower.comrebates.asp State California Program Type Rebate...

  18. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program -12184

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Christopher; Kothari, Vijendra; Starr, Ken; Widdop, Michael; Gillespie, Joey

    2012-02-26

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) methods and protocols allow evaluation of remediation and final site conditions to determine if remediated sites remain protective. Two case studies are presented that involve the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and associated vicinity properties (VPs), which are being remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are a part of the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW). In response to stakeholders concerns about whether certain remediated NFSS VPs were putting them at risk, DOE met with stakeholders and agreed to evaluate protectiveness. Documentation in the DOE records collection adequately described assessed and final radiological conditions at the completed VPs. All FUSRAP wastes at the completed sites were cleaned up to meet DOE guidelines for unrestricted use. DOE compiled the results of the investigation in a report that was released for public comment. In conducting the review of site conditions, DOE found that stakeholders were also concerned about waste from the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) that was handled at LOOW. DOE agreed to determine if SPRU waste remained at that needed to be remediated. DOE reviewed records of waste characterization, historical handling locations and methods, and assessment and remediation data. DOE concluded that the SPRU waste was remediated on the LOOW to levels that pose no unacceptable risk and allow unrestricted use and unlimited exposure. This work confirms the following points as tenets of an effective long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) program:  Stakeholder interaction must be open and transparent, and DOE must respond promptly to stakeholder concerns.  DOE, as the long-term custodian, must collect and preserve site records in order to demonstrate that remediated sites pose no unacceptable risk.  DOE must continue to maintain constructive relationships with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and state and federal regulators.

  19. Greg Rutherford Executive Director Global Power & Utilities Investment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Rutherford Executive Director Global Power & Utilities Investment Banking Morgan Stanley Bankability of Electricity Transmission, Storage and Distribution Infrastructure Investment...

  20. Ohio Electricity Restructuring Active

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Restructuring Ohio Restructuring Active Other Links Ohio Electricity Profile Ohio Energy Profile Ohio Web Sites Acronyms for the State of Ohio AEP-American Electric Power CG&E-Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company CRES-Certified Retail Electric Supplier DP&L-Dayton Power and Light Company FERC-Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ISO-Independent System Operator OCC-Ohio Consumers' Counsel PUCO-Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Last Updated: September 2010 08/09: Dominion Energy offered

  1. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  2. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  3. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  4. Sand Mountain Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sand Mountain Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sand Mountain Electric Coop Place: Alabama Phone Number: Rainsville Area: 256---638---2153; Henagar Area:...

  5. EM Utility Contracts

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2/2012 EM UTILITY CONTRACT Site State Supplier Executed Contract Type DOE Contract # East Tennessee Technology Park TN Tennessee Valley Authority 4/27/2007 Energy supply contract (retail) DE-AC05-07OR23242 Hanford WA Bonneville Power Administration 10/1/2001 Transmission Service Agreement Hanford WA Bonneville Power Administration 10/1/2011 Power Sales Agreement (retail) Moab UT Paducah KY Electric Energy, Inc. (EEI as agent for DOE) Original Power Contract Portsmouth OH Pike Natural Gas

  6. Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tons) 155,564 31.5% Nuclear Generation (Thousand MWh) 64,547 3.4% Electric utilities invest in enhanced distribution system efficiency Electric utilities are investing in a...

  7. Utilization Graphs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that use data from the PDSF batch scheduler (SGE) to show the utilization of the cluster over the past 24 hours. The graphs were generated with RRDTool and are updated...

  8. Electric sales and revenue 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the United States. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1994.

  9. Electric sales and revenue 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1997. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

  10. Type A Accident Investigation Board Report on the July 11, 1996, Electrical Shock at Technical Area 53, Building MPF-14, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an independent product of an electrical shock accident investigation board appointed by Bruce G. Twining, Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office, Department of Energy.

  11. Solar Electric Power Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington, DC Product: Nonprofit organization whose membership consists of more than 100 electric service providers, utilities, manufacturers, government agencies, research...

  12. (Electric and Gas) Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energize CT in coordination with participating utilities offers various rebates for energy efficient electric and natural gas equipment.  

  13. Electric Vehicle Safety Training for Emergency Responders | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    presentation discusses national trends in electric utility energy efficiency programs for industrial customers, insights from investor-owned utilities, and national trends/developments among electric cooperatives. PDF icon Electric Utility Energy Efficiency Programs (October 5, 2010) More Documents & Publications CX-004355: Categorical Exclusion Determination Industrial Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators

  14. United States Electricity Industry Primer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States Electricity Industry Primer provides a high-level overview of the U.S. electricity supply chain, including generation, transmission, and distribution; markets and ownership structures, including utilities and regulatory agencies; and system reliability and vulnerabilities.

  15. A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - December...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A & N Electric Coop for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-12 Utility Company A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) Place Maryland Start Date...

  16. A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - February...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A & N Electric Coop for February 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-02 Utility Company A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) Place Maryland Start Date...

  17. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    May 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for May 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue...

  18. A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - January...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for January 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

  19. A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - March...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    March 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for March 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data...

  20. A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - January...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for January 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

  1. A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - April...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    April 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for April 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data...

  2. A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - March...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    March 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for March 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data...

  3. A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - March...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    March 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for March 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data...

  4. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    June 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for June 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue...

  5. Category:Utility Company Aliases | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Public Utility GreyStone H HECO Huntsville Utilities I IID I cont. Integrys J JCP&L K Kansas Gas & Electric Co KCP&L Kentucky Utilities Co (Virginia) KeySpan Generation LLC...

  6. Electrical Engineer- OPEN CONTINUOUS ANNOUNCEMENT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This recruitment is an OPEN CONTINUOUS ANNOUNCEMENT (OCA) being utilized to fill current and future Electrical Engineer vacancies within BPA's Transmission Field Services organization. Positions...

  7. Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,109 45 Electric utilities 3,480 36 IPP & CHP ...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,924 42 Electric utilities 3,394 37 IPP & CHP ...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Washington) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,656 10 Electric utilities 27,070 5 IPP & CHP ...

  11. Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Commercial Industrial InstallersContractors Savings Category Clothes Washers Dehumidifiers Equipment Insulation Lighting Heat recovery Steam-system upgrades Energy Mgmt. Systems...

  12. Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    refrigeration, lighting, motors, variable frequency drives, appliances, personal computers, retro-commissioning, and other energy efficient measures. Below is a list of...

  13. Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    sq. ft. Smart Thermostat: 50 (self-installed); 100 (contractor-installed) ENERGY STARECO-Rated manufactured home: 800 ENERGY STAR rated Stick Built home: 1,000 Summary Avista...

  14. Ashland Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is 7,500. The loans can be used for a variety of energy saving projects, including solar water heaters, heat pump systems, duct sealing or replacement, replacement windows, and...

  15. Ashland Electric Utility - Commercial Conservation Loan Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in facilities. The loans can be used for lighting retrofits, water heating equipment, food service equipment and other energy efficient measures. Loans are up to 10,000, and...

  16. Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: Varies Lighting Controls: 20-50sensor Compressed Air: 120-200HP Variable Speed Drives (Retrofit): 1050-4400 Motors...

  17. Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hualapai Tribal Nation

    2008-05-25

    The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon West Power Project construction of the power infrastructure at Grand Canyon West. Develop the maintenance and operations capacity necessary to support utility operations. Develop rates for customers on the Grand Canyon West “mini-grid” sufficient for the tribal utility to be self-sustaining. Establish an implementation strategy for tribal utility service at Grand Canyon West Objective 2 - Develop a strategy for tribal utility takeover of electric service on the Reservation. Perform a cost analysis of Reservation electrical service. Develop an implementation strategy for tribal takeover of Reservation electrical service. Examine options and costs associated with integration of the Tribe’s wind resources.

  18. Lakeland Electric- Solar Water Heating Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lakeland Electric, a municipal utility in Florida, is the nation's first utility to offer solar-heated domestic hot water on a "pay-for-energy" basis. The utility has contracted with a solar...

  19. Type A Accident Investigation Board Report on the August 13, 1996, Electrical Shock at TRA-609, Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an independent product of an electrical shock accident investigation report board appointed by John M. Wilcynski, Manager, Idaho Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Equity implications of utility energy conservation programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, R.J.

    1994-03-15

    This paper uses the Residential Energy Consumption Survey undertaken by the Energy Information Administration in 1990 to estimate the statistical association between household income and participation in electric utility energy conservation programs and the association between participation and the electricity consumption. The results indicate that utility rebates, energy audits, load management programs and other conservation measures tend to be undertaken at greater frequency by high income households than by low income households. Participants in conservation programs tend to occupy relatively new and energy efficient residences and undertake conservation measures other than utility programs, which suggests that utility sponsored programs are substitutes for other conservation investments. Electricity consumption during 1990 is not significantly less for households participating in utility programs than for nonparticipants, which also implies that utility conservation programs are displacing other conservation investments. Apparently, utility programs are not avoiding costs of new construction and instead are transferring wealth, particularly to high income participating households.

  1. "Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area," ... "Notes: * NERC region and reliability assessment area maps are provided on ...

  2. "January","NERC Regional Assesment Area"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assesment Area, " ... "Notes: * NERC region and reliability assessment area maps are provided on ...

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

  4. Court denies review of contractor/utility feud: contractors fear denial sets precedent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poplett, J.

    1986-02-03

    On Jan. 27, the US Supreme Court refused to review a recent federal circuit court decision allowing a California public utility to enter into energy-related contractor activities; this may set a precedent for future related cases, according to an attorney for the contractor plaintiffs. The Supreme Court's refusal lets stand the 9th Federal Circuit Court of Appeals decision on Grason Electric Co. et al. vs. the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). That decision allows SMUD - a public utility - to engage in energy-related businesses such as the installation of energy management systems and lighting retrofits, according to the attorney. The plaintiffs in the case, 13 electrical contractors in the Sacramento area, originally brought the case against SMUD on antitrust grounds because, they alleged, the utility was encroaching upon their businesses.

  5. West Texas geothermal resource assessment. Part II. Preliminary utilization assessment of the Trans-Pecos geothermal resource. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilliland, M.W.; Fenner, L.B.

    1980-01-01

    The utilization potential of geothermal resources in Trans-Pecos, Texas was assessed. The potential for both direct use and electric power generation were examined. As with the resource assessment work, the focus was on the Hueco Tanks area in northeastern El Paso County and the Presidio Bolson area in Presidio County. Suitable users of the Hueco Tanks and Presidio Bolson resource areas were identified by matching postulated temperature characteristics of the geothermal resource to the need characteristics of existing users in each resource area. The amount of geothermal energy required and the amount of fossil fuel that geothermal energy would replace were calculated for each of the users identified as suitable. Current data indicate that temperatures in the Hueco Tanks resource area are not high enough for electric power generation, but in at least part of the Presidio Bolson resource area, they may be high enough for electric power generation.

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arkansas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,754 30 Electric utilities 11,526 23 IPP & CHP 3,227 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 61,592,137 24 Electric utilities 48,752,895 18 IPP & CHP 12,839,241 28 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 89,528 15 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 47,048 20 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 37,289 23 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 9 Nitrogen oxide

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Washington) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,949 10 Electric utilities 27,376 5 IPP & CHP 3,573 26 Net generation (megawatthours) 116,334,363 11 Electric utilities 102,294,256 5 IPP & CHP 14,040,107 24 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 13,716 36 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 18,316 40 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,427 398 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 44

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,276 25 Electric utilities 11,981 21 IPP & CHP 4,295 21 Net generation (megawatthours) 81,059,577 19 Electric utilities 63,331,833 15 IPP & CHP 17,727,743 17 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 102,406 12 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 72,995 11 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 73,606 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 14

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,166 23 Electric utilities 14,377 18 IPP & CHP 2,788 32 Net generation (megawatthours) 61,064,796 25 Electric utilities 47,301,782 20 IPP & CHP 13,763,014 26 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 81,239 17 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 39,597 27 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,750 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 12 Nitrogen

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,458 37 Electric utilities 7,233 32 IPP & CHP 1,225 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,696,183 32 Electric utilities 45,068,982 23 IPP & CHP 4,627,201 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 45,704 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 49,638 18 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 47,337 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 22 Nitrogen Oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 28,249 13 Electric utilities 21,311 11 IPP & CHP 6,938 17 Net generation (megawatthours) 112,257,187 13 Electric utilities 94,847,135 8 IPP & CHP 17,410,053 19 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 22,597 32 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 56,726 17 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 53,684 16 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 41 Nitrogen oxide

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    California Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (California) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 74,646 2 Electric utilities 28,201 4 IPP & CHP 46,446 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 198,807,622 5 Electric utilities 71,037,135 14 IPP & CHP 127,770,487 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,102 46 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 98,348 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,223 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,933 29 Electric utilities 10,204 28 IPP & CHP 4,729 18 Net generation (megawatthours) 53,847,386 30 Electric utilities 43,239,615 26 IPP & CHP 10,607,771 30 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 28,453 30 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,349 24 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 38,474 22 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,832 35 Electric utilities 161 45 IPP & CHP 8,671 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 33,676,980 38 Electric utilities 54,693 45 IPP & CHP 33,622,288 11 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,897 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,910 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,959 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 46 Nitrogen oxide

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,086 46 Electric utilities 102 46 IPP & CHP 2,984 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,703,584 47 Electric utilities 49,050 46 IPP & CHP 7,654,534 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 824 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,836 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,276 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 45 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 9 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 9 51 Net generation (megawatthours) 67,612 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 67,612 51 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 0 51 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 147 51 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 48 50 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 51 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 3

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Florida Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 59,440 3 Electric utilities 51,775 1 IPP & CHP 7,665 15 Net generation (megawatthours) 230,015,937 2 Electric utilities 211,970,587 1 IPP & CHP 18,045,350 15 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 126,600 10 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 91,356 6 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 111,549 2 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 30 Nitrogen

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,250 7 Electric utilities 28,873 3 IPP & CHP 9,377 10 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,837,224 10 Electric utilities 109,523,336 4 IPP & CHP 16,313,888 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 105,998 11 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 58,144 14 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 62,516 12 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 24 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,672 47 Electric utilities 1,732 40 IPP & CHP 939 45 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,204,158 46 Electric utilities 5,517,389 39 IPP & CHP 4,686,769 40 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 21,670 33 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 26,928 31 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,313 42 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.2 4 Nitrogen oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,727 4 Electric utilities 5,263 35 IPP & CHP 39,464 4 Net generation (megawatthours) 202,143,878 4 Electric utilities 10,457,398 36 IPP & CHP 191,686,480 3 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 187,536 6 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 58,076 15 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 96,624 6 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 20 Nitrogen

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,499 14 Electric utilities 23,319 7 IPP & CHP 4,180 23 Net generation (megawatthours) 115,395,392 12 Electric utilities 100,983,285 6 IPP & CHP 14,412,107 22 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 332,396 3 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 133,412 3 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 103,391 3 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.8 1 Nitrogen oxide

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,507 24 Electric utilities 12,655 20 IPP & CHP 3,852 25 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,853,282 28 Electric utilities 43,021,954 27 IPP & CHP 13,831,328 25 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 74,422 19 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 41,793 25 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 39,312 21 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 13 Nitrogen oxide

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,227 31 Electric utilities 11,468 24 IPP & CHP 2,759 33 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,728,363 31 Electric utilities 39,669,629 29 IPP & CHP 10,058,734 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,550 29 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 29,014 29 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 31,794 29 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Nitrogen oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 20,878 21 Electric utilities 19,473 15 IPP & CHP 1,405 40 Net generation (megawatthours) 90,896,435 17 Electric utilities 90,133,403 10 IPP & CHP 763,032 49 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 204,873 5 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 89,253 7 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 85,795 7 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3 Nitrogen oxide

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,657 15 Electric utilities 18,120 16 IPP & CHP 8,537 13 Net generation (megawatthours) 104,229,402 15 Electric utilities 58,518,271 17 IPP & CHP 45,711,131 8 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 96,240 14 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 83,112 8 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,137 15 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 21

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Maine Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,470 43 Electric utilities 10 49 IPP & CHP 4,460 20 Net generation (megawatthours) 13,248,710 44 Electric utilities 523 49 IPP & CHP 13,248,187 27 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,990 38 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,622 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,298 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 25 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Maryland Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Maryland) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 12,264 33 Electric utilities 85 47 IPP & CHP 12,179 8 Net generation (megawatthours) 37,833,652 35 Electric utilities 20,260 47 IPP & CHP 37,813,392 9 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 41,370 26 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,626 35 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 20,414 34 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 18 Nitrogen oxide

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,128 32 Electric utilities 971 42 IPP & CHP 12,157 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 31,118,591 40 Electric utilities 679,986 43 IPP & CHP 30,438,606 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,748 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,831 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,231 39 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 40

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,435 12 Electric utilities 22,260 9 IPP & CHP 8,175 14 Net generation (megawatthours) 106,816,991 14 Electric utilities 84,075,322 12 IPP & CHP 22,741,669 13 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 173,521 7 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,950 9 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 64,062 11 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 7 Nitrogen oxide

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,621 28 Electric utilities 11,557 22 IPP & CHP 4,064 24 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,998,330 27 Electric utilities 45,963,271 22 IPP & CHP 11,035,059 29 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 39,272 27 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 38,373 28 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 32,399 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 27 Nitrogen

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,090 26 Electric utilities 13,494 19 IPP & CHP 2,597 34 Net generation (megawatthours) 55,127,092 29 Electric utilities 47,084,382 21 IPP & CHP 8,042,710 34 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 101,093 13 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,993 32 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,037 33 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 5

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,790 19 Electric utilities 20,538 13 IPP & CHP 1,252 42 Net generation (megawatthours) 87,834,468 18 Electric utilities 85,271,253 11 IPP & CHP 2,563,215 46 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 149,842 9 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,749 10 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 75,735 8 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 6 Nitrogen oxide

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Montana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,330 41 Electric utilities 3,209 38 IPP & CHP 3,121 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 30,257,616 41 Electric utilities 12,329,411 35 IPP & CHP 17,928,205 16 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 14,426 34 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,538 36 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,678 36 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,732 36 Electric utilities 7,913 30 IPP & CHP 819 46 Net generation (megawatthours) 39,431,291 34 Electric utilities 36,560,960 30 IPP & CHP 2,870,331 45 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 63,994 22 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 27,045 30 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 26,348 31 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 8 Nitrogen oxide

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,485 34 Electric utilities 8,480 29 IPP & CHP 2,006 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,000,537 37 Electric utilities 27,758,728 33 IPP & CHP 8,241,809 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,229 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,606 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,222 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 38 Nitrogen

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric utilities 1,121 41 IPP & CHP 3,292 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 19,778,520 42 Electric utilities 2,266,903 41 IPP & CHP 17,511,617 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,733 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 5,057 47 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,447 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 45 Nitrogen

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 19,399 22 Electric utilities 544 43 IPP & CHP 18,852 7 Net generation (megawatthours) 68,051,086 23 Electric utilities -117,003 50 IPP & CHP 68,168,089 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,369 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,615 41 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,905 35 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 47 Nitrogen oxide

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,072 39 Electric utilities 6,094 33 IPP & CHP 1,978 37 Net generation (megawatthours) 32,306,210 39 Electric utilities 26,422,867 34 IPP & CHP 5,883,343 38 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 12,064 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,192 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,712 32 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 37 Nitrogen

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    York Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 40,404 6 Electric utilities 10,989 27 IPP & CHP 29,416 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,122,202 7 Electric utilities 34,082 31 IPP & CHP 103,039,347 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,878 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,971 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,240 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 39 Nitrogen oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12 Electric utilities 26,706 6 IPP & CHP 3,342 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,936,293 9 Electric utilities 116,317,050 2 IPP & CHP 9,619,243 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 71,293 20 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 62,397 12 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,940 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric utilities 5,292 34 IPP & CHP 1,274 41 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,021,673 39 Electric utilities 31,044,374 32 IPP & CHP 3,977,299 42 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 56,854 23 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 48,454 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 30,274 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 11 Nitrogen oxide

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Ohio Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Ohio) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 31,507 9 Electric utilities 11,134 26 IPP & CHP 20,372 6 Net generation (megawatthours) 134,476,405 8 Electric utilities 43,290,512 25 IPP & CHP 91,185,893 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 355,108 1 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 105,688 4 Carbon dioxide (thousand metrictons) 98,650 5 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.3 2 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,048 17 Electric utilities 17,045 17 IPP & CHP 7,003 16 Net generation (megawatthours) 70,155,504 22 Electric utilities 48,096,026 19 IPP & CHP 22,059,478 14 Emissions Sulfur dioxide 78,556 18 Nitrogen oxide 44,874 23 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,994 18 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 17 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 42,723 5 Electric utilities 39 48 IPP & CHP 42,685 3 Net generation (megawatthours) 221,058,365 3 Electric utilities 90,994 44 IPP & CHP 220,967,371 2 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 297,598 4 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 141,486 2 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 101,361 4 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 11 Nitrogen oxide

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,810 49 Electric utilities 8 50 IPP & CHP 1,803 38 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,281,748 49 Electric utilities 10,670 48 IPP & CHP 6,271,078 36 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 100 49 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 1,224 49 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,566 48 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 48 Nitrogen oxide

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 22,824 18 Electric utilities 20,836 12 IPP & CHP 1,988 36 Net generation (megawatthours) 97,158,465 16 Electric utilities 93,547,004 9 IPP & CHP 3,611,461 43 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 43,659 25 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,592 34 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,083 27 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 35

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tennessee Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Tennessee) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 20,998 20 Electric utilities 20,490 14 IPP & CHP 508 47 Net generation (megawatthours) 79,506,886 20 Electric utilities 76,986,629 13 IPP & CHP 2,520,257 47 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 89,357 16 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,913 33 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 41,405 20 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 16 Nitrogen oxide

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 112,914 1 Electric utilities 29,113 2 IPP & CHP 83,800 1 Net generation (megawatthours) 437,629,668 1 Electric utilities 94,974,953 7 IPP & CHP 342,654,715 1 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 349,245 2 Nitrogen Oxide short tons) 229,580 1 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 254,488 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 26 Nitrogen Oxide

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    United States Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (United States) Item Value Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,068,422 Electric utilities 616,632 IPP & CHP 451,791 Net generation (megawatthours) 4,093,606,005 Electric utilities 2,382,473,495 IPP & CHP 1,711,132,510 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 3,842,005 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 2,400,375 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,160,342 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 Nitrogen Oxide

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 650 50 Electric utilities 337 44 IPP & CHP 313 49 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,031,394 48 Electric utilities 868,079 42 IPP & CHP 6,163,315 37 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 71 50 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 737 50 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 14 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 50 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,292 16 Electric utilities 22,062 10 IPP & CHP 4,231 22 Net generation (megawatthours) 77,137,438 21 Electric utilities 62,966,914 16 IPP & CHP 14,170,524 23 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 68,550 20 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 40,656 26 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,295 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 23 Nitrogen

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,276 25 Electric utilities 11,981 21 IPP & CHP 4,295 21 Net generation (megawatthours) 81,059,577 19 Electric utilities 63,331,833 15 IPP & CHP 17,727,743 17 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 102,406 12 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 72,995 11 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 73,606 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 14

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,166 23 Electric utilities 14,377 18 IPP & CHP 2,788 32 Net generation (megawatthours) 61,064,796 25 Electric utilities 47,301,782 20 IPP & CHP 13,763,014 26 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 81,239 17 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 39,597 27 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,750 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 12 Nitrogen

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,458 37 Electric utilities 7,233 32 IPP & CHP 1,225 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,696,183 32 Electric utilities 45,068,982 23 IPP & CHP 4,627,201 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 45,704 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 49,638 18 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 47,337 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 22 Nitrogen Oxide

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,464 48 Electric utilities 2,313 39 IPP & CHP 151 50 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,042,830 50 Electric utilities 5,509,991 40 IPP & CHP 532,839 50 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 4,129 43 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 19,281 38 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,558 44 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 28 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 28,249 13 Electric utilities 21,311 11 IPP & CHP 6,938 17 Net generation (megawatthours) 112,257,187 13 Electric utilities 94,847,135 8 IPP & CHP 17,410,053 19 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 22,597 32 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 56,726 17 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 53,684 16 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 41 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (California) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 74,646 2 Electric utilities 28,201 4 IPP & CHP 46,446 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 198,807,622 5 Electric utilities 71,037,135 14 IPP & CHP 127,770,487 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,102 46 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 98,348 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,223 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,933 29 Electric utilities 10,204 28 IPP & CHP 4,729 18 Net generation (megawatthours) 53,847,386 30 Electric utilities 43,239,615 26 IPP & CHP 10,607,771 30 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 28,453 30 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,349 24 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 38,474 22 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,832 35 Electric utilities 161 45 IPP & CHP 8,671 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 33,676,980 38 Electric utilities 54,693 45 IPP & CHP 33,622,288 11 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,897 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,910 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,959 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 46 Nitrogen oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,086 46 Electric utilities 102 46 IPP & CHP 2,984 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,703,584 47 Electric utilities 49,050 46 IPP & CHP 7,654,534 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 824 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,836 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,276 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 45 Nitrogen oxide