National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for area control error

  1. Quantum error control codes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelhamid Awad Aly Ahmed, Sala

    2008-10-10

    by SALAH ABDELHAMID AWAD ALY AHMED Submitted to the O–ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulflllment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2008 Major Subject: Computer Science QUANTUM ERROR CONTROL CODES A... Members, Mahmoud M. El-Halwagi Anxiao (Andrew) Jiang Rabi N. Mahapatra Head of Department, Valerie Taylor May 2008 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Quantum Error Control Codes. (May 2008) Salah Abdelhamid Awad Aly Ahmed, B.Sc., Mansoura...

  2. Servo control booster system for minimizing following error

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, William L. (Mountain View, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A closed-loop feedback-controlled servo system is disclosed which reduces command-to-response error to the system's position feedback resolution least increment, .DELTA.S.sub.R, on a continuous real-time basis for all operating speeds. The servo system employs a second position feedback control loop on a by exception basis, when the command-to-response error .gtoreq..DELTA.S.sub.R, to produce precise position correction signals. When the command-to-response error is less than .DELTA.S.sub.R, control automatically reverts to conventional control means as the second position feedback control loop is disconnected, becoming transparent to conventional servo control means. By operating the second unique position feedback control loop used herein at the appropriate clocking rate, command-to-response error may be reduced to the position feedback resolution least increment. The present system may be utilized in combination with a tachometer loop for increased stability.

  3. When soft controls get slippery: User interfaces and human error

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubler, W.F.; O`Hara, J.M.

    1998-12-01

    Many types of products and systems that have traditionally featured physical control devices are now being designed with soft controls--input formats appearing on computer-based display devices and operated by a variety of input devices. A review of complex human-machine systems found that soft controls are particularly prone to some types of errors and may affect overall system performance and safety. This paper discusses the application of design approaches for reducing the likelihood of these errors and for enhancing usability, user satisfaction, and system performance and safety.

  4. Error Control Based Model Reduction for Parameter Optimization of Elliptic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of technical devices that rely on multiscale processes, such as fuel cells or batteries. As the solutionError Control Based Model Reduction for Parameter Optimization of Elliptic Homogenization Problems optimization of elliptic multiscale problems with macroscopic optimization functionals and microscopic material

  5. Control del Error para la Multirresoluci on Quincunx a la

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amat, Sergio

    multirresoluci#19;on discreta no lineal de Harten. En los algoritmos de multirresoluci#19;on se transforma una obtiene ^ f L la cual debera de estar cerca de #22; f L . Por lo tanto, los algoritmos no deben de ser inestables. En este estudio, introduciremos algoritmos de control del error y de la estabilidad. Se obtendr

  6. Error Control of Iterative Linear Solvers for Integrated Groundwater Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Error Control of Iterative Linear Solvers for Integrated Groundwater Models by Matthew F. Dixon1 for integrated groundwater models, which are implicitly coupled to another model, such as surface water models in legacy groundwater modeling packages, resulting in the overall simulation speedups as large as 7

  7. Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danko, George (Reno, NV)

    2011-11-22

    Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two-joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

  8. A CHARACTERISTIC GALERKIN METHOD WITH ADAPTIVE ERROR CONTROL FOR THE CONTINUOUS CASTING PROBLEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nochetto, Ricardo H.

    A CHARACTERISTIC GALERKIN METHOD WITH ADAPTIVE ERROR CONTROL FOR THE CONTINUOUS CASTING PROBLEM casting problem is a convection­dominated nonlinearly degenerate diffusion problem. It is discretized adaptive method. Keywords. a posteriori error estimates, continuous casting, method of characteristics

  9. Low delay and area efficient soft error correction in arbitration logic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugawara, Yutaka

    2013-09-10

    There is provided an arbitration logic device for controlling an access to a shared resource. The arbitration logic device comprises at least one storage element, a winner selection logic device, and an error detection logic device. The storage element stores a plurality of requestors' information. The winner selection logic device selects a winner requestor among the requestors based on the requestors' information received from a plurality of requestors. The winner selection logic device selects the winner requestor without checking whether there is the soft error in the winner requestor's information.

  10. Integrated Control-Path Design and Error Recovery in the Synthesis of Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    11 Integrated Control-Path Design and Error Recovery in the Synthesis of Digital Microfluidic Lab that incorporates control paths and an error- recovery mechanism in the design of a digital microfluidic lab, compared to a baseline chip design, the biochip with a control path can reduce the completion time by 30

  11. Error Control of Iterative Linear Solvers for Integrated Groundwater Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Matthew; Brush, Charles; Chung, Francis; Dogrul, Emin; Kadir, Tariq

    2010-01-01

    An open problem that arises when using modern iterative linear solvers, such as the preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) method or Generalized Minimum RESidual method (GMRES) is how to choose the residual tolerance in the linear solver to be consistent with the tolerance on the solution error. This problem is especially acute for integrated groundwater models which are implicitly coupled to another model, such as surface water models, and resolve both multiple scales of flow and temporal interaction terms, giving rise to linear systems with variable scaling. This article uses the theory of 'forward error bound estimation' to show how rescaling the linear system affects the correspondence between the residual error in the preconditioned linear system and the solution error. Using examples of linear systems from models developed using the USGS GSFLOW package and the California State Department of Water Resources' Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM), we observe that this error bound guides the choice of a prac...

  12. Finite Element Approximation of the Acoustic Wave Equation: Error Control and Mesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bangerth, Wolfgang

    Finite Element Approximation of the Acoustic Wave Equation: Error Control and Mesh Adaptation of the Acoustic Wave Equation: Error Control and Mesh Adaptation Wolfgang Bangerth and Rolf Rannacher1 Institute@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de Abstract We present an approach to solving the acoustic wave equation by adaptive finite el- ement methods

  13. Impact of Turbulence Closures and Numerical Errors for the Optimization of Flow Control Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Impact of Turbulence Closures and Numerical Errors for the Optimization of Flow Control Devices J the use of a Kriging-based global optimization method to determine optimal control parameters conduct an optimization process and measure the impact of numerical and modeling errors on the optimal

  14. AN ADAPTIVE METHOD WITH RIGOROUS ERROR CONTROL FOR THE HAMILTON-JACOBI EQUATIONS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ADAPTIVE METHOD WITH RIGOROUS ERROR CONTROL FOR THE HAMILTON-JACOBI EQUATIONS. PART II: THE TWO adaptive method with rigorous error control for the Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Part II: The two and study an adaptive method for finding approximations to the viscosity solution of Hamilton-Jacobi

  15. On the Fourier Transform Approach to Quantum Error Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hari Dilip Kumar

    2012-08-24

    Quantum codes are subspaces of the state space of a quantum system that are used to protect quantum information. Some common classes of quantum codes are stabilizer (or additive) codes, non-stabilizer (or non-additive) codes obtained from stabilizer codes, and Clifford codes. These are analyzed in a framework using the Fourier transform on finite groups, the finite group in question being a subgroup of the quantum error group considered. All the classes of codes that can be obtained in this framework are explored, including codes more general than Clifford codes. The error detection properties of one of these more general classes ("direct sums of translates of Clifford codes") are characterized. Examples codes are constructed, and computer code search results presented and analysed.

  16. A CHARACTERISTIC GALERKIN METHOD WITH ADAPTIVE ERROR CONTROL FOR THE CONTINUOUS CASTING PROBLEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A CHARACTERISTIC GALERKIN METHOD WITH ADAPTIVE ERROR CONTROL FOR THE CONTINUOUS CASTING PROBLEM. Engrg. (to appear) Abstract. the continuous casting problem is a convection­dominated nonlinearly, continuous casting, method of characteristics, convec­ tion dominated diffusion, degenerate parabolic

  17. The Smoke Control Area (Authorised Fuels) Regulations 1963 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Keith

    1963-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1963 No. 1275 CLEAN AIR The Smoke Control Areas (Authorised Fuels) Regulations 1963

  18. Low Probability Tail Event Analysis and Mitigation in BPA Control Area: Task 2 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Makarov, Yuri V.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Jin, Shuangshuang

    2009-09-18

    Task report detailing low probability tail event analysis and mitigation in BPA control area. Tail event refers to the situation in a power system when unfavorable forecast errors of load and wind are superposed onto fast load and wind ramps, or non-wind generators falling short of scheduled output, causing the imbalance between generation and load to become very significant.

  19. PUBLISHED IN: PROCEEDINGS OF THE IEEE ICC 2013 1 Towards an Error Control Scheme for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatziantoniou, Damianos

    evaluation of its performance. An obvious use case for our scheme is the reliable delivery of softwarePUBLISHED IN: PROCEEDINGS OF THE IEEE ICC 2013 1 Towards an Error Control Scheme for a Publish for efficient content distribution. However, the design of efficient reliable transport protocols for multicast

  20. Turbine airfoil with controlled area cooling arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liang, George

    2010-04-27

    A gas turbine airfoil (10) includes a serpentine cooling path (32) with a plurality of channels (34,42,44) fluidly interconnected by a plurality of turns (38,40) for cooling the airfoil wall material. A splitter component (50) is positioned within at least one of the channels to bifurcate the channel into a pressure-side channel (46) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the pressure side (24) and a suction-side channel (48) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the suction side (26) longitudinally downstream of an intermediate height (52). The cross-sectional area of the pressure-side channel (46) and suction-side channel (48) are thereby controlled in spite of an increasing cross-sectional area of the airfoil along its longitudinal length, ensuring a sufficiently high mach number to provide a desired degree of cooling throughout the entire length of the airfoil.

  1. Assessment of Systematic Chromatic Errors that Impact Sub-1% Photometric Precision in Large-Area Sky Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, T S; Marshall, J L; Tucker, D; Kessler, R; Annis, J; Bernstein, G M; Boada, S; Burke, D L; Finley, D A; James, D J; Kent, S; Lin, H; Marriner, J; Mondrik, N; Nagasawa, D; Rykoff, E S; Scolnic, D; Walker, A R; Wester, W; Abbott, T M C; Allam, S; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Maia, M A G; Melchior28, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Vikram, V

    2016-01-01

    Meeting the science goals for many current and future ground-based optical large-area sky surveys requires that the calibrated broadband photometry is stable in time and uniform over the sky to 1% precision or better. Past surveys have achieved photometric precision of 1-2% by calibrating the survey's stellar photometry with repeated measurements of a large number of stars observed in multiple epochs. The calibration techniques employed by these surveys only consider the relative frame-by-frame photometric zeropoint offset and the focal plane position-dependent illumination corrections, which are independent of the source color. However, variations in the wavelength dependence of the atmospheric transmission and the instrumental throughput induce source color-dependent systematic errors. These systematic errors must also be considered to achieve the most precise photometric measurements. In this paper, we examine such systematic chromatic errors using photometry from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) as an example...

  2. Chaos synchronization of the master-slave generalized Lorenz systems via linear state error feedback control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaofeng Wu; Guanrong Chen; Jianping Cai

    2008-07-14

    This paper provides a unified method for analyzing chaos synchronization of the generalized Lorenz systems. The considered synchronization scheme consists of identical master and slave generalized Lorenz systems coupled by linear state error variables. A sufficient synchronization criterion for a general linear state error feedback controller is rigorously proven by means of linearization and Lyapunov's direct methods. When a simple linear controller is used in the scheme, some easily implemented algebraic synchronization conditions are derived based on the upper and lower bounds of the master chaotic system. These criteria are further optimized to improve their sharpness. The optimized criteria are then applied to four typical generalized Lorenz systems, i.e. the classical Lorenz system, the Chen system, the Lv system and a unified chaotic system, obtaining precise corresponding synchronization conditions. The advantages of the new criteria are revealed by analytically and numerically comparing their sharpness with that of the known criteria existing in the literature.

  3. Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  4. Vehicle to Grid -A Control Area Operators Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Mexico Nav Glen Four Corners NM Coal Hydro Gas Wind Other Palo Verde AZ Market- place S. NV #12;#12;Key ISO Roles · Frequency Monitoring & Time Error Control · Scheduling of Power Transfers · Grid Planning of experience in dealing with Distributed Resources #12;Wireless Provider Grid Operator Power Command Power

  5. Evolving Cyclic Control for a Hexapod Robot Performing Area Coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary B.

    Evolving Cyclic Control for a Hexapod Robot Performing Area Coverage Gary B. Parker Department. In this paper, we use cyclic genetic al- gorithms to learn the control cycles required to make an actual hexapod

  6. 1456 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INSTRUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT, VOL. 50, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2001 A Fuzzy Error Correction Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petriu, Emil M.

    . This is a very limited application that only considers a docking station. A helicopter fuzzy controller developed by Cavalcante in Florianopolis, Brazil [4], decomposes the movements of a helicopter into four separate blocks inputs represent errors and error deviations. The fuzzy output represents corrections to the helicopter

  7. Case-control studies of genetic and environmental factors with error in measurement of environmental factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobach, Iryna

    2009-05-15

    to illustrate our approach in this simple case. We assumed that environmental variables (X;W), genetic variant (G), and disease status (D) are binary. Given the values of (G;X) we generated a binary disease outcome D from the following logistic model logitfpr... with error with misclassi cation probabili- ties pr(W = 0jX = 1) = 0:20 and pr(W = 1jX = 0) = 0:10. The results are based on a simulation study with 500 replications for 1000 cases and 1000 controls. Logistic Retrospective Semiparametric Parameter True Value...

  8. Decision support systems for automated terminal area air traffic control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pararas, John Demetrios

    1982-01-01

    This work studies the automation of the terminal area Air Traffic Management and Control (ATM/C) system. The ATM/C decision-making process is analyzed and broken down into a number of "automation functions". Each of these ...

  9. MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF A MICROGRID WITH PLUG-IN VEHICLES: ERROR MODELING AND THE ROLE OF PREDICTION HORIZON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF A MICROGRID WITH PLUG-IN VEHICLES: ERROR MODELING AND THE ROLE) for a microgrid with plug-in vehicles. A predictive model is de- veloped based on a hub model of the microgrid INTRODUCTION Recently, the control of electrical microgrids has been the focus of research efforts. A microgrid

  10. Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle, Alexander Romanovsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    1 Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle employing an OTS (Off-The-Shelf) item. The case study used a Simulink model of a steam boiler system, employing software models of the PID controller and the steam boiler system rather than conducting

  11. Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle, Alexander Romanovsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle-The-Shelf) item. The case study used a Simulink model of a steam boiler system together with an OTS PID in practice, employing software models of the PID controller and the steam boiler system rather than

  12. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castor, S.B.; Lock, D.E.

    1996-08-01

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

  13. Multi-UAV Network Control through Dynamic Task Allocation: Ensuring Data-Rate and Bit-Error-Rate Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-UAV Network Control through Dynamic Task Allocation: Ensuring Data-Rate and Bit-Error-Rate Support Andrew Kopeikin, Sameera S. Ponda, Luke B. Johnson, and Jonathan P. How Abstract-- A multi-UAV distributed task allocation to engage under-utilized UAVs to serve as communication relays and to ensure

  14. Combined wavelet video coding and error control for internet streaming and multicast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Tianli

    2002-01-01

    In the past several years, advances in Internet video streaming have been tremendous. Originally designed without error protection, Receiver-driven layered multicast (RLM) has proved to be a very effective scheme for scalable video multicast. Though...

  15. STATIC VAR COMPENSATOR CONTROL USING A QUANTIZED CONTROLLER FOR A TWO AREA MULTI-MACHINE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilamowski, Bogdan Maciej

    the reactive power supplied at a certain bus of an electric power system. It is an efficient and cost effective, a complex linearized mathematical model is needed for the power system. This summary includes Compensators (SVC) control to enhance the damping of the power-swing. The test system used is a two area multi

  16. Abstract --Since high error rates are inevitable to the wireless environment, energy-efficient error-control is an important issue for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Havinga, Paul J.M.

    Abstract -- Since high error rates are inevitable to the wireless environment, energy mechanisms only, but the required extra energy consumed by the wireless interface should be incorporated energy consumption is a key issue for portable wireless network devices like computers like PDAs

  17. Bonneville Power Administration is investigating wide-area stability and voltage control. The control provides a flexible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatasubramanian, Mani V.

    Summary Bonneville Power Administration is investigating wide-area stability and voltage control are being developed in close collaboration between Bonneville Power Administration and Washington State and Voltage Control Carson W. Taylor Mani V. Venkatasubramanian Yonghong Chen Bonneville Power Administration

  18. In Search of a Taxonomy for Classifying Qualitative Spreadsheet Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Przasnyski, Zbigniew; Seal, Kala Chand

    2011-01-01

    Most organizations use large and complex spreadsheets that are embedded in their mission-critical processes and are used for decision-making purposes. Identification of the various types of errors that can be present in these spreadsheets is, therefore, an important control that organizations can use to govern their spreadsheets. In this paper, we propose a taxonomy for categorizing qualitative errors in spreadsheet models that offers a framework for evaluating the readiness of a spreadsheet model before it is released for use by others in the organization. The classification was developed based on types of qualitative errors identified in the literature and errors committed by end-users in developing a spreadsheet model for Panko's (1996) "Wall problem". Closer inspection of the errors reveals four logical groupings of the errors creating four categories of qualitative errors. The usability and limitations of the proposed taxonomy and areas for future extension are discussed.

  19. QUANTUM ERROR Osbert Bastani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reversible (unitary) Ancillary qbits Controlled gates (cX, cZ) #12;Measurement Deterministic Duplication;Decoding use ancillary bits to determine what error occurred #12;Decoding use ancillary bits to determine what error occurred set to 0 if first two bits equal, set to 1 if not #12;Decoding use ancillary bits

  20. Control of molecular dynamics with zero-area fields: Application to molecular orientation and photofragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Sugny; Stéphane Vranckx; Mamadou Ndong; Nathalie Vaeck; Osman Atabek; Michèle Desouter-Lecomte

    2014-12-15

    The constraint of time-integrated zero-area on the laser field is a fundamental, both theoretical and experimental requirement in the control of molecular dynamics. By using techniques of local and optimal control theory, we show how to enforce this constraint on two benchmark control problems, namely molecular orientation and photofragmentation. The origin and the physical implications on the dynamics of this zero-area control field are discussed.

  1. 1. Multi-Agent Systems, Intelligent Robotics, Mechatronics, and General Control Areas. 2. Power Electronics, Renewable Energy, and Smart Grid.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    , and General Control Areas. 2. Power Electronics, Renewable Energy, and Smart Grid. 3. Computer Science

  2. High-surface-area hydrated lime for SO2 control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; Moran, D.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States). Minerals Engineering Section)

    1993-03-01

    Since 1986, the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), has been developing a process to produce high-surface-area hydrated lime (HSAHL) with more activity for adsorbing SO2 than commercially available hydrated lime. HSAHL prepared by the ISGS method as considerably higher surface area and porosity, and smaller mean particle diameter and crystallite size than commercial hydrated lime. The process has been optimized in a batch, bench-scale reactor and has been scaled-up to a 20--100 lb/hr process optimization unit (POU). Experiments have been conducted to optimize the ISGS hydration process and identify key parameters influencing hydrate properties for SO2 capture (surface area, porosity, particle size, and crystallite size). The known how is available to tailor properties of hydrated limes for specific SO2 removal applications. Pilot-scale tests conducted with the HSAHL under conditions typical of burning high-sulfur coals have achieved up to 90% SO2 capture in various DSI systems. The removal results are enough to bring most high-sulfur coals into compliance with acid rain legislation goals for the year 2000. The focus of the POU program is to generate critical engineering data necessary for the private sector to scale-up the process to a commercial level and provide estimates of the optimal cost of construction and operation of a commercial plant. ISGS is currently participating in a clean coal technology program (CCT-1) by providing 50 tons of HSAHL for a demonstration test at Illinois Power's Hennepin station in January 1993.

  3. EFFECTS OF RADIO WAVE PROPAGATION IN URBANIZED AREAS ON UAV-GCS COMMAND AND CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenn, David C.

    EFFECTS OF RADIO WAVE PROPAGATION IN URBANIZED AREAS ON UAV-GCS COMMAND AND CONTROL Lock Wai Lek In an urban environment, the linkage between UAVs and ground control stations are subjected to multipath multipath can result in a nearly complete loss of command signals, which can limit the UAV's operational

  4. Scheduling messages with offsets on Controller Area Network -a major performance boost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navet, Nicolas

    by car manufacturers is to schedule the messages with offsets, which leads to a desynchronization in the case of Controller Area Net- work, which is a de-facto standard in the automotive world. Comprehensive of traffic with the increasing amount of data exchanged between Electronic Control Units (ECUs). A car

  5. Low Probability Tail Event Analysis and Mitigation in BPA Control Area: Task One Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2009-04-01

    This is a report for task one of the tail event analysis project for BPA. Tail event refers to the situation in a power system when unfavorable forecast errors of load and wind are superposed onto fast load and wind ramps, or non-wind generators falling short of scheduled output, the imbalance between generation and load becomes very significant. This type of events occurs infrequently and appears on the tails of the distribution of system power imbalance; therefore, is referred to as tail events. This report analyzes what happened during the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) reliability event on February 26, 2008, which was widely reported because of the involvement of wind generation. The objective is to identify sources of the problem, solutions to it and potential improvements that can be made to the system. Lessons learned from the analysis include the following: (1) Large mismatch between generation and load can be caused by load forecast error, wind forecast error and generation scheduling control error on traditional generators, or a combination of all of the above; (2) The capability of system balancing resources should be evaluated both in capacity (MW) and in ramp rate (MW/min), and be procured accordingly to meet both requirements. The resources need to be able to cover a range corresponding to the variability of load and wind in the system, additional to other uncertainties; (3) Unexpected ramps caused by load and wind can both become the cause leading to serious issues; (4) A look-ahead tool evaluating system balancing requirement during real-time operations and comparing that with available system resources should be very helpful to system operators in predicting the forthcoming of similar events and planning ahead; and (5) Demand response (only load reduction in ERCOT event) can effectively reduce load-generation mismatch and terminate frequency deviation in an emergency situation.

  6. Reducing Timing Errors of Polling Mechanism Using Event Timpstamps for Safety-Critical Real-Time Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and responsiveness. A real-time control system only with polling mechanims can be designed to execute a set of tasks

  7. PHYSICS DIVISION ESH BULLETIN 2008-1 Access Requirements for HRIBF Controlled-Entry Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    beam is present: · Dosimeters are always required in Building 6000. · Facility-specific training (Building 6000 Access Training) is required for unescorted access to Building 6000. · Facility-specific training (HRIBF Radiological Safety) is required for unescorted access to HRIBF Controlled-Entry Areas when

  8. Multi-UAV network control through dynamic task allocation: Ensuring data-rate and bit-error-rate support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopeikin, Andrew

    A multi-UAV system relies on communications to operate. Failure to communicate remotely sensed mission data to the base may render the system ineffective, and the inability to exchange command and control messages can lead ...

  9. Upstream open loop control of the recirculation area downstream of a backward-facing step

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gautier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The flow downstream a backward-facing step is controlled using a pulsed jet placed upstream of the step edge. Experimental velocity fields are computed and used to the recirculation area quantify. The effects of jet amplitude, frequency and duty cycle on this recirculation area are investigated for two Reynolds numbers (Re=2070 and Re=2900). The results of this experimental study demonstrate that upstream actuation can be as efficient as actuation at the step edge when exciting the shear layer at its natural frequency. Moreover it is shown that it is possible to minimize both jet amplitude and duty cycle and still achieve optimal efficiency. With minimal amplitude and a duty-cycle as low as 10\\% the recirculation area is nearly canceled.

  10. Dynamic Planning and control Methodology : understanding and managing iterative error and change cycles in large-scale concurrent design and construction projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sang Hyun, 1973-

    2006-01-01

    Construction projects are uncertain and complex in nature. One of the major driving forces that may account for these characteristics is iterative cycles caused by errors and changes. Errors and changes worsen project ...

  11. OPS 9.3 Control Area Activities 8/24/98 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable forSite |n t787 (02-94)| Department3 Control Area

  12. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 Self-configuring, Mobile Networks in the Area of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by a micro controller (PAN = private area network). Based on the wireless standard of ZigBee, the network an Atmel micro controller to actuate function. The functions ZigBee, GPS, CAN, GPRS and SD Card are transmitted via SPI. ZigBee is used for the communication between mobile machines and the head quarter

  13. Analysis of Solar Two Heliostat Tracking Error Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, S.A.; Stone, K.W.

    1999-01-28

    This paper explores the geometrical errors that reduce heliostat tracking accuracy at Solar Two. The basic heliostat control architecture is described. Then, the three dominant error sources are described and their effect on heliostat tracking is visually illustrated. The strategy currently used to minimize, but not truly correct, these error sources is also shown. Finally, a novel approach to minimizing error is presented.

  14. Aalborg Universitet Hierarchical Control for Voltage Harmonics Compensation in Multi-Area Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    -Area Microgrids Hashempour, Mohammad M.; Savaghebi, Mehdi; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez; Guerrero, Josep M in Multi-Area Microgrids. In IEEE 10th International Symposium on Diagnostics for Electrical Machines in Multi-Area Microgrids Mohammad M. Hashempour, Mehdi Savaghebi, Member, IEEE, Juan C. Vasquez, Senior

  15. Monte Carlo errors with less errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulli Wolff

    2006-11-29

    We explain in detail how to estimate mean values and assess statistical errors for arbitrary functions of elementary observables in Monte Carlo simulations. The method is to estimate and sum the relevant autocorrelation functions, which is argued to produce more certain error estimates than binning techniques and hence to help toward a better exploitation of expensive simulations. An effective integrated autocorrelation time is computed which is suitable to benchmark efficiencies of simulation algorithms with regard to specific observables of interest. A Matlab code is offered for download that implements the method. It can also combine independent runs (replica) allowing to judge their consistency.

  16. V-228: RealPlayer Buffer Overflow and Memory Corruption Error...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a memory corruption error and execute arbitrary code on the target system. IMPACT: Access control error SOLUTION: vendor recommends upgrading to version 16.0.3.51 Addthis...

  17. Error detection method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Eric J.

    2013-06-11

    An apparatus, program product, and method that run an algorithm on a hardware based processor, generate a hardware error as a result of running the algorithm, generate an algorithm output for the algorithm, compare the algorithm output to another output for the algorithm, and detect the hardware error from the comparison. The algorithm is designed to cause the hardware based processor to heat to a degree that increases the likelihood of hardware errors to manifest, and the hardware error is observable in the algorithm output. As such, electronic components may be sufficiently heated and/or sufficiently stressed to create better conditions for generating hardware errors, and the output of the algorithm may be compared at the end of the run to detect a hardware error that occurred anywhere during the run that may otherwise not be detected by traditional methodologies (e.g., due to cooling, insufficient heat and/or stress, etc.).

  18. Input-specific control of reward and aversion in the ventral tegmental area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tye, Kay

    Ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons have important roles in adaptive and pathological brain functions related to reward and motivation. However, it is unknown whether subpopulations of VTA dopamine neurons ...

  19. STIMULUS: End-System Network Interface Controller for 100 Gb/s Wide Area Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarkesh-Ha, Payman

    2014-09-12

    The main goal of this research grant is to develop a system-level solution leveraging novel technologies that enable network communications at 100 Gb/s or beyond. University of New Mexico in collaboration with Acadia Optronics LLC has been working on this project to develop the 100 Gb/s Network Interface Controller (NIC) under this Department of Energy (DOE) grant.

  20. Thermodynamics of error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Sartori; Simone Pigolotti

    2015-04-24

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and dissipated work of the process. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics, hence its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  1. Controlled growth of larger heterojunction interface area for organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Fan (Somerset, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2009-12-29

    An optoelectronic device and a method of fabricating a photosensitive optoelectronic device includes depositing a first organic semiconductor material on a first electrode to form a continuous first layer having protrusions, a side of the first layer opposite the first electrode having a surface area at least three times greater than an underlying lateral cross-sectional area; depositing a second organic semiconductor material directly on the first layer to form a discontinuous second layer, portions of the first layer remaining exposed; depositing a third organic semiconductor material directly on the second layer to form a discontinuous third layer, portions of at least the second layer remaining exposed; depositing a fourth organic semiconductor material on the third layer to form a continuous fourth layer, filling any exposed gaps and recesses in the first, second, and third layers; and depositing a second electrode on the fourth layer, wherein at least one of the first electrode and the second electrode is transparent, and the first and third organic semiconductor materials are both of a donor-type or an acceptor-type relative to second and fourth organic semiconductor materials, which are of the other material type.

  2. Brush Control and Range Improvement: In the Post Oak-Blackjack Oak Area of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darrow, Robert A.; McCully, Wayne G.

    1959-01-01

    plant treatments with herbi. cides include basal trunk spray, stump spray, frill spray, trunk injection and soil injection. Oil solutions of 2,4,5-T ester are effective for all individual plant treatments. Water suspen- sions of monuron or fenuron... plant or broadcast treat- merits for control sf .woody plants. Rasnl Trunk Spray Rasal spray applications of oil solutions contain- ing 2,4,5-T ester or water suspensions of monuron polvtler are recommended for co~itrol of post and blackjack oaks...

  3. Controlled Source Audio MT At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans, EtInformation Control of Well KS-8 in

  4. End-System Network Interface Controller for 100 Gb/s Wide Area Networks: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Jesse

    2013-08-30

    In recent years, network bandwidth requirements have scaled multiple folds, pushing the need for the development of data exchange mechanisms at 100 Gb/s and beyond. High performance computing, climate modeling, large-scale storage, and collaborative scientific research are examples of applications that can greatly benefit by leveraging high bandwidth capabilities of the order of 100 Gb/s. Such requirements and advances in IEEE Ethernet standards, Optical Transport Unit4 (OTU4), and host-system interconnects demand a network infrastructure supporting throughput rates of the order of 100 Gb/s with a single wavelength. To address such a demand Acadia Optronics in collaboration with the University of New Mexico, proposed and developed a end-system Network Interface Controller (NIC) for the 100Gbps WANs. Acadia’s 100G NIC employs an FPGA based system with a high-performance processor interconnect (PCIe 3.0) and a high capacity optical transmission link (CXP) to provide data transmission at the rate of 100 Gbps.

  5. ADJOINT AND DEFECT ERROR BOUNDING AND CORRECTION FOR FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Niles A.

    decades. Integral functionals also arise in other aerospace areas such as the calculation of radar cross functional that results from residual errors in approximating the solution to the partial differential to handle flows with shocks; numerical experiments confirm 4th order error estimates for a pressure integral

  6. Error Dynamics: The Dynamic Emergence of Error Avoidance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bickhard, Mark H.

    . Standard such notions are, however, arguably limited and bad notions, being based on untenable models of learning about error and of handling error knowledge constitute a complex major theme in evolution VICARIANTS Avoiding Error. The central theme is a progressive elaboration of kinds of dynamics that manage

  7. Theoretical analysis of reflected ray error from surface slope error and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01

    Surface slope error of concentrator is one of the main factors to influence the performance of the solar concentrated collectors which cause deviation of reflected ray and reduce the intercepted radiation. This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from slope error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 5 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope error is transferred to the reflected ray in more than 2 folds when the incidence angle is more than 0. The equation for reflected ray error is generally fit for all reflection surfaces, and can also be applied to control the error in designing an abaxial optical system.

  8. Register file soft error recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Bruce M.; Fox, Thomas W.; Wait, Charles D.; Muff, Adam J.; Watson, III, Alfred T.

    2013-10-15

    Register file soft error recovery including a system that includes a first register file and a second register file that mirrors the first register file. The system also includes an arithmetic pipeline for receiving data read from the first register file, and error detection circuitry to detect whether the data read from the first register file includes corrupted data. The system further includes error recovery circuitry to insert an error recovery instruction into the arithmetic pipeline in response to detecting the corrupted data. The inserted error recovery instruction replaces the corrupted data in the first register file with a copy of the data from the second register file.

  9. Example Curriculum Plan Neuromotor control and rehabilitation concentration area Requirements: 10 credits of rehabilitation science coursework, 12 credits of research tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    Example Curriculum Plan ­ Neuromotor control and rehabilitation concentration area Requirements: 10 credits of rehabilitation science coursework, 12 credits of research tools coursework and 22 credits Rehabilitation Science I,II 6 PTRS689 (2 semesters) Research Seminar: I-IV (4 semesters) 4 PTRS788 Total: 10

  10. The Use of WinSLAMM to Evaluate Combinations of Source Area and Outfall Controls Using Continuous, Long-term Rainfall Records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    The Use of WinSLAMM to Evaluate Combinations of Source Area and Outfall Controls Using Continuous applications of WinSLAMM, specifically showing how it can be used to consider combinations of development by WinSLAMM, the Source Loading and Management Model, and how it can be used in decision analysis

  11. Global estimates of mineral dust aerosol iron and aluminum solubility that account for particle size using diffusion-controlled and surface-area-controlled approximations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    T. D. Jickells (2006), Mineral particle size as a control onInvestigating Microbial-Mineral Interactions, CMS Workshopstudy of iron-containing mineral dust source materials, J.

  12. Using error correction to determine the noise model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Laforest; D. Simon; J. -C. Boileau; J. Baugh; M. Ditty; R. Laflamme

    2007-01-25

    Quantum error correcting codes have been shown to have the ability of making quantum information resilient against noise. Here we show that we can use quantum error correcting codes as diagnostics to characterise noise. The experiment is based on a three-bit quantum error correcting code carried out on a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum information processor. Utilizing both engineered and natural noise, the degree of correlations present in the noise affecting a two-qubit subsystem was determined. We measured a correlation factor of c=0.5+/-0.2 using the error correction protocol, and c=0.3+/-0.2 using a standard NMR technique based on coherence pathway selection. Although the error correction method demands precise control, the results demonstrate that the required precision is achievable in the liquid-state NMR setting.

  13. Photometric Redshifts and Photometry Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Wittman; P. Riechers; V. E. Margoniner

    2007-09-21

    We examine the impact of non-Gaussian photometry errors on photometric redshift performance. We find that they greatly increase the scatter, but this can be mitigated to some extent by incorporating the correct noise model into the photometric redshift estimation process. However, the remaining scatter is still equivalent to that of a much shallower survey with Gaussian photometry errors. We also estimate the impact of non-Gaussian errors on the spectroscopic sample size required to verify the photometric redshift rms scatter to a given precision. Even with Gaussian {\\it photometry} errors, photometric redshift errors are sufficiently non-Gaussian to require an order of magnitude larger sample than simple Gaussian statistics would indicate. The requirements increase from this baseline if non-Gaussian photometry errors are included. Again the impact can be mitigated by incorporating the correct noise model, but only to the equivalent of a survey with much larger Gaussian photometry errors. However, these requirements may well be overestimates because they are based on a need to know the rms, which is particularly sensitive to tails. Other parametrizations of the distribution may require smaller samples.

  14. A Key Recovery Attack on Error Correcting Code Based a Lightweight Security Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    become prevalent in various fields. Manufacturing, supply chain management and inventory control are some--Authentication, error correcting coding, lightweight, privacy, RFID, security ! 1 INTRODUCTION RFID technology has

  15. Measuring worst-case errors in a robot workcell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, R.W.; Brost, R.C.; Kholwadwala, D.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center

    1997-10-01

    Errors in model parameters, sensing, and control are inevitably present in real robot systems. These errors must be considered in order to automatically plan robust solutions to many manipulation tasks. Lozano-Perez, Mason, and Taylor proposed a formal method for synthesizing robust actions in the presence of uncertainty; this method has been extended by several subsequent researchers. All of these results presume the existence of worst-case error bounds that describe the maximum possible deviation between the robot`s model of the world and reality. This paper examines the problem of measuring these error bounds for a real robot workcell. These measurements are difficult, because of the desire to completely contain all possible deviations while avoiding bounds that are overly conservative. The authors present a detailed description of a series of experiments that characterize and quantify the possible errors in visual sensing and motion control for a robot workcell equipped with standard industrial robot hardware. In addition to providing a means for measuring these specific errors, these experiments shed light on the general problem of measuring worst-case errors.

  16. DATA COMPRESSION USING WAVELETS: ERROR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-90-11

    algorithms that introduce differences between the original and compressed data in ... to choose an error metric that parallels the human visual system, so that image .... signal data along a communications channel, one sends integer codes that ...

  17. Optimal and robust control for a small-area FLL C. Albea, D. Puschini, S. Lesecq and E. Beigne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , optimiza- tion, disturbance rejection, LMIs. I. INTRODUCTION The continuous increase in clock frequency´e Abstract--Fine-grain Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) is becoming a requirement for Globally-Asynchronous Locally-Synchronous (GALS) architectures. However, the area overhead of adding voltage and frequency

  18. The Challenge of Quantum Error Correction.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    in the design of physical bits. #12;What we need Hardware requirements: 1. Many 103-104 / R individual bits (R flip classical error b. Phase error 0exp( ( ) )z i E t dt = - Fluctuates 1. Need hardware error #12;Classical error correction by the software and hardware. , / 2 0 Hardware error correction: Ising

  19. Unequal error protection of subband coded bits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devalla, Badarinath

    1994-01-01

    Source coded data can be separated into different classes based on their susceptibility to channel errors. Errors in the Important bits cause greater distortion in the reconstructed signal. This thesis presents an Unequal Error Protection scheme...

  20. Communication error detection using facial expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Sy Bor, 1976-

    2008-01-01

    Automatic detection of communication errors in conversational systems typically rely only on acoustic cues. However, perceptual studies have indicated that speakers do exhibit visual communication error cues passively ...

  1. Catastrophic photometric redshift errors: Weak-lensing survey requirements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bernstein, Gary; Huterer, Dragan

    2010-01-11

    We study the sensitivity of weak lensing surveys to the effects of catastrophic redshift errors - cases where the true redshift is misestimated by a significant amount. To compute the biases in cosmological parameters, we adopt an efficient linearized analysis where the redshift errors are directly related to shifts in the weak lensing convergence power spectra. We estimate the number Nspec of unbiased spectroscopic redshifts needed to determine the catastrophic error rate well enough that biases in cosmological parameters are below statistical errors of weak lensing tomography. While the straightforward estimate of Nspec is ~106 we find that using onlymore »the photometric redshifts with z ? 2.5 leads to a drastic reduction in Nspec to ~ 30,000 while negligibly increasing statistical errors in dark energy parameters. Therefore, the size of spectroscopic survey needed to control catastrophic errors is similar to that previously deemed necessary to constrain the core of the zs – zp distribution. We also study the efficacy of the recent proposal to measure redshift errors by cross-correlation between the photo-z and spectroscopic samples. We find that this method requires ~ 10% a priori knowledge of the bias and stochasticity of the outlier population, and is also easily confounded by lensing magnification bias. In conclusion, the cross-correlation method is therefore unlikely to supplant the need for a complete spectroscopic redshift survey of the source population.« less

  2. Improving STT-MRAM Density Through Multibit Error Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    . Traditional methods enhance robustness at the cost of area/energy by using larger cell sizes to improve the thermal stability of the MTJ cells. This paper employs multibit error correction with DRAM to the read operation) through TX. A key attribute of an MTJ is the notion of thermal stability. Fig. 2

  3. Errors-in-variables problems in transient electromagnetic mineral exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braslavsky, Julio H.

    Errors-in-variables problems in transient electromagnetic mineral exploration K. Lau, J. H in transient electromagnetic mineral exploration. A specific sub-problem of interest in this area geological surveys, dia- mond drilling, and airborne mineral exploration. Our interest here is with ground

  4. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

  5. ERROR ANALYSIS OF COMPOSITE SHOCK INTERACTION PROBLEMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LEE,T.MU,Y.ZHAO,M.GLIMM,J.LI,X.YE,K.

    2004-07-26

    We propose statistical models of uncertainty and error in numerical solutions. To represent errors efficiently in shock physics simulations we propose a composition law. The law allows us to estimate errors in the solutions of composite problems in terms of the errors from simpler ones as discussed in a previous paper. In this paper, we conduct a detailed analysis of the errors. One of our goals is to understand the relative magnitude of the input uncertainty vs. the errors created within the numerical solution. In more detail, we wish to understand the contribution of each wave interaction to the errors observed at the end of the simulation.

  6. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    used in area like smart buildings, street light controls andbuilding. This section focuses on HAN design to address two smart

  7. Energy efficiency of error correction for wireless communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Havinga, Paul J.M.

    -control is an important issue for mobile computing systems. This includes energy spent in the physical radio transmission and Networking Conference 1999 [7]. #12;ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF ERROR CORRECTION FOR WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONA ­ 2 on the energy of transmission and the energy of redundancy computation. We will show that the computational cost

  8. Mitigating FPGA Interconnect Soft Errors by In-Place LUT Inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Lei

    but with high overhead in area, power and performance. Recent logic re-synthesis techniques, such as ROSE [2Mitigating FPGA Interconnect Soft Errors by In-Place LUT Inversion Naifeng Jing1 , Ju-Yueh Lee2 the Soft Error Rate (SER) at chip level, and reveal a locality and NP-Hardness of the IPV problem. We

  9. Kernel Regression in the Presence of Correlated Errors Kernel Regression in the Presence of Correlated Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kernel Regression in the Presence of Correlated Errors Kernel Regression in the Presence in nonparametric regression is difficult in the presence of correlated errors. There exist a wide variety vector machines for regression. Keywords: nonparametric regression, correlated errors, bandwidth choice

  10. Microstrip post production tuning bar error and compact resonators using negative refractive index metamaterials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scher, Aaron David

    2005-08-29

    In this thesis, two separate research topics are undertaken both in the general area of compact RF/microwave circuit design. The first topic involves characterizing the parasitic effects and error due to unused post-production tuning bars...

  11. Approximate error conjugation gradient minimization methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S

    2013-05-21

    In one embodiment, a method includes selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In another embodiment, a system includes a processor for executing logic, logic for selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, logic for calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and logic for calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In other embodiments, computer program products, methods, and systems are described capable of using approximate error in constrained conjugate gradient minimization problems.

  12. Ritz-Volterra Reconstructions and A Posteriori Error Analysis of Finite Element Method for Parabolic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    conduction in material with memory [10], the compression of poro-viscoelasticity media [11], nuclear reactor meshing procedures de- signed to control and minimize the error. Over the last two decades, a posteriori

  13. Fate and transport processes controlling the migration of hazardous and radioactive materials from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estrella, R.

    1994-10-01

    Desert vadose zones have been considered as suitable environments for the safe and long-term isolation of hazardous wastes. Low precipitation, high evapotranspiration and thick unsaturated alluvial deposits commonly found in deserts make them attractive as waste disposal sites. The fate and transport of any contaminant in the subsurface is ultimately determined by the operating retention and transformation processes in the system and the end result of the interactions among them. Retention (sorption) and transformation are the two major processes that affect the amount of a contaminant present and available for transport. Retention processes do not affect the total amount of a contaminant in the soil system, but rather decrease or eliminate the amount available for transport at a given point in time. Sorption reactions retard the contaminant migration. Permanent binding of solute by the sorbent is also possible. These processes and their interactions are controlled by the nature of the hazardous waste, the properties of the porous media and the geochemical and environmental conditions (temperature, moisture and vegetation). The present study summarizes the available data and investigates the fate and transport processes that govern the migration of contaminants from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). While the site is currently used only for low-level radioactive waste disposal, past practices have included burial of material now considered hazardous. Fundamentals of chemical and biological transformation processes are discussed subsequently, followed by a discussion of relevant results.

  14. Group representations, error bases and quantum codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knill, E

    1996-01-01

    This report continues the discussion of unitary error bases and quantum codes. Nice error bases are characterized in terms of the existence of certain characters in a group. A general construction for error bases which are non-abelian over the center is given. The method for obtaining codes due to Calderbank et al. is generalized and expressed purely in representation theoretic terms. The significance of the inertia subgroup both for constructing codes and obtaining the set of transversally implementable operations is demonstrated.

  15. On a fatal error in tachyonic physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Kapu?cik

    2013-08-10

    A fatal error in the famous paper on tachyons by Gerald Feinberg is pointed out. The correct expressions for energy and momentum of tachyons are derived.

  16. Adjoint Error Estimation for Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimack, Peter

    Adjoint Error Estimation for Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication by Daniel Edward Hart Submitted elastohydro- dynamic lubrication (EHL) problems. A functional is introduced, namely the friction

  17. Measure of Diffusion Model Error for Thermal Radiation Transport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Akansha

    2013-04-19

    and computational time. However, this approximation often has significant error. Error due to the inherent nature of a physics model is called model error. Information about the model error associated with the diffusion approximation is clearly desirable...

  18. runtime error message: "readControlMsg: System returned error Connection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r m m m mrofox Ames Laboratoryrsl |timed out on

  19. WIPP Weatherization: Common Errors and Innovative Solutions Presentati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WIPP Weatherization: Common Errors and Innovative Solutions Presentation WIPP Weatherization: Common Errors and Innovative Solutions Presentation This presentation contains...

  20. Error field and magnetic diagnostic modeling for W7-X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazerson, Sam A.; Gates, David A.; NEILSON, GEORGE H.; OTTE, M.; Bozhenkov, S.; Pedersen, T. S.; GEIGER, J.; LORE, J.

    2014-07-01

    The prediction, detection, and compensation of error fields for the W7-X device will play a key role in achieving a high beta (? = 5%), steady state (30 minute pulse) operating regime utilizing the island divertor system [1]. Additionally, detection and control of the equilibrium magnetic structure in the scrape-off layer will be necessary in the long-pulse campaign as bootstrapcurrent evolution may result in poor edge magnetic structure [2]. An SVD analysis of the magnetic diagnostics set indicates an ability to measure the toroidal current and stored energy, while profile variations go undetected in the magnetic diagnostics. An additional set of magnetic diagnostics is proposed which improves the ability to constrain the equilibrium current and pressure profiles. However, even with the ability to accurately measure equilibrium parameters, the presence of error fields can modify both the plasma response and diverter magnetic field structures in unfavorable ways. Vacuum flux surface mapping experiments allow for direct measurement of these modifications to magnetic structure. The ability to conduct such an experiment is a unique feature of stellarators. The trim coils may then be used to forward model the effect of an applied n = 1 error field. This allows the determination of lower limits for the detection of error field amplitude and phase using flux surface mapping. *Research supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 with Princeton University.

  1. Inference for Model Error Allan Seheult

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Reservoirs, Model Error, Reification, Thermohaline Circulation. 1 Introduction Mathematical models of complex that the uncertainties associated with both calibrating a mathematical model to observations on a physical system specification exercise of model error with the cosmologists, linked to an extensive analysis of model

  2. Nonparametric Regression with Correlated Errors Jean Opsomer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuedong

    Nonparametric Regression with Correlated Errors Jean Opsomer Iowa State University Yuedong Wang Nonparametric regression techniques are often sensitive to the presence of correlation in the errors splines and wavelet regression under correlation, both for short-range and long-range dependence

  3. Remarks on statistical errors in equivalent widths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Vollmann; Thomas Eversberg

    2006-07-03

    Equivalent width measurements for rapid line variability in atomic spectral lines are degraded by increasing error bars with shorter exposure times. We derive an expression for the error of the line equivalent width $\\sigma(W_\\lambda)$ with respect to pure photon noise statistics and provide a correction value for previous calculations.

  4. Characterizing Application Memory Error Vulnerability to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutlu, Onur

    -reliability memory (HRM) Store error-tolerant data in less-reliable lower-cost memory Store error-vulnerable data an application Observation 2: Data can be recovered by software ·Heterogeneous-Reliability Memory (HRM: Data can be recovered by software ·Heterogeneous-Reliability Memory (HRM) ·Evaluation 4 #12;Server

  5. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2010 to January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2011-02-01

    The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer focus research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, and CY 2009 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project has responded to all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of “Modeling” and “Well-Field Mitigation” plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2010 including the quantification of well-bore flows in the fully screened wells and the testing of means to mitigate them; the development of site geostatistical models of hydrologic and geochemical properties including the distribution of U; developing and parameterizing a reactive transport model of the smear zone that supplies contaminant U to the groundwater plume; performance of a second passive experiment of the spring water table rise and fall event with a associated multi-point tracer test; performance of downhole biogeochemical experiments where colonization substrates and discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to the lower aquifer zone; and modeling of past injection experiments for model parameterization, deconvolution of well-bore flow effects, system understanding, and publication. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, and have now implemented a new strategy for this activity to bypass an approach that was found unworkable. An important focus of CY 2010 activities has been infrastructure modification to the IFRC site to eliminate vertical well bore flows in the fully screened wells. The mitigation procedure was carefully evaluated and is now being implementated. A new experimental campaign is planned for early spring 2011 that will utilize the modified well-field for a U reactive transport experiment in the upper aquifer zone. Preliminary geophysical monitoring experiments of rainwater recharge in the vadose zone have been initiated with promising results, and a controlled infiltration experiment to evaluate U mobilization from the vadose zone is now under planning for the September 2011. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes.

  6. Aperiodic dynamical decoupling sequences in presence of pulse errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Hui Wang; V. V. Dobrovitski

    2011-01-12

    Dynamical decoupling (DD) is a promising tool for preserving the quantum states of qubits. However, small imperfections in the control pulses can seriously affect the fidelity of decoupling, and qualitatively change the evolution of the controlled system at long times. Using both analytical and numerical tools, we theoretically investigate the effect of the pulse errors accumulation for two aperiodic DD sequences, the Uhrig's DD UDD) protocol [G. S. Uhrig, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 98}, 100504 (2007)], and the Quadratic DD (QDD) protocol [J. R. West, B. H. Fong and D. A. Lidar, Phys. Rev. Lett {\\bf 104}, 130501 (2010)]. We consider the implementation of these sequences using the electron spins of phosphorus donors in silicon, where DD sequences are applied to suppress dephasing of the donor spins. The dependence of the decoupling fidelity on different initial states of the spins is the focus of our study. We investigate in detail the initial drop in the DD fidelity, and its long-term saturation. We also demonstrate that by applying the control pulses along different directions, the performance of QDD protocols can be noticeably improved, and explain the reason of such an improvement. Our results can be useful for future implementations of the aperiodic decoupling protocols, and for better understanding of the impact of errors on quantum control of spins.

  7. Adaptive control system for pulsed megawatt klystrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolie, Victor W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01

    The invention provides an arrangement for reducing waveform errors such as errors in phase or amplitude in output pulses produced by pulsed power output devices such as klystrons by generating an error voltage representing the extent of error still present in the trailing edge of the previous output pulse, using the error voltage to provide a stored control voltage, and applying the stored control voltage to the pulsed power output device to limit the extent of error in the leading edge of the next output pulse.

  8. Sparse and Optimal Wide-Area Damping Control in Power Networks Florian Dorfler, Mihailo R. Jovanovic, Michael Chertkov, and Francesco Bullo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Mihailo

    of renewables in remote areas, and the increasing deregulation of energy markets, long-distance power transfers. Chertkov is with Theory Division & Center for Nonlinear Studies at LANL and with New Mexico Consortium, Los

  9. Occlusion-Aware Hessians for Error Control in Irradiance Caching /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarzhaupt, Jorge Andres

    2013-01-01

    5.2 Derivation of the Irradiance Hessian . . 5.3of the translational irradiance gradient. . . . . .1.1.1 Occlusion-Aware Irradiance Hessian . . . . . . . .

  10. Agility metric sensitivity using linear error theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David Matthew

    2000-01-01

    Aircraft agility metrics have been proposed for use to measure the performance and capability of aircraft onboard while in-flight. The sensitivity of these metrics to various types of errors and uncertainties is not ...

  11. Quantum Error Correction for Quantum Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara M. Terhal

    2015-04-10

    Active quantum error correction using qubit stabilizer codes has emerged as a promising, but experimentally challenging, engineering program for building a universal quantum computer. In this review we consider the formalism of qubit stabilizer and subsystem stabilizer codes and their possible use in protecting quantum information in a quantum memory. We review the theory of fault-tolerance and quantum error-correction, discuss examples of various codes and code constructions, the general quantum error correction conditions, the noise threshold, the special role played by Clifford gates and the route towards fault-tolerant universal quantum computation. The second part of the review is focused on providing an overview of quantum error correction using two-dimensional (topological) codes, in particular the surface code architecture. We discuss the complexity of decoding and the notion of passive or self-correcting quantum memories. The review does not focus on a particular technology but discusses topics that will be relevant for various quantum technologies.

  12. Simulating Bosonic Baths with Error Bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mischa P. Woods; M. Cramer; M. B. Plenio

    2015-04-07

    We derive rigorous truncation-error bounds for the spin-boson model and its generalizations to arbitrary quantum systems interacting with bosonic baths. For the numerical simulation of such baths the truncation of both, the number of modes and the local Hilbert-space dimensions is necessary. We derive super-exponential Lieb--Robinson-type bounds on the error when restricting the bath to finitely-many modes and show how the error introduced by truncating the local Hilbert spaces may be efficiently monitored numerically. In this way we give error bounds for approximating the infinite system by a finite-dimensional one. As a consequence, numerical simulations such as the time-evolving density with orthogonal polynomials algorithm (TEDOPA) now allow for the fully certified treatment of the system-environment interaction.

  13. Errors and paradoxes in quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Rohrlich

    2007-08-28

    Errors and paradoxes in quantum mechanics, entry in the Compendium of Quantum Physics: Concepts, Experiments, History and Philosophy, ed. F. Weinert, K. Hentschel, D. Greenberger and B. Falkenburg (Springer), to appear

  14. Quantum error-correcting codes and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gottesman, Daniel (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-10-03

    A method of forming quantum error-correcting codes by first forming a stabilizer for a Hilbert space. A quantum information processing device can be formed to implement such quantum codes.

  15. Organizational Errors: Directions for Future Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, John Stephen

    The goal of this chapter is to promote research about organizational errors—i.e., the actions of multiple organizational participants that deviate from organizationally specified rules and can potentially result in adverse ...

  16. Gross Error Detection in Chemical Plants and Refineries for On-Line Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    Automation - FACS DOT Products, Inc. - NOVA #12;Distributed Control System Runs control algorithmthreetimesGross Error Detection in Chemical Plants and Refineries for On-Line Optimization Xueyu Chen, Derya, Baton Rouge, LA (February 28, 2003) #12;INTRODUCTION o Status of on-line optimization o Theoretical

  17. Quantifying truncation errors in effective field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Furnstahl; N. Klco; D. R. Phillips; S. Wesolowski

    2015-06-03

    Bayesian procedures designed to quantify truncation errors in perturbative calculations of quantum chromodynamics observables are adapted to expansions in effective field theory (EFT). In the Bayesian approach, such truncation errors are derived from degree-of-belief (DOB) intervals for EFT predictions. Computation of these intervals requires specification of prior probability distributions ("priors") for the expansion coefficients. By encoding expectations about the naturalness of these coefficients, this framework provides a statistical interpretation of the standard EFT procedure where truncation errors are estimated using the order-by-order convergence of the expansion. It also permits exploration of the ways in which such error bars are, and are not, sensitive to assumptions about EFT-coefficient naturalness. We first demonstrate the calculation of Bayesian probability distributions for the EFT truncation error in some representative examples, and then focus on the application of chiral EFT to neutron-proton scattering. Epelbaum, Krebs, and Mei{\\ss}ner recently articulated explicit rules for estimating truncation errors in such EFT calculations of few-nucleon-system properties. We find that their basic procedure emerges generically from one class of naturalness priors considered, and that all such priors result in consistent quantitative predictions for 68% DOB intervals. We then explore several methods by which the convergence properties of the EFT for a set of observables may be used to check the statistical consistency of the EFT expansion parameter.

  18. Evaluating operating system vulnerability to memory errors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G.; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Mueller, Frank; Fiala, David; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2012-05-01

    Reliability is of great concern to the scalability of extreme-scale systems. Of particular concern are soft errors in main memory, which are a leading cause of failures on current systems and are predicted to be the leading cause on future systems. While great effort has gone into designing algorithms and applications that can continue to make progress in the presence of these errors without restarting, the most critical software running on a node, the operating system (OS), is currently left relatively unprotected. OS resiliency is of particular importance because, though this software typically represents a small footprint of a compute node's physical memory, recent studies show more memory errors in this region of memory than the remainder of the system. In this paper, we investigate the soft error vulnerability of two operating systems used in current and future high-performance computing systems: Kitten, the lightweight kernel developed at Sandia National Laboratories, and CLE, a high-performance Linux-based operating system developed by Cray. For each of these platforms, we outline major structures and subsystems that are vulnerable to soft errors and describe methods that could be used to reconstruct damaged state. Our results show the Kitten lightweight operating system may be an easier target to harden against memory errors due to its smaller memory footprint, largely deterministic state, and simpler system structure.

  19. Decay of motor memories in the absence of error Pavan A. Vaswani1 and Reza Shadmehr2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadmehr, Reza

    1 Decay of motor memories in the absence of error Pavan A. Vaswani1 and Reza Shadmehr2 1. Department of Neuroscience, 2. Department of Biomedical Engineering Laboratory for Computational Motor@jhmi.edu Running title: Decay of motor memories Keywords: motor control, motor learning, decay, error

  20. Abstract--Robots promise to enhance minimally-invasive surgery, but flexion of the thin instrument shaft introduces error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    shaft introduces error into models of the robot kinematics. Visual or electromagnetic tracking of the instrument tip provides correct forward kinematics, but uncertainty in shaft bending and port location leaves. Comparison with a controller assuming a straight instrument shaft quantifies motion errors resulting from

  1. Receding Horizon Covariance Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendel, Eric

    2012-10-19

    Covariance assignment theory, introduced in the late 1980s, provided the only means to directly control the steady-state error properties of a linear system subject to Gaussian white noise and parameter uncertainty. This theory, however, does...

  2. Investigating SANS/CWE Top 25 Programming Errors. 1 Investigating the SANS/CWE Top 25 Programming Errors List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamlen, Kevin W.

    Investigating SANS/CWE Top 25 Programming Errors. 1 Investigating the SANS/CWE Top 25 Programming Errors List Running Title: Investigating SANS/CWE Top 25 Programming Errors. Investigating the SANS;Investigating SANS/CWE Top 25 Programming Errors. 2 Investigating the SANS/CWE Top 25 Programming Errors List

  3. Stratigraphic and diagenetic controls on the occurrence of porosity in the Mississippian Mission Canyon Formation in the Billings Nose Area, North Dakota 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaber, Daniel Edward

    1989-01-01

    , intercrystalline and dissolution, were identified. Intercrystalline porosity formed as the result of partial dolomitization of the dominantly lime mud matrix. Dissolution preferentially removed the limestone grains. Depositional facies controlled... the distribution of grains and, therefore, the distribution of dissolution to some extent. Stratigraphic location controlled the degree of dolomitization. The stratigraphically higher A and B zones were in closer proximity to the dolomitizing fluids from...

  4. Neutron multiplication error in TRU waste measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veilleux, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stanfield, Sean B [CCP; Wachter, Joe [CCP; Ceo, Bob [CCP

    2009-01-01

    Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) in neutron assays of transuranic waste (TRU) are comprised of several components including counting statistics, matrix and source distribution, calibration inaccuracy, background effects, and neutron multiplication error. While a minor component for low plutonium masses, neutron multiplication error is often the major contributor to the TMU for items containing more than 140 g of weapons grade plutonium. Neutron multiplication arises when neutrons from spontaneous fission and other nuclear events induce fissions in other fissile isotopes in the waste, thereby multiplying the overall coincidence neutron response in passive neutron measurements. Since passive neutron counters cannot differentiate between spontaneous and induced fission neutrons, multiplication can lead to positive bias in the measurements. Although neutron multiplication can only result in a positive bias, it has, for the purpose of mathematical simplicity, generally been treated as an error that can lead to either a positive or negative result in the TMU. While the factors that contribute to neutron multiplication include the total mass of fissile nuclides, the presence of moderating material in the matrix, the concentration and geometry of the fissile sources, and other factors; measurement uncertainty is generally determined as a function of the fissile mass in most TMU software calculations because this is the only quantity determined by the passive neutron measurement. Neutron multiplication error has a particularly pernicious consequence for TRU waste analysis because the measured Fissile Gram Equivalent (FGE) plus twice the TMU error must be less than 200 for TRU waste packaged in 55-gal drums and less than 325 for boxed waste. For this reason, large errors due to neutron multiplication can lead to increased rejections of TRU waste containers. This report will attempt to better define the error term due to neutron multiplication and arrive at values that are more realistic and accurate. To do so, measurements of standards and waste drums were performed with High Efficiency Neutron Counters (HENC) located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The data were analyzed for multiplication effects and new estimates of the multiplication error were computed. A concluding section will present alternatives for reducing the number of rejections of TRU waste containers due to neutron multiplication error.

  5. Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory Authors: Schunck, N ; McDonnell,...

  6. Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory You are accessing a document...

  7. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications TheGashome /Areas Research Areas

  8. Optimal error estimates for corrected trapezoidal rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talvila, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Corrected trapezoidal rules are proved for $\\int_a^b f(x)\\,dx$ under the assumption that $f"\\in L^p([a,b])$ for some $1\\leq p\\leq\\infty$. Such quadrature rules involve the trapezoidal rule modified by the addition of a term $k[f'(a)-f'(b)]$. The coefficient $k$ in the quadrature formula is found that minimizes the error estimates. It is shown that when $f'$ is merely assumed to be continuous then the optimal rule is the trapezoidal rule itself. In this case error estimates are in terms of the Alexiewicz norm. This includes the case when $f"$ is integrable in the Henstock--Kurzweil sense or as a distribution. All error estimates are shown to be sharp for the given assumptions on $f"$. It is shown how to make these formulas exact for all cubic polynomials $f$. Composite formulas are computed for uniform partitions.

  9. MATERIAL CONTROL ACCOUNTING INMM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasty, T.

    2009-06-14

    Since 1996, the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC - formerly known as K-26), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have been cooperating under the cooperative Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program between the Russian Federation and the U.S. Governments. Since MCC continues to operate a reactor for steam and electricity production for the site and city of Zheleznogorsk which results in production of the weapons grade plutonium, one of the goals of the MPC&A program is to support implementation of an expanded comprehensive nuclear material control and accounting (MC&A) program. To date MCC has completed upgrades identified in the initial gap analysis and documented in the site MC&A Plan and is implementing additional upgrades identified during an update to the gap analysis. The scope of these upgrades includes implementation of MCC organization structure relating to MC&A, establishing material balance area structure for special nuclear materials (SNM) storage and bulk processing areas, and material control functions including SNM portal monitors at target locations. Material accounting function upgrades include enhancements in the conduct of physical inventories, limit of error inventory difference procedure enhancements, implementation of basic computerized accounting system for four SNM storage areas, implementation of measurement equipment for improved accountability reporting, and both new and revised site-level MC&A procedures. This paper will discuss the implementation of MC&A upgrades at MCC based on the requirements established in the comprehensive MC&A plan developed by the Mining and Chemical Combine as part of the MPC&A Program.

  10. This article has been published in: Urban Water Journal, Vol. 9(1), 2012 Rainwater harvesting to control stormwater runoff in suburban areas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 This article has been published in: Urban Water Journal, Vol. 9(1), 2012 Rainwater harvesting. This paper investigates the macroscopic effect of rainwater harvesting on runoff, and thus the potential. Keywords: rainwater harvesting; source control; BMP; runoff; rainfall-runoff analysis; sewer overflows 1

  11. POWER SPECTRAL PARAMETERIZATIONS OF ERROR AS A FUNCTION OF RESOLUTION IN GRIDDED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexey

    POWER SPECTRAL PARAMETERIZATIONS OF ERROR AS A FUNCTION OF RESOLUTION IN GRIDDED ALTIMETRY MAPS be expressed in terms of the averages over model grid box areas. In reality, however, observations are either differently by the model grid and by the observational system. This difference turns out to be a major

  12. Temporal Memoization for Energy-Efficient Timing Error Recovery in GPGPUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajesh

    commonly use conservative guardbands for the operating frequency or voltage to ensure error-free operation therefore enables reduction of the minimum operating voltage [7]. Similarly, in non-volatile memory area%­4%) and outperforms recent advances in resilient architectures. This technique also enhances robustness in the voltage

  13. Lateral boundary errors in regional numerical weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Lateral boundary errors in regional numerical weather prediction models Author: Ana Car Advisor, they describe evolution of atmospher - weather forecast. Every NWP model solves the same system of equations (1: assoc. prof. dr. Nedjeljka Zagar January 5, 2015 Abstract Regional models are used in many national

  14. MEASUREMENT AND CORRECTION OF ULTRASONIC ANEMOMETER ERRORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    commonly show systematic errors depending on wind speed due to inaccurate ultrasonic transducer mounting three- dimensional wind speed time series. Results for the variance and power spectra are shown. 1 wind speeds with ultrasonic anemometers: The measu- red flow is distorted by the probe head

  15. Chinese Remaindering with Errors Oded Goldreich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Chinese Remaindering with Errors Oded Goldreich Department of Computer Science Weizmann Institute 02139, USA madhu@mit.edu. z Abstract The Chinese Remainder Theorem states that a positive integer m The Chinese Remainder Theorem states that a positive integer m is uniquely specified by its remainder modulo k

  16. Distribution of Wind Power Forecasting Errors from Operational Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Ela, E.; Milligan, M.

    2011-10-01

    This presentation offers new data and statistical analysis of wind power forecasting errors in operational systems.

  17. Novel strategies for the synthesis of methane adsorbents with controlled porosity and high surface area. Annual report, January 1, 1994-December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ventura, S.C.; Kumar, S.K.; Yokoi, S.I.

    1995-04-01

    Natural gas is an attractive alternative to gasoline as fuel for cars because of its desirable emission characteristics, good cold starting characteristics, and high octane number. A major factor that limits widespread use of NGV`s is the low energy density of natural gas. The authors have developed low-cost gel precursors that are excellent binders of high surface area carbon and produce monoliths with piece density of 0.64 g/mL, carbon packing density of 0.62 g/mL and methane volumetric storage capacity of 140 V/V (based on volume of gas delivered) at 500 psia. The authors` preliminary experiments show that piece density may be further increased under suitable processing conditions and that even higher methane volumetric capacities will be attainable.

  18. 10.1177/1087057105276989Kevorkov and MakarenkovSystematic Errors in High-Throughput Screening Statistical Analysis of Systematic Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarenkov, Vladimir

    - mentaldatarequiresan efficientautomaticroutinefor theselection of hits. Unfortunately, random and systematic errors can

  19. Adaptive control for accelerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eaton, Lawrie E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jachim, Stephen P. (Los Alamos, NM); Natter, Eckard F. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

  20. Detecting Soft Errors in Stencil based Computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, V.; Gopalkrishnan, G.; Bronevetsky, G.

    2015-05-06

    Given the growing emphasis on system resilience, it is important to develop software-level error detectors that help trap hardware-level faults with reasonable accuracy while minimizing false alarms as well as the performance overhead introduced. We present a technique that approaches this idea by taking stencil computations as our target, and synthesizing detectors based on machine learning. In particular, we employ linear regression to generate computationally inexpensive models which form the basis for error detection. Our technique has been incorporated into a new open-source library called SORREL. In addition to reporting encouraging experimental results, we demonstrate techniques that help reduce the size of training data. We also discuss the efficacy of various detectors synthesized, as well as our future plans.

  1. Modulation of contact resistance between metal and graphene by controlling the graphene edge, contact area, and point defects: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Bo; Wen, Yanwei, E-mail: ywwen@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Gong, Cheng; Cho, Kyeongjae [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Chen, Rong [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology and School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Shan, Bin, E-mail: ywwen@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    A systematic first-principles non-equilibrium Green's function study is conducted on the contact resistance between a series of metals (Au, Ag, Pt, Cu, Ni, and Pd) and graphene in the side contact geometry. Different factors such as the termination of the graphene edge, contact area, and point defect in contacted graphene are investigated. Notable differences are observed in structural configurations and electronic transport characteristics of these metal-graphene contacts, depending on the metal species and aforementioned influencing factors. It is found that the enhanced chemical reactivity of the graphene due to dangling bonds from either the unsaturated graphene edge or point defects strengthens the metal-graphene bonding, leading to a considerable contact resistance reduction for weakly interacting metals Au and Ag. For stronger interacting metals Pt and Cu, a slightly reduced contact resistance is found due to such influencing factors. However, the wetting metals Ni and Pd most strongly hybridize with graphene, exhibiting negligible dependence on the above influencing factors. This study provides guidance for the optimization of metal-graphene contacts at an atomic scale.

  2. The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-31

    The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

  3. Gross error detection in process data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Gurmeet

    1992-01-01

    , 1991), with many optimum properties, seems to have been untapped by chemical engineers. We first review the background of the Tr test, and present relevant properties of the test. IV. A Hotelling's Generalization of Students t Test One of the most...: Chemical Engineering GROSS ERROR DETECTION IN PROCESS DATA A Thesis by GURMEET SINGH Approved as to style and content by: Ralph E. White (Chair of Committee) Michael Nikoloau (Member Richard B. Gri n (Member) R. W. Flummerfelt (Head...

  4. Validating SystemLevel Error Recovery for Spacecraft Robyn R. Lutz \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Robyn R.

    executions of the error­ recovery software with the software that controls the science and engineering events these intercommand constraints. A failure to do so can jeopardize the collection of scientific data, a spacecraft the ground and stored in the spacecraft's temporary memory until the time comes for each command

  5. PROPER FILTER DESIGN PROCEDURE FOR VIBRATION SUPPRESSION USING DELAY-ERROR-ORDER CURVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    PROPER FILTER DESIGN PROCEDURE FOR VIBRATION SUPPRESSION USING DELAY-ERROR-ORDER CURVES D. Economou of Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical Design and Control Systems Division, 9 Heroon Polytechniou Str., 15773@central.ntua.gr B Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace

  6. Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Blanchard, Sean P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Debardeleben, Nathan A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-25

    As supercomputers continue to get faster and more powerful in the future, they will also have more nodes. If nothing is done, then the amount of memory in supercomputer clusters will soon grow large enough that memory failures will be unmanageable to deal with by manually replacing memory DIMMs. "Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux" is a process oriented method to solve this problem by using the Linux kernel to disable (offline) faulty memory pages containing bad addresses, preventing them from being used again by a process. The process of offlining memory pages simplifies error handling and results in reducing both hardware and manpower costs required to run Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) clusters. This process will be necessary for the future of supercomputing to allow the development of exascale computers. It will not be feasible without memory error handling to manually replace the number of DIMMs that will fail daily on a machine consisting of 32-128 petabytes of memory. Testing reveals the process of offlining memory pages works and is relatively simple to use. As more and more testing is conducted, the entire process will be automated within the high-performance computing (HPC) monitoring software, Zenoss, at LANL.

  7. New insights on numerical error in symplectic integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugo Jiménez-Pérez; Jean-Pierre Vilotte; Barbara Romanowicz

    2015-08-13

    We implement and investigate the numerical properties of a new family of integrators connecting both variants of the symplectic Euler schemes, and including an alternative to the classical symplectic mid-point scheme, with some additional terms. This family is derived from a new method, introduced in a previous study, for generating symplectic integrators based on the concept of special symplectic manifold. The use of symplectic rotations and a particular type of projection keeps the whole procedure within the symplectic framework. We show that it is possible to define a set of parameters that control the additional terms providing a way of "tuning" these new symplectic schemes. We test the "tuned" symplectic integrators with the perturbed pendulum and we compare its behavior with an explicit scheme for perturbed systems. Remarkably, for the given examples, the error in the energy integral can be reduced considerably. There is a natural geometrical explanation, sketched at the end of this paper. This is the subject of a parallel article where a finer analysis is performed. Numerical results obtained in this paper open a new point of view on symplectic integrators and Hamiltonian error.

  8. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2011 to January 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2012-03-05

    The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface biogeochemical setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer motivates research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated biogeochemical system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, CY 2009, and CY 2010 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project acted upon all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of 'Modeling' and 'Well-Field Mitigation' plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site, and modifications to the IFRC well-field completed in CY 2011. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2011 including: (i) well modifications to eliminate well-bore flows, (ii) hydrologic testing of the modified well-field and upper aquifer, (iii) geophysical monitoring of winter precipitation infiltration through the U-contaminated vadose zone and spring river water intrusion to the IFRC, (iv) injection experimentation to probe the lower vadose zone and to evaluate the transport behavior of high U concentrations, (v) extended passive monitoring during the period of water table rise and fall, and (vi) collaborative down-hole experimentation with the PNNL SFA on the biogeochemistry of the 300 A Hanford-Ringold contact and the underlying redox transition zone. The modified well-field has functioned superbly without any evidence for well-bore flows. Beyond these experimental efforts, our site-wide reactive transport models (PFLOTRAN and eSTOMP) have been updated to include site geostatistical models of both hydrologic properties and adsorbed U distribution; and new hydrologic characterization measurements of the upper aquifer. These increasingly robust models are being used to simulate past and recent U desorption-adsorption experiments performed under different hydrologic conditions, and heuristic modeling to understand the complex functioning of the smear zone. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, with significant and positive progress in 2011 that will enable publication in 2012. Our increasingly comprehensive field experimental results and robust reactive transport simulators, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes influencing N, S, C, Mn, and Fe. Collectively these findings and higher scale models are providing a unique and unparalleled system-scale understanding of the biogeochemical function of the groundwater-river interaction zone.

  9. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammon, Glenn; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2010-02-01

    The Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research which relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007 and CY 2008 progress summarized in preceding reports. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2009 with completion of extensive laboratory measurements on field sediments, field hydrologic and geophysical characterization, four field experiments, and modeling. The laboratory characterization results are being subjected to geostatistical analyses to develop spatial heterogeneity models of U concentration and chemical, physical, and hydrologic properties needed for reactive transport modeling. The field experiments focused on: (1) physical characterization of the groundwater flow field during a period of stable hydrologic conditions in early spring, (2) comprehensive groundwater monitoring during spring to characterize the release of U(VI) from the lower vadose zone to the aquifer during water table rise and fall, (3) dynamic geophysical monitoring of salt-plume migration during summer, and (4) a U reactive tracer experiment (desorption) during the fall. Geophysical characterization of the well field was completed using the down-well Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) array, with results subjected to robust, geostatistically constrained inversion analyses. These measurements along with hydrologic characterization have yielded 3D distributions of hydraulic properties that have been incorporated into an updated and increasingly robust hydrologic model. Based on significant findings from the microbiologic characterization of deep borehole sediments in CY 2008, down-hole biogeochemistry studies were initiated where colonization substrates and spatially discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to select wells. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes. A significant issue related to vertical flow in the IFRC wells was identified and evaluated during the spring and fall field experimental campaigns. Both upward and downward flows were observed in response to dynamic Columbia River stage. The vertical flows are caused by the interaction of pressure gradients with our heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field. These impacts are being evaluated with additional modeling and field activities to facilitate interpretation and mitigation. The project moves into CY 2010 with ambitious plans for a drilling additional wells for the IFRC well field, additional experiments, and modeling. This research is part of the ERSP Hanford IFRC at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  10. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities. Final report, February 24, 1992--September 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, V.J.

    1995-09-18

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate the utility of a device called the {open_quotes}beach cone{close_quotes} in combating coastal erosion. Seven initial sites were selected for testing beach cones in a variety of geometric configurations. Permits were obtained from the State of Louisiana and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform the work associated with this study. Six hundred beach cones were actually installed at six of the sites in late July and early August, 1992. Findings indicate that beach cones accreted significant amounts of materials along the beach of a barrier island, and they might have been instrumental in repairing an approximately 200 meter gap in the island. At the eighth installation the amount of accreted material was measured by surveys to be 2200 cubic meters (2900 cubic yards) in February of 1993, when the cones were found to have been completely covered by the material. At other test sites, accretion rates have been less dramatic but importantly, no significant additional erosion has occurred, which is a positive result. The cost of sediment accretion using beach cones was found to be about $13.72 per cubic yard, which would be much lower if the cones were mass produced (on the order of $3.00 per cubic yard). The survival of the cones through the fringes of Hurricane Andrew indicates that they can be anchored sufficiently to survive significant storms. The measurements of the cones settling rates indicate that this effect is not significant enough to hinder their effectiveness. A subcontract to Xavier University to assess the ecological quality of the experimental sites involved the study of the biogeochemical cycle of trace metals. The highest concentration of heavy metals were near a fishing camp while the lowest levels were in the beach sand of a barrier island. This suggests that the metals do not occur naturally in these areas, but have been placed in the sediments by man`s activities.

  11. Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wannamaker...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area, Nevada- Structural Controls, Hydrothermal Alteration and Deep Fluid Sources Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMagne...

  12. Decoherence and dephasing errors caused by the dc Stark effect...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Decoherence and dephasing errors caused by the dc Stark effect in rapid ion transport Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Decoherence and dephasing errors caused by the dc...

  13. Human error contribution to nuclear materials-handling events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Bradley (Bradley Jordan)

    2007-01-01

    This thesis analyzes a sample of 15 fuel-handling events from the past ten years at commercial nuclear reactors with significant human error contributions in order to detail the contribution of human error to fuel-handling ...

  14. Error analysis in cross-correlation of sky maps: application to the ISW detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Cabre; Pablo Fosalba; Enrique Gaztanaga; Marc Manera

    2007-01-15

    Constraining cosmological parameters from measurements of the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect requires developing robust and accurate methods for computing statistical errors in the cross-correlation between maps. This paper presents a detailed comparison of such error estimation applied to the case of cross-correlation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and large-scale structure data. We compare theoretical models for error estimation with montecarlo simulations where both the galaxy and the CMB maps vary around a fiducial auto-correlation and cross-correlation model which agrees well with the current concordance LCDM cosmology. Our analysis compares estimators both in harmonic and configuration (or real) space, quantifies the accuracy of the error analysis and discuss the impact of partial sky survey area and the choice of input fiducial model on dark-energy constraints. We show that purely analytic approaches yield accurate errors even in surveys that cover only 10% of the sky and that parameter constraints strongly depend on the fiducial model employed. Alternatively, we discuss the advantages and limitations of error estimators that can be directly applied to data. In particular, we show that errors and covariances from the Jack-Knife method agree well with the theoretical approaches and simulations. We also introduce a novel method in real space that is computationally efficient and can be applied to real data and realistic survey geometries. Finally, we present a number of new findings and prescriptions that can be useful for analysis of real data and forecasts, and present a critical summary of the analyses done to date.

  15. Error Reduction for Weigh-In-Motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hively, Lee M; Abercrombie, Robert K; Scudiere, Matthew B; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2009-01-01

    Federal and State agencies need certifiable vehicle weights for various applications, such as highway inspections, border security, check points, and port entries. ORNL weigh-in-motion (WIM) technology was previously unable to provide certifiable weights, due to natural oscillations, such as vehicle bouncing and rocking. Recent ORNL work demonstrated a novel filter to remove these oscillations. This work shows further filtering improvements to enable certifiable weight measurements (error < 0.1%) for a higher traffic volume with less effort (elimination of redundant weighing).

  16. Forward Error Correction and Functional Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bull, Tristan Michael

    2011-04-25

    .1 Annapolis Micro Wildstar 5 DDR2 DRAM Interface . . . . . . . . 50 6.2 Dual-Port DRAM Wrapper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 6.3 Kansas Lava DRAM Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 7 Conclusion 58 7.1 Future Work... codewords. We ran the simulation using input data with energy per bit to noise power spectral density ratios (Eb=N0) of 3dB to 6dB in 0.5dB increments. For each Eb=N0 value, we ran the simulation until at least 25,000 bit errors were recorded. Results...

  17. Unitary-process discrimination with error margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Hashimoto; A. Hayashi; M. Hayashi; M. Horibe

    2010-06-10

    We investigate a discrimination scheme between unitary processes. By introducing a margin for the probability of erroneous guess, this scheme interpolates the two standard discrimination schemes: minimum-error and unambiguous discrimination. We present solutions for two cases. One is the case of two unitary processes with general prior probabilities. The other is the case with a group symmetry: the processes comprise a projective representation of a finite group. In the latter case, we found that unambiguous discrimination is a kind of "all or nothing": the maximum success probability is either 0 or 1. We also closely analyze how entanglement with an auxiliary system improves discrimination performance.

  18. On the Error in QR Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieci, Luca; Van Vleck, Erik

    2008-03-07

    Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Vol. 46, No. 3, pp. 1166–1189 ON THE ERROR IN QR INTEGRATION? LUCA DIECI† AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK‡ Abstract. An important change of variables for a linear time varying system x? = A(t)x, t ? 0, is that induced...(X) is the matrix comprising the diagonal part of X, the rest being all 0’s; upp(X) is the matrix comprising the upper triangular part of X, the rest being all 0’s; and low(X) is the matrix comprising the strictly lower triangular part of X, the rest being all 0’s...

  19. Bolstered Error Estimation Ulisses Braga-Neto a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braga-Neto, Ulisses

    the bolstered error estimators proposed in this paper, as part of a larger library for classification and error of the data. It has a direct geometric interpretation and can be easily applied to any classification rule as smoothed error estimation. In some important cases, such as a linear classification rule with a Gaussian

  20. A Taxonomy of Number Entry Error Sarah Wiseman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    A Taxonomy of Number Entry Error Sarah Wiseman UCLIC MPEB, Malet Place London, WC1E 7JE sarah and the subsequent process of creating a taxonomy of errors from the information gathered. A total of 345 errors were. These codes are then organised into a taxonomy similar to that of Zhang et al (2004). We show how

  1. Gross error detection and stage efficiency estimation in a separation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serth, R.W.; Srikanth, B. . Dept. of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering); Maronga, S.J. . Dept. of Chemical and Process Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    Accurate process models are required for optimization and control in chemical plants and petroleum refineries. These models involve various equipment parameters, such as stage efficiencies in distillation columns, the values of which must be determined by fitting the models to process data. Since the data contain random and systematic measurement errors, some of which may be large (gross errors), they must be reconciled to obtain reliable estimates of equipment parameters. The problem thus involves parameter estimation coupled with gross error detection and data reconciliation. MacDonald and Howat (1988) studied the above problem for a single-stage flash distillation process. Their analysis was based on the definition of stage efficiency due to Hausen, which has some significant disadvantages in this context, as discussed below. In addition, they considered only data sets which contained no gross errors. The purpose of this article is to extend the above work by considering alternative definitions of state efficiency and efficiency estimation in the presence of gross errors.

  2. Integrating human related errors with technical errors to determine causes behind offshore accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    errors were embedded as an integral part of the oil well drilling opera- tion. To reduce the number assessment of the failure. The method is based on a knowledge model of the oil-well drilling process. All of non-productive time (NPT) during oil-well drilling. NPT exhibits a much lower declining trend than

  3. Analysis of Errors in a Special Perturbations Satellite Orbit Propagator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckerman, M.; Jones, J.P.

    1999-02-01

    We performed an analysis of error densities for the Special Perturbations orbit propagator using data for 29 satellites in orbits of interest to Space Shuttle and International Space Station collision avoidance. We find that the along-track errors predominate. These errors increase monotonically over each 36-hour prediction interval. The predicted positions in the along-track direction progressively either leap ahead of or lag behind the actual positions. Unlike the along-track errors the radial and cross-track errors oscillate about their nearly zero mean values. As the number of observations per fit interval decline the along-track prediction errors, and amplitudes of the radial and cross-track errors, increase.

  4. Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, Jeff M; Walker, William C

    2014-01-01

    A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

  5. Quantum Error Correction with magnetic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    José J. Baldoví; Salvador Cardona-Serra; Juan M. Clemente-Juan; Luis Escalera-Moreno; Alejandro Gaita-Ariño; Guillermo Mínguez Espallargas

    2014-08-22

    Quantum algorithms often assume independent spin qubits to produce trivial $|\\uparrow\\rangle=|0\\rangle$, $|\\downarrow\\rangle=|1\\rangle$ mappings. This can be unrealistic in many solid-state implementations with sizeable magnetic interactions. Here we show that the lower part of the spectrum of a molecule containing three exchange-coupled metal ions with $S=1/2$ and $I=1/2$ is equivalent to nine electron-nuclear qubits. We derive the relation between spin states and qubit states in reasonable parameter ranges for the rare earth $^{159}$Tb$^{3+}$ and for the transition metal Cu$^{2+}$, and study the possibility to implement Shor's Quantum Error Correction code on such a molecule. We also discuss recently developed molecular systems that could be adequate from an experimental point of view.

  6. Aperiodic dynamical decoupling sequences in presence of pulse errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhi-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Dynamical decoupling (DD) is a promising tool for preserving the quantum states of qubits. However, small imperfections in the control pulses can seriously affect the fidelity of decoupling, and qualitatively change the evolution of the controlled system at long times. Using both analytical and numerical tools, we theoretically investigate the effect of the pulse errors accumulation for two aperiodic DD sequences, the Uhrig's DD UDD) protocol [G. S. Uhrig, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 98}, 100504 (2007)], and the Quadratic DD (QDD) protocol [J. R. West, B. H. Fong and D. A. Lidar, Phys. Rev. Lett {\\bf 104}, 130501 (2010)]. We consider the implementation of these sequences using the electron spins of phosphorus donors in silicon, where DD sequences are applied to suppress dephasing of the donor spins. The dependence of the decoupling fidelity on different initial states of the spins is the focus of our study. We investigate in detail the initial drop in the DD fidelity, and its long-term saturation. We also demonstra...

  7. Bit Error Rate, Power and Area Analysis of Multiple FPGA Implementations of Underwater FSK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kastner, Ryan

    Beijing 100871, P.R.China country code: 086 liying~, zhangx~@ime.pku.edu.cn + University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA USA country code: 001 b1benson~ ,kastner~@cs.ucsd.edu ABSTRACT There has been an increasing interest in creating short-range, low data-rate underwater wireless sensor networks for scientific

  8. Controlling Roosting Birds in Urban Areas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2006-09-06

    ornamental plants. Grackles are noisy birds, often making a disturbing and obnoxious racket. Grackles may consume or destroy farm crops such as citrus, tomatoes, watermelons, cabbage, lettuce, grain, corn, peaches, figs and can- taloupes. Starlings Starlings...

  9. Excess Capacity from LADWP Control Area

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 InfographiclighbulbsDepartmentDeveloping11, 20125EXAMPLE DOEExcess

  10. Instrumentation and Control Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelBConservationEnergy5975-01 REPORT ONInstitutional ChangeUsed FuelNOT

  11. Multifield optimization intensity-modulated proton therapy (MFO-IMPT) for prostate cancer: Robustness analysis through simulation of rotational and translational alignment errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Amos, Richard A.; John Baptiste, Sandra; Choi, Seungtaek; Nhu Nguyen, Quyhn; Ronald Zhu, X.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric consequences of rotational and translational alignment errors in patients receiving intensity-modulated proton therapy with multifield optimization (MFO-IMPT) for prostate cancer. Ten control patients with localized prostate cancer underwent treatment planning for MFO-IMPT. Rotational and translation errors were simulated along each of 3 axes: anterior-posterior (A-P), superior-inferior (S-I), and left-right. Clinical target-volume (CTV) coverage remained high with all alignment errors simulated. Rotational errors did not result in significant rectum or bladder dose perturbations. Translational errors resulted in larger dose perturbations to the bladder and rectum. Perturbations in rectum and bladder doses were minimal for rotational errors and larger for translational errors. Rectum V45 and V70 increased most with A-P misalignment, whereas bladder V45 and V70 changed most with S-I misalignment. The bladder and rectum V45 and V70 remained acceptable even with extreme alignment errors. Even with S-I and A-P translational errors of up to 5 mm, the dosimetric profile of MFO-IMPT remained favorable. MFO-IMPT for localized prostate cancer results in robust coverage of the CTV without clinically meaningful dose perturbations to normal tissue despite extreme rotational and translational alignment errors.

  12. State discrimination with error margin and its locality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Hayashi; T. Hashimoto; M. Horibe

    2008-07-10

    There are two common settings in a quantum-state discrimination problem. One is minimum-error discrimination where a wrong guess (error) is allowed and the discrimination success probability is maximized. The other is unambiguous discrimination where errors are not allowed but the inconclusive result "I don't know" is possible. We investigate discrimination problem with a finite margin imposed on the error probability. The two common settings correspond to the error margins 1 and 0. For arbitrary error margin, we determine the optimal discrimination probability for two pure states with equal occurrence probabilities. We also consider the case where the states to be discriminated are multipartite, and show that the optimal discrimination probability can be achieved by local operations and classical communication.

  13. Error models in quantum computation: an application of model selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucia Schwarz; Steven van Enk

    2013-09-04

    Threshold theorems for fault-tolerant quantum computing assume that errors are of certain types. But how would one detect whether errors of the "wrong" type occur in one's experiment, especially if one does not even know what type of error to look for? The problem is that for many qubits a full state description is impossible to analyze, and a full process description is even more impossible to analyze. As a result, one simply cannot detect all types of errors. Here we show through a quantum state estimation example (on up to 25 qubits) how to attack this problem using model selection. We use, in particular, the Akaike Information Criterion. The example indicates that the number of measurements that one has to perform before noticing errors of the wrong type scales polynomially both with the number of qubits and with the error size.

  14. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  15. A technique for human error analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, S.E.; Ramey-Smith, A.M.; Wreathall, J.; Parry, G.W. [and others

    1996-05-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has become an important tool in the nuclear power industry, both for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the operating utilities. Human reliability analysis (HRA) is a critical element of PRA; however, limitations in the analysis of human actions in PRAs have long been recognized as a constraint when using PRA. A multidisciplinary HRA framework has been developed with the objective of providing a structured approach for analyzing operating experience and understanding nuclear plant safety, human error, and the underlying factors that affect them. The concepts of the framework have matured into a rudimentary working HRA method. A trial application of the method has demonstrated that it is possible to identify potentially significant human failure events from actual operating experience which are not generally included in current PRAs, as well as to identify associated performance shaping factors and plant conditions that have an observable impact on the frequency of core damage. A general process was developed, albeit in preliminary form, that addresses the iterative steps of defining human failure events and estimating their probabilities using search schemes. Additionally, a knowledge- base was developed which describes the links between performance shaping factors and resulting unsafe actions.

  16. Error Detection, Factorization and Correction for Multi-View Scene Reconstruction from Aerial Imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hess-Flores, M

    2011-11-10

    Scene reconstruction from video sequences has become a prominent computer vision research area in recent years, due to its large number of applications in fields such as security, robotics and virtual reality. Despite recent progress in this field, there are still a number of issues that manifest as incomplete, incorrect or computationally-expensive reconstructions. The engine behind achieving reconstruction is the matching of features between images, where common conditions such as occlusions, lighting changes and texture-less regions can all affect matching accuracy. Subsequent processes that rely on matching accuracy, such as camera parameter estimation, structure computation and non-linear parameter optimization, are also vulnerable to additional sources of error, such as degeneracies and mathematical instability. Detection and correction of errors, along with robustness in parameter solvers, are a must in order to achieve a very accurate final scene reconstruction. However, error detection is in general difficult due to the lack of ground-truth information about the given scene, such as the absolute position of scene points or GPS/IMU coordinates for the camera(s) viewing the scene. In this dissertation, methods are presented for the detection, factorization and correction of error sources present in all stages of a scene reconstruction pipeline from video, in the absence of ground-truth knowledge. Two main applications are discussed. The first set of algorithms derive total structural error measurements after an initial scene structure computation and factorize errors into those related to the underlying feature matching process and those related to camera parameter estimation. A brute-force local correction of inaccurate feature matches is presented, as well as an improved conditioning scheme for non-linear parameter optimization which applies weights on input parameters in proportion to estimated camera parameter errors. Another application is in reconstruction pre-processing, where an algorithm detects and discards frames that would lead to inaccurate feature matching, camera pose estimation degeneracies or mathematical instability in structure computation based on a residual error comparison between two different match motion models. The presented algorithms were designed for aerial video but have been proven to work across different scene types and camera motions, and for both real and synthetic scenes.

  17. RESEARCH ARTICLE Minimization of divergence error in volumetric velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusic, Ivan

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Minimization of divergence error in volumetric velocity measurements Volumetric velocity measurements taken in incompressible fluids are typically hindered by a nonzero

  18. Distributed PI-Control with Applications to Power Systems Frequency Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    Distributed PI-Control with Applications to Power Systems Frequency Control Martin Andreasson12 for networked dynamical systems. Sufficient conditions for when the controller is able to stabilize a general linear system and eliminate static control errors are presented. The proposed controller is applied

  19. Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomplun, Marc

    Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION Advancing Area Activation towards a General Model at Boston 100 Morrissey Boulevard Boston, MA 02125-3393 USA Phone: 617-287-6485 Fax: 617-287-6433 e. Without great effort, human observers clearly outperform every current artificial vision system in tasks

  20. Plasma dynamics and a significant error of macroscopic averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek A. Szalek

    2005-05-22

    The methods of macroscopic averaging used to derive the macroscopic Maxwell equations from electron theory are methodologically incorrect and lead in some cases to a substantial error. For instance, these methods do not take into account the existence of a macroscopic electromagnetic field EB, HB generated by carriers of electric charge moving in a thin layer adjacent to the boundary of the physical region containing these carriers. If this boundary is impenetrable for charged particles, then in its immediate vicinity all carriers are accelerated towards the inside of the region. The existence of the privileged direction of acceleration results in the generation of the macroscopic field EB, HB. The contributions to this field from individual accelerated particles are described with a sufficient accuracy by the Lienard-Wiechert formulas. In some cases the intensity of the field EB, HB is significant not only for deuteron plasma prepared for a controlled thermonuclear fusion reaction but also for electron plasma in conductors at room temperatures. The corrected procedures of macroscopic averaging will induce some changes in the present form of plasma dynamics equations. The modified equations will help to design improved systems of plasma confinement.

  1. Mutual information, bit error rate and security in Wójcik's scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhanjun Zhang

    2004-02-21

    In this paper the correct calculations of the mutual information of the whole transmission, the quantum bit error rate (QBER) are presented. Mistakes of the general conclusions relative to the mutual information, the quantum bit error rate (QBER) and the security in W\\'{o}jcik's paper [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 90}, 157901(2003)] have been pointed out.

  2. Kernel Regression with Correlated Errors K. De Brabanter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kernel Regression with Correlated Errors K. De Brabanter , J. De Brabanter , , J.A.K. Suykens B: It is a well-known problem that obtaining a correct bandwidth in nonparametric regression is difficult support vector machines for regression. Keywords: nonparametric regression, correlated errors, short

  3. Ridge Regression Estimation Approach to Measurement Error Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shalabh

    Ridge Regression Estimation Approach to Measurement Error Model A.K.Md. Ehsanes Saleh Carleton of the regression parameters is ill conditioned. We consider the Hoerl and Kennard type (1970) ridge regression (RR) modifications of the five quasi- empirical Bayes estimators of the regression parameters of a measurement error

  4. Solving LWE problem with bounded errors in polynomial time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Solving LWE problem with bounded errors in polynomial time Jintai Ding1,2 Southern Chinese call the learning with bounded errors (LWBE) problems, we can solve it with complexity O(nD ). Keywords, this problem corresponds to the learning parity with noise (LPN) problem. There are several ways to solve

  5. ERROR-TOLERANT MULTI-MODAL SENSOR FUSION Farinaz Koushanfar*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    ERROR-TOLERANT MULTI-MODAL SENSOR FUSION Farinaz Koushanfar* , Sasha Slijepcevic , Miodrag is multi-modal sensor fusion, where data from sensors of dif- ferent modalities are combined in order applications, including multi- modal sensor fusion, is to ensure that all of the techniques and tools are error

  6. Fault-Tolerant Error Correction with the Gauge Color Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin J. Brown; Naomi H. Nickerson; Dan E. Browne

    2015-08-03

    The gauge color code is a quantum error-correcting code with local syndrome measurements that, remarkably, admits a universal transversal gate set without the need for resource-intensive magic state distillation. A result of recent interest, proposed by Bomb\\'{i}n, shows that the subsystem structure of the gauge color code admits an error-correction protocol that achieves tolerance to noisy measurements without the need for repeated measurements, so called single-shot error correction. Here, we demonstrate the promise of single-shot error correction by designing a two-part decoder and investigate its performance. We simulate fault-tolerant error correction with the gauge color code by repeatedly applying our proposed error-correction protocol to deal with errors that occur continuously to the underlying physical qubits of the code over the duration that quantum information is stored. We estimate a sustainable error rate, i.e. the threshold for the long time limit, of $ \\sim 0.31\\%$ for a phenomenological noise model using a simple decoding algorithm.

  7. Error detection through consistency checking Peng Gong* Lan Mu#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Error detection through consistency checking Peng Gong* Lan Mu# *Center for Assessment & Monitoring Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3110 gong@nature.berkeley.edu mulan, accessibility, and timeliness as recorded in the lineage data (Chen and Gong, 1998). Spatial error refers

  8. Analysis of Probabilistic Error Checking Procedures on Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ing-Ray

    Analysis of Probabilistic Error Checking Procedures on Storage Systems ING-RAY CHEN AND I.-LING YEN Email: irchen@iie.ncku.edu.tw Conventionally, error checking on storage systems is performed on-the-fly (with probability 1) as the storage system is being accessed in order to improve the reliability

  9. Kinematic Error Correction for Minimally Invasive Surgical Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in two likely sources of kinematic error: port displacement and instrument shaft flexion. For a quasi. To reach the surgical site near the chest wall, the instrument shaft applies significant torque to the port, and the instrument shaft to bend. These kinematic errors impair positioning of the robot and cause deviations from

  10. Grid-scale Fluctuations and Forecast Error in Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bel; C. P. Connaughton; M. Toots; M. M. Bandi

    2015-03-29

    The fluctuations in wind power entering an electrical grid (Irish grid) were analyzed and found to exhibit correlated fluctuations with a self-similar structure, a signature of large-scale correlations in atmospheric turbulence. The statistical structure of temporal correlations for fluctuations in generated and forecast time series was used to quantify two types of forecast error: a timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) that quantifies the deviations between the high frequency components of the forecast and the generated time series, and a scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$) that quantifies the degree to which the models fail to predict temporal correlations in the fluctuations of the generated power. With no $a$ $priori$ knowledge of the forecast models, we suggest a simple memory kernel that reduces both the timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) and the scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$).

  11. Grid-scale Fluctuations and Forecast Error in Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bel, G; Toots, M; Bandi, M M

    2015-01-01

    The fluctuations in wind power entering an electrical grid (Irish grid) were analyzed and found to exhibit correlated fluctuations with a self-similar structure, a signature of large-scale correlations in atmospheric turbulence. The statistical structure of temporal correlations for fluctuations in generated and forecast time series was used to quantify two types of forecast error: a timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) that quantifies the deviations between the high frequency components of the forecast and the generated time series, and a scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$) that quantifies the degree to which the models fail to predict temporal correlations in the fluctuations of the generated power. With no $a$ $priori$ knowledge of the forecast models, we suggest a simple memory kernel that reduces both the timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) and the scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$).

  12. Impaired hippocampal plasticity and errors in cognitive performance in mice with maladaptive AChE splice site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochner, Binyamin

    E splicing, we compared hippocampal plasticity and errors of executive function in TgS and TgR transgenic mice overexpressing AChE-S or AChE-R, respectively. Hippocampal slices from TgS and TgR mice presented controls. TgS slices further showed failed recruitment of both the a-amino-3- hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4

  13. Slope Error Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed an optical measurement tool for parabolic solar collectors that measures the combined errors due to absorber misalignment and reflector slope error. The combined absorber alignment and reflector slope errors are measured using a digital camera to photograph the reflected image of the absorber in the collector. Previous work using the image of the reflection of the absorber finds the reflector slope errors from the reflection of the absorber and an independent measurement of the absorber location. The accuracy of the reflector slope error measurement is thus dependent on the accuracy of the absorber location measurement. By measuring the combined reflector-absorber errors, the uncertainty in the absorber location measurement is eliminated. The related performance merit, the intercept factor, depends on the combined effects of the absorber alignment and reflector slope errors. Measuring the combined effect provides a simpler measurement and a more accurate input to the intercept factor estimate. The minimal equipment and setup required for this measurement technique make it ideal for field measurements.

  14. Balancing aggregation and smoothing errors in inverse models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-01-13

    Inverse models use observations of a system (observation vector) to quantify the variables driving that system (state vector) by statistical optimization. When the observation vector is large, such as with satellite data, selecting a suitable dimension for the state vector is a challenge. A state vector that is too large cannot be effectively constrained by the observations, leading to smoothing error. However, reducing the dimension of the state vector leads to aggregation error as prior relationships between state vector elements are imposed rather than optimized. Here we present a method for quantifying aggregation and smoothing errors as a function ofmore »state vector dimension, so that a suitable dimension can be selected by minimizing the combined error. Reducing the state vector within the aggregation error constraints can have the added advantage of enabling analytical solution to the inverse problem with full error characterization. We compare three methods for reducing the dimension of the state vector from its native resolution: (1) merging adjacent elements (grid coarsening), (2) clustering with principal component analysis (PCA), and (3) applying a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) with Gaussian pdfs as state vector elements on which the native-resolution state vector elements are projected using radial basis functions (RBFs). The GMM method leads to somewhat lower aggregation error than the other methods, but more importantly it retains resolution of major local features in the state vector while smoothing weak and broad features.« less

  15. Balancing aggregation and smoothing errors in inverse models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-06-30

    Inverse models use observations of a system (observation vector) to quantify the variables driving that system (state vector) by statistical optimization. When the observation vector is large, such as with satellite data, selecting a suitable dimension for the state vector is a challenge. A state vector that is too large cannot be effectively constrained by the observations, leading to smoothing error. However, reducing the dimension of the state vector leads to aggregation error as prior relationships between state vector elements are imposed rather than optimized. Here we present a method for quantifying aggregation and smoothing errors as a function ofmore »state vector dimension, so that a suitable dimension can be selected by minimizing the combined error. Reducing the state vector within the aggregation error constraints can have the added advantage of enabling analytical solution to the inverse problem with full error characterization. We compare three methods for reducing the dimension of the state vector from its native resolution: (1) merging adjacent elements (grid coarsening), (2) clustering with principal component analysis (PCA), and (3) applying a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) with Gaussian pdfs as state vector elements on which the native-resolution state vector elements are projected using radial basis functions (RBFs). The GMM method leads to somewhat lower aggregation error than the other methods, but more importantly it retains resolution of major local features in the state vector while smoothing weak and broad features.« less

  16. Trends in furnace control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.J.; Keefe, M.D. (Italimpianti of America, Inc., Coraopolis, PA (United States). Instrumentation and Controls Dept.)

    1993-07-01

    This paper relates Italimpianti's experiences over the past few years in the area of control of reheat furnaces for the steel industry. The focus is on the level 1 area; specifically on the use of PLC-based systems to perform both combustion control and mechanical/hydraulic control. Some topics to be discussed are: overview of reheat furnace control system requirements; PLC only control vs separate PLC and DCS systems; PLC hardware requirements; man machine interface (MMI) requirements; purge, light-on and safety logic; implementation of more sophisticated level 1 control algorithms; furnace temperature optimization: look up tables vs full thermal modeling; and recent trends including integrated PLC/DCS system.

  17. Wind Power Forecasting Error Distributions: An International Comparison; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Sillanpaa, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Scharff, R.; Soder, L.; Larsen, X. G.; Giebel, G.; Flynn, D.; Dobschinski, J.

    2012-09-01

    Wind power forecasting is expected to be an important enabler for greater penetration of wind power into electricity systems. Because no wind forecasting system is perfect, a thorough understanding of the errors that do occur can be critical to system operation functions, such as the setting of operating reserve levels. This paper provides an international comparison of the distribution of wind power forecasting errors from operational systems, based on real forecast data. The paper concludes with an assessment of similarities and differences between the errors observed in different locations.

  18. Learning Control Algorithms: Convergence and Anatoly A. Pervozvanskii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avrachenkov, Konstantin

    of Mechanics and Control Processes St.Petersburg State Technical University St.Petersburg, Russia e simple and nat- ural: the control scheme should use information about errors from the previous cycles

  19. A complete Randomized Benchmarking Protocol accounting for Leakage Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Chasseur; F. K. Wilhelm

    2015-07-09

    Randomized Benchmarking allows to efficiently and scalably characterize the average error of an unitary 2-design such as the Clifford group $\\mathcal{C}$ on a physical candidate for quantum computation, as long as there are no non-computational leakage levels in the system. We investigate the effect of leakage errors on Randomized Benchmarking induced from an additional level per physical qubit and provide a modified protocol that allows to derive reliable estimates for the error per gate in their presence. We assess the variance of the sequence fidelity corresponding to the number of random sequences needed for valid fidelity estimation. Our protocol allows for gate dependent error channels without being restricted to perturbations. We show that our protocol is compatible with Interleaved Randomized Benchmarking and expand to benchmarking of arbitrary gates. This setting is relevant for superconducting transmon qubits, among other systems.

  20. Honest Confidence Intervals for the Error Variance in Stepwise Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Robert A.

    Honest Confidence Intervals for the Error Variance in Stepwise Regression Dean P. Foster and Robert alternatives are used. These simpler algorithms (e.g., forward or backward stepwise regression) obtain

  1. Removing Systematic Errors from Rotating Shadowband Pyranometer Data Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    of the pyranometer to briefly shade the pyranometer once a minute. Direct hori- zontal irradiance is calculated used in programs evaluating the performance of photovoltaic systems, and systematic errors in the data

  2. Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Ralf

    Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows Ralf Hartmann1 and Paul Houston, 38108 Braunschweig, Germany Ralf.Hartmann@dlr.de 2 School of Mathematical Sciences University

  3. MULTITARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Ralf

    MULTI­TARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS RALF HARTMANN of Scientific Computing, TU Braunschweig, Germany (Ralf.Hartmann@dlr.de). 1 #12; 2 R. HARTMANN

  4. Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Ralf

    Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows Ralf Hartmann, Joachim Held), Lilien- thalplatz 7, 38108 Braunschweig, Germany, e-mail: Ralf.Hartmann@dlr.de 1 #12;2 Ralf Hartmann

  5. MULTITARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Ralf

    MULTITARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS RALF HARTMANN Abstract, Germany (Ralf.Hartmann@dlr.de). 1 #12;2 R. HARTMANN quantity under consideration. However, in many

  6. Inflated applicants: Attribution errors in performance evaluation by professionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swift, Samuel; Moore, Don; Sharek, Zachariah; Gino, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    performance among applicants from each ‘‘type’’ of school.and interview performance. Each school provided multi-yearschool, PLOS ONE | www.plosone.org July 2013 | Volume 8 | Issue 7 | e69258 Attribution Errors in Performance

  7. Wind Power Forecasting Error Distributions over Multiple Timescales: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Milligan, M.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we examine the shape of the persistence model error distribution for ten different wind plants in the ERCOT system over multiple timescales. Comparisons are made between the experimental distribution shape and that of the normal distribution.

  8. On Student's 1908 Article "The Probable Error of a Mean"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jong-Min

    's "attention" resulted in a report, "The Application of the `Law of Error' to the work of the Brewery" dated No] and other records available in their Dublin brewery"; see Pearson 1939, p. 213.) Unable to find

  9. Performance optimizations for compiler-based error detection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitropoulou, Konstantina

    2015-06-29

    The trend towards smaller transistor technologies and lower operating voltages stresses the hardware and makes transistors more susceptible to transient errors. In future systems, performance and power gains will come ...

  10. Efficient Semiparametric Estimators for Biological, Genetic, and Measurement Error Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Tanya

    2012-10-19

    Many statistical models, like measurement error models, a general class of survival models, and a mixture data model with random censoring, are semiparametric where interest lies in estimating finite-dimensional parameters ...

  11. Error bars for linear and nonlinear neural network regression models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    Error bars for linear and nonlinear neural network regression models William D. Penny and Stephen J College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London SW7 2BT., U.K. w.penny@ic.ac.uk, s

  12. NOVELTY, CONFIDENCE & ERRORS IN CONNECTIONIST Stephen J. Roberts & William Penny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Stephen

    d NOVELTY, CONFIDENCE & ERRORS IN CONNECTIONIST SYSTEMS Stephen J. Roberts & William Penny Neural, Technology & Medicine London, UK s.j.roberts@ic.ac.uk, w.penny@ic.ac.uk April 21, 1997 Abstract Key words

  13. Predicting Intentional Tax Error Using Open Source Literature and Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for each PUMS respondent (or agent), in certain line item/taxpayer categories, allowing us to construct dis-Likelihood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5 Results of Meta-Analysis 12 6 Intentional Error in Line Items/Taxpayer Categories 13 6

  14. Combustor air flow control method for fuel cell apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY); Mowery, Kenneth D. (Noblesville, IN); Ripley, Eugene V. (Russiaville, IN)

    2001-01-01

    A method for controlling the heat output of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual air inlet streams including atmospheric air and fuel cell cathode effluent containing oxygen depleted air. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is provided by regulating the quantity of the air flow stream to the combustor to support fuel cell processor heat requirements. A control provides a quick fast forward change in an air valve orifice cross section in response to a calculated predetermined air flow, the molar constituents of the air stream to the combustor, the pressure drop across the air valve, and a look up table of the orifice cross sectional area and valve steps. A feedback loop fine tunes any error between the measured air flow to the combustor and the predetermined air flow.

  15. Wind Power Forecasting Error Frequency Analyses for Operational Power System Studies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Florita, A.; Hodge, B. M.; Milligan, M.

    2012-08-01

    The examination of wind power forecasting errors is crucial for optimal unit commitment and economic dispatch of power systems with significant wind power penetrations. This scheduling process includes both renewable and nonrenewable generators, and the incorporation of wind power forecasts will become increasingly important as wind fleets constitute a larger portion of generation portfolios. This research considers the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study database of wind power forecasts and numerical actualizations. This database comprises more than 30,000 locations spread over the western United States, with a total wind power capacity of 960 GW. Error analyses for individual sites and for specific balancing areas are performed using the database, quantifying the fit to theoretical distributions through goodness-of-fit metrics. Insights into wind-power forecasting error distributions are established for various levels of temporal and spatial resolution, contrasts made among the frequency distribution alternatives, and recommendations put forth for harnessing the results. Empirical data are used to produce more realistic site-level forecasts than previously employed, such that higher resolution operational studies are possible. This research feeds into a larger work of renewable integration through the links wind power forecasting has with various operational issues, such as stochastic unit commitment and flexible reserve level determination.

  16. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimm, Lars J., E-mail: Lars.grimm@duke.edu; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Kim, Connie [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Kuzmiak, Cherie M. [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 2006 Old Clinic, CB No. 7510, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 2006 Old Clinic, CB No. 7510, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Mazurowski, Maciej A. [Duke University Medical Center, Box 2731 Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)] [Duke University Medical Center, Box 2731 Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Methods: Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results: Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502–0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543–0.680,p < 0.002). Conclusions: Patterns in detection errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees.

  17. Suboptimal quantum-error-correcting procedure based on semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoki Yamamoto; Shinji Hara; Koji Tsumura

    2006-06-13

    In this paper, we consider a simplified error-correcting problem: for a fixed encoding process, to find a cascade connected quantum channel such that the worst fidelity between the input and the output becomes maximum. With the use of the one-to-one parametrization of quantum channels, a procedure finding a suboptimal error-correcting channel based on a semidefinite programming is proposed. The effectiveness of our method is verified by an example of the bit-flip channel decoding.

  18. TESLA-FEL 2009-07 Errors in Reconstruction of Difference Orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 Standard Least Squares Solution 2 3 Error Emittance and Error Twiss Parameters as the position of the reconstruction point changes, we will introduce error Twiss parameters and invariant error in the point of interest has to be achieved by matching error Twiss parameters in this point to the desired

  19. A Taxonomy to Enable Error Recovery and Correction in Software Vilas Sridharan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaeli, David R.

    A Taxonomy to Enable Error Recovery and Correction in Software Vilas Sridharan ECE Department years, reliability research has largely used the following taxonomy of errors: Undetected Errors Errors (CE). While this taxonomy is suitable to characterize hardware error detection and correction

  20. A simple real-word error detection and correction using local word bigram and trigram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A simple real-word error detection and correction using local word bigram and trigram Pratip bbcisical@gmail.com Abstract Spelling error is broadly classified in two categories namely non word error and real word error. In this paper a localized real word error detection and correction method is proposed

  1. Compiler-Assisted Detection of Transient Memory Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavarageri, Sanket; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2014-06-09

    The probability of bit flips in hardware memory systems is projected to increase significantly as memory systems continue to scale in size and complexity. Effective hardware-based error detection and correction requires that the complete data path, involving all parts of the memory system, be protected with sufficient redundancy. First, this may be costly to employ on commodity computing platforms and second, even on high-end systems, protection against multi-bit errors may be lacking. Therefore, augmenting hardware error detection schemes with software techniques is of consider- able interest. In this paper, we consider software-level mechanisms to comprehensively detect transient memory faults. We develop novel compile-time algorithms to instrument application programs with checksum computation codes so as to detect memory errors. Unlike prior approaches that employ checksums on computational and architectural state, our scheme verifies every data access and works by tracking variables as they are produced and consumed. Experimental evaluation demonstrates that the proposed comprehensive error detection solution is viable as a completely software-only scheme. We also demonstrate that with limited hardware support, overheads of error detection can be further reduced.

  2. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Errormore »rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu , Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition. « less

  3. Adaptive dynamic inversion of nonlinear systems subjected to control saturation constraints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tandale, Monish Deepak

    2007-09-17

    The adaptive dynamic inversion control methodology uses dynamic inversion to calculate the control, and adaptation to compensate for the errors in the inversion due to model uncertainties. Traditionally, adaptive control assumes full authority...

  4. OCTOBER 2013 IEEE CONTROL SYSTEMS MAGAZINE 23 PEOPLE IN CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    OCTOBER 2013 « IEEE CONTROL SYSTEMS MAGAZINE 23 PEOPLE IN CONTROL « I n this issue of IEEE Control Systems Magazine, we speak with six IEEE Fellows in the control systems field. Ben M. Chen is a professor and area director of Control, Intelligent Systems, and Robotics in the Department of Elec- trical

  5. Performance Analysis: Work Control Events Identified January - August 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Grange, C E; Freeman, J W; Kerr, C E; Holman, G; Marsh, K; Beach, R

    2011-01-14

    This performance analysis evaluated 24 events that occurred at LLNL from January through August 2010. The analysis identified areas of potential work control process and/or implementation weaknesses and several common underlying causes. Human performance improvement and safety culture factors were part of the causal analysis of each event and were analyzed. The collective significance of all events in 2010, as measured by the occurrence reporting significance category and by the proportion of events that have been reported to the DOE ORPS under the ''management concerns'' reporting criteria, does not appear to have increased in 2010. The frequency of reporting in each of the significance categories has not changed in 2010 compared to the previous four years. There is no change indicating a trend in the significance category and there has been no increase in the proportion of occurrences reported in the higher significance category. Also, the frequency of events, 42 events reported through August 2010, is not greater than in previous years and is below the average of 63 occurrences per year at LLNL since 2006. Over the previous four years, an average of 43% of the LLNL's reported occurrences have been reported as either ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' In 2010, 29% of the occurrences have been reported as ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' This rate indicates that LLNL is now reporting fewer ''management concern'' and ''near miss'' occurrences compared to the previous four years. From 2008 to the present, LLNL senior management has undertaken a series of initiatives to strengthen the work planning and control system with the primary objective to improve worker safety. In 2008, the LLNL Deputy Director established the Work Control Integrated Project Team to develop the core requirements and graded elements of an institutional work planning and control system. By the end of that year this system was documented and implementation had begun. In 2009, training of the workforce began and as of the time of this report more than 50% of authorized Integration Work Sheets (IWS) use the activity-based planning process. In 2010, LSO independently reviewed the work planning and control process and confirmed to the Laboratory that the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) System was implemented. LLNL conducted a cross-directorate management self-assessment of work planning and control and is developing actions to respond to the issues identified. Ongoing efforts to strengthen the work planning and control process and to improve the quality of LLNL work packages are in progress: completion of remaining actions in response to the 2009 DOE Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) evaluation of LLNL's ISM System; scheduling more than 14 work planning and control self-assessments in FY11; continuing to align subcontractor work control with the Institutional work planning and control system; and continuing to maintain the electronic IWS application. The 24 events included in this analysis were caused by errors in the first four of the five ISMS functions. The most frequent cause was errors in analyzing the hazards (Function 2). The second most frequent cause was errors occurring when defining the work (Function 1), followed by errors during the performance of work (Function 4). Interestingly, very few errors in developing controls (Function 3) resulted in events. This leads one to conclude that if improvements are made to defining the scope of work and analyzing the potential hazards, LLNL may reduce the frequency or severity of events. Analysis of the 24 events resulted in the identification of ten common causes. Some events had multiple causes, resulting in the mention of 39 causes being identified for the 24 events. The most frequent cause was workers, supervisors, or experts believing they understood the work and the hazards but their understanding was incomplete. The second most frequent cause was unclear, incomplete or confusing documents directing the work. Together, these two causes were mentioned 17 times and co

  6. On the implementation of error handling in dynamic interfaces to scientific codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, C.J.

    1993-11-01

    With the advent of powerful workstations with windowing systems, the scientific community has become interested in user friendly interfaces as a means of promoting the distribution of scientific codes to colleagues. Distributing scientific codes to a wider audience can, however, be problematic because scientists, who are familiar with the problem being addressed but not aware of necessary operational details, are encouraged to use the codes. A more friendly environment that not only guides user inputs, but also helps catch errors is needed. This thesis presents a dynamic graphical user interface (GUI) creation system with user controlled support for error detection and handling. The system checks a series of constraints defining a valid input set whenever the state of the system changes and notifies the user when an error has occurred. A naive checking scheme was implemented that checks every constraint every time the system changes. However, this method examines many constraints whose values have not changed. Therefore, a minimum evaluation scheme that only checks those constraints that may have been violated was implemented. This system was implemented in a prototype and user testing was used to determine if it was a success. Users examined both the GUI creation system and the end-user environment. The users found both to be easy to use and efficient enough for practical use. Moreover, they concluded that the system would promote distribution.

  7. Bayesian Semiparametric Density Deconvolution and Regression in the Presence of Measurement Errors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Abhra

    2014-06-24

    Although the literature on measurement error problems is quite extensive, solutions to even the most fundamental measurement error problems like density deconvolution and regression with errors-in-covariates are available ...

  8. Estimation of the error for small-sample optimal binary filter design using prior knowledge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabbagh, David L

    1999-01-01

    Optimal binary filters estimate an unobserved ideal quantity from observed quantities. Optimality is with respect to some error criterion, which is usually mean absolute error MAE (or equivalently mean square error) for the binary values. Both...

  9. Fault tree analysis of commonly occurring medication errors and methods to reduce them 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherian, Sandhya Mary

    1994-01-01

    -depth analysis of over two hundred actual medication error incidents. These errors were then classified according to type, in an attempt at deriving a generalized fault tree for the medication delivery system that contributed to errors. This generalized fault...

  10. EFFECT OF MANUFACTURING ERRORS ON FIELD QUALITY OF DIPOLE MAGNETS FOR THE SSC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meuser, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    in Fig. 2. Table 2. Manufacturing Error Mode Groups13-16, 1985 EFFECT OF MANUFACTURING ERRORS ON FIELD QUALITYMag Note-27 EFFECT OF MANUFACTURING ERRORS ON FIELO QUALITY

  11. The New York Times headquarters daylighting mockup: Monitoredperformance of the daylighting control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2006-02-24

    A nine-month monitored field study of the performance of automated roller shades and daylighting controls was conducted in a 401 m{sup 2} unoccupied, furnished daylighting mockup. The mockup mimicked the southwest corner of a new 110 km{sub 2} commercial building in New York, New York, where The New York Times will be the major tenant. This paper focuses on evaluating the performance of two daylighting control systems installed in separate areas of an open plan office with 1.2-m high workstation partitions: (1) Area A had 0-10 V dimmable ballasts with an open-loop proportional control system and an automated shade controlled to reduce window glare and increase daylight, and (2) Area B had digital addressable lighting interface (DALI) ballasts with a closed-loop integral reset control system and an automated shade controlled to block direct sun. Daylighting control system performance and lighting energy use were monitored. The daylighting control systems demonstrated very reliable performance after they were commissioned properly. Work plane illuminance levels were maintained above 90% of the maximum fluorescent illuminance level for 99.9{+-}0.5% and 97.9{+-}6.1% of the day on average over the monitored period, respectively, in Areas A and B. Daily lighting energy use savings were significant in both Areas over the equinox-to-equinox period compared to a non-daylit reference case. At 3.35 m from the window, 30% average savings were achieved with a sidelit west-facing condition in Area A while 50-60% were achieved with a bilateral daylit south-facing condition in Area B. At 4.57-9.14 m from the window, 5-10% and 25-40% savings were achieved in Areas A and B, respectively. Average savings for the 7-m deep dimming zone were 20-23% and 52-59% for Areas A and B, respectively, depending on the lighting schedule. The large savings and good reliability can be attributed to the automatic management of the interior shades. The DALI-based system exhibited faulty behavior that remains unexplained, but operational errors are expected to be resolved as DALI products reach full maturity. The building owner received very competitive bids ($30-75 US/DALI ballast) and was able to justify use of the daylighting control system based on operational cost savings and increased amenity. Additional energy savings due to reduced solar and lighting heat gains were not quantified but will add to the total operational cost savings.

  12. Demolition/Construction to Close Parking Areas Near Accelerator...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DemolitionConstruction to Close Parking Areas Near Accelerator Site Entrance Demolition of the two Radiation Control Department trailers and Building 52 is expected to begin on...

  13. Remote sensing survey of the Coso geothermal area, Inyo county...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, Calif., is an area of granitic rock exposure and fracture-controlled explosion breccias and perlitic domes. Fumarolic and hot springs activity...

  14. Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit 51, CC in GIS; Cowen, David; Ferguson, Warren

    1990-01-01

    51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS1990 Page 1 Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas Computers inyour students. UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS Compiled with

  15. Structure of minimum-error quantum state discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joonwoo Bae

    2013-07-19

    Distinguishing different quantum states is a fundamental task having practical applications for information processing. Despite the efforts devoted so far, however, strategies for optimal discrimination are known only for specific examples. We here consider the problem of minimum-error quantum state discrimination where the average error is attempted to be minimized. We show the general structure of minimum-error state discrimination as well as useful properties to derive analytic solutions. Based on the general structure, we present a geometric formulation of the problem, which can be applied to cases where quantum state geometry is clear. We also introduce equivalent classes of sets of quantum states in terms of minimum-error discrimination: sets of quantum states in an equivalence class share the same guessing probability. In particular, for qubit states where the state geometry is found with the Bloch sphere, we illustrate that for an arbitrary set of qubit states, the minimum-error state discrimination with equal prior probabilities can be analytically solved, that is, optimal measurement and the guessing probability are explicitly obtained.

  16. Economic penalties of problems and errors in solar energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, K.; Sparkes, H.R.

    1983-01-01

    Experience with a large number of installed solar energy systems in the HUD Solar Program has shown that a variety of problems and design/installation errors have occurred in many solar systems, sometimes resulting in substantial additional costs for repair and/or replacement. In this paper, the effect of problems and errors on the economics of solar energy systems is examined. A method is outlined for doing this in terms of selected economic indicators. The method is illustrated by a simple example of a residential solar DHW system. An example of an installed, instrumented solar energy system in the HUD Solar Program is then discussed. Detailed results are given for the effects of the problems and errors on the cash flow, cost of delivered heat, discounted payback period, and life-cycle cost of the solar energy system. Conclusions are drawn regarding the most suitable economic indicators for showing the effects of problems and errors in solar energy systems. A method is outlined for deciding on the maximum justifiable expenditure for maintenance on a solar energy system with problems or errors.

  17. Goal-oriendted local a posteriori error estimator for H(div)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-12-15

    Dec 15, 2011 ... error estimator measures the pollution effect from the outside region of D ... error estimators which account for and quantify the pollution effect.

  18. Using mammographic density to predict breast cancer risk: dense area or percent dense area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Jennifer; Ding, Jane; Warren, Ruth M L; Duffy, Stephen; Hopper, John L

    2010-11-18

    and dense area were strongly associated with breast cancer risk; however, inclusion of dense area in a PDA-adjusted model improved the pre- diction of breast cancer risk, but not vice versa. This suggests that, in terms of a single parameter, dense area... dense area alone. Conclusions: As a single parameter, dense area provides more information than PDA on breast cancer risk. Introduction A number of prospective, nested case control studies have shown that, for women of the same age, those with greater...

  19. Reducing collective quantum state rotation errors with reversible dephasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Kevin C.; Norcia, Matthew A.; Weiner, Joshua M.; Bohnet, Justin G.; Thompson, James K.

    2014-12-29

    We demonstrate that reversible dephasing via inhomogeneous broadening can greatly reduce collective quantum state rotation errors, and observe the suppression of rotation errors by more than 21?dB in the context of collective population measurements of the spin states of an ensemble of 2.1×10{sup 5} laser cooled and trapped {sup 87}Rb atoms. The large reduction in rotation noise enables direct resolution of spin state populations 13(1) dB below the fundamental quantum projection noise limit. Further, the spin state measurement projects the system into an entangled state with 9.5(5) dB of directly observed spectroscopic enhancement (squeezing) relative to the standard quantum limit, whereas no enhancement would have been obtained without the suppression of rotation errors.

  20. Characterization of quantum dynamics using quantum error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Omkar; R. Srikanth; S. Banerjee

    2015-01-27

    Characterizing noisy quantum processes is important to quantum computation and communication (QCC), since quantum systems are generally open. To date, all methods of characterization of quantum dynamics (CQD), typically implemented by quantum process tomography, are \\textit{off-line}, i.e., QCC and CQD are not concurrent, as they require distinct state preparations. Here we introduce a method, "quantum error correction based characterization of dynamics", in which the initial state is any element from the code space of a quantum error correcting code that can protect the state from arbitrary errors acting on the subsystem subjected to the unknown dynamics. The statistics of stabilizer measurements, with possible unitary pre-processing operations, are used to characterize the noise, while the observed syndrome can be used to correct the noisy state. Our method requires at most $2(4^n-1)$ configurations to characterize arbitrary noise acting on $n$ qubits.

  1. Non-Gaussian numerical errors versus mass hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Meurice; M. B. Oktay

    2000-05-12

    We probe the numerical errors made in renormalization group calculations by varying slightly the rescaling factor of the fields and rescaling back in order to get the same (if there were no round-off errors) zero momentum 2-point function (magnetic susceptibility). The actual calculations were performed with Dyson's hierarchical model and a simplified version of it. We compare the distributions of numerical values obtained from a large sample of rescaling factors with the (Gaussian by design) distribution of a random number generator and find significant departures from the Gaussian behavior. In addition, the average value differ (robustly) from the exact answer by a quantity which is of the same order as the standard deviation. We provide a simple model in which the errors made at shorter distance have a larger weight than those made at larger distance. This model explains in part the non-Gaussian features and why the central-limit theorem does not apply.

  2. Factorization of correspondence and camera error for unconstrained dense correspondence applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoblauch, D; Hess-Flores, M; Duchaineau, M; Kuester, F

    2009-09-29

    A correspondence and camera error analysis for dense correspondence applications such as structure from motion is introduced. This provides error introspection, opening up the possibility of adaptively and progressively applying more expensive correspondence and camera parameter estimation methods to reduce these errors. The presented algorithm evaluates the given correspondences and camera parameters based on an error generated through simple triangulation. This triangulation is based on the given dense, non-epipolar constraint, correspondences and estimated camera parameters. This provides an error map without requiring any information about the perfect solution or making assumptions about the scene. The resulting error is a combination of correspondence and camera parameter errors. An simple, fast low/high pass filter error factorization is introduced, allowing for the separation of correspondence error and camera error. Further analysis of the resulting error maps is applied to allow efficient iterative improvement of correspondences and cameras.

  3. Full protection of superconducting qubit systems from coupling errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Storcz; J. Vala; K. R. Brown; J. Kempe; F. K. Wilhelm; K. B. Whaley

    2005-08-09

    Solid state qubits realized in superconducting circuits are potentially extremely scalable. However, strong decoherence may be transferred to the qubits by various elements of the circuits that couple individual qubits, particularly when coupling is implemented over long distances. We propose here an encoding that provides full protection against errors originating from these coupling elements, for a chain of superconducting qubits with a nearest neighbor anisotropic XY-interaction. The encoding is also seen to provide partial protection against errors deriving from general electronic noise.

  4. Comment on "Optimum Quantum Error Recovery using Semidefinite Programming"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Reimpell; R. F. Werner; K. Audenaert

    2006-06-07

    In a recent paper ([1]=quant-ph/0606035) it is shown how the optimal recovery operation in an error correction scheme can be considered as a semidefinite program. As a possible future improvement it is noted that still better error correction might be obtained by optimizing the encoding as well. In this note we present the result of such an improvement, specifically for the four-bit correction of an amplitude damping channel considered in [1]. We get a strict improvement for almost all values of the damping parameter. The method (and the computer code) is taken from our earlier study of such correction schemes (quant-ph/0307138).

  5. Error-prevention scheme with two pairs of qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Yang, Chui-Ping; Han, Siyuan

    2002-09-04

    Ei jue ie j&5ue je i& , e iP$0,1% @6#!. The expressions for HS and HSB are as follows: HS5e0~s I z 1s II z !, *Email address: cpyang@floquet.chem.ku.edu †Email address: sichu@ku.edu ‡ Email address: han@ku.eduError-prevention scheme Chui-Ping Yang.... The sche two pairs of qubits and through error-prevention proc through a decoherence-free subspace for collective p pairs; leakage out of the encoding space due to amp addition, how to construct decoherence-free states for n discussed. DOI: 10.1103/Phys...

  6. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy: Human error and critical tasks in remote afterloading brachytherapy and approaches for improved system performance. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L. [Pacific Science and Engineering Group, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error.

  7. Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 2011 DOE STANDARD Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public...

  8. Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CHANGE NOTICE NO.1 AUGUST 2011 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR MATERIALS CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington,...

  9. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and roads The spatial location and boundaries for each Site shown on the Site Monitoring Area maps originate from activities conducted under the Compliance Order on Consent with...

  10. Contributions to Human Errors and Breaches in National Security Applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pond, D. J.; Houghton, F. K.; Gilmore, W. E.

    2002-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has recognized that security infractions are often the consequence of various types of human errors (e.g., mistakes, lapses, slips) and/or breaches (i.e., deliberate deviations from policies or required procedures with no intention to bring about an adverse security consequence) and therefore has established an error reduction program based in part on the techniques used to mitigate hazard and accident potentials. One cornerstone of this program, definition of the situational and personal factors that increase the likelihood of employee errors and breaches, is detailed here. This information can be used retrospectively (as in accident investigations) to support and guide inquiries into security incidents or prospectively (as in hazard assessments) to guide efforts to reduce the likelihood of error/incident occurrence. Both approaches provide the foundation for targeted interventions to reduce the influence of these factors and for the formation of subsequent 'lessons learned.' Overall security is enhanced not only by reducing the inadvertent releases of classified information but also by reducing the security and safeguards resources devoted to them, thereby allowing these resources to be concentrated on acts of malevolence.

  11. Backward Error and Condition of Polynomial Eigenvalue Problems \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higham, Nicholas J.

    , 1999 Abstract We develop normwise backward errors and condition numbers for the polyno­ mial eigenvalue Research Council grant GR/L76532. 1 #12; where A l 2 C n\\Thetan , l = 0: m and we refer to P as a â??­matrix. Few direct numerical methods are available for solving the polynomial eigenvalue problem (PEP). When m

  12. DISCRIMINATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF UXO USING MAGNETOMETRY: INVERSION AND ERROR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sambridge, Malcolm

    DISCRIMINATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF UXO USING MAGNETOMETRY: INVERSION AND ERROR ANALYSIS USING for the different solutions didn't even overlap. Introduction A discrimination and classification strategy ambiguity and possible remanent magnetization the recovered dipole moment is compared to a library

  13. Rate Regions for Coherent and Noncoherent Multisource Network Error Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tracey

    ,tho,effros}@caltech.edu Joerg Kliewer New Mexico State University Email: jkliewer@nmsu.edu Elona Erez Yale University Email a single error on a network link may lead to a corruption of many received packets at the destination nodes

  14. Optimal Estimation from Relative Measurements: Error Scaling (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hespanha, João Pedro

    "relative" measurement between xu and xv is available: uv = xu - xv + u,v Rk , (u, v) E V × V, (1) whereOptimal Estimation from Relative Measurements: Error Scaling (Extended Abstract) Prabir Barooah Jo~ao P. Hespanha I. ESTIMATION FROM RELATIVE MEASUREMENTS We consider the problem of estimating a number

  15. Low Degree Test with Polynomially Small Error Dana Moshkovitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshkovitz, Dana

    Low Degree Test with Polynomially Small Error Dana Moshkovitz October 19, 2014 Abstract A long line of work in Theoretical Computer Science shows that a function is close to a low degree polynomial iff it is close to a low degree polynomial locally. This is known as low degree testing

  16. Time reversal in thermoacoustic tomography - an error estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hristova, Yulia

    2008-01-01

    The time reversal method in thermoacoustic tomography is used for approximating the initial pressure inside a biological object using measurements of the pressure wave made outside the object. This article presents error estimates for the time reversal method in the cases of variable, non-trapping sound speeds.

  17. DISCRIMINATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF UXO USING MAGNETOMETRY: INVERSION AND ERROR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    DISCRIMINATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF UXO USING MAGNETOMETRY: INVERSION AND ERROR ANALYSIS USING for the different solutions didn't even overlap. Introduction A discrimination and classification strategy-UXOs dug per UXO). The discrimination and classification methodology depends on the magnitude of the recov

  18. Designing Automation to Reduce Operator Errors Nancy G. Leveson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    Designing Automation to Reduce Operator Errors Nancy G. Leveson Computer Science and Engineering University of Washington Everett Palmer NASA Ames Research Center Introduction Advanced automation has been of mode­related problems [SW95]. After studying accidents and incidents in the new, highly automated

  19. Verification of unfold error estimates in the unfold operator code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation that attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the unfold operator (UFO) code written at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, the UFO code also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by estimated random uncertainties in the data. In UFO the unfold uncertainty is obtained from the error matrix. This built-in estimate has now been compared to error estimates obtained by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the test problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5{percent} (standard deviation). One hundred random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95{percent} confidence level). A possible 10{percent} bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetermined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 223 A Geometric Approach to Error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 223 A Geometric Approach to Error Detection and Recovery for Robot Motion, and uncertainty in the geometric * This report describes research done at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massach- usetts Institute of Technology. Support for the Laboratory's Artificial Intelligence research

  1. Error Bounds from Extra Precise Iterative Refinement James Demmel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaoye Sherry

    now prevented its adoption in standard subroutine libraries like LAPACK: (1) There was no standard way a reliable error bound for the computed solution. The completion of the new BLAS Technical Forum Standard [5 Cooperative Agreement No. ACI-9619020; NSF Grant Nos. ACI-9813362 and CCF-0444486; the DOE Grant Nos. DE-FG03

  2. Error rate and power dissipation in nano-logic devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jong Un

    2005-08-29

    of an error-free condition on temperature in single electron logic processors is derived. The size of the quantum dot of single electron transistor is predicted when a single electron logic processor with the a billion single electron transistors works without...

  3. Error rate and power dissipation in nano-logic devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jong Un

    2004-01-01

    -free condition on temperature in single electron logic processors is derived. The size of the quantum dot of a single electron transistor is predicted when a single electron logic processor with the 10? single electron transistors works without error at room...

  4. Urban Water Demand with Periodic Error Correction David R. Bell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Ronald

    them. Econometric estimates of residential demand for water abound (Dalhuisen et al. 2003Urban Water Demand with Periodic Error Correction by David R. Bell and Ronald C. Griffin February, Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University. #12;Abstract Monthly demand for publicly supplied

  5. Estimating the error distribution function in nonparametric regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Uschi

    Schick, Wolfgang Wefelmeyer Summary: We construct an efficient estimator for the error distribution estimator, influence function #12;2 M¨uller - Schick - Wefelmeyer M¨uller, Schick and Wefelmeyer (2004a. We refer also to the introduction of M¨uller, Schick and Wefelmeyer (2004b). Our proof is complicat

  6. Automatic Error Elimination by Horizontal Code Transfer across Multiple Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Automatic Error Elimination by Horizontal Code Transfer across Multiple Applications Stelios CSAIL, Cambridge, MA, USA Abstract We present Code Phage (CP), a system for automatically transferring. To the best of our knowledge, CP is the first system to automatically transfer code across multiple

  7. Development of an Expert System for Classification of Medical Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopec, Danny

    in the United States. There has been considerable speculation that these figures are either overestimated published by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) indicated that between 44,000 and 98,000 unnecessary deaths per in hospitals in the IOM report, what is of importance is that the number of deaths caused by such errors

  8. The contour method cutting assumption: error minimization and correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prime, Michael B; Kastengren, Alan L

    2010-01-01

    The recently developed contour method can measure 2-D, cross-sectional residual-stress map. A part is cut in two using a precise and low-stress cutting technique such as electric discharge machining. The contours of the new surfaces created by the cut, which will not be flat if residual stresses are relaxed by the cutting, are then measured and used to calculate the original residual stresses. The precise nature of the assumption about the cut is presented theoretically and is evaluated experimentally. Simply assuming a flat cut is overly restrictive and misleading. The critical assumption is that the width of the cut, when measured in the original, undeformed configuration of the body is constant. Stresses at the cut tip during cutting cause the material to deform, which causes errors. The effect of such cutting errors on the measured stresses is presented. The important parameters are quantified. Experimental procedures for minimizing these errors are presented. An iterative finite element procedure to correct for the errors is also presented. The correction procedure is demonstrated on experimental data from a steel beam that was plastically bent to put in a known profile of residual stresses.

  9. Selected CRC Polynomials Can Correct Errors and Thus Reduce Retransmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mache, Jens

    sensor networks, minimizing communication is crucial to improve energy consumption and thus lifetime Correction, Reliability, Network Protocol, Low Power Comsumption I. INTRODUCTION Error detection using Cyclic of retransmitting the whole packet - improves energy consumption and thus lifetime of wireless sensor networks

  10. A Spline Algorithm for Modeling Cutting Errors Turning Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilsinn, David E.

    . Bandy Automated Production Technology Division National Institute of Standards and Technology 100 Bureau are made up of features with profiles defined by arcs and lines. An error model for turned parts must take. In the case where there is a requirement of tangency between two features, such as a line tangent to an arc

  11. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Ordovician shale quartzite MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest...

  12. 300 Area signal cable study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whattam, J.W.

    1994-09-15

    This report was prepared to discuss the alternatives available for removing the 300 Area overhead signal cable system. This system, installed in 1969, has been used for various monitoring and communication signaling needs throughout the 300 Area. Over the years this cabling system has deteriorated, has been continually reconfigured, and has been poorly documented to the point of nonreliability. The first step was to look at the systems utilizing the overhead signal cable that are still required for operation. Of the ten systems that once operated via the signal cable, only five are still required; the civil defense evacuation alarms, the public address (PA) system, the criticality alarms, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Facilities Management Control System (FMCS), and the 384 annunciator panel. Of these five, the criticality alarms and the FMCS have been dealt with under other proposals. Therefore, this study focused on the alternatives available for the remaining three systems (evacuation alarms, PA system, and 384 panel) plus the accountability aid phones. Once the systems to be discussed were determined, then three alternatives for providing the signaling pathway were examined for each system: (1) re-wire using underground communication ducts, (2) use the Integrated Voice/Data Telecommunications System (IVDTS) already installed and operated by US West, and (3) use radio control. Each alternative was developed with an estimated cost, advantages, and disadvantages. Finally, a recommendation was provided for the best alternative for each system.

  13. Neutron Science Research Areas | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home | Science & Discovery | Neutron Science | Research Areas SHARE Research Areas Neutron scattering research at ORNL covers four broad research areas: biology and soft...

  14. CEES - Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of characterization, theory and materials synthesis, will lead to new approaches to control electrochemical reactions at the extreme conditions found in lithium-ion battery systems...

  15. Control Theory of Digitally Networked Dynamic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    Control Theory of Digitally Networked Dynamic Systems #12;Jan Lunze Editor Control Theory control technology for mobile objects. Due to this flexibility, a new challenge for control theory about networked control systems as a new area of control theory. This book gives a concise introduc

  16. MPI Runtime Error Detection with MUST: Advances in Deadlock Detection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hilbrich, Tobias; Protze, Joachim; Schulz, Martin; de Supinski, Bronis R.; Müller, Matthias S.

    2013-01-01

    The widely used Message Passing Interface (MPI) is complex and rich. As a result, application developers require automated tools to avoid and to detect MPI programming errors. We present the Marmot Umpire Scalable Tool (MUST) that detects such errors with significantly increased scalability. We present improvements to our graph-based deadlock detection approach for MPI, which cover future MPI extensions. Our enhancements also check complex MPI constructs that no previous graph-based detection approach handled correctly. Finally, we present optimizations for the processing of MPI operations that reduce runtime deadlock detection overheads. Existing approaches often require (p) analysis time per MPI operation,more »forpprocesses. We empirically observe that our improvements lead to sub-linear or better analysis time per operation for a wide range of real world applications.« less

  17. Comparison of Wind Power and Load Forecasting Error Distributions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Florita, A.; Orwig, K.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2012-07-01

    The introduction of large amounts of variable and uncertain power sources, such as wind power, into the electricity grid presents a number of challenges for system operations. One issue involves the uncertainty associated with scheduling power that wind will supply in future timeframes. However, this is not an entirely new challenge; load is also variable and uncertain, and is strongly influenced by weather patterns. In this work we make a comparison between the day-ahead forecasting errors encountered in wind power forecasting and load forecasting. The study examines the distribution of errors from operational forecasting systems in two different Independent System Operator (ISO) regions for both wind power and load forecasts at the day-ahead timeframe. The day-ahead timescale is critical in power system operations because it serves the unit commitment function for slow-starting conventional generators.

  18. Method and system for reducing errors in vehicle weighing systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Abercrombie, Robert K. (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-08-24

    A method and system (10, 23) for determining vehicle weight to a precision of <0.1%, uses a plurality of weight sensing elements (23), a computer (10) for reading in weighing data for a vehicle (25) and produces a dataset representing the total weight of a vehicle via programming (40-53) that is executable by the computer (10) for (a) providing a plurality of mode parameters that characterize each oscillatory mode in the data due to movement of the vehicle during weighing, (b) by determining the oscillatory mode at which there is a minimum error in the weighing data; (c) processing the weighing data to remove that dynamical oscillation from the weighing data; and (d) repeating steps (a)-(c) until the error in the set of weighing data is <0.1% in the vehicle weight.

  19. Geographic Area Month

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Fuels by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for...

  20. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  1. Runtime Detection of C-Style Errors in UPC Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirkelbauer, P; Liao, C; Panas, T; Quinlan, D

    2011-09-29

    Unified Parallel C (UPC) extends the C programming language (ISO C 99) with explicit parallel programming support for the partitioned global address space (PGAS), which provides a global memory space with localized partitions to each thread. Like its ancestor C, UPC is a low-level language that emphasizes code efficiency over safety. The absence of dynamic (and static) safety checks allows programmer oversights and software flaws that can be hard to spot. In this paper, we present an extension of a dynamic analysis tool, ROSE-Code Instrumentation and Runtime Monitor (ROSECIRM), for UPC to help programmers find C-style errors involving the global address space. Built on top of the ROSE source-to-source compiler infrastructure, the tool instruments source files with code that monitors operations and keeps track of changes to the system state. The resulting code is linked to a runtime monitor that observes the program execution and finds software defects. We describe the extensions to ROSE-CIRM that were necessary to support UPC. We discuss complications that arise from parallel code and our solutions. We test ROSE-CIRM against a runtime error detection test suite, and present performance results obtained from running error-free codes. ROSE-CIRM is released as part of the ROSE compiler under a BSD-style open source license.

  2. On the efficiency of nondegenerate quantum error correction codes for Pauli channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunnar Bjork; Jonas Almlof; Isabel Sainz

    2009-05-19

    We examine the efficiency of pure, nondegenerate quantum-error correction-codes for Pauli channels. Specifically, we investigate if correction of multiple errors in a block is more efficient than using a code that only corrects one error per block. Block coding with multiple-error correction cannot increase the efficiency when the qubit error-probability is below a certain value and the code size fixed. More surprisingly, existing multiple-error correction codes with a code length equal or less than 256 qubits have lower efficiency than the optimal single-error correcting codes for any value of the qubit error-probability. We also investigate how efficient various proposed nondegenerate single-error correcting codes are compared to the limit set by the code redundancy and by the necessary conditions for hypothetically existing nondegenerate codes. We find that existing codes are close to optimal.

  3. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  4. Tracking granules at the Sun's surface and reconstructing velocity fields. II. Error analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Tkaczuk; M. Rieutord; N. Meunier; T. Roudier

    2007-07-13

    The determination of horizontal velocity fields at the solar surface is crucial to understanding the dynamics and magnetism of the convection zone of the sun. These measurements can be done by tracking granules. Tracking granules from ground-based observations, however, suffers from the Earth's atmospheric turbulence, which induces image distortion. The focus of this paper is to evaluate the influence of this noise on the maps of velocity fields. We use the coherent structure tracking algorithm developed recently and apply it to two independent series of images that contain the same solar signal. We first show that a k-\\omega filtering of the times series of images is highly recommended as a pre-processing to decrease the noise, while, in contrast, using destretching should be avoided. We also demonstrate that the lifetime of granules has a strong influence on the error bars of velocities and that a threshold on the lifetime should be imposed to minimize errors. Finally, although solar flow patterns are easily recognizable and image quality is very good, it turns out that a time sampling of two images every 21 s is not frequent enough, since image distortion still pollutes velocity fields at a 30% level on the 2500 km scale, i.e. the scale on which granules start to behave like passive scalars. The coherent structure tracking algorithm is a useful tool for noise control on the measurement of surface horizontal solar velocity fields when at least two independent series are available.

  5. Quantum control theory and applications: A survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daoyi Dong; Ian R Petersen

    2011-01-10

    This paper presents a survey on quantum control theory and applications from a control systems perspective. Some of the basic concepts and main developments (including open-loop control and closed-loop control) in quantum control theory are reviewed. In the area of open-loop quantum control, the paper surveys the notion of controllability for quantum systems and presents several control design strategies including optimal control, Lyapunov-based methodologies, variable structure control and quantum incoherent control. In the area of closed-loop quantum control, the paper reviews closed-loop learning control and several important issues related to quantum feedback control including quantum filtering, feedback stabilization, LQG control and robust quantum control.

  6. An error-controlled adaptive chemistry method for reacting flow simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oluwole, Oluwayemisi

    2006-01-01

    Many technologically important processes in the chemical and mechanical industries involve coupled interactions of heat and mass transfer with chemical reactions - e.g. commercial burners, gas turbines, internal combustion ...

  7. Restricted Area Electives The following is a list of approved Restricted Area Electives for EE and CEO students. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Systems Analysis ECE 476 Control Systems Lab ECE 479 Digital Control Systems AREA 3: MATERIALS AND DEVICES Digital System Design ECE 481 Digital System Design Lab ECE 482 Computer Vision & Digital Image Processing ECE 484 Computer Architecture ECE 485 Programmable Logic Controllers ECE 486 Embedded Systems ECE 487

  8. A global conformance quality model. A new strategic tool for minimizing defects caused by variation, error, and complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinckley, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of Japanese products in the marketplace points to the dominant role of quality in product competition. Our focus is motivated by the tremendous pressure to improve conformance quality by reducing defects to previously unimaginable limits in the range of 1 to 10 parts per million. Toward this end, we have developed a new model of conformance quality that addresses each of the three principle defect sources: (1) Variation, (2) Human Error, and (3) Complexity. Although the role of variation in conformance quality is well documented, errors occur so infrequently that their significance is not well known. We have shown that statistical methods are not useful in characterizing and controlling errors, the most common source of defects. Excessive complexity is also a root source of defects, since it increases errors and variation defects. A missing link in the defining a global model has been the lack of a sound correlation between complexity and defects. We have used Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to quantify assembly complexity and have shown that assembly times can be described in terms of the Pareto distribution in a clear exception to the Central Limit Theorem. Within individual companies we have found defects to be highly correlated with DFA measures of complexity in broad studies covering tens of millions of assembly operations. Applying the global concepts, we predicted that Motorola`s Six Sigma method would only reduce defects by roughly a factor of two rather than orders of magnitude, a prediction confirmed by Motorola`s data. We have also shown that the potential defects rates of product concepts can be compared in the earliest stages of development. The global Conformance Quality Model has demonstrated that the best strategy for improvement depends upon the quality control strengths and weaknesses.

  9. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  10. Randomized control of open quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenza Viola

    2006-01-16

    The problem of open-loop dynamical control of generic open quantum systems is addressed. In particular, I focus on the task of effectively switching off environmental couplings responsible for unwanted decoherence and dissipation effects. After revisiting the standard framework for dynamical decoupling via deterministic controls, I describe a different approach whereby the controller intentionally acquires a random component. An explicit error bound on worst-case performance of stochastic decoupling is presented.

  11. Simulations of error in quantum adiabatic computations of random 2-SAT instances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gill, Jay S. (Jay Singh)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a series of simulations of quantum computations using the adiabatic algorithm. The goal is to explore the effect of error, using a perturbative approach that models 1-local errors to the Hamiltonian ...

  12. Design techniques for graph-based error-correcting codes and their applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lan, Ching Fu

    2006-04-12

    -correcting (channel) coding. The main idea of error-correcting codes is to add redundancy to the information to be transmitted so that the receiver can explore the correlation between transmitted information and redundancy and correct or detect errors caused...

  13. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre; Zeeb, Hajo

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope ? is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of ?) is biased for ??0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.

  14. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre; Zeeb, Hajo

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takesmore »up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope ? is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of ?) is biased for ??0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.« less

  15. A REMARK ON ROBUST STABILIZATION OF GENERAL ASYMPTOTICALLY CONTROLLABLE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    A REMARK ON ROBUST STABILIZATION OF GENERAL ASYMPTOTICALLY CONTROLLABLE SYSTEMS Yu. S recently by Clarke, Ledyaev, Sontag and Subbotin that any asymptotically controllable system can to measurement error. This new design relies upon a controller which incorporates an internal model of the system

  16. The Impact of Soil Sampling Errors on Variable Rate Fertilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. Hoskinson; R C. Rope; L G. Blackwood; R D. Lee; R K. Fink

    2004-07-01

    Variable rate fertilization of an agricultural field is done taking into account spatial variability in the soil’s characteristics. Most often, spatial variability in the soil’s fertility is the primary characteristic used to determine the differences in fertilizers applied from one point to the next. For several years the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) to determine the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field, based on existing soil fertility at the site, predicted yield of the crop that would result (and a predicted harvest-time market price), and the current costs and compositions of the fertilizers to be applied. Typically, soil is sampled at selected points within a field, the soil samples are analyzed in a lab, and the lab-measured soil fertility of the point samples is used for spatial interpolation, in some statistical manner, to determine the soil fertility at all other points in the field. Then a decision tool determines the fertilizers to apply at each point. Our research was conducted to measure the impact on the variable rate fertilization recipe caused by variability in the measurement of the soil’s fertility at the sampling points. The variability could be laboratory analytical errors or errors from variation in the sample collection method. The results show that for many of the fertility parameters, laboratory measurement error variance exceeds the estimated variability of the fertility measure across grid locations. These errors resulted in DSS4Ag fertilizer recipe recommended application rates that differed by up to 138 pounds of urea per acre, with half the field differing by more than 57 pounds of urea per acre. For potash the difference in application rate was up to 895 pounds per acre and over half the field differed by more than 242 pounds of potash per acre. Urea and potash differences accounted for almost 87% of the cost difference. The sum of these differences could result in a $34 per acre cost difference for the fertilization. Because of these differences, better analysis or better sampling methods may need to be done, or more samples collected, to ensure that the soil measurements are truly representative of the field’s spatial variability.

  17. Error-field penetration in reversed magnetic shear configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H. H.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, X. Q. [MOE Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Beams of the Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [MOE Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Beams of the Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, X. G. [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Error-field penetration in reversed magnetic shear (RMS) configurations is numerically investigated by using a two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic model in slab geometry. To explore different dynamic processes in locked modes, three equilibrium states are adopted. Stable, marginal, and unstable current profiles for double tearing modes are designed by varying the current intensity between two resonant surfaces separated by a certain distance. Further, the dynamic characteristics of locked modes in the three RMS states are identified, and the relevant physics mechanisms are elucidated. The scaling behavior of critical perturbation value with initial plasma velocity is numerically obtained, which obeys previously established relevant analytical theory in the viscoresistive regime.

  18. Error 401 on upload? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop,Erosion Flume Jump to: navigation, search BasicError

  19. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  20. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  1. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  2. Plasma parameter scaling of the error-field penetration threshold in tokamaks Richard Fitzpatrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    Plasma parameter scaling of the error-field penetration threshold in tokamaks Richard Fitzpatrick of a rotating tokamak plasma to a resonant error-field Phys. Plasmas 21, 092513 (2014); 10.1063/1.4896244 A nonideal error-field response model for strongly shaped tokamak plasmas Phys. Plasmas 17, 112502 (2010); 10

  3. Matt Duckham Page 1 Implementing an object-oriented error sensitive GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckham, Matt

    Matt Duckham Page 1 Implementing an object-oriented error sensitive GIS Matt Duckham Department in the handling of uncertainty within GIS, the production of what has been described as an error sensitive GIS of opportunities, but also impediments to the implemen- tation of such an error sensitive GIS. An important barrier

  4. Repeated quantum error correction on a continuously encoded qubit by real-time feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia Cramer; Norbert Kalb; M. Adriaan Rol; Bas Hensen; Machiel S. Blok; Matthew Markham; Daniel J. Twitchen; Ronald Hanson; Tim H. Taminiau

    2015-08-06

    Reliable quantum information processing in the face of errors is a major fundamental and technological challenge. Quantum error correction protects quantum states by encoding a logical quantum bit (qubit) in multiple physical qubits, so that errors can be detected without affecting the encoded state. To be compatible with universal fault-tolerant computations, it is essential that the states remain encoded at all times and that errors are actively corrected. Here we demonstrate such active error correction on a continuously protected qubit using a diamond quantum processor. We encode a logical qubit in three long-lived nuclear spins, repeatedly detect phase errors by non-destructive measurements using an ancilla electron spin, and apply corrections on the encoded state by real-time feedback. The actively error-corrected qubit is robust against errors and multiple rounds of error correction prevent errors from accumulating. Moreover, by correcting phase errors naturally induced by the environment, we demonstrate that encoded quantum superposition states are preserved beyond the dephasing time of the best physical qubit used in the encoding. These results establish a powerful platform for the fundamental investigation of error correction under different types of noise and mark an important step towards fault-tolerant quantum information processing.

  5. Simulating and Detecting Radiation-Induced Errors for Onboard Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulating and Detecting Radiation-Induced Errors for Onboard Machine Learning Robert Granat, Kiri-based fault tolerance (ABFT) methods into onboard data analysis algorithms to detect radiation-induced errors for detecting and recovering from such errors. A common hardware technique for achieving radiation protection

  6. Edit: Study -APP Save | Exit | Hide/Show Errors | Print... | Jump To

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biederman, Irving

    Edit: Study - APP Save | Exit | Hide/Show Errors | Print... | Jump To: 01. Project Guidance Save | Exit | Hide/Show Errors | Print... | Jump To: 01. Project IdentificationStarDev/ResourceAdministration/Project/ProjectEditor?Project=com... 1 #12;Edit: Study - APP- Save | Exit | Hide/Show Errors | Print... | Jump To: 02. Study

  7. Error Correction on a Tree: An Instanton Approach V. Chernyak,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepanov, Misha

    or semianalytical estimating of the post-error correction bit error rate (BER) when a forward-error correction 630090, Russia 5 Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA is utilized for transmitting information through a noisy channel. The generic method that applies to a variety

  8. Exposure Measurement Error in Time-Series Studies of Air Pollution: Concepts and Consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    1 Exposure Measurement Error in Time-Series Studies of Air Pollution: Concepts and Consequences S in time-series studies 1 11/11/99 Keywords: measurement error, air pollution, time series, exposure of air pollution and health. Because measurement error may have substantial implications for interpreting

  9. Verification of unfold error estimates in the UFO code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F.

    1996-07-01

    Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation which attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of tabulated response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the UFO (UnFold Operator) code. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, UFO also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5% (standard deviation). 100 random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95% confidence level). A possible 10% bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetemined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-Pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums.

  10. Compensated gain control circuit for buck regulator command charge circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barrett, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A buck regulator command charge circuit includes a compensated-gain control signal for compensating for changes in the component values in order to achieve optimal voltage regulation. The compensated-gain control circuit includes an automatic-gain control circuit for generating a variable-gain control signal. The automatic-gain control circuit is formed of a precision rectifier circuit, a filter network, an error amplifier, and an integrator circuit.

  11. Compensated gain control circuit for buck regulator command charge circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barrett, D.M.

    1996-11-05

    A buck regulator command charge circuit includes a compensated-gain control signal for compensating for changes in the component values in order to achieve optimal voltage regulation. The compensated-gain control circuit includes an automatic-gain control circuit for generating a variable-gain control signal. The automatic-gain control circuit is formed of a precision rectifier circuit, a filter network, an error amplifier, and an integrator circuit. 5 figs.

  12. SU-E-T-374: Sensitivity of ArcCHECK to Tomotherapy Delivery Errors: Dependence On Analysis Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, A; Chu, J; Turian, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: ArcCHECK (Sun Nuclear) is a cylindrical diode array detector allowing three-dimensional sampling of dose, particularly useful in treatment delivery QA of helical tomotherapy. Gamma passing rate is a common method of analyzing results from diode arrays, but is less intuitive in 3D with complex measured dose distributions. This study explores the sensitivity of gamma passing rate to choice of analysis technique in the context of its ability to detect errors introduced into the treatment delivery. Methods: Nine treatment plans were altered to introduce errors in: couch speed, gantry/sonogram synchronization, and leaf open time. Each plan was then delivered to ArcCHECK in each of the following arrangements: “offset,” when the high dose area of the plan is delivered to the side of the phantom so that some diode measurements will be on the order of the prescription dose, and “centered,” when the high dose is in the center of the phantom where an ion chamber measurement may be acquired, but the diode measurements are in the mid to low-dose region at the periphery of the plan. Gamma analysis was performed at 3%/3mm tolerance and both global and local gamma criteria. The threshold of detectability for each error type was calculated as the magnitude at which the gamma passing rate drops below 90%. Results: Global gamma criteria reduced the sensitivity in the offset arrangement (from 2.3% to 4.5%, 8° to 21°, and 3ms to 8ms for couch-speed decrease, gantry-error, and leaf-opening increase, respectively). The centered arrangement detected changes at 3.3%, 5°, and 4ms with smaller variation. Conclusion: Each arrangement has advantages; offsetting allows more sampling of the higher dose region, while centering allows an ion chamber measurement and potentially better use of tools such as 3DVH, at the cost of positioning more of the diodes in the sometimes noisy mid-dose region.

  13. Using System Dynamics to Define, Study, and Implement Smart Control Strategies on the Electric Power Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle G. Roybal; Robert F Jeffers

    2013-07-01

    The United States electric power grid is the most complex and expansive control system in the world. Local generation control occurs at individual units based on response time and unit economics, larger regional control coordinates unit response to error conditions, and high level large-area regional control is ultimately administered by a network of humans guided by economic and resiliency related factors. Under normal operating conditions, the grid is a relatively slow moving entity that exhibits high inertia to outside stimuli, and behaves along repeatable diurnal and seasonal patterns. However, that paradigm is quickly changing because of the increasing implementation of renewable generation sources. Renewable generators by nature cannot be tightly controlled or scheduled. They appear like a negative load to the system with all of the variability associated with load on a larger scale. Also, grid-reactive loads (i.e. smart devices) can alter their consumption based on price or demand rules adding more variability to system behavior. This paper demonstrates how a systems dynamic modeling approach capable of operating over multiple time scales, can provide valuable insight into developing new “smart-grid” control strategies and devices needed to accommodate renewable generation and regulate the frequency of the grid.

  14. Program Areas | National Security | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Program Areas SHARE Program Areas image Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a robust...

  15. V-235: Cisco Mobility Services Engine Configuration Error Lets...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-076: Cisco Wireless LAN Controller Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service and Remote Authenticated Users...

  16. Priority and fair scheduling in wireless local area networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dugar, Anurag

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, fair scheduling and quality of service (QoS) in Wireless Local Area Networks have received significant attention from the networking research community. This thesis presents a distributed Medium Access Control (MAC) protocol...

  17. Errors Characteristics of Two Grid Refinement Approaches in Aquaplanet Simulations: MPAS-A and WRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd

    2013-09-01

    This study compares the error characteristics associated with two grid refinement approaches including global variable resolution and nesting for high resolution regional climate modeling. The global variable resolution model, Model for Prediction Across Scales-Atmosphere (MPAS-A), and the limited area model, Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are compared in an idealized aqua-planet context. For MPAS-A, simulations have been performed with a quasi-uniform resolution global domain at coarse (1°) and high (0.25°) resolution, and a variable resolution domain with a high resolution region at 0.25° configured inside a coarse resolution global domain at 1° resolution. Similarly, WRF has been configured to run on a coarse (1°) and high (0.25°) tropical channel domain as well as a nested domain with a high resolution region at 0.25° nested two-way inside the coarse resolution (1°) tropical channel. The variable resolution or nested simulations are compared against the high resolution simulations. Both models respond to increased resolution with enhanced precipitation. Limited and significant reduction in the ratio of convective to non-convective precipitation. The limited area grid refinement induces zonal asymmetry in precipitation (heating), accompanied by zonal anomalous Walker like circulations and standing Rossby wave signals. Within the high resolution limited area, the zonal distribution of precipitation is affected by advection in MPAS-A and by the nesting strategy in WRF. In both models, 20 day Kelvin waves propagate through the high-resolution domains fairly unaffected by the change in resolution (and the presence of a boundary in WRF) but increased resolution strengthens eastward propagating inertio-gravity waves.

  18. Pollution error in the h-version of the finite-element method and the local quality of a-posteriori error estimators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Anuj

    1994-01-01

    In this work we study the pollution-error in the h-version of the finite element method and its effect on the local quality of a-posteriori error estimators. We show that the pollution-effect in an interior subdomain depends on the relationship...

  19. Errors, 3rd printing Page 3, Fig 1.2 has an error in the stratigraphic key: "Tertiary" should be "Triassic".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossen, Haakon

    Errors, 3rd printing ·Page 3, Fig 1.2 has an error in the stratigraphic key: "Tertiary" should "-amplitude" to "-wavelength". ·Page 231, 6th and 3rd last lines of the page: Add "Figure" in front of 19.5a ..." and 3rd line: "three principal axes" (not two). #12;

  20. Comparison of Small Area Models in SAIPE Tapabrata Maiti and Eric V. Slud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    -squared errors, generalized linear mixed model, mixed effect logistic regression, loss function, small area-Herriot models for logarithms of county child poverty rates with a unit- (i.e., individual-) level logistic regression model with county-level random effects (GLMM). This comparison is based upon several loss criteria

  1. Error field penetration and locking to the backward propagating wave

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Finn, John M.; Cole, Andrew J.; Brennan, Dylan P.

    2015-12-30

    In this letter we investigate error field penetration, or locking, behavior in plasmas having stable tearing modes with finite real frequencies wr in the plasma frame. In particular, we address the fact that locking can drive a significant equilibrium flow. We show that this occurs at a velocity slightly above v = wr/k, corresponding to the interaction with a backward propagating tearing mode in the plasma frame. Results are discussed for a few typical tearing mode regimes, including a new derivation showing that the existence of real frequencies occurs for viscoresistive tearing modes, in an analysis including the effects ofmore »pressure gradient, curvature and parallel dynamics. The general result of locking to a finite velocity flow is applicable to a wide range of tearing mode regimes, indeed any regime where real frequencies occur.« less

  2. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; et al

    2015-05-11

    The study present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty aboutmore »a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ~1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Sérsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods’ results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.« less

  3. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; Fenech Conti, Ian; Gavazzi, Raphael; Gentile, Marc; Gill, Mandeep S. S.; Hogg, David W.; Huff, Eric M.; Jee, M. James; Kacprzak, Tomasz; Kilbinger, Martin; Kuntzer, Thibault; Lang, Dustin; Luo, Wentao; March, Marisa C.; Marshall, Philip J.; Meyers, Joshua E.; Miller, Lance; Miyatake, Hironao; Nakajima, Reiko; Ngole Mboula, Fred Maurice; Nurbaeva, Guldariya; Okura, Yuki; Paulin-Henriksson, Stephane; Rhodes, Jason; Schneider, Michael D.; Shan, Huanyuan; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simet, Melanie; Starck, Jean -Luc; Sureau, Florent; Tewes, Malte; Zarb Adami, Kristian; Zhang, Jun; Zuntz, Joe

    2015-05-11

    The study present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ~1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Sérsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods’ results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.

  4. 100 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentataboutScalablePhysicist: Christian Bauer 101000 Area

  5. 300 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News Below are newsBelle-IIProcesses -1300 Area

  6. 700 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News Below are4B Drawings 4B618-10 and700 Area

  7. Tank Farm Area Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:Take Action APPENDIX-11CoverArea

  8. Tank Farm Area Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:Take Action APPENDIX-11CoverArea

  9. Material Disposal Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudgetMaterial Disposal Areas Material

  10. Working with Radioactive Materials in Clinical Areas -Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Working with Radioactive Materials in Clinical Areas - Documentation Procedure: 7.54 Created: 2008 Version: 1.1 Revised: 11/5/2013 10/22/2014 Working with Radioactive Materials in Clinical Areas of the City of New York, Article 175, Radiation Control1 and New York City Department of Health Radioactive

  11. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Collingwood CFB Borden 0 10 20 Kilometers Area = 521,900 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Population

  12. Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.orgsitesdefaultfilespublications...

  13. Dream controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L; Wang, Qiang; Chow, Andrew J

    2013-11-26

    A method and apparatus for intelligently controlling continuous process variables. A Dream Controller comprises an Intelligent Engine mechanism and a number of Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controllers, each of which is suitable to control a process with specific behaviors. The Intelligent Engine can automatically select the appropriate MFA controller and its parameters so that the Dream Controller can be easily used by people with limited control experience and those who do not have the time to commission, tune, and maintain automatic controllers.

  14. Neutron economic reactivity control system for light water reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luce, Robert G. (Glenville, NY); McCoy, Daniel F. (Latham, NY); Merriman, Floyd C. (Rotterdam, NY); Gregurech, Steve (Scotia, NY)

    1989-01-01

    A neutron reactivity control system for a LWBR incorporating a stationary seed-blanket core arrangement. The core arrangement includes a plurality of contiguous hexagonal shaped regions. Each region has a central and a peripheral blanket area juxapositioned an annular seed area. The blanket areas contain thoria fuel rods while the annular seed area includes seed fuel rods and movable thoria shim control rods.

  15. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  16. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-07

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  17. Quantifying the gap between embedded control models and time-triggered implementations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    . For linear systems controlled by linear controllers, we show how to calculate the exact error between on illustrative examples. 1 Introduction Contemporary industrial control design relies heavily on tools of implementing feedback control loops by soft- ware [9]. Consider a physical plant interacting with a digital

  18. SU-E-J-235: Varian Portal Dosimetry Accuracy at Detecting Simulated Delivery Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, J; Bellon, M; Barton, K; Gulam, M; Chetty, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To use receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to quantify the Varian Portal Dosimetry (VPD) application's ability to detect delivery errors in IMRT fields. Methods: EPID and VPD were calibrated/commissioned using vendor-recommended procedures. Five clinical plans comprising 56 modulated fields were analyzed using VPD. Treatment sites were: pelvis, prostate, brain, orbit, and base of tongue. Delivery was on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator at 6MV using a Millenium120 multi-leaf collimator. Image pairs (VPD-predicted and measured) were exported in dicom format. Each detection test imported an image pair into Matlab, optionally inserted a simulated error (rectangular region with intensity raised or lowered) into the measured image, performed 3%/3mm gamma analysis, and saved the gamma distribution. For a given error, 56 negative tests (without error) were performed, one per 56 image pairs. Also, 560 positive tests (with error) with randomly selected image pairs and randomly selected in-field error location. Images were classified as errored (or error-free) if percent pixels with ?errors of different sizes. VPD was considered to reliably detect an error if images were correctly classified as errored or error-free at least 95% of the time, for some ?+? combination. Results: 20mm{sup 2} errors with intensity altered by ?20% could be reliably detected, as could 10mm{sup 2} errors with intensity was altered by ?50%. Errors with smaller size or intensity change could not be reliably detected. Conclusion: Varian Portal Dosimetry using 3%/3mm gamma analysis is capable of reliably detecting only those fluence errors that exceed the stated sizes. Images containing smaller errors can pass mathematical analysis, though may be detected by visual inspection. This work was not funded by Varian Oncology Systems. Some authors have other work partly funded by Varian Oncology Systems.

  19. Secure estimation and control for cyber-physical systems under adversarial attacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fawzi, Hamza; Diggavi, Suhas

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of today's critical infrastructure is supported by numerous feedback control loops and an attack on these control loops can have disastrous consequences. This is a major concern since modern control systems are becoming large and decentralized and thus more vulnerable to attacks. This paper is concerned with the estimation and control of linear systems when some of the sensors or actuators are corrupted by an attacker. In the first part we look at the estimation problem where we characterize the resilience of a system to attacks and study the possibility of increasing its resilience by a change of parameters. We then propose an efficient algorithm to estimate the state despite the attacks and we characterize its performance. Our approach is inspired from the areas of error-correction over the reals and compressed sensing. In the second part we consider the problem of designing output-feedback controllers that stabilize the system despite attacks. We show that a principle of separation betwee...

  20. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 2:50pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department...

  1. Robustness of Controlled Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andy Koswara; Raj Chakrabarti

    2014-09-29

    Control of multi-level quantum systems is sensitive to implementation errors in the control field and uncertainties associated with system Hamiltonian parameters. A small variation in the control field spectrum or the system Hamiltonian can cause an otherwise optimal field to deviate from controlling desired quantum state transitions and reaching a particular objective. An accurate analysis of robustness is thus essential in understanding and achieving model-based quantum control, such as in control of chemical reactions based on ab initio or experimental estimates of the molecular Hamiltonian. In this paper, theoretical foundations for quantum control robustness analysis are presented from both a distributional perspective - in terms of moments of the transition amplitude, interferences, and transition probability - and a worst-case perspective. Based on this theory, analytical expressions and a computationally efficient method for determining the robustness of coherently controlled quantum dynamics are derived. The robustness analysis reveals that there generally exists a set of control pathways that are more resistant to destructive interferences in the presence of control field and system parameter uncertainty. These robust pathways interfere and combine to yield a relatively accurate transition amplitude and high transition probability when uncertainty is present.

  2. Contagious error sources would need time travel to prevent quantum computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil Kalai; Greg Kuperberg

    2015-05-07

    We consider an error model for quantum computing that consists of "contagious quantum germs" that can infect every output qubit when at least one input qubit is infected. Once a germ actively causes error, it continues to cause error indefinitely for every qubit it infects, with arbitrary quantum entanglement and correlation. Although this error model looks much worse than quasi-independent error, we show that it reduces to quasi-independent error with the technique of quantum teleportation. The construction, which was previously described by Knill, is that every quantum circuit can be converted to a mixed circuit with bounded quantum depth. We also consider the restriction of bounded quantum depth from the point of view of quantum complexity classes.

  3. Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting ControlApplications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

    2005-03-21

    The Subcontract Statement of Work consists of two major tasks. This report is the Final Report in fulfillment of the contract deliverable for Task 1. The purpose of Task 1 was to evaluate existing and emerging protocols and standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The detailed task description follows: Task 1. Evaluate alternative sensor/field buses. The objective of this task is to evaluate existing and emerging standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The protocols to be evaluated will include at least: (1) 1-Wire Net, (2) DALI, (3) MODBUS (or appropriate substitute such as EIB) and (4) ZigBee. The evaluation will include a comparative matrix for comparing the technical performance features of the different alternative systems. The performance features to be considered include: (1) directionality and network speed, (2) error control, (3) latency times, (4) allowable cable voltage drop, (5) topology, and (6) polarization. Specifically, Subcontractor will: (1) Analyze the proposed network architecture and identify potential problems that may require further research and specification. (2) Help identify and specify additional software and hardware components that may be required for the communications network to operate properly. (3) Identify areas of the architecture that can benefit from existing standards and technology and enumerate those standards and technologies. (4) Identify existing companies that may have relevant technology that can be applied to this research. (5) Help determine if new standards or technologies need to be developed.

  4. Brainstem areas controlling the motor inhibition of animal hypnosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBride, Russell Leavitt

    1968-01-01

    hattorX, with the electrode aud tho wire fran the- positivo yole of tho batterX . in salinoX x~ bubbles coro given off only at Cho electrode tip, tho insulatian wao incest {sures, et. ~. , 1'F), After stripping, the egposed ends, individual wires were...

  5. Appendix C: Transmission, Ancillary and Control Area Service...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power and Conservation Planning Council NPV net present value NR New Resource Firm Power NRFS NR Resource Flattening Service NT Network Integration NTSA Non-Treaty Storage...

  6. Controller Area Network (CAN) Schedulability Analysis for Messages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navet, Nicolas

    and Work-Conserving Queues Robert Davis1 and Nicolas Navet2 1Real-Time Systems Research Group, University Motivation and work-conserving queues Scheduling model and analysis for priority queues Analysis for Work-conserving queues Priority assignment Case study Impact of work-conserving queues Empirical investigation Summary

  7. Appendix C: Transmission, Ancillary and Control Area Service...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intertie, by BPA on account of any reduction in Transmission Demand, termination, or partial termination of any such agreement or otherwise to compensate BPA for the...

  8. Appendix C: Transmission, Ancillary and Control Area Service Rate Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal Facility Agreement and Consent04 STANDARDC. Part

  9. Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobal L P Jump to:OpenOpen

  10. Systems and Control Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    ), the automobile companies Ford, GM) computer companies (IBM, Lucent, Bellcore) by the aerospace industry (GE, JPL areas require cross-disciplinary tools and methods for their solution. The Bachelor of Science program include the modeling, analysis, optimization and control of complex biological, energy, and industrial

  11. Method and apparatus for detecting timing errors in a system oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gliebe, Ronald J. (Library, PA); Kramer, William R. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A method of detecting timing errors in a system oscillator for an electronic device, such as a power supply, includes the step of comparing a system oscillator signal with a delayed generated signal and generating a signal representative of the timing error when the system oscillator signal is not identical to the delayed signal. An LED indicates to an operator that a timing error has occurred. A hardware circuit implements the above-identified method.

  12. The Importance of Run-time Error Detection Glenn R. Luecke 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luecke, Glenn R.

    Iowa State University's High Performance Computing Group, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, USA State University's High Performance Computing Group for evaluating run-time error detection capabilities

  13. Eccentricity Error Correction for Automated Estimation of Polyethylene Wear after Total Hip Arthroplasty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulidowski, Irek

    Eccentricity Error Correction for Automated Estimation of Polyethylene Wear after Total Hip. Wire markers are typically attached to the polyethylene acetabular component of the prosthesis so

  14. Choose and choose again: appearance-reality errors, pragmatics and logical ability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deák, Gedeon O; Enright, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Development, 62, 753–766. Speer, J.R. (1984). Two practicalolder still make errors (e.g. Speer, 1984), some preschool

  15. Choose and choose again: appearance-reality errors, pragmatics and logical ability.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deák, Gedeon O; Enright, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Development, 62, 753-766. Speer, J. R. (1984). Two practicalolder still make errors (e.g. , Speer, 1984), some preschool

  16. Neutron Soft Errors in Xilinx FPGAs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Quasi-Monoenergetic Neutron Beam from Deuteron Breakup”, inexperiments of atmospheric neutron effects on deep sub-Neutron Soft Errors in Xilinx FPGAs at Lawrence Berkeley

  17. Threshold analysis with fault-tolerant operations for nonbinary quantum error correcting codes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanungo, Aparna

    2005-11-01

    an expression to compute the gate error threshold for nonbinary quantum codes and test this result for different classes of codes, to get codes with best threshold results....

  18. F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractors have cleaned up the F Reactor Area, the first reactor area at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state to be fully remediated.

  19. Genetic Epidemiology (2006) Stratified False Discovery Control for Large-Scale Hypothesis Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craiu, V. Radu

    2006-01-01

    with Application to Genome-Wide Association Studies Lei Sun,1­3Ã Radu V. Craiu,3 Andrew D. Paterson1,2 and Shelley positive control and low power inherent in high-volume genome-wide linkage and association studies. In many; genome-scans; type I error; type II error; power; false discovery rate (FDR); stratified FDR Contract

  20. Listed below are specific requirements to review for those areas that generate and/or store hazardous waste as applicable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Movileanu, Liviu

    hazardous waste as applicable: 1) The work area generating hazardous waste must be under the control) The hazardous waste Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA) is: A) located at or near the point of generation (where accumulation area is clearly marked as "Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Area". 4) The accumulation area

  1. Monroe Urbanized Area MTP 2035 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2010-10-31

    /plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Monroe Urbanized Area MTP 2035 The 2035 Metropolitan Transportation Plan for the Monroe Urbanized Area Developed for The Monroe Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization and The Louisiana Department... of Transportation and Development Developed by In association with Neel-Schaffer, Inc. **DRAFT** Adopted Date Here This document was prepared in cooperation with: The Monroe Urbanized Area MPO Technical Advisory Committee and The Louisiana...

  2. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    RidgeRd. SimcoeSt. Hwy.7&12 RegRd.57 0 4 8 Kilometers Area = 51,980 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICSdatamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY Drivers Vehicles Trips/day 2011 2006 1996 1986 datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT

  3. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    .7 4.1 5.8 27.9 TRIPS MADE TO TTS AREA 4,070,800 22.8% 51% 22% 6% 21% 61% 13% 12% 2% 8% 4% 7.1 3.3 7datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 5 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY AREA City of Orillia Durham Region City

  4. Controlling Data in the Cloud: Outsourcing Computation without Outsourcing Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Elaine

    Controlling Data in the Cloud: Outsourcing Computation without Outsourcing Control Richard Chow.fujitsu.com ABSTRACT Cloud computing is clearly one of today's most enticing technology areas due, at least in part, there are significant, persistent concerns about cloud computing that are impeding momentum and will eventually

  5. A two-dimensional matrix correction for off-axis portal dose prediction errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Daniel W.; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Bakhtiari, Mohammad; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This study presents a follow-up to a modified calibration procedure for portal dosimetry published by Bailey et al. ['An effective correction algorithm for off-axis portal dosimetry errors,' Med. Phys. 36, 4089-4094 (2009)]. A commercial portal dose prediction system exhibits disagreement of up to 15% (calibrated units) between measured and predicted images as off-axis distance increases. The previous modified calibration procedure accounts for these off-axis effects in most regions of the detecting surface, but is limited by the simplistic assumption of radial symmetry. Methods: We find that a two-dimensional (2D) matrix correction, applied to each calibrated image, accounts for off-axis prediction errors in all regions of the detecting surface, including those still problematic after the radial correction is performed. The correction matrix is calculated by quantitative comparison of predicted and measured images that span the entire detecting surface. The correction matrix was verified for dose-linearity, and its effectiveness was verified on a number of test fields. The 2D correction was employed to retrospectively examine 22 off-axis, asymmetric electronic-compensation breast fields, five intensity-modulated brain fields (moderate-high modulation) manipulated for far off-axis delivery, and 29 intensity-modulated clinical fields of varying complexity in the central portion of the detecting surface. Results: Employing the matrix correction to the off-axis test fields and clinical fields, predicted vs measured portal dose agreement improves by up to 15%, producing up to 10% better agreement than the radial correction in some areas of the detecting surface. Gamma evaluation analyses (3 mm, 3% global, 10% dose threshold) of predicted vs measured portal dose images demonstrate pass rate improvement of up to 75% with the matrix correction, producing pass rates that are up to 30% higher than those resulting from the radial correction technique alone. As in the 1D correction case, the 2D algorithm leaves the portal dosimetry process virtually unchanged in the central portion of the detector, and thus these correction algorithms are not needed for centrally located fields of moderate size (at least, in the case of 6 MV beam energy).Conclusion: The 2D correction improves the portal dosimetry results for those fields for which the 1D correction proves insufficient, especially in the inplane, off-axis regions of the detector. This 2D correction neglects the relatively smaller discrepancies that may be caused by backscatter from nonuniform machine components downstream from the detecting layer.

  6. Geothermal resource area 9: Nye County. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource area 9 encompasses all of Nye County, Nevada. Within this area there are many different known geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/ to over 265/sup 0/ F. Fifteen of the more major sites have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the resource sites discussed in this Area Development Plan were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities, and comparing those with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 15 geothermal sites considered in this Area Development Plan are summarized.

  7. Evaluating specific error characteristics of microwave-derived cloud liquid water products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    of cloud LWP products globally using concurrent data from visible/ infrared satellite sensors. The approachEvaluating specific error characteristics of microwave-derived cloud liquid water products Thomas J microwave satellite measurements. Using coincident visible/infrared satellite data, errors are isolated

  8. A nonideal error-field response model for strongly shaped tokamak plasmas R. Fitzpatrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    A nonideal error-field response model for strongly shaped tokamak plasmas R. Fitzpatrick Citation of a rotating tokamak plasma to a resonant error-field Phys. Plasmas 21, 092513 (2014); 10.1063/1.4896244 Kinetic description of rotating Tokamak plasmas with anisotropic temperatures in the collisionless regime

  9. Upper Bounds on ErrorCorrecting RunlengthLimited Block Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ytrehus, Ã?yvind

    . Inf. Th. May 1991, pp. 941--945 Abstract --- Upper bounds are derived on the number of codewords­limited codes, error­correction. This work was supported by the Norwegian Research Council for Science on the size of (d; k)­ constrained, simple­error correcting block codes. There are two directions in which one

  10. Potential Hydraulic Modelling Errors Associated with Rheological Data Extrapolation in Laminar Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shadday, Martin A., Jr.

    1997-03-20

    The potential errors associated with the modelling of flows of non-Newtonian slurries through pipes, due to inadequate rheological models and extrapolation outside of the ranges of data bases, are demonstrated. The behaviors of both dilatant and pseudoplastic fluids with yield stresses, and the errors associated with treating them as Bingham plastics, are investigated.

  11. Low-voltage, low-power, low switching error, class-AB switched current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serdijn, Wouter A.

    Low-voltage, low-power, low switching error, class-AB switched current memory cell C. Sawigun and W into two components by a low-voltage class-AB current splitter and subsequently processes the individual signals by two low switching error class-A memory cells. As a conse- quence, the output current obtained

  12. Using system simulation to model the impact of human error in a maritime system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    the modeling of human error related accident event sequences in a risk assessment of maritime oil framwork was developed for the Prince William Sound Risk Assessment based on interviews with maritime William Sound; Human error; Maritime accidents; Expert judgement; Risk assessment; Risk management 1

  13. Convergence Analysis of the LMS Algorithm with a General Error Nonlinearity and an IID Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.

    Convergence Analysis of the LMS Algorithm with a General Error Nonlinearity and an IID Input Tareq. of Electrical Eng. Abstract The class of least mean square (LMS) algorithms employing a general error are entirely consis- tent with those of the LMS algorithm and several of its variants. The results also

  14. The Optimum Error Nonlinearity in LMS Adaptation with an Independent and Identically Distributed Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.

    The Optimum Error Nonlinearity in LMS Adaptation with an Independent and Identically Distributed, CA 94305 Dhahran 31261 USA Saudi Arabia Abstract The class of LMS algorithms employing a gen- eral view of error nonlinearities in LMS adaptation. In particular, it subsumes two recently developed

  15. Outage Probability for Free-Space Optical Systems Over Slow Fading Channels With Pointing Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hranilovic, Steve

    Outage Probability for Free-Space Optical Systems Over Slow Fading Channels With Pointing Errors, Canada. Email: farid@grads.ece.mcmaster.ca, hranilovic@mcmaster.ca Abstract-- We investigate the outage errors. An expression for the outage probability is derived and we show that optimizing the transmit- ted

  16. Object calculus and the object-oriented analysis and design of an error-sensitive GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckham, Matt

    Object calculus and the object-oriented analysis and design of an error-sensitive GIS MATT DUCKHAM of an error-sensitive GIS Abstract. The use of object-oriented analysis and design (OOAD) in GIS research of the key contemporary issues in GIS. This paper examines the application of one particular OO formalism

  17. State preservation by repetitive error detection in a superconducting quantum circuit J. Kelly,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinis, John M.

    State preservation by repetitive error detection in a superconducting quantum circuit J. Kelly,1 , and superconducting circuits11­13 have demonstrated multi-qubit states that are first-order toler- ant to one type of error. Recently, experiments with ion traps and superconducting circuits have shown the simultaneous de

  18. Mitigating FPGA Interconnect Soft Errors by In-Place LUT Inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Lei

    , power and perfor- mance. Recent logic re-synthesis techniques, such as ROSE [2], IPR [3], IPD [4] and R2Mitigating FPGA Interconnect Soft Errors by In-Place LUT Inversion Naifeng Jing1 , Ju-Yueh Lee2 the Soft Error Rate (SER) at chip level, and reveal a locality and NP-Hardness of the IPV problem. We

  19. An Energy-Aware Fault Tolerant Scheduling Framework for Soft Error Resilient Cloud Computing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    An Energy-Aware Fault Tolerant Scheduling Framework for Soft Error Resilient Cloud Computing has drastically increased their susceptibility to soft errors. At the grand scale of cloud computing outputs or system crash. At the grand scale of cloud computing, this problem can only worsen [2, 3, 4, 5

  20. PII S00167037(99)00204-5 A test for systematic errors in 40

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Kyoungwon

    dating arise from uncertainties in the 40 K decay constants and K/Ar isotopic data for neutron fluence monitors (standards). The activity data underlying the decay constants used in geochronology since 1977). These studies have shown that system- atic errors outweigh typical analytical errors by at least one order

  1. TYPOGRAPHICAL AND ORTHOGRAPHICAL SPELLING ERROR Kyongho Min*, William H. Wilson*, Yoo-Jin Moon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Bill

    -Jin Moon *School of Computer Science and Engineering The University of New South Wales Sydney NSW 2052 of spelling errors such as typographical (Damerau, 1964; Pollock and Zamora, 1983), orthographical (Sterling), and orthographical errors in spontaneous writings of children (Sterling, 1983; Mitton, 1987). 1.2. Approaches

  2. A Case for Soft Error Detection and Correction in Computational Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Dam, Hubertus JJ; Vishnu, Abhinav; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2013-09-10

    High performance computing platforms are expected to deliver 10(18) floating operations per second by the year 2022 through the deployment of millions of cores. Even if every core is highly reliable the sheer number of the them will mean that the mean time between failures will become so short that most applications runs will suffer at least one fault. In particular soft errors caused by intermittent incorrect behavior of the hardware are a concern as they lead to silent data corruption. In this paper we investigate the impact of soft errors on optimization algorithms using Hartree-Fock as a particular example. Optimization algorithms iteratively reduce the error in the initial guess to reach the intended solution. Therefore they may intuitively appear to be resilient to soft errors. Our results show that this is true for soft errors of small magnitudes but not for large errors. We suggest error detection and correction mechanisms for different classes of data structures. The results obtained with these mechanisms indicate that we can correct more than 95% of the soft errors at moderate increases in the computational cost.

  3. Measurement and Analysis of the Error Characteristics of an In-Building Wireless Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steenkiste, Peter

    on fiber or electrical connections have excellent error characteris- tics but that wireless networksMeasurement and Analysis of the Error Characteristics of an In-Building Wireless Network David fdavide,prsg@cs.cmu.edu Abstract There is general belief that networks based on wireless technolo- gies

  4. A Non-Stationary Errors-in-Variables Method with Application to Mineral Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braslavsky, Julio H.

    A Non-Stationary Errors-in-Variables Method with Application to Mineral Exploration K. Lau 1 J. H-cancellation in transient electromagnetic mineral exploration. Alternative methods for noise cancellation in these systems for this class of systems is proposed and applied to a problem arising in mineral exploration. An errors

  5. Presenting JECA: A Java Error Correcting Algorithm for the Java Intelligent Tutoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franek, Frantisek

    Presenting JECA: A Java Error Correcting Algorithm for the Java Intelligent Tutoring System Edward context involving small Java programs. Furthermore, this paper presents JECA (Java Error Correction is to provide a foundation for the Java Intelligent Tutoring System (JITS) currently being field-tested. Key

  6. A POSTERIORI ERROR ANALYSIS OF THE LINKED INTERPOLATION TECHNIQUE FOR PLATE BENDING PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovadina, Carlo

    A POSTERIORI ERROR ANALYSIS OF THE LINKED INTERPOLATION TECHNIQUE FOR PLATE BENDING PROBLEMS CARLO Interpolation Tech- nique' to approximate the solution of plate bending problems. We show that the proposed. 1. Introduction. In this paper we present an a posteriori error analysis for the so-called `Linked

  7. ERROR BOUNDS FOR MONOTONE APPROXIMATION SCHEMES FOR HAMILTON-JACOBI-BELLMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ERROR BOUNDS FOR MONOTONE APPROXIMATION SCHEMES FOR HAMILTON-JACOBI-BELLMAN EQUATIONS GUY BARLES AND ESPEN R. JAKOBSEN Abstract. We obtain error bounds for monotone approximation schemes of Hamilton-Jacobi, (almost) smooth supersolutions for the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. 1. Introduction This paper

  8. PROBABILITY OF ERROR FOR TRAINED UNITARY SPACE-TIME MODULATION OVER A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swindlehurst, A. Lee

    PROBABILITY OF ERROR FOR TRAINED UNITARY SPACE-TIME MODULATION OVER A GAUSS-INNOVATIONS RICIAN probability of error for trained uni- tary space-time modulation over channels with a constant specular trained modulation, assuming that the channel is constant between training periods. All of the above

  9. Characterization of the Impact of Indoor Doppler Errors on Pedestrian Dead Reckoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Characterization of the Impact of Indoor Doppler Errors on Pedestrian Dead Reckoning Valérie, University of Calgary 2500 University Drive NW Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 1N4 Abstract--Indoor pedestrian on a Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) navigation filter is investigated. Doppler errors are simulated using

  10. IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 3, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2003 595 Active Structural Error Suppression in MEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhongping

    -run perturbations are presented. Index Terms--Error suppression, microelectromechanical sys- tems (MEMS), rate integrating gyroscopes, smart MEMS. I. INTRODUCTION AS MICROELECTROMECHANICAL systems (MEMS) inertial sensorsIEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 3, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2003 595 Active Structural Error Suppression in MEMS

  11. Control of a benchmark structure using GA-optimized fuzzy logic control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shook, David Adam

    2009-05-15

    Algorithm II NSGA-II CE Non-Dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II with Controlled Elitism PAES Pareto-Archived Evolution Strategy RMS Root-Mean Squared RMSE Root-Mean-Squared-Error SPEA Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm V.......................................................................................................... 56 5.2. Overview of NSGA-II CE ......................................................................... 57 5.3. Makeup of Chromosome ........................................................................... 57 5.4. Objectives...

  12. Control and Protection Paradigms of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Control and Protection Paradigms of the Future Future Grid Thrust Area 2 White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;Thrust Area 2 White Paper Control and Protection Paradigms of the Future Project Team C.L. DeMarco, C.A. Baone, B

  13. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keim, E.

    1997-04-01

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

  14. Methods and apparatus using commutative error detection values for fault isolation in multiple node computers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Almasi, Gheorghe (Ardsley, NY) [Ardsley, NY; Blumrich, Matthias Augustin (Ridgefield, CT) [Ridgefield, CT; Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY) [Croton-On-Hudson, NY; Coteus, Paul (Yorktown, NY) [Yorktown, NY; Gara, Alan (Mount Kisco, NY) [Mount Kisco, NY; Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY) [Irvington, NY; Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY) [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Hoenicke, Dirk I. (Ossining, NY) [Ossining, NY; Singh, Sarabjeet (Mississauga, CA) [Mississauga, CA; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Wernau, DE) [Wernau, DE; Takken, Todd (Brewster, NY) [Brewster, NY; Vranas, Pavlos (Bedford Hills, NY) [Bedford Hills, NY

    2008-06-03

    Methods and apparatus perform fault isolation in multiple node computing systems using commutative error detection values for--example, checksums--to identify and to isolate faulty nodes. When information associated with a reproducible portion of a computer program is injected into a network by a node, a commutative error detection value is calculated. At intervals, node fault detection apparatus associated with the multiple node computer system retrieve commutative error detection values associated with the node and stores them in memory. When the computer program is executed again by the multiple node computer system, new commutative error detection values are created and stored in memory. The node fault detection apparatus identifies faulty nodes by comparing commutative error detection values associated with reproducible portions of the application program generated by a particular node from different runs of the application program. Differences in values indicate a possible faulty node.

  15. Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-03

    The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

  16. Grupo 10 Control de Xarxes de Computadors 2 Q1: 12-11-2012 Nombre: Apellidos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    paquetes que pertenecen al mismo flujo ¨ Tiene un mecanismo de control de error basado en CRC en lugar del tipo vector-distancia ý En terminología OSPF, link significa interfaz de un router ¨ Se usa el

  17. A fuzzy logic based motion controller for a multi-degree-of-freedom robot arm 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pate, Billy Blakley

    1993-01-01

    This thesis addresses the task of producing a generic control algorithm for Cartesian motion of manipulators. The algorithm employs a self organizing fuzzy logic estimator to produce joint space changes given Cartesian error. The output from...

  18. Constraint-based navigation for safe, shared control of ground vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Sterling J., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Human error in machine operation is common and costly. This thesis introduces, develops, and experimentally demonstrates a new paradigm for shared-adaptive control of human-machine systems that mitigates the effects of ...

  19. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    % 7% 6.5 5.5 6.5 68.5 30,100 10% 5% 51% 34% 73% 17% 1% * 3% 7% 7.0 7.2 10.0 * ANCASTER AREA CITYdatamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 85 ANCASTER AREA CITY OF HAMILTON Mohawk Rd. Main St. Carluke Rd. Governors Rd. Garner

  20. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    ,213,000 38% 13% 35% 14% 60% 14% 16% 1% 7% 2% 5.7 4.1 6.6 30.0 TRIPS MADE TO TTS AREA 3,168,200 23.5% 51% 22datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 5 GREATER TORONTO HAMILTON AREA Durham Region Peel Region City of Hamilton City

  1. REMOTE AREA RADIATION MONITORING (RARM) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NELSON RL

    2008-07-18

    The Remote Area Radiation Monitoring (RARM) system will be used to provide real-time radiation monitoring information to the operations personnel during tank retrieval and transfer operations. The primary focus of the system is to detect potential anomalous (waste leaks) or transient radiological conditions. This system will provide mobile, real-time radiological monitoring, data logging, and status at pre-selected strategic points along the waste transfer route during tank retrieval operations. The system will provide early detection and response capabilities for the Retrieval and Closure Operations organization and Radiological Control personnel.

  2. Kodiak Area Management Reports, 19242010 Kodiak Area Management Reports, 19242010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    367 Kodiak Area Management Reports, 1924­2010 APPENDIX 4 Kodiak Area Management Reports, 1924­2010 1924: Fred R. Lucas. Report of Kodiak-Afognak Fish- eries District to August 31, 1924. U.S. Bureau of Fisheries, Afognak, AK (5 September 1924). 8 p. 1924: Fred R. Lucas. Report of Kodiak-Afognak Dis- trict

  3. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    and implementation of smart home energy management systemsStandard Technologies for Smart Home Area Networks EnablingInteroperability framework for smart home systems”, Consumer

  4. Quantum state tomography of large nuclear spins in a semiconductor quantum well: Robustness against errors as quantified by condition numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Miranowicz; Sahin K. Ozdemir; Jiri Bajer; Go Yusa; Nobuyuki Imoto; Yoshiro Hirayama; Franco Nori

    2014-10-09

    We discuss methods of quantum state tomography for solid-state systems with a large nuclear spin $I=3/2$ in nanometer-scale semiconductors devices based on a quantum well. Due to quadrupolar interactions, the Zeeman levels of these nuclear-spin devices become nonequidistant, forming a controllable four-level quantum system (known as quartit or ququart). The occupation of these levels can be selectively and coherently manipulated by multiphoton transitions using the techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) [Yusa et al., Nature (London) 434, 101 (2005)]. These methods are based on an unconventional approach to NMR, where the longitudinal magnetization $M_z$ is directly measured. This is in contrast to the standard NMR experiments and tomographic methods, where the transverse magnetization $M_{xy}$ is detected. The robustness against errors in the measured data is analyzed by using condition numbers. We propose several methods with optimized sets of rotations. The optimization is applied to decrease the number of NMR readouts and to improve the robustness against errors, as quantified by condition numbers. An example of state reconstruction, using Monte Carlo methods, is presented. Tomographic methods for quadrupolar nuclei with higher-spin numbers (including $I=7/2$) are also described.

  5. Large-Scale Uncertainty and Error Analysis for Time-dependent Fluid/Structure Interactions in Wind Turbine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Juan J. [Stanford University; Iaccarino, Gianluca [Stanford University

    2013-08-25

    The following is the final report covering the entire period of this aforementioned grant, June 1, 2011 - May 31, 2013 for the portion of the effort corresponding to Stanford University (SU). SU has partnered with Sandia National Laboratories (PI: Mike S. Eldred) and Purdue University (PI: Dongbin Xiu) to complete this research project and this final report includes those contributions made by the members of the team at Stanford. Dr. Eldred is continuing his contributions to this project under a no-cost extension and his contributions to the overall effort will be detailed at a later time (once his effort has concluded) on a separate project submitted by Sandia National Laboratories. At Stanford, the team is made up of Profs. Alonso, Iaccarino, and Duraisamy, post-doctoral researcher Vinod Lakshminarayan, and graduate student Santiago Padron. At Sandia National Laboratories, the team includes Michael Eldred, Matt Barone, John Jakeman, and Stefan Domino, and at Purdue University, we have Prof. Dongbin Xiu as our main collaborator. The overall objective of this project was to develop a novel, comprehensive methodology for uncertainty quantification by combining stochastic expansions (nonintrusive polynomial chaos and stochastic collocation), the adjoint approach, and fusion with experimental data to account for aleatory and epistemic uncertainties from random variable, random field, and model form sources. The expected outcomes of this activity were detailed in the proposal and are repeated here to set the stage for the results that we have generated during the time period of execution of this project: 1. The rigorous determination of an error budget comprising numerical errors in physical space and statistical errors in stochastic space and its use for optimal allocation of resources; 2. A considerable increase in efficiency when performing uncertainty quantification with a large number of uncertain variables in complex non-linear multi-physics problems; 3. A solution to the long-time integration problem of spectral chaos approaches; 4. A rigorous methodology to account for aleatory and epistemic uncertainties, to emphasize the most important variables via dimension reduction and dimension-adaptive refinement, and to support fusion with experimental data using Bayesian inference; 5. The application of novel methodologies to time-dependent reliability studies in wind turbine applications including a number of efforts relating to the uncertainty quantification in vertical-axis wind turbine applications. In this report, we summarize all accomplishments in the project (during the time period specified) focusing on advances in UQ algorithms and deployment efforts to the wind turbine application area. Detailed publications in each of these areas have also been completed and are available from the respective conference proceedings and journals as detailed in a later section.

  6. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    in home automation and LonWorks is widely used in industrialto industrial control, building and home automation. Fig.

  7. Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram S. (Los Angeles, CA); Dyer, James D. (La Mirada, CA); Martinez Morales, Carlos A. (Upland, CA)

    2011-11-15

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  8. Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budhraja, Vikram S.; Dyer, James D.; Martinez Morales, Carlos A.

    2013-03-19

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  9. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 45, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2000 2203 How much Uncertainty can be Dealt with by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Lei

    existing areas of control theory can shed some light. Robust control and adaptive control are two function space. Index Terms--Adaptive control, feedback, nonlinear, robust control, stability, stochastic

  10. Modern Palliative Radiation Treatment: Do Complexity and Workload Contribute to Medical Errors?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Souza, Neil; Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario ; Holden, Lori; Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario ; Robson, Sheila; Mah, Kathy; Di Prospero, Lisa; Wong, C. Shun; Chow, Edward; Spayne, Jacqueline; Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine whether treatment workload and complexity associated with palliative radiation therapy contribute to medical errors. Methods and Materials: In the setting of a large academic health sciences center, patient scheduling and record and verification systems were used to identify patients starting radiation therapy. All records of radiation treatment courses delivered during a 3-month period were retrieved and divided into radical and palliative intent. 'Same day consultation, planning and treatment' was used as a proxy for workload and 'previous treatment' and 'multiple sites' as surrogates for complexity. In addition, all planning and treatment discrepancies (errors and 'near-misses') recorded during the same time frame were reviewed and analyzed. Results: There were 365 new patients treated with 485 courses of palliative radiation therapy. Of those patients, 128 (35%) were same-day consultation, simulation, and treatment patients; 166 (45%) patients had previous treatment; and 94 (26%) patients had treatment to multiple sites. Four near-misses and 4 errors occurred during the audit period, giving an error per course rate of 0.82%. In comparison, there were 10 near-misses and 5 errors associated with 1100 courses of radical treatment during the audit period. This translated into an error rate of 0.45% per course. An association was found between workload and complexity and increased palliative therapy error rates. Conclusions: Increased complexity and workload may have an impact on palliative radiation treatment discrepancies. This information may help guide the necessary recommendations for process improvement for patients who require palliative radiation therapy.

  11. How Radiation Oncologists Would Disclose Errors: Results of a Survey of Radiation Oncologists and Trainees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Suzanne B.; Yu, James B.; Chagpar, Anees

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To analyze error disclosure attitudes of radiation oncologists and to correlate error disclosure beliefs with survey-assessed disclosure behavior. Methods and Materials: With institutional review board exemption, an anonymous online survey was devised. An email invitation was sent to radiation oncologists (American Society for Radiation Oncology [ASTRO] gold medal winners, program directors and chair persons of academic institutions, and former ASTRO lecturers) and residents. A disclosure score was calculated based on the number or full, partial, or no disclosure responses chosen to the vignette-based questions, and correlation was attempted with attitudes toward error disclosure. Results: The survey received 176 responses: 94.8% of respondents considered themselves more likely to disclose in the setting of a serious medical error; 72.7% of respondents did not feel it mattered who was responsible for the error in deciding to disclose, and 3.9% felt more likely to disclose if someone else was responsible; 38.0% of respondents felt that disclosure increased the likelihood of a lawsuit, and 32.4% felt disclosure decreased the likelihood of lawsuit; 71.6% of respondents felt near misses should not be disclosed; 51.7% thought that minor errors should not be disclosed; 64.7% viewed disclosure as an opportunity for forgiveness from the patient; and 44.6% considered the patient's level of confidence in them to be a factor in disclosure. For a scenario that could be considerable, a non-harmful error, 78.9% of respondents would not contact the family. Respondents with high disclosure scores were more likely to feel that disclosure was an opportunity for forgiveness (P=.003) and to have never seen major medical errors (P=.004). Conclusions: The surveyed radiation oncologists chose to respond with full disclosure at a high rate, although ideal disclosure practices were not uniformly adhered to beyond the initial decision to disclose the occurrence of the error.

  12. Performance and Error Analysis of Knill's Postselection Scheme in a Two-Dimensional Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ching-Yi Lai; Gerardo Paz; Martin Suchara; Todd A. Brun

    2013-05-31

    Knill demonstrated a fault-tolerant quantum computation scheme based on concatenated error-detecting codes and postselection with a simulated error threshold of 3% over the depolarizing channel. %We design a two-dimensional architecture for fault-tolerant quantum computation based on Knill's postselection scheme. We show how to use Knill's postselection scheme in a practical two-dimensional quantum architecture that we designed with the goal to optimize the error correction properties, while satisfying important architectural constraints. In our 2D architecture, one logical qubit is embedded in a tile consisting of $5\\times 5$ physical qubits. The movement of these qubits is modeled as noisy SWAP gates and the only physical operations that are allowed are local one- and two-qubit gates. We evaluate the practical properties of our design, such as its error threshold, and compare it to the concatenated Bacon-Shor code and the concatenated Steane code. Assuming that all gates have the same error rates, we obtain a threshold of $3.06\\times 10^{-4}$ in a local adversarial stochastic noise model, which is the highest known error threshold for concatenated codes in 2D. We also present a Monte Carlo simulation of the 2D architecture with depolarizing noise and we calculate a pseudo-threshold of about 0.1%. With memory error rates one-tenth of the worst gate error rates, the threshold for the adversarial noise model, and the pseudo-threshold over depolarizing noise, are $4.06\\times 10^{-4}$ and 0.2%, respectively. In a hypothetical technology where memory error rates are negligible, these thresholds can be further increased by shrinking the tiles into a $4\\times 4$ layout.

  13. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 51 TOWN OF RICHMOND HILL REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF YORK LeslieSt. Stouffville Rd. King 6 Kilometers Area = 10,180 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Population Age Daily

  14. Area Health Education Center of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Area Health Education Center of Eastern Washington Washington State University Extension's Area Health Education Center of Eastern Washington works with university and community allies to promote health for underserved and at-risk populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions

  15. Control-Lyapunov Functions for Systems Satisfying the Conditions of the Jurdjevic-Quinn Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    Control-Lyapunov Functions for Systems Satisfying the Conditions of the Jurdjevic-Quinn Theorem Fr-Quinn conditions, we construct a family of smooth control-Lyapunov functions whose derivatives along-input-to-state stable to actuator errors. Index Terms--Control-Lyapunov functions, global asymp- totic and integral

  16. Experimental demonstration of error-insensitive approximate universal-NOT gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Min Lee; Jeongho Bang; Heonoh Kim; Hyunseok Jeong; Jinhyoung Lee; Han Seb Moon

    2014-03-17

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an approximate universal-NOT (U-NOT) operation that is robust against operational errors. In our proposal, the U-NOT operation is composed of stochastic unitary operations represented by the vertices of regular polyhedrons. The operation is designed to be robust against random operational errors by increasing the number of unitary operations (i.e., reference axes). Remarkably, no increase in the total number of measurements nor additional resources are required to perform the U-NOT operation. Our method can be applied in general to reduce operational errors to an arbitrary degree of precision when approximating any anti-unitary operation in a stochastic manner.

  17. Error propagation equations for estimating the uncertainty in high-speed wind tunnel test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.L.

    1994-07-01

    Error propagation equations, based on the Taylor series model, are derived for the nondimensional ratios and coefficients most often encountered in high-speed wind tunnel testing. These include pressure ratio and coefficient, static force and moment coefficients, dynamic stability coefficients, and calibration Mach number. The error equations contain partial derivatives, denoted as sensitivity coefficients, which define the influence of free-steam Mach number, M{infinity}, on various aerodynamic ratios. To facilitate use of the error equations, sensitivity coefficients are derived and evaluated for five fundamental aerodynamic ratios which relate free-steam test conditions to a reference condition.

  18. Formalism for Simulation-based Optimization of Measurement Errors in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuehong Xie

    2009-04-29

    Miminizing errors of the physical parameters of interest should be the ultimate goal of any event selection optimization in high energy physics data analysis involving parameter determination. Quick and reliable error estimation is a crucial ingredient for realizing this goal. In this paper we derive a formalism for direct evaluation of measurement errors using the signal probability density function and large fully simulated signal and background samples without need for data fitting and background modelling. We illustrate the elegance of the formalism in the case of event selection optimization for CP violation measurement in B decays. The implication of this formalism on choosing event variables for data analysis is discussed.

  19. Before Mapping After Mapping Area Power Area Delay Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    32 Exam- ples Before Mapping After Mapping Area Power Area Delay Power 5xp1 0.93 0.98 0.86 0.82 0 1.01 1.01 1.02 1.07 0.99 duke2 1.01 1.01 0.99 1.13 0.97 e64 1.00 0.51 0.83 1.16 0.50 ex5 0.99 0.89 0.99 0.92 0.96 1.05 0.90 Table 2: Area, delay and power statistics for power script (normalized

  20. Synchronization of a class of master-slave non-autonomous chaotic systems with parameter mismatch via sinusoidal feedback control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianping Cai; Mihua Ma; Xiaofeng Wu

    2009-08-22

    In this paper we investigate a master-slave synchronization scheme of two n-dimensional non-autonomous chaotic systems coupled by sinusoidal state error feedback control, where parameter mismatch exists between the external harmonic excitation of master system and that of slave one. A concept of synchronization with error bound is introduced due to parameter mismatch, and then the bounds of synchronization error are estimated analytically. Some synchronization criteria are firstly obtained in the form of matrix inequalities by the Lyapunov direct method, and then simplified into some algebraic inequalities by the Gerschgorin disc theorem. The relationship between the estimated synchronization error bound and system parameters reveals that the synchronization error can be controlled as small as possible by increasing the coupling strength or decreasing the magnitude of mismatch. A three-dimensional gyrostat system is chosen as an example to verify the effectiveness of these criteria, and the estimated synchronization error bounds are compared with the numerical error bounds. Both the theoretical and numerical results show that the present sinusoidal state error feedback control is effective for the synchronization. Numerical examples verify that the present control is robust against amplitude or phase mismatch.

  1. Project Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

  2. Error Detection Techniques Applicable in an Architecture Framework and Design Methodology for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ould Ahmedou, Mohameden

    /environmental variations and external radiation caus- ing so-called soft-errors. Overall, these trends result in a severe in analogy to the IP library of the functional layer shall eventually represent an autonomic IP library (AE

  3. Title and author(s) Notes on Human Error Analysis and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    calibration and testing as found in the US Licensee Event Reports. Available on request from Risø Library JUDGEMENT 4 "HUMAN ERROR" - DEFINITION AND CLASSIFICATION 6 RELIABILITY AND SAFETY ANALYSIS 10 HUMAN FACTORS

  4. From prediction error to incentive salience: mesolimbic computation of reward motivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berridge, Kent

    From prediction error to incentive salience: mesolimbic computation of reward motivation Kent C separable psychological components of learning, incentive motivation and pleasure. Most computational models have focused only on the learning component of reward, but the motivational component is equally

  5. Comment on 'Discussions on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benestad, R E

    2013-01-01

    Comment on Scafetta, Nicola. 'Discussion on Common Errors in Analyzing Sea Level Accelerations, Solar Trends and Global Warming.' arXiv:1305.2812 (May 13, 2013a). doi:10.5194/prp-1-37-2013.

  6. Grid-search event location with non-Gaussian error models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodi, William L.

    This study employs an event location algorithm based on grid search to investigate the possibility of improving seismic event location accuracy by using non-Gaussian error models. The primary departure from the Gaussian ...

  7. Ability of stabilizer quantum error correction to protect itself from its own imperfection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichiro Fujiwara

    2014-12-02

    The theory of stabilizer quantum error correction allows us to actively stabilize quantum states and simulate ideal quantum operations in a noisy environment. It is critical is to correctly diagnose noise from its syndrome and nullify it accordingly. However, hardware that performs quantum error correction itself is inevitably imperfect in practice. Here, we show that stabilizer codes possess a built-in capability of correcting errors not only on quantum information but also on faulty syndromes extracted by themselves. Shor's syndrome extraction for fault-tolerant quantum computation is naturally improved. This opens a path to realizing the potential of stabilizer quantum error correction hidden within an innocent looking choice of generators and stabilizer operators that have been deemed redundant.

  8. Development of methodology to correct sampling error associated with FRM PM10 samplers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jing

    2009-05-15

    to correct the sampling error associated with the FRM PM10 sampler: (1) wind tunnel testing facilities and protocol for experimental evaluation of samplers; (2) the variation of the oversampling ratios of FRM PM10 samplers for computational evaluation...

  9. Distinguishing mixed quantum states: Minimum-error discrimination versus optimum unambiguous discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distinguishing mixed quantum states: Minimum-error discrimination versus optimum unambiguous discrimination Ulrike Herzog1, * and János A. Bergou2 1 Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin 2004) We consider two different optimized measurement strategies for the discrimination

  10. 297 Copyright 2007 Psychonomic Society, Inc. Cross-task individual differences in error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Tim

    , Arizona and christopher d'lauro and tiM curran University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado The error, including the online detection and bias (positive learners; Frank, Woroch, & Curran, 2005). correction

  11. Analysis of atmospheric delays and asymmetric positioning errors in the global positioning system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materna, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Errors in modeling atmospheric delays are one of the limiting factors in the accuracy of GPS position determination. In regions with uneven topography, atmospheric delay phenomena can be especially complicated. ...

  12. Investigation of Simple Linear Measurement Error Models (SLMEMS) with Correlated Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Ming

    2014-12-06

    the measurement errors are normally distributed to allow development of likelihood-based methods of inference. Simulated true responses are modeled as a simple linear regression on the true response values. That is, we wish to detect if either additive...

  13. Verifica(on of Hurricane Irene, Isaac and Sandy's Storm Track, Intensity, and Wind Radii Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Verifica(on of Hurricane Irene, Isaac and Sandy's Storm Track, Intensity/onal Hurricane Center (NHC). Forecasts of the track have steadily improved over the past, intensity (MWND) and wind radii (WRAD) errors of Hurricane Irene (2011

  14. Effects of systematic phase errors on optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Chao Zhang; Wan-Su Bao; Xiang Wang; Xiang-Qun Fu

    2015-01-09

    This paper researches how the systematic errors in phase inversions affect the success rate and the number of iterations in optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm. Through geometric description of this algorithm, the model of the algorithm with phase errors is established and the relationship between the success rate of the algorithm, the database size, the number of iterations and the phase error is depicted. For a given sized database, we give both the maximum success rate of the algorithm and the required number of iterations when the algorithm is in the presence of phase errors. Through analysis and numerical simulations, it shows that optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm is more robust than Grover's algorithm.

  15. The Effect of OCR Errors on Stylistic Text Classification Sterling Stuart Stein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Effect of OCR Errors on Stylistic Text Classification Sterling Stuart Stein Linguistic retrieval; Taghva and Coombs [1] found that a search engine could be made to work well over OCR documents

  16. Efficient error correction for speech systems using constrained re-recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Gregory T

    2008-01-01

    Efficient error correction of recognition output is a major barrier in the adoption of speech interfaces. This thesis addresses this problem through a novel correction framework and user interface. The system uses constraints ...

  17. On the evaluation of human error probabilities for post-initiating events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presley, Mary R

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of human error probabilities (HEPs) for the purpose of human reliability assessment (HRA) is very complex. Because of this complexity, the state of the art includes a variety of HRA models, each with its own ...

  18. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locatelli, R.

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

  19. V-109: Google Chrome WebKit Type Confusion Error Lets Remote...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to be executed on the target user's system. A remote user can create specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a type confusion error in WebKit and...

  20. On the Relationship Between Generalization Error, Hypothesis Complexity, and Sample Complexity for Radial Basis Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Partha

    1994-02-01

    In this paper, we bound the generalization error of a class of Radial Basis Function networks, for certain well defined function learning tasks, in terms of the number of parameters and number of examples. We show ...

  1. Modifed Minimum Classification Error Learning and Its Application to Neural Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimodaira, Hiroshi; Rokui, Jun; Nakai, Mitsuru

    A novel method to improve the generalization performance of the Minimum Classification Error (MCE) / Generalized Probabilistic Descent (GPD) learning is proposed. The MCE/GPD learning proposed by Juang and Katagiri in 1992 ...

  2. Gilles Lachaud For detecting and correcting the inevitable errors which creep in during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provence Aix-Marseille I, Université de

    Gilles Lachaud For detecting and correcting the inevitable errors which creep in during digital by the grea- test possible number of discs of the same size without any overlaps. #12;The words of a message

  3. On the Importance of Considering Measurement Errors in a Fuzzy Logic System for Scientific Applications in Nuclear Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Importance of Considering Measurement Errors in a Fuzzy Logic System for Scientific Applications in Nuclear Fusion

  4. Progress in Understanding Error-field Physics in NSTX Spherical Torus Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Menard, R.E. Bell, D.A. Gates, S.P. Gerhardt, J.-K. Park, S.A. Sabbagh, J.W. Berkery, A. Egan, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B. LeBlanc, Y.Q. Liu, A. Sontag, D. Swanson, H. Yuh, W. Zhu and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-05-19

    The low aspect ratio, low magnetic field, and wide range of plasma beta of NSTX plasmas provide new insight into the origins and effects of magnetic field errors. An extensive array of magnetic sensors has been used to analyze error fields, to measure error field amplification, and to detect resistive wall modes in real time. The measured normalized error-field threshold for the onset of locked modes shows a linear scaling with plasma density, a weak to inverse dependence on toroidal field, and a positive scaling with magnetic shear. These results extrapolate to a favorable error field threshold for ITER. For these low-beta locked-mode plasmas, perturbed equilibrium calculations find that the plasma response must be included to explain the empirically determined optimal correction of NSTX error fields. In high-beta NSTX plasmas exceeding the n=1 no-wall stability limit where the RWM is stabilized by plasma rotation, active suppression of n=1 amplified error fields and the correction of recently discovered intrinsic n=3 error fields have led to sustained high rotation and record durations free of low-frequency core MHD activity. For sustained rotational stabilization of the n=1 RWM, both the rotation threshold and magnitude of the amplification are important. At fixed normalized dissipation, kinetic damping models predict rotation thresholds for RWM stabilization to scale nearly linearly with particle orbit frequency. Studies for NSTX find that orbit frequencies computed in general geometry can deviate significantly from those computed in the high aspect ratio and circular plasma cross-section limit, and these differences can strongly influence the predicted RWM stability. The measured and predicted RWM stability is found to be very sensitive to the E × B rotation profile near the plasma edge, and the measured critical rotation for the RWM is approximately a factor of two higher than predicted by the MARS-F code using the semi-kinetic damping model.

  5. Design consistency and driver error as reflected by driver workload and accident rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Mark Douglas

    1992-01-01

    DESIGN CONSISTENCY AND DRIVER ERROR AS REFLECTED BY DRIVER WORKLOAD AND ACCIDENT RATES A Thesis by MARK DOUGLAS WOOLDRIDGE Approved as to style and content by: Daniel B. Fambro (Chair of Committee) Raymond A. Krammes (Member) Olga J.... Pendleton (Member) James T. P. Yao (Head of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Design Consistency and Driver Error as Reflected by Driver Workload and Accident Rates (May 1992) Mark Douglas Wooldridge, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...

  6. Solution-verified reliability analysis and design of bistable MEMS using error estimation and adaptivity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldred, Michael Scott; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Neckels, David; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Notz, Patrick K.; Adams, Brian M.; Carnes, Brian; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Bichon, Barron J.; Copps, Kevin D.

    2006-10-01

    This report documents the results for an FY06 ASC Algorithms Level 2 milestone combining error estimation and adaptivity, uncertainty quantification, and probabilistic design capabilities applied to the analysis and design of bistable MEMS. Through the use of error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement, solution verification can be performed in an automated and parameter-adaptive manner. The resulting uncertainty analysis and probabilistic design studies are shown to be more accurate, efficient, reliable, and convenient.

  7. Control method and system for hydraulic machines employing a dynamic joint motion model

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danko, George (Reno, NV)

    2011-11-22

    A control method and system for controlling a hydraulically actuated mechanical arm to perform a task, the mechanical arm optionally being a hydraulically actuated excavator arm. The method can include determining a dynamic model of the motion of the hydraulic arm for each hydraulic arm link by relating the input signal vector for each respective link to the output signal vector for the same link. Also the method can include determining an error signal for each link as the weighted sum of the differences between a measured position and a reference position and between the time derivatives of the measured position and the time derivatives of the reference position for each respective link. The weights used in the determination of the error signal can be determined from the constant coefficients of the dynamic model. The error signal can be applied in a closed negative feedback control loop to diminish or eliminate the error signal for each respective link.

  8. AREA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO...

  9. A multi-site analysis of random error in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    68504, USA d Department of Meteorology, Penn State University, 512 Walker Building, University Park, PA error for H are small, in contrast to both LE and FCO2, for which the random errors are roughly three with increasing wind speed. Data from two sites suggest that FCO2 random error may be slightly smaller when

  10. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    21] ZigBee Alliance. "ZigBee Smart Energy V2.0”, 2011 [22]Secure remote access to Smart Energy Home area Networks”,Density HEMS SEP Smart Energy Profile HV Home Energy

  11. Progress Update: M Area Closure

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    A progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The celebration of the first area cleanup completion with the help of the Recovery Act.

  12. Security Area Vouching and Piggybacking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-05

    Establishes requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Security Area practice of "vouching" or "piggybacking" access by personnel. DOE N 251.40, dated 5-3-01, extends this directive until 12-31-01.

  13. Confirmation of standard error analysis techniques applied to EXAFS using simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Corwin H; Hu, Yung-Jin

    2009-12-14

    Systematic uncertainties, such as those in calculated backscattering amplitudes, crystal glitches, etc., not only limit the ultimate accuracy of the EXAFS technique, but also affect the covariance matrix representation of real parameter errors in typical fitting routines. Despite major advances in EXAFS analysis and in understanding all potential uncertainties, these methods are not routinely applied by all EXAFS users. Consequently, reported parameter errors are not reliable in many EXAFS studies in the literature. This situation has made many EXAFS practitioners leery of conventional error analysis applied to EXAFS data. However, conventional error analysis, if properly applied, can teach us more about our data, and even about the power and limitations of the EXAFS technique. Here, we describe the proper application of conventional error analysis to r-space fitting to EXAFS data. Using simulations, we demonstrate the veracity of this analysis by, for instance, showing that the number of independent dat a points from Stern's rule is balanced by the degrees of freedom obtained from a 2 statistical analysis. By applying such analysis to real data, we determine the quantitative effect of systematic errors. In short, this study is intended to remind the EXAFS community about the role of fundamental noise distributions in interpreting our final results.

  14. Variable area fuel cell cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

  15. Multi-area network analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Liang

    2005-02-17

    -1 MULTI-AREA NETWORK ANALYSIS A Dissertation by LIANG ZHAO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY... December 2004 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering MULTI-AREA NETWORK ANALYSIS A Dissertation by LIANG ZHAO Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  16. Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Research Areas Research Areas Properties of Materials under Extreme Conditions and Hydrodynamics During open solicitations research...

  17. Automatic lighting controls demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R.

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least 50% using various combinations of control strategies. By reducing light levels over circulation areas (tuning) and reducing after hours light levels to accommodate the less stringent lighting demands of the cleaning crew (scheduling), lighting energy consumption on weekdays was reduced an average of 54% relative to the initial condition. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  19. EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.)

  20. Flea Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Michael E.

    2002-08-23

    This publication will help you identify fleas and learn their behaviors and potential dangers to pets and humans. Included are methods for controlling fleas indoors and out....

  1. Tick Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Michael E.

    2002-08-23

    This publication will help you identify ticks and learn their behaviors and potential dangers. Included are methods for avoiding, controlling and removing ticks....

  2. Theoretical analysis of error transfer from surface slope to refractive ray and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from optical error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 8 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope errors in two direction is transferred to any one direction of the focus ray when the incidence angle is more than 0 for solar trough and heliostats reflector; for point focus Fresnel lens, point focus parabolic glass mirror, line focus parabolic galss mirror, the error transferring coefficient from optical to focus ray will increase when the rim angle increase; for TIR-R concentrator, it will decrease; for glass heliostat, it relates to the incidence angle and azimuth of the reflecting point. Keywords: optic error, standard deviation, refractive ray error, concentrated solar collector

  3. Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacommare, Kristina S H

    2011-01-01

    per hour in both balancing areas Wind power ramps down atper hour in both balancing areas Wind power ramps down atbalancing area 2 Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-

  4. Plutonium contamination in soils in open space and residential areas near Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litaor, M.I.

    1999-02-01

    Spatial analysis of the {sup 240}Pu:{sup 239}Pu isotopic ratio of 42 soil samples collected around Rocky Flats Plant near Golden, Colorado, was conducted to assess the effect of Rocky Flats Plant activity on the soil environment. Two probability maps that quantified the uncertainty of the spatial distribution of plutonium isotopic ratios were constructed using the sequential Gaussian simulation technique (sGs). Assuming a plutonium isotopic ratio range of 0.152 {+-} 0.003 to 0.169 {+-} 0.009 is characteristic to global fallout in Colorado, and a mean value of 0.155 is representative for the Rocky Flats Plant area, the main findings of the current work were (1) the areas northwest and southwest of Rocky Flats Plant exhibited a plutonium ratio {ge}0.155, this were minimally impacted by the plant activity; (2) he study area east of Rocky Flats Plant exhibited a plutonium isotopic ratio {le}0.155, which is a definitive indicator of Rocky Flats Plant-derived plutonium; and (3) inventory calculations across the study area exhibited large standard error of estimates. These errors were originated from the high variability in plutonium activity over a small sampling scale and the uncertainty in the global fallout isotopic ratio. Using the mean simulated estimates of plutonium isotopic ratio, coupled with plutonium activity measured at 11 soil pits and additional plutonium information published elsewhere, the plutonium loading on the open space and residential areas amounted to 111.2 GBq, with a standard error of estimate of 50.8 GBq.

  5. Control of Hamiltonian chaos as a possible tool to control anomalous transport in fusion plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Ciraolo; F. Briolle; C. Chandre; E. Floriani; R. Lima; M. Vittot; M. Pettini; C. Figarella; P. Ghendrih

    2003-12-17

    It is shown that a relevant control of Hamiltonian chaos is possible through suitable small perturbations whose form can be explicitly computed. In particular, it is possible to control (reduce) the chaotic diffusion in the phase space of a Hamiltonian system with 1.5 degrees of freedom which models the diffusion of charged test particles in a turbulent electric field across the confining magnetic field in controlled thermonuclear fusion devices. Though still far from practical applications, this result suggests that some strategy to control turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas, in particular tokamaks, is conceivable. The robustness of the control is investigated in terms of a departure from the optimum magnitude, of a varying cut-off at large wave vectors, and of random errors on the phases of the modes. In all three cases, there is a significant region of maximum efficiency in the vicinity of the optimum control term.

  6. CO2 MONITORING FOR DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David; Eliseeva, Ekaterina

    2010-03-17

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sensors are often deployed in commercial buildings to obtain CO{sub 2} data that are used, in a process called demand-controlled ventilation, to automatically modulate rates of outdoor air ventilation. The objective is to keep ventilation rates at or above design specifications and code requirements and also to save energy by avoiding excessive ventilation rates. Demand controlled ventilation is most often used in spaces with highly variable and sometime dense occupancy. Reasonably accurate CO{sub 2} measurements are needed for successful demand controlled ventilation; however, prior research has suggested substantial measurement errors. Accordingly, this study evaluated: (a) the accuracy of 208 CO{sub 2} single-location sensors located in 34 commercial buildings, (b) the accuracy of four multi-location CO{sub 2} measurement systems that utilize tubing, valves, and pumps to measure at multiple locations with single CO{sub 2} sensors, and (c) the spatial variability of CO{sub 2} concentrations within meeting rooms. The field studies of the accuracy of single-location CO{sub 2} sensors included multi-concentration calibration checks of 90 sensors in which sensor accuracy was checked at multiple CO{sub 2} concentrations using primary standard calibration gases. From these evaluations, average errors were small, -26 ppm and -9 ppm at 760 and 1010 ppm, respectively; however, the averages of the absolute values of error were 118 ppm (16%) and 138 ppm (14%), at concentrations of 760 and 1010 ppm, respectively. The calibration data are generally well fit by a straight line as indicated by high values of R{sup 2}. The Title 24 standard specifies that sensor error must be certified as no greater than 75 ppm for a period of five years after sensor installation. At 1010 ppm, 40% of sensors had errors greater than {+-}75 ppm and 31% of sensors has errors greater than {+-}100 ppm. At 760 ppm, 47% of sensors had errors greater than {+-}75 ppm and 37% of sensors had errors greater than {+-}100 ppm. A significant fraction of sensors had errors substantially larger than 100 ppm. For example, at 1010 ppm, 19% of sensors had an error greater than 200 ppm and 13% of sensors had errors greater than 300 ppm. The field studies also included single-concentration calibration checks of 118 sensors at the concentrations encountered in the buildings, which were normally less than 500 ppm during the testing. For analyses, these data were combined with data from the calibration challenges at 510 ppm obtained during the multi-concentration calibration checks. For the resulting data set, the average error was 60 ppm and the average of the absolute value of error was 154 ppm. Statistical analyses indicated that there were statistically significant differences between the average accuracies of sensors from different manufacturers. Sensors with a 'single lamp single wavelength' design tended to have a statistically significantly smaller average error than sensors with other designs except for 'single lamp dual wavelength' sensors, which did not have a statistically significantly lower accuracy. Sensor age was not consistently a statistically significant predictor of error.

  7. H-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  8. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    and commercial building automation. HomePlug’s protocols areof this HAN is building automation and energy management,industrial control, building and home automation. Fig. 4.7

  9. Nuclear power plant control room operator control and monitoring tasks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovell, C.R.; Beck, M.G. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Carter, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Labs., TN (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a research project the purpose of which is to develop the technical bases for regulatory review criteria for use in evaluating the safety implications of human factors associated with the use of artificial intelligence and expert systems, and with advanced instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants (NPP). This report documents the results from Task 8 of that project. The primary objectives of the task was to identify the scope and type of control and monitoring tasks now performed by control-room operators. Another purpose was to address the types of controls and safety systems needed to operate the nuclear plant. The final objective of Task 8 was to identify and categorize the type of information and displays/indicators required to monitor the performance of the control and safety systems. This report also discusses state-of-the-art controls and advanced display devices which will be available for use in control-room retrofits and in control room of future plants. The fundamental types of control and monitoring tasks currently conducted by operators can be divided into four classifications: function monitoring tasks, control manipulation tasks, fault diagnostic tasks, and administrative tasks. There are three general types of controls used in today`s NPPs, switches, pushbuttons, and analog controllers. Plant I and C systems include components to achieve a number of safety-related functions: measuring critical plant parameters, controlling critical plant parameters within safety limits, and automatically actuating protective devices if safe limits are exceeded. The types of information monitored by the control-room operators consist of the following parameters: pressure, fluid flow and level, neutron flux, temperature, component status, water chemistry, electrical, and process and area radiation. The basic types of monitoring devices common to nearly all NPP control rooms include: analog meters, graphic recorders, digital displays and counters, light indicators, visual and audio alarms, and cathode-ray tubes.

  10. 01-07-1999 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control Areas by Fruit Flies Document Number: NA Effective Date: 011999 File (public): PDF icon 01-07-1999red...

  11. Dental analysis of Classic period population variability in the Maya area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherer, Andrew Kenneth

    2005-02-17

    is still debated. Some researchers believe Teotihuacan exhibited direct control of select Maya sites (Adams 1986; Coggins 1983). Others see the relationship between Teotihuacan and the Maya as one of mutual trade and respect (Demarest and Foias 1993... by distance model. I collected dental nonmetric and metric traits on 977 skeletons, from 18 Classic period sites, representing seven different archaeological zones. I corrected the data for intraobserver error. For the dental nonmetric data, I developed...

  12. TIM3 Front-Panel 1. VE: Flash for VME bus access error OR On for Geog-Addr error (i.e. wrong slot).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University College London

    -Busy (note: In Stand-Alone Mode TIM is normally busy) 4. TB: Shows status of TIM-BusyOut All LEDs (apart from power supplies) have a 60ms pulse stretcher for better visibility. -5 -12 OR VE SA SC TB CA BR SP +5 +3 Error1 -5V, -12V Power On Stand-Alone Mode Enabled Stand-Alone Clock Present TIM BusyOut4 ROD Busy's (1

  13. Traffic flow wide-area surveillance system definition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allgood, G.O.; Ferrell, R.K.; Kercel, S.W.; Abston, R.A.; Carnal, C.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moynihan, P.I. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Traffic Flow Wide-Area Surveillance (TFWAS) is a system for assessing the state of traffic flow over a wide area for enhanced traffic control and improved traffic management and planning. The primary purpose of a TFWAS system is to provide a detailed traffic flow description and context description to sophisticated traffic management and control systems being developed or envisioned for the future. A successful TFWAS system must possess the attributes of safety, reconfigurability, reliability, and expandability. The primary safety premise of TFWAS is to ensure that no action or failure of the TFWAS system or its components can result in risk of injury to humans. A wide variety of communication techniques is available for use with TFWAS systems. These communication techniques can be broken down into two categories, landlines and wireless. Currently used and possible future traffic sensing technologies have been examined. Important criteria for selecting TFWAS sensors include sensor capabilities, costs, operational constraints, sensor compatibility with the infrastructure, and extent. TFWAS is a concept that can take advantage of the strengths of different traffic sensing technologies, can readily adapt to newly developed technologies, and can grow with the development of new traffic control strategies. By developing innovative algorithms that will take information from a variety of sensor types and develop descriptions of traffic flows over a wide area, a more comprehensive understanding of the traffic state can be provided to the control system to perform the most reasonable control actions over the entire wide area. The capability of characterizing the state of traffic over an entire region should revolutionize developments in traffic control strategies.

  14. An Integrated Signaling-Encryption Mechanism to Reduce Error Propagation in Wireless Communications: Performance Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Matalgah, Mustafa M [ORNL; Bobrek, Miljko [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Traditional encryption techniques require packet overhead, produce processing time delay, and suffer from severe quality of service deterioration due to fades and interference in wireless channels. These issues reduce the effective transmission data rate (throughput) considerably in wireless communications, where data rate with limited bandwidth is the main constraint. In this paper, performance evaluation analyses are conducted for an integrated signaling-encryption mechanism that is secure and enables improved throughput and probability of bit-error in wireless channels. This mechanism eliminates the drawbacks stated herein by encrypting only a small portion of an entire transmitted frame, while the rest is not subject to traditional encryption but goes through a signaling process (designed transformation) with the plaintext of the portion selected for encryption. We also propose to incorporate error correction coding solely on the small encrypted portion of the data to drastically improve the overall bit-error rate performance while not noticeably increasing the required bit-rate. We focus on validating the signaling-encryption mechanism utilizing Hamming and convolutional error correction coding by conducting an end-to-end system-level simulation-based study. The average probability of bit-error and throughput of the encryption mechanism are evaluated over standard Gaussian and Rayleigh fading-type channels and compared to the ones of the conventional advanced encryption standard (AES).

  15. Admission Control Framework to Provide Guaranteed Delay in Errorprone Wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Saswati

    1 Admission Control Framework to Provide Guaranteed Delay in Error­prone Wireless Channel Prasanna Chaporkar and Saswati Sarkar Abstract We consider a wireless system in which sessions traverse different­prone wireless system. By ``general'' we mean that the scheduling policies from a large class can be plugged

  16. An Optical Survey of the Position Error Contours of Unidentified High Energy Gamma-Ray Sources at Galactic Latitude b >|20| degrees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. D. Bloom; D. A. Dale; R. Cool; K. Dupczak; C. Miller; A. Haugsjaa; C. Peters; M. Tornikoski; P. Wallace; M. Pierce

    2004-04-02

    We present the most recent results of an optical survey of the position error contours ("error boxes") of unidentified high energy gamma-ray sources.

  17. Aging effects of environmental factors on rolled erosion control products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khanna, Sumee

    2007-04-25

    This thesis presents a study made on erosion control blankets with respect to their aging and longevity. Erosion control blankets have been relied upon increasingly in recent times replacing the old and traditional methods for protecting areas from...

  18. University of Virginia Housing Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    University of Virginia Housing Areas Copeley Hill Faulkner Copeley III & IV Piedmont Hereford Gardens Lile-Maupin House 2372 Tuttle - Dunnington House 2373 Shannon House 2374 Gibbons House 2375 IvyGardensWay Tree House Drive Grady Avenue University Court Farrish Circle W estview Road Engineer'sWay Gildersleve

  19. 200 area TEDF sample schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.

    1995-03-22

    This document summarizes the sampling criteria associated with the 200 Area Treatment Effluent Facility (TEDF) that are needed to comply with the requirements of the Washington State Discharge Permit No. WA ST 4502 and good engineering practices at the generator streams that feed into TEDF. In addition, this document Identifies the responsible parties for both sampling and data transference.

  20. EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

  1. Short-Term Load Forecasting Error Distributions and Implications for Renewable Integration Studies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Load forecasting in the day-ahead timescale is a critical aspect of power system operations that is used in the unit commitment process. It is also an important factor in renewable energy integration studies, where the combination of load and wind or solar forecasting techniques create the net load uncertainty that must be managed by the economic dispatch process or with suitable reserves. An understanding of that load forecasting errors that may be expected in this process can lead to better decisions about the amount of reserves necessary to compensate errors. In this work, we performed a statistical analysis of the day-ahead (and two-day-ahead) load forecasting errors observed in two independent system operators for a one-year period. Comparisons were made with the normal distribution commonly assumed in power system operation simulations used for renewable power integration studies. Further analysis identified time periods when the load is more likely to be under- or overforecast.

  2. Discrimination with error margin between two states - Case of general occurrence probabilities -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Sugimoto; T. Hashimoto; M. Horibe; A. Hayashi

    2009-11-18

    We investigate a state discrimination problem which interpolates minimum-error and unambiguous discrimination by introducing a margin for the probability of error. We closely analyze discrimination of two pure states with general occurrence probabilities. The optimal measurements are classified into three types. One of the three types of measurement is optimal depending on parameters (occurrence probabilities and error margin). We determine the three domains in the parameter space and the optimal discrimination success probability in each domain in a fully analytic form. It is also shown that when the states to be discriminated are multipartite, the optimal success probability can be attained by local operations and classical communication. For discrimination of two mixed states, an upper bound of the optimal success probability is obtained.

  3. Error correcting code with chip kill capability and power saving enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Chen, Dong (Croton On Husdon, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Flynn, William T. (Rochester, MN); Marcella, James A. (Rochester, MN); Takken, Todd (Brewster, NY); Trager, Barry M. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Winograd, Shmuel (Scarsdale, NY)

    2011-08-30

    A method and system are disclosed for detecting memory chip failure in a computer memory system. The method comprises the steps of accessing user data from a set of user data chips, and testing the user data for errors using data from a set of system data chips. This testing is done by generating a sequence of check symbols from the user data, grouping the user data into a sequence of data symbols, and computing a specified sequence of syndromes. If all the syndromes are zero, the user data has no errors. If one of the syndromes is non-zero, then a set of discriminator expressions are computed, and used to determine whether a single or double symbol error has occurred. In the preferred embodiment, less than two full system data chips are used for testing and correcting the user data.

  4. HUMAN ERROR QUANTIFICATION USING PERFORMANCE SHAPING FACTORS IN THE SPAR-H METHOD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold S. Blackman; David I. Gertman; Ronald L. Boring

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes a cognitively based human reliability analysis (HRA) quantification technique for estimating the human error probabilities (HEPs) associated with operator and crew actions at nuclear power plants. The method described here, Standardized Plant Analysis Risk-Human Reliability Analysis (SPAR-H) method, was developed to aid in characterizing and quantifying human performance at nuclear power plants. The intent was to develop a defensible method that would consider all factors that may influence performance. In the SPAR-H approach, calculation of HEP rates is especially straightforward, starting with pre-defined nominal error rates for cognitive vs. action-oriented tasks, and incorporating performance shaping factor multipliers upon those nominal error rates.

  5. Stability and error analysis of nodal expansion method for convection-diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Z.; Rizwan-Uddin; Li, F.; Sun, Y.

    2012-07-01

    The development, and stability and error analyses of nodal expansion method (NEM) for one dimensional steady-state convection diffusion equation is presented. Following the traditional procedure to develop NEM, the discrete formulation of the convection-diffusion equation, which is similar to the standard finite difference scheme, is derived. The method of discrete perturbation analysis is applied to this discrete form to study the stability of the NEM. The scheme based on the NEM is found to be stable for local Peclet number less than 4.644. A maximum principle is proved for the NEM scheme, followed by an error analysis carried out by applying the Maximum principle together with a carefully constructed comparison function. The scheme for the convection diffusion equation is of second-order. Numerical experiments are carried and the results agree with the conclusions of the stability and error analyses. (authors)

  6. Error-rejecting quantum computing with solid state spins assisted by low-Q optical microcavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao Li; Fu-Guo Deng

    2015-10-31

    We present an efficient proposal for error-rejecting quantum computing with quantum dots (QD) embedded in single-sided optical microcavities based on the interface between the circularly-polarized photon and the QDs. A unity fidelity of the quantum entangling gate (EG) can be implemented with a detectable error that leads to a recycling EG procedure, which improves further the efficiency of our proposal for EG along with robustness to the errors involved in the imperfect input-output process. Meanwhile, we discuss the performance of our proposal for EG on two solid state spins with currently achieved experiment parameters, showing that it is feasible with current experimental technology. It provides a promising building block for solid-state quantum computing and quantum networks.

  7. Fade-resistant forward error correction method for free-space optical communications systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Ruggiero, Anthony J. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-10-02

    Free-space optical (FSO) laser communication systems offer exceptionally wide-bandwidth, secure connections between platforms that cannot other wise be connected via physical means such as optical fiber or cable. However, FSO links are subject to strong channel fading due to atmospheric turbulence and beam pointing errors, limiting practical performance and reliability. We have developed a fade-tolerant architecture based on forward error correcting codes (FECs) combined with delayed, redundant, sub-channels. This redundancy is made feasible though dense wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) and/or high-order M-ary modulation. Experiments and simulations show that error-free communications is feasible even when faced with fades that are tens of milliseconds long. We describe plans for practical implementation of a complete system operating at 2.5 Gbps.

  8. Control of tearing modes in toroidal fusion experiments using "designer" error fields Richard Fitzpatrick and Enrico Rossi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    of magnetic islands inside the plasma. Such island chains degrade plasma confinement because both heat October 2000; accepted 20 February 2001 It is demonstrated that a magnetic island chain formed and particles are able to travel radially from one side of an island chain to the other by flowing along

  9. Proof of the Local Discretization Error Estimate for the Optimal Control Problem in the Presence of Interior Layers2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinkenschloss, Matthias

    a | log()|-neighborhood in the crosswind direction influence exact solution at x0. The same behavior can, the exact solution may vary strongly in the crosswind direction, but not in the streamline direction. Since

  10. Mapping Transmission Risk of Lassa Fever in West Africa: The Importance of Quality Control, Sampling Bias, and Error Weighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Moses, Lina M.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2014-08-08

    Lassa fever is a disease that has been reported from sites across West Africa; it is caused by an arenavirus that is hosted by the rodent M. natalensis. Although it is confined to West Africa, and has been documented in detail in some well...

  11. From the ACM SIGGRAPH Asia 2012 conference proceedings. Practical Hessian-Based Error Control for Irradiance Caching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwicker, Matthias

    for Irradiance Caching Jorge Schwarzhaupt UC San Diego Henrik Wann Jensen UC San Diego Wojciech Jarosz Disney Research Z¨urich Pure Split-Sphere RMSE: 0.0901 Reference Reference (Irradiance) Bounded Split-Sphere RMSE-Sphere (clamped to the gradient and 150px max spacing) for irradiance caching. It also performs significantly

  12. Glucose control in the ICU using continuous glucose monitoring: What level of the measurement error is acceptable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilinska, Malgorzata E.; Hovorka, Roman

    2014-10-07

    were reversed. The Yale protocol was most balanced with 50% of time spent in a tight glucose range and a low risk of hypoglycemia. Additional analyses contrasted CGM imprecision and bias. In agreement with Boyd and Bruns [20], we observed a... observations in an appropriately designed clinical study is desirable but is logistically and ethically challenging. Accuracy of glucose meters in the ICU has been studied extensively [10-13] although accuracy guidelines and standards are being debated...

  13. Decentralized, Cooperative Control of Multivehicle Systems: Design and Stability Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weitz, Lesley A.

    2010-01-16

    for the UAV formation. ............... 41 8 Separation between vehicle pairs for the UAV simulation........ 41 9 UAV states: body-?xed velocity perturbations. ............ 42 10 UAV states: body-?xed angular-velocity perturbations. ........ 42 11 UAV states...: Euler angles. ........................ 43 12 UAV control inputs: control-surface de?ections. ............ 43 13 Example vehicle string where controlinputs arefunctions of spac- ing errors between vehicles. ....................... 47 14 Magnitude ofthe...

  14. Scheme for precise correction of orbit variation caused by dipole error field of insertion device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakatani, T.; Agui, A.; Aoyagi, H.; Matsushita, T.; Takao, M.; Takeuchi, M.; Yoshigoe, A.; Tanaka, H.

    2005-05-15

    We developed a scheme for precisely correcting the orbit variation caused by a dipole error field of an insertion device (ID) in a storage ring and investigated its performance. The key point for achieving the precise correction is to extract the variation of the beam orbit caused by the change of the ID error field from the observed variation. We periodically change parameters such as the gap and phase of the specified ID with a mirror-symmetric pattern over the measurement period to modulate the variation. The orbit variation is measured using conventional wide-frequency-band detectors and then the induced variation is extracted precisely through averaging and filtering procedures. Furthermore, the mirror-symmetric pattern enables us to independently extract the orbit variations caused by a static error field and by a dynamic one, e.g., an error field induced by the dynamical change of the ID gap or phase parameter. We built a time synchronization measurement system with a sampling rate of 100 Hz and applied the scheme to the correction of the orbit variation caused by the error field of an APPLE-2-type undulator installed in the SPring-8 storage ring. The result shows that the developed scheme markedly improves the correction performance and suppresses the orbit variation caused by the ID error field down to the order of submicron. This scheme is applicable not only to the correction of the orbit variation caused by a special ID, the gap or phase of which is periodically changed during an experiment, but also to the correction of the orbit variation caused by a conventional ID which is used with a fixed gap and phase.

  15. Estimating rock properties in two phase petroleum reservoirs: an error analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Anthony Ian

    1983-01-01

    by the same amount from the true porosity value. In Fig. 5, the objective function is slightly better represented by the series approximation in 1/4. A Monte Carlo study was performed using the same history matching conditions as for the permeability... estimates were used in a Monte Carlo study to calculate the predicted well values, after the history matching period. The errors in the rock property estimates increases rapidly with an increasing number of unknowns. In many cases, even when large errors...

  16. Sequence decoding in the presence of timing errors for NRZ signaling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinard, Barbara Kay

    1990-01-01

    SEQUENCE DECODING IN THE PRESENCE OF TIMING ERRORS FOR NRZ SIGNALING A Thesis by BARBARA KAY KINARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering SEQUENC'E DECODING IN THE PRESENCE OF TIMIVG ERRORS FOR NRZ SIGNALING A Thesis by BARBARA I&AY KINARD Approved as to style and content by: ostas N. Georg iades (C'hair of C'ommittee) i...

  17. MOTION CONTROL FOR UNDERACTUATED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS ON LIE GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    MOTION CONTROL FOR UNDERACTUATED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS ON LIE GROUPS Francesco Bullo Control controlla­ bility, underactuated systems Abstract Control design for underactuated mechanical systems is an active area of research. In this paper we focus on mechanical control systems defined on Lie groups

  18. Development of a CAN Based Electric Vehicle Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Stephen Andrew

    2014-08-31

    the bus featured an unreliable control system to manage load control and drive enable functions. As a result this thesis presents the design of a Controller Area Network (CAN) based control system to be used as a replacement for the existing system...

  19. Controlling Fleas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Michael E.; Robinson, James V.

    2006-12-18

    . For this reason, avoid close contact with wild rodents such as squirrels, rats and prairie dogs. Their fleas can bite you and may transmit disease. Cat fleas, however, do not carry plague. Control An integrated flea control program includes good sanitation... and treatment of the pet and environment. You can eliminate fleas from your home with proper treatment, but it may take time, especially if the infes- tation is heavy. Sanitation. Change pet bedding regularly and vacuum thoroughly. Vacuuming removes up to 30...

  20. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.