National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for area community reuse

  1. Personal Property Disposition - Community Reuse Organizations (CROs) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Personal Property Disposition - Community Reuse Organizations (CROs) Personal Property Disposition - Community Reuse Organizations (CROs) MEMORANDUM TO: DISTRIBUTION FROM: Michael Owen (signed) Director, Office of Worker and Community Transition Department of Energy Washington, DC 20505 January 22, 2003 Disposition of Excess Personal Property BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE CROs have been operating asset conversion and personal property transfer programs since shortly after the

  2. Community Reuse Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community Reuse Organization Community Reuse Organization HANFORD Carl Adrian TRIDEC 7130 West Grandridge Blvd., Suite A Kennewick, WA 99336 (509) 735-1000, ext. 225 (509) 735-6609 (FAX) cadrian@tridec.org LOS ALAMOS Kathy Keith, Executive Director Regional Development Corporation 706 Bond Street Espanola, NM 87532 (505) 820-1226 (505) 983-8654 (FAX) info@rdcnm.org MOUND Mike Grauwelman, President MMCIC P.O. Box 232 Miamisburg, OH 45343-0232 (937) 865-4462 (937) 865-4431 (FAX) mikeg@mound.com

  3. Hosted by the SRS Community Reuse Organization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosted by the SRS Community Reuse Organization COMMUNITY FORUM on SRS BUDGET Service ● Safety ● Security ● Stewardship ● SRNL ● Sustainability March 3, 2016 ~ Aiken Technical College Jack Craig Site Manager DOE  Savannah River Doug Dearolph Field Office Manager DOE  NNSA www.srs.gov DOE-Savannah River Federal Organization 2 www.srs.gov Contractors * Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) - Management & Operations - Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) * Savannah River

  4. Personal Property Disposition - Community Reuse Organizations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... enterprise for use in its business operations as an inducement to establish productive capacity in a CRO's geographical service area that will result in the creation of new ...

  5. Comprehensive Fuel Cycle Research Study Presented to the Savannah River Site Community Reuse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comprehensive Fuel Cycle Research Study Presented to the Savannah River Site Community Reuse Organization February 2013 The content of this Study reflects the independent views of Dickstein Shapiro LLP, based on information available from a variety of sources. The Study is not intended to reflect the views of the Savannah River Site Community Reuse Organization. 1 Table of Contents Page I. Executive Summary

  6. Department of Energy Awards $300,000 to Albuquerque’s Next Generation Economy Community Reuse Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy Awards $300,000 to Albuquerque’s Next Generation Economy Community Reuse Organization

  7. Department of Energy Awards $345,000 to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council Community Reuse Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy Awards $345,000 to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council Community Reuse Organization

  8. Department of Energy Awards $200,000 Grant to the Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative Community Reuse Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy Awards $200,000 Grant to the Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative Community Reuse Organization

  9. Department of Energy Awards $485,000 Grant to the Southern Ohio Diversification Initiative Community Reuse Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy Awards $485,000 Grant to the Southern Ohio Diversification Initiative Community Reuse Organization

  10. THEORY INTO PRACTICE PAG REGIONAL WORKFORCE STUDY PREPARED FOR THE SRS COMMUNITY REUSE ORGANIZATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THEORY INTO PRACTICE PAG REGIONAL WORKFORCE STUDY PREPARED FOR THE SRS COMMUNITY REUSE ORGANIZATION APRIL 2015 AIKEN ● ALLENDALE ● BARNWELL ● COLUMBIA ● RICHMOND CONTENTS Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 1 Approach ................................................................................................................................................ 1 Key

  11. Executive Summary: Comprehensive Fuel Cycle Research Study Presented to the Savannah River Site Community Reuse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Executive Summary: Comprehensive Fuel Cycle Research Study Presented to the Savannah River Site Community Reuse Organization February 2013 The content of this Study reflects the independent views of Dickstein Shapiro LLP, based on information available from a variety of sources. The Study is not intended to reflect the views of the Savannah River Site Community Reuse Organization. 1 I. Executive Summary The purpose of this report is to provide the five-county region ("Region")

  12. Long-Term Need for New Nuclear Workers The SRS Community Reuse Organization (SRSCRO) Region of Georgia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Need for New Nuclear Workers The SRS Community Reuse Organization (SRSCRO) Region of Georgia and South Carolina has the most unique nuclear industry capabilities in the nation. This region is at the forefront of new nuclear power production, environmental stewardship, innovative technology and national security. In 2009, the SRSCRO commissioned a survey of eight area nuclear employers that concluded nearly 10,000 new workers will be needed in the next decade to support existing

  13. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-09-01

    This renewal application for a Recycled Water Reuse Permit is being submitted in accordance with the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.17 “Recycled Water Rules” and the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 for continuing the operation of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The permit expires March 16, 2015. The permit requires a renewal application to be submitted six months prior to the expiration date of the existing permit. For the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant, the renewal application must be submitted by September 16, 2014. The information in this application is consistent with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater and discussions with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality personnel.

  14. 2012 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2011, through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2012 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant.

  15. 2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike lewis

    2011-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

  16. 2011 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Lewis

    2012-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Site description; (2) Facility and system description; (3) Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; (4) Status of special compliance conditions and activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 permit year, approximately 1.22 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

  17. Reusing Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into...

  18. Reusing Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into ...

  19. Improving Reuse & Recycling | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving Reuse & Recycling series of images of recycling: trash heap, light bulbs, circuit boards diagram for focus area three, improving reuse and recycling (A click on the org...

  20. 2013 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013. The report contains, as applicable, the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. However, soil samples were collected in October from soil monitoring unit SU-014101.

  1. 2014 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike

    2015-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2013, through October 31, 2014. The report contains, as applicable, the following information; Site description; Facility and system description; Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; Status of compliance conditions and activities; and Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. The current permit expires on March 16, 2015. A permit renewal application was submitted to Idaho Department of Environmental Quality on September 15, 2014. During the 2014 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. Seepage testing of the three lagoons was performed between August 26, 2014 and September 22, 2014. Seepage rates from Lagoons 1 and 2 were below the 0.25 inches/day requirement; however, Lagoon 3 was above the 0.25 inches/day. Lagoon 3 has been isolated and is being evaluated for future use or permanent removal from service.

  2. Microsoft Word - (Revised) Final Land Asset Transfer for Beneficial Reuse Report 6 9 15.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    i TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1. Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................... 1 Section 2. Introduction and History of DOE Land Disposals ........................................................................ 2 Authorization ............................................................................................................................................ 3 Asset Reuse History and Community Reuse

  3. Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The George Washington UniversityEnvironmental Resource Policy Graduate Program Capstone ProjectBeneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon SiteFeasibility and Community Support for Photovoltaic ArrayMay 2012

  4. Types of Reuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

  5. Chairman, SRS Community Reuse Organization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radionuclide Subgroup of the Verification Monitoring Task Force, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Chair, CTBT working group B Radionuclide Expert Group and the U.S. Radionuclide Subgroup of the Verification Monitoring Task Force, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ted Bowyer Ted Bowyer Ted Bowyer has been appointed a member of the National Academy of Sciences Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty panel. With the Obama Administration

  6. Des Moines Area Community College | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information Des Moines Area Community College Spotlights Home DOE Applauds Des Moines Area Community College Science and Technical Programs Des Moines Area Community College Des Moines Area Community College Des Moines, Iowa Agri/Natural Resources Biology Biomass Operations Biotechnology Environmental Science Information Technology Manufacturing Technology Microcomputers Civil Engineering Pre-Medical Telecommunications Wind Turbines Resource Links About Library

  7. Oxford Area Community School District (Michigan) Bonds Case Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigans Oxford Area Community School District entered into an energy savings performance contract and issued limited tax general obligation bonds to fund the up-front costs of almost $3 million of energy-related improvements. Case study is excerpted from Financing Energy Upgrades for K-12 School Districts: A Guide to Tapping into Funding for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Improvements. Author: Merrian Borgeson and Mark Zimring

  8. Google Earth Tour: Water reuse at LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Google Earth Tour: Water reuse at LANL Google Earth Tour: Water reuse at LANL

  9. Beneficial Reuse | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Beneficial Reuse Beneficial Reuse Beneficial Reuse One goal of LM, as laid out in the 2011-2020 Strategic Plan, is to place DOE legacy sites and property in the most beneficial use consistent with LM's mission requirements. LM considers environmentally sound land uses for properties under its custody, directing a significant effort to evaluating possible land use options. Where possible, LM makes lands and facilities available for government, public, and private use consistent with the tenets of

  10. co2-use-reuse | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Use and Reuse Carbon dioxide is thermodynamically stable, but it is still reactive under certain conditions that do not necessarily require intensive energy input. Using CO2 as a feedstock for a variety of products is a promising research area, particularly in conjunction with energy generated from renewable energy sources. The Carbon Use and Reuse Technology Area seeks to support the development of technologies identified as having the greatest potential to help boost the commodity

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Pollution Prevention: Reuse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reuse Reuse is more important and environmentally rewarding than recycling or waste-to-energy incineration, according to the waste management hierarchy. These highlighted programs...

  12. Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Home CSM's picture Submitted by CSM(5) Member 14 May, 2014 - 21:59 Travis Brown and Kamran Baksh, Final Submission Colorado School of Mines Waunita Hot Springs...

  13. Portsmouth Community Outreach | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portsmouth SSAB tour onsite disposal cell test pit Portsmouth public meeting on ... Protection Agency Community Reuse Organization (Southern Ohio Diversification ...

  14. Scenario of solid waste reuse in Khulna city of Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bari, Quazi H.; Mahbub Hassan, K.; Haque, R.

    2012-12-15

    The reuse and recycling of waste materials are now sincerely considered to be an integral part of solid waste management in many parts of the world. In this context, a vast number of options ranging from small scale decentralized to larger scale centralized plants have been adopted. This study aimed at investigating the waste reuse schemes in Khulna city located in the southern part of Bangladesh and ranked third largest city in the country. The shops for reusable material (SRM) were mostly situated around railway, waterway, and truck station markets which provided easy transportation to further locations. For the reuses of waste materials and products, a chain system was found to collect reusable wastes under a total number of 310 identified SRM with 859 persons directly or indirectly involved in the scheme. This was a decentralized waste management system with self sufficient (autonomous) management. According to mass balance, about 38.52 tons d{sup -1} solid wastes were reused in Khulna city area, accounting for 7.65% of the total generated wastes. This study revealed that apparently a silent, systematic, smooth, and clean reuse chain has been established in Khulna city area under private initiatives, whose sustainability was confirmed over the years in the country without any official or formal funds. However, proper adjustment between the higher and lower chain in the materials flow path, as well as personal hygiene training for the workers, would further improve the achievements of the established reuse scheme.

  15. How many times can LANL reuse water?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How many times can LANL reuse water? How many times can LANL reuse water? LANL reuses the same water up to 8 times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. August 1, 2013 LANL reuses water up to 8 times. How many times can LANL reuse water? LANL reuses the same water up to 8 times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. These uses are in place, not theoretical. Most systems in New Mexico mine water from the aquifer, use

  16. Focus Areas | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Areas FA 1: Diversifying Supply FA 2: Developing Substitutes FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling FA 4: Crosscutting Research

  17. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobensack, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  18. Google Earth Tour: Water reuse at LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Google Earth Tour: Water reuse at LANL Google Earth Tour: Water reuse at LANL Open full screen to view more You are running an unsupported browser, some features may not work....

  19. Water reuse and technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Reuse and the Energetic Connection Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new ... Water Reuse and the Energetic Connection Aymer Maturana 2015.05.28 Water scarcity is a ...

  20. ICT reuse in socio-economic enterprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ongondo, F.O.; Williams, I.D.; Dietrich, J.; Carroll, C.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We analyse ICT equipment reuse operations of socio-economic enterprises. • Most common ICT products dealt with are computers and related equipment. • In the UK in 2010, ∼143,750 appliances were reused. • Marketing and legislative difficulties are the common hurdles to reuse activities. • Socio-economic enterprises can significantly contribute to resource efficiency. - Abstract: In Europe, socio-economic enterprises such as charities, voluntary organisations and not-for-profit companies are involved in the repair, refurbishment and reuse of various products. This paper characterises and analyses the operations of socio-economic enterprises that are involved in the reuse of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) equipment. Using findings from a survey, the paper specifically analyses the reuse activities of socio-economic enterprises in the UK from which Europe-wide conclusions are drawn. The amount of ICT products handled by the reuse organisations is quantified and potential barriers and opportunities to their operations are analysed. By-products from reuse activities are discussed and recommendations to improve reuse activities are provided. The most common ICT products dealt with by socio-economic enterprises are computers and related equipment. In the UK in 2010, an estimated 143,750 appliances were reused. However, due to limitations in data, it is difficult to compare this number to the amount of new appliances that entered the UK market or the amount of waste electrical and electronic equipment generated in the same period. Difficulties in marketing products and numerous legislative requirements are the most common barriers to reuse operations. Despite various constraints, it is clear that organisations involved in reuse of ICT could contribute significantly to resource efficiency and a circular economy. It is suggested that clustering of their operations into “reuse parks” would enhance both their profile and their

  1. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 1\ ".~ -. , ;J Community _ Loblolly Pine _ Slash Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood ~ Upland Hard'MJod Bottomland Hand'MJod Mixed Swamp Forest I!!!!I Carolina Bay Wetland _Water 8 Bottomland Hand'MJod/Pine DForb/Grassland _ Other* Disturbed Area &:i Scrub/Shrub %~~~sBoundary :tfW'Roads o Utimy ROW Streams NPDES outfalls o Monitoring Wells * Wastesites CJ TES Plants (2) ~ Other Set*Asides .-. SRS Bays Areas D Hydric Soiis o Soils Soil Series and Phase D AnB D BaB D BaC D Ch I::!:I Fa D LaB _

  2. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Community Environmental Documents Tours Community Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab ⇒ Navigate Section Community Environmental Documents Tours Community Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab IMG_0128-b Building strong and productive bridges with Berkeley Lab's neighbors and with local, state and federal officials is critical to ensuring that great science continues to thrive at the Lab. The Office of State Government and Community Relations exists to serve as a resource for community

  3. Cooling tower water treatment and reuse. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cooling tower water treatment and reuse. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cooling tower water treatment and reuse. No abstract prepared. Authors: Brady, Patrick Vane ; ...

  4. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-02-27

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials.

  5. Reusing Property Resulting from Analytical Laboratory Closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J.; DePinho, D.; Wetherstein, P.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) site in Grand Junction, Colorado, faced the problem of reusing an extensive assortment of laboratory equipment and supplies when its on-site analytical chemistry laboratory closed. This challenge, undertaken as part of the Grand Junction site's pollution prevention program, prioritized reuse of as much of the laboratory equipment and supplies as possible during a 9-month period in fiscal year 2004. Reuse remedies were found for approximately $3 million worth of instrumentation, equipment, chemicals, precious metals, and other laboratory items through other Grand Junction site projects, Federal Government databases, and extensive contact with other DOE facilities, universities, and colleges. In 2005, the DOE-LM Grand Junction site received two prestigious DOE pollution prevention awards for reuse of the laboratory's equipment and supplies. (authors)

  6. Decontamination and reuse of ORGDP aluminum scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Wilson, D.F.

    1996-12-01

    The Gaseous Diffusion Plants, or GDPs, have significant amounts of a number of metals, including nickel, aluminum, copper, and steel. Aluminum was used extensively throughout the GDPs because of its excellent strength to weight ratios and good resistance to corrosion by UF{sub 6}. This report is concerned with the recycle of aluminum stator and rotor blades from axial compressors. Most of the stator and rotor blades were made from 214-X aluminum casting alloy. Used compressor blades were contaminated with uranium both as a result of surface contamination and as an accumulation held in surface-connected voids inside of the blades. A variety of GDP studies were performed to evaluate the amounts of uranium retained in the blades; the volume, area, and location of voids in the blades; and connections between surface defects and voids. Based on experimental data on deposition, uranium content of the blades is 0.3%, or roughly 200 times the value expected from blade surface area. However, this value does correlate with estimated internal surface area and with lengthy deposition times. Based on a literature search, it appears that gaseous decontamination or melt refining using fluxes specific for uranium removal have the potential for removing internal contamination from aluminum blades. A melt refining process was used to recycle blades during the 1950s and 1960s. The process removed roughly one-third of the uranium from the blades. Blade cast from recycled aluminum appeared to perform as well as blades from virgin material. New melt refining and gaseous decontamination processes have been shown to provide substantially better decontamination of pure aluminum. If these techniques can be successfully adapted to treat aluminum 214-X alloy, internal and, possibly, external reuse of aluminum alloys may be possible.

  7. Information architecture as a framework for reuse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, M.L.; Chang, I.N.

    1995-09-01

    This paper relates two tenets of modern acquisition, Information Architecture (IA) and reuse. An IA is the product of a modeling effort performed at the analysis level of system development that identifies essential information elements and describes the fundamental characteristics and behavior of the objective system. Principles and observations on reuse, including definitions and criteria to be used in applying reuse in the system engineering and software development process, are presented. The two tenets are related to show how the IA supports reuse as an element of an overall system engineering and software development approach, particularly when that approach is intentionally defined to emphasize reuse. The paper draws from recent efforts in the Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) Program to implement modern acquisition practices, emphasize reuse and develop IAs for the National Missile Defense (NMD) Battle Management, Command, Control and Communications (BMC3) system. The intention of this paper is to offer observations and examples that would help system developers achieve successful reusability in their products. Such products would include the IA itself as well as system engineering and software development products generated with an IA-based approach to system development.

  8. EA-1640: Transfer of Land and Facilities within the East Tennessee Technology Park and Surrounding Area, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Oak Ridge Operations Office issued a final EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to convey DOE property located at the East Tennessee Technology Park and the surrounding area to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee, City of Oak Ridge, other agencies, or private entities for mixed use economic development.Public Comment Opportunities.

  9. Regional Nuclear Workforce Development in the Central Savannah River Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Nuclear Workforce Development in the Central Savannah River Area Dr. Susan A. Winsor Aiken Technical College President: P.O. Box 696, Aiken, SC 29802, winsors@atc.edu Mindy Mets Nuclear Workforce Initiative Program Manager, SRS Community Reuse Organization: P.O. Box 696, Aiken, SC 29802, mindy.mets@srscro.org INTRODUCTION An expanding role for nuclear energy in the United States has dramatic implications for the nuclear workforce demand in the two-state region of Georgia and South

  10. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Community Images of the Lab's neighbors in Los Alamos and Northern New Mexico. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets PHOTOS BY TOPIC Careers Community Visitors Environment History Science The Lab Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Volunteers fill sandbags to assist Santa Clara Pueblo in the aftermath of 2011's Las

  11. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Community Our good neighbor pledge: contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico through economic development, education excellence, and active employee engagement. 9th Annual Native American Economic Summit Economic Development Partnering and investing to stimulate business growth, create jobs, strengthen our communities READ MORE Northern New Mexico student competition Education Impacting student and teacher achievement, inspiring our future workforce READ MORE Employees

  12. REGIONAL WORKFORCE STUDY PREPARED FOR THE SRS COMMUNITY REUSE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    workers poses a significant challenge for regional employers. The 15 regional higher education institutions graduate about 7,300 students annually. The most popular fields of...

  13. Community-Minded Interns at Savannah River Site Help Area Residents in Need with Home Repairs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – More than two dozen college interns who worked at the Savannah River Site (SRS) this summer joined other volunteers and headed into area neighborhoods to help people in need with home repairs.

  14. Land and Asset Transfer for Beneficial Reuse | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Land and Asset Transfer for Beneficial Reuse More Documents & Publications EA-0531: Final Environmental Assessment EIS-0068: Final Environmental Impact Statement EA-1008: ...

  15. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    _ Loblolly Pine IiiiiI Slash Pine D Bottomland Hardwood D Wetland Depression _Water _ Other - Disturbed Area N A 560 Meters o Mon~oring Wells 1\1 Streams N Utility ROW -0 Openwells NRoads ~I +: TES Plants (1) o SRS Bays IE] Hydric Soils o ** 280 o Vegetation o o Soils Soil Series and Phase D DoA D DoB D FuA .Og .VeC sc Figure 16-2. Plant comlllllllities and soils (~f the Rainbow Bay Amphibian Reserve Area. 16-11 Set-Aside 16: Rainbow Bay Amphibian Reserve

  16. Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert A. Liske

    2006-07-31

    This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and

  17. Wash solvent reuse in paint production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, A.B.; Heater, K.J.; Olfenbuttel, R.F.

    1994-04-01

    The project evaluated solvent used to clean paint manufacture equipment for its utility in production of subsequent batches of solvent-borne paint. Reusing wash solvent would reduce the amount of solvent disposed of as waste. The evaluation of this wash-solvent recovery technology was conducted by Battelle Memorial Institute for the Pollution Prevention Research Branch of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The evaluation was conducted with the cooperation and assistance of Vanex Color, Inc. The product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic impacts of this technology change, as it has been implemented by Vanex, were examined. Two batches of a solvent-borne alkyd house paint were prepared at Vanex--one batch made with 100%-new solvent and the other with 30%-wash solvent--and sampled for laboratory analysis at Battelle.

  18. Enterprise SRS Past Reuse Success | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Past Reuse Success Enterprise SRS Past Reuse Success The Savannah River Site has a long history of partnerships with national laboratories, research universities, and federal and commercial entities. ESRS_past_re-use_successes.pdf (1.22 MB) More Documents & Publications Enterprise SRS Overview Enterprise SRS Future Initiatives EA-1605: Final Environmental Assessment

  19. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iLoblolly P ine , Mixed Pine/Hardwood Upland Hardwood Bottomland Hardwood . Bottomland Hardwood/Pine Other-disturbed area N ATTA Range o Mon~oring Wells ~ Streams SRS Bays Pipes o Openwells ~ Roads * TES Plants (1) [2J Other Set~Asides fIE] HydrIC Soils 1100 Soils Soil Series and Phase DAnB DBaB DBaC DEnA DFuB .HoA DLuB _LuC _OcA _OrB _Pk C;:;]Rm _TrB DTrC DTrD _TuE I!!!iTuF DVaD DWaB .Wm o 2200 Meters N A Figure 12-2. Plallt C011l1l/1I1lties alld soils associated with the Oak-Hickory Forest #2

  20. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Slash Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood D Upland Hardwood D Bottomland Hardwood * Water ElI] Bottomland Hardwood/Pine 1:\1 Streams ~Rails NUtility ROW o Openwells Ii NPDES outfall Roads c::J Other Set-Asides o SRS Bays EEJ Hydric Soils 450 L Soil Series and Phase DAnB DBaB I::J NoB .Pk c:J Rm DWaB .Wm o Soils 450 900 Meters N A sc Figure 8-1. Plant cO/ll/llunities and soils associated with the Steel Creek Bay Set-Aside Area. 8-7 Set-Aside 8: Steel Creek Bay

  1. Transferring the Wayne, New Jersey, Site to Beneficial Reuse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, C.; Widdop, M.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) included the Wayne, New Jersey, Site in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1984, and the site was listed on the National Priorities List that same year. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completed physical remediation of the site in 2006 and is pursuing regulatory closeout. In September 2006, DOE transferred the site to Wayne Township for park and recreational use. The transfer and reuse process involved the coordinated efforts of DOE, USACE, and other local, state, and federal agencies. DOE imposed an interim ground water use restriction as a best management practice until the regulators concur that the remedy is fully implemented and protective. An institutional control will be applied to potential contamination remaining beneath public rights-of-way. This paper presents a discussion of the process of transferring site responsibility from USACE to the DOE Office of Legacy Management, transitioning the site to an appropriate new use that benefits the local community, long-term surveillance and maintenance requirements for the remediated site, the challenges that were identified and addressed, and lessons learned that may be applied to future FUSRAP site transfers. (authors)

  2. Beneficial reuse of US DOE Radioactive scrap metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motl, G.P.

    1995-01-19

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has more than 2.5 million tons of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) that is either in inventory or expected to be generated over the next 25 years as major facilities within the weapons complex are decommissioned. Since much of this metal cannot be decontaminated easily, past practice has been to either retain this material in inventory or ship it to DOE disposal sites for burial. In an attempt to conserve natural resources and to avoid burial of this material at DOE disposal sites, options are now being explored to ``beneficially reuse`` this material. Under the beneficial reuse concept, RSM that cannot be decontaminated and free released is used in applications where the inherent contamination is not a detriment to its end use. This paper describes initiatives currently in progress in the United States that support the DOE beneficial reuse concept.

  3. Innovative Concepts for Beneficial Reuse of Carbon Dioxide | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Innovative Concepts for Beneficial Reuse of Carbon Dioxide Innovative Concepts for Beneficial Reuse of Carbon Dioxide Funding for 12 projects to test innovative concepts for the beneficial use of carbon dioxide (CO2) was announced by the U.S. Department of Energy. The awards are part of $1.4 billion in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) for projects that will capture carbon dioxide from industrial sources. These 12 projects will engage in a first phase

  4. Survey of Technologies to Support Reuse of Gloveboxes at LANL TA-55

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; P. A. Pinson.

    1998-11-01

    This report is a summary of ideas and technologies available to support reuse of plutonium gloveboxes at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 55 (TA-55). This work is the second of two deliverables in the task to enhance glovebox design for longevity and reusability at TA-55. The report presents several design change suggestions to be evaulated for their feasibility by LANL glovebox designers. The report also describes some techniques to be evaluated by LANL for their usefulness in reducing glovebox waste.

  5. Asset Revitalization Initiative Guide for Sustainable Asset Management and Reuse

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-03-11

    The Guide is intended to assist sites in sustainable planning, management, and reuse of assets that allows effective mission execution, optimizes federal and public resources, and supports local and national goals for economic growth and diversification in support of DOE O 430.1B.

  6. Reuse of waste cutting sand at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, S., LLNL

    1998-02-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined the waste stream from a water jet cutting operation, to evaluate the possible reuse of waste garnet sand. The sand is a cutting agent used to shape a variety of materials, including metals. Nearly 70,000 pounds of waste sand is generated annually by the cutting operation. The Environmental Protection Department evaluated two potential reuses for the spent garnet sand: backfill in utility trenches; and as a concrete constituent. In both applications, garnet waste would replace the sand formerly purchases by LLNL for these purposes. Findings supported the reuse of waste garnet sand in concrete, but disqualified its proposed application as trench backfill. Waste sand stabilized in ac concrete matrix appeared to present no metals-leaching hazard; however, unconsolidated sand in trenches could potentially leach metals in concentrations high enough to threaten ground water quality. A technical report submitted to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board was reviewed and accepted by that body. Reuse of waste garnet cutting sand as a constituent in concrete poured to form walkways and patios at LLNL was approved.

  7. V-058: Microsoft Internet Explorer CDwnBindInfo Object Reuse...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Microsoft Internet Explorer CDwnBindInfo Object Reuse Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-058: Microsoft Internet Explorer CDwnBindInfo Object Reuse Flaw Lets Remote...

  8. Transferring the Wayne, NJ, Site to Beneficial Reuse | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transferring the Wayne, NJ, Site to Beneficial Reuse Transferring the Wayne, NJ, Site to Beneficial Reuse Transferring the Wayne, NJ, Site to Beneficial Reuse (Waste Management Conference 2007) Transferring the Wayne, NJ, Site to Beneficial Reuse (Waste Management Conference 2007) (431.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Coordination Between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Assessing and

  9. The US Department of Energy`s facility reuse at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    This audit was initiated to determine whether the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site was maximizing its reuse of excess facilities.

  10. Enhancing the Impact of Science Data: Toward Data Discovery and Reuse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chappell, Alan R.; Weaver, Jesse R.; Purohit, Sumit; Smith, William P.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; West, Patrick; Lee, Benno; Fox, Peter

    2015-06-28

    The amount of data produced in support of scientific research continues to grow rapidly. Despite the accumulation and demand for scientific data, relatively little data are actually made available for the broader scientific community. We surmise that one root of this problem is the perceived difficulty of electronically publishing scientific data and associated metadata in a way that makes it discoverable. We propose exploiting Semantic Web technologies and best practices to make metadata both discoverable and easy to publish. We share experiences in curating metadata to illustrate the cumbersome nature of data reuse in the current research environment. We also make recommendations with a real-world example of how data publishers can provide their metadata by adding limited additional markup to HTML pages on the Web. With little additional effort from data publishers, the difficulty of data discovery, access, and sharing can be greatly reduced and the impact of research data greatly enhanced.

  11. Community Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Videos » Community Videos Community Videos

  12. Low-power Gm-C filter employing current-reuse differential difference amplifiers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mincey, John S.; Briseno-Vidrios, Carlos; Silva-Martinez, Jose; Rodenbeck, Christopher T.

    2016-08-10

    This study deals with the design of low-power, high performance, continuous-time filters. The proposed OTA architecture employs current-reuse differential difference amplifiers in order to produce more power efficient Gm-C filter solutions. To demonstrate this, a 6th order low-pass Butterworth filter was designed in 0.18 m CMOS achieving a 65-MHz -3-dB frequency, an in-band input-referred third-order intercept point of 12.0 dBm, and an input referred noise density of 40 nV/Hz1=2, while only consuming 8.07 mW from a 1.8 V supply and occupying a total chip area of 0.21 mm2 with a power consumption of only 1.19 mW per pole.

  13. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

  14. CO{sub 2} Reuse in Petrochemical Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Trembly; Brian Turk; Maruthi Pavani; Jon McCarty; Chris Boggs; Aqil Jamal; Raghubir Gupta

    2010-12-31

    To address public concerns regarding the consequences of climate change from anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is actively funding a CO{sub 2} management program to develop technologies capable of mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions from power plant and industrial facilities. Over the past decade, this program has focused on reducing the costs of carbon capture and storage technologies. Recently, DOE/NETL launched an alternative CO{sub 2} mitigation program focused on beneficial CO{sub 2} reuse to support the development of technologies that mitigate emissions by converting CO{sub 2} into valuable chemicals and fuels. RTI, with DOE/NETL support, has been developing an innovative beneficial CO{sub 2} reuse process for converting CO{sub 2} into substitute natural gas (SNG) by using by-product hydrogen (H{sub 2)-containing fuel gas from petrochemical facilities. This process leveraged commercial reactor technology currently used in fluid catalytic crackers in petroleum refining and a novel nickel (Ni)-based catalyst developed by RTI. The goal was to generate an SNG product that meets the pipeline specifications for natural gas, making the SNG product completely compatible with the existing natural gas infrastructure. RTI's technology development efforts focused on demonstrating the technical feasibility of this novel CO{sub 2} reuse process and obtaining the necessary engineering information to design a pilot demonstration unit for converting about 4 tons per day (tons/day) of CO{sub 2} into SNG at a suitable host site. This final report describes the results of the Phase I catalyst and process development efforts. The methanation activity of several commercial fixed-bed catalysts was evaluated under fluidized-bed conditions in a bench-scale reactor to identify catalyst performance targets. RTI developed two fluidizable Ni-based catalyst formulations (Cat-1 and Cat-3) that

  15. Solar Community | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Community Address: 4704 E Cesar Chavez St Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78702 Region: Texas Area Sector: Solar Product: Solar sales...

  16. Long-Term Need for New Nuclear Workers The SRS Community Reuse...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    suitable for all ages. Education Tools - NWI projects have produced a nuclear animation and on-line job shadow tools available to K-12 students in GA & SC. NWI has...

  17. Clean-out and Reuse of GCEP Facilities at Portsmouth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz, William; Hickman, Mark

    2008-01-15

    PORTS began operations in 1956 to enrich uranium for both civilian and military use. It operated under Goodyear Atomic Corporation and Lockheed-Martin as a government-owned contractor-operated facility until the formation of the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as a government corporation in 1993. In 1998, USEC was privatized as a publicly traded corporation. USEC leases the Portsmouth and Paducah GDPs from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Enrichment operations were terminated at Portsmouth in 2001, although USEC continues to lease and maintain the Portsmouth GDP in Cold Shutdown and conduct some DOE projects there. LPP found that removal of old equipment to allow reuse of a facility can present unexpected challenges. Classified components create significant logistics issues. In this case, teamwork and attention to detail by USEC, LATA/Parallax, and DOE resulted in solutions and success. Lessons learnt: - Transportation logistics are particularly important when shipping waste streams with special requirements. - Investment in extra equipment yields tangible benefits where other resources (cleared drivers) are scarce. - An early start to providing specially qualified drivers, in this case providing security clearances, is essential. Availability is limited, and the time required to qualify new drivers may be lengthy. - A dedicated communications station, rather than reliance on existing resources (shift superintendent), is invaluable.

  18. Recovery and reuse of asphalt roofing waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desai, S.; Graziano, G.; Shepherd, P.

    1984-02-02

    Burning of asphalt roofing waste as a fuel and incorporating asphalt roofing waste in bituminous paving were identified as the two outstanding resource recovery concepts out of ten studied. Four additional concepts might be worth considering under different market or technical circumstances. Another four concepts were rated as worth no further consideration at this time. This study of the recovery of the resource represented in asphalt roofing waste has identified the sources and quantities of roofing waste. About six million cubic yards of scrap roofing are generated annually in the United States, about 94% from removal of old roofing at the job site and the remainder from roofing material production at factories. Waste disposal is a growing problem for manufacturers and contractors. Nearly all roofing waste is hauled to landfills at a considerable expense to roofing contractors and manufacturers. Recovery of the roofing waste resource should require only a modest economic incentive. The asphalt contained in roofing waste represents an energy resource of more than 7 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year. Another 1 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year may be contained in field-applied asphalt on commercial building roofs. The two concepts recommended by this study appear to offer the broadest applicability, the most favorable economics, and the highest potential for near-term implementation to reuse this resource.

  19. Recovery and reuse of cellulase catalyst in an exzymatic cellulose hydrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, Jonathan

    1989-01-01

    A process for recovering cellulase from the hydrolysis of cellulose, and reusing it in subsequent hydrolyois procedures. The process utilizes a commercial adsorbent that efficiently removes cellulase from reaction products which can be easily removed by simple decantation.

  20. Reuse of secondhand TVs exported from Japan to the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Aya; Terazono, Atsushi

    2010-06-15

    The trade of secondhand electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) from developed to developing countries has become a growing environmental issue owing to concerns about improper recycling of these goods in developing countries. We followed a 12-m cargo container of cathode-ray-tube color TVs exported from Japan to the Philippines in February 2008. We surveyed the number of TVs damaged in transport, as well as the number of malfunctioning TVs from this shipment. In addition, we present the results of interviews with 113 Filipino consumers who intended to buy secondhand EEE at nine secondhand shops in Metro Manila. Approximately 3% of the imported TVs were damaged upon arrival. The importer sold some of the units directly to local dealers, and kept the rest to repair, refurbish and resell. Approximately 40% of the imported TVs malfunctioned and needed repair in addition to basic reconditioning. Most interviewees indicated that they prefer to buy secondhand EEE because the prices are lower than those of brand-new products. Consumers indicated that they planned on using the product for an average of about 5 years, but the actual period of use may be lower. Most end-of-life EEE in the Philippines is dismantled and recycled by unregulated companies and untrained individuals in markets or near landfill sites, and it is clear that a proper collection system and treatment methods are needed for e-waste. In addition to the material flow of secondhand TVs, we also discuss several economic aspects and appropriate control measures of the international reuse of secondhand TVs.

  1. FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Area 3 - Peterson, Jones Electronic Waste: DOD is Recovering Materials but Several ... Read more about Electronic Waste: DOD is Recovering Materials but Several Factors May ...

  2. Community Involvement | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Involvement Community Involvement Y-12 is committed to keeping the community informed in areas of operations, environmental concerns, safety and emergency preparedness. To...

  3. Innovative technologies for recycling and reusing radioactively contaminated materials from DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossart, S.J. ); Hyde, J. )

    1993-01-01

    Through award of ten contracts under the solicitation, DOE is continuing efforts to develop innovative technologies for decontamination and recycling or reusing of process equipment, scrap metal, and concrete. These ten technologies are describe briefly in this report. There is great economic incentive for recycling or reusing materials generated during D D of DOE's facilities. If successfully developed, these superior technologies will enable DOE to clean its facilities by 2019. These technologies will also generate a reusable or recyclable product, while achieving D D in less time at lower cost with reduced health and safety risks to the workers, the public and the environment.

  4. Innovative technologies for recycling and reusing radioactively contaminated materials from DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossart, S.J.; Hyde, J.

    1993-06-01

    Through award of ten contracts under the solicitation, DOE is continuing efforts to develop innovative technologies for decontamination and recycling or reusing of process equipment, scrap metal, and concrete. These ten technologies are describe briefly in this report. There is great economic incentive for recycling or reusing materials generated during D&D of DOE`s facilities. If successfully developed, these superior technologies will enable DOE to clean its facilities by 2019. These technologies will also generate a reusable or recyclable product, while achieving D&D in less time at lower cost with reduced health and safety risks to the workers, the public and the environment.

  5. Progress in Recycling Elemental Lead for Reuse of Radiologically-Contaminated within the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, C.

    2003-02-26

    Duratek successfully demonstrated a process for reusing contaminated lead as a shielding material for radioactive waste containers. This process offers the Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial utilities a cost-effective strategy for reusing a material that would otherwise require costly disposal as a mixed waste. During the past year, GTS-Duratek Inc. approximately 500,000 pounds of contaminated and potentially contaminated lead into shielding (bricks) and shielded steel containers. The lead originated from the DOE facilities including INEEL, Hanford, Argonne, Los Alamos, Berkeley and Sandia.

  6. Environmental transport and fate of endocrine disruptors from non-potable reuse of municipal wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, B; Beller, H; Bartel, C M; Kane, S; Campbell, C; Grayson, A; Liu, N; Burastero, S

    2005-11-16

    This project was designed to investigate the important but virtually unstudied topic of the subsurface transport and fate of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) when treated wastewater is used for landscape irrigation (non-potable water reuse). Although potable water reuse was outside the scope of this project, the investigation clearly has relevance to such water recycling practices. The target compounds, which are discussed in the following section and include EDCs such as 4-nonylphenol (NP) and 17{beta}-estradiol, were studied not only because of their potential estrogenic effects on receptors but also because they can be useful as tracers of wastewater residue in groundwater. Since the compounds were expected to occur at very low (part per trillion) concentrations in groundwater, highly selective and sensitive analytical techniques had to be developed for their analysis. This project assessed the distributions of these compounds in wastewater effluents and groundwater, and examined their fate in laboratory soil columns simulating the infiltration of treated wastewater into an aquifer (e.g., as could occur during irrigation of a golf course or park with nonpotable treated water). Bioassays were used to determine the estrogenic activity present in effluents and groundwater, and the results were correlated with those from chemical analysis. In vitro assays for estrogenic activity were employed to provide an integrated measure of estrogenic potency of environmental samples without requiring knowledge or measurement of all bioactive compounds in the samples. For this project, the Las Positas Golf Course (LPGC) in the City of Livermore provided an ideal setting. Since 1978, irrigation of this area with treated wastewater has dominated the overall water budget. For a variety of reasons, a group of 10 monitoring wells were installed to evaluate wastewater impacts on the local groundwater. Additionally, these wells were regularly monitored for tritium ({sup 3}H

  7. Issues for reuse of gloveboxes at LANL TA-55

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Pinson, P.A.; Miller, C.F.

    1998-08-01

    This report is a summary of issues that face plutonium glovebox designers and users at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 55 (TA-55). Characterizing the issues is a step in the task of enhancing the next generation glovebox design to minimize waste streams while providing the other design functions. This report gives an initial assessment of eight important design and operation issues that can benefit from waste minimization.

  8. T-696: RSA Adaptive Authentication Has Unspecified Remote Authenticated Session Re-use Flaw

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An issue with Adaptive Authentication (On-Premise) was discovered which in certain circumstances might affect the out-of-the-box available authentication methods. In certain circumstances, when authentication information is compromised, and with the knowledge of additional session information, the authentication information might be reused within an active session.

  9. Recovery and reuse of cellulase catalyst in an enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, J.

    1987-09-18

    A process for recovering cellulase from the hydrolysis of cellulose, and reusing it in subsequent hydrolyois procedures. The process utilizes a commercial adsorbent that efficiently removes cellulase from reaction products which can be easily removed by simple decantation. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. FRED | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales FRED Overview Slides Hi FRED Team Welcome to our community area Group members (13) Managers: Dbrodt Recent...

  11. Community Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Programs Community Environmental Documents Tours Community Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab ⇒ Navigate Section Community Environmental Documents Tours Community Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab Community Education Programs Workforce Development & Education As part of the Lab's education mission to inspire and prepare the next generation of scientists and engineers, the Workforce Development & Education runs numerous education programs for all ages of students-from elementary

  12. Community Commitment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    icon-community.jpg Community Commitment Our good neighbor pledge: to contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico through economic development, excellence in...

  13. Rejuvenation and reuse of high-activity catalyst for hydroprocessing high metals residua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildebrandt, S.J.; Koseoglu, R.O.; Duddy, J.E.; Sherwood, D.E.

    1993-12-31

    In the 1980`s, Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) developed a new catalyst processing technology for recovery and reuse of spent catalysts from hydroprocessing of petroleum residua in the H-Oil Process. Recently, HRI and Texaco have applied Catalyst Rejuvenation Technology to a new high-activity H-Oil catalyst developed by Texaco. This paper will discuss the application of Catalyst Rejuvenation to the high activity Texaco catalyst when processing a high metals vacuum residuum.

  14. The Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Membrane Bioreactor for Energy-Efficient Wastewater Reuse

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Membrane Bioreactor for Energy-Efficient Wastewater Reuse Perry L. McCarty Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Stanford University 2 Compact water recycling systems Distributed treatment system planning Energy-positive wastewater treatment Open water unit process wetlands Ecosystem rehabilitation Re-inventing the Nation's Urban Water Infrastructure NSF Engineering Research Center Research Issues ReNUWIt Leadership Team 3 Stanford, UC Berkeley, New Mexico

  15. Asset Recovery of Hazardous Materials Beneficial Reuse of Radiologically Encumbered Lead Stocks ''Getting the Lead Out''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2003-01-23

    Underutilized and surplus lead stocks and leaded components are a common legacy environmental problem across much of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. While seeking to dispose of these items through its Environmental Management Program, DOE operational programs continue to pursue contemporary mission requirements such as managing and/or storing radioactive isotopes that require lead materials for shielding. This paradox was identified in late 1999 when DOES policies for managing scrap metal were assessed. In January 2000, the Secretary of Energy directed the National Center of Excellence for Materials Recycle (NMR) to develop and implement a comprehensive lead reuse program for all of DOE. Fluor Hanford, contractor for DOE Richland Operations, subsequently contacted NMR to pilot lead reclamation and reuse at the Hanford Site, This relationship resulted in the development of a beneficial reuse pathway for lead reclaimed from spent fuel transport railcars being stored at Hanford. The 1.3 million pounds of lead in the railcars is considered radiologically encumbered due to its prior use. Further, the material was considered a mixed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) low-level radioactive waste that would require expensive storage or macro encapsulation to meet land disposal restrictions prior to burial. Working closely with Flour Hanford and the Office of Air, Water, and Radiation (EH-412), NMR developed a directed reuse pathway for this and other radiologically encumbered lead When derived supplemental release limits were used, the lead recovered from these railcars became eligible for reuse in shielding products to support DOE and commercial nuclear industry operations. Using this disposition pathway has saved Hanford one third of the cost of disposing of the lead and the cost of acquiring additional lead for nuclear shielding applications. Furthermore, the environmental costs associated with mining and producing new lead for shielding products and

  16. Review of processes for the release of DOE real and non-real property for reuse and recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranek, N.L.; Kamboj, S.; Hensley, J.; Chen, S.Y.; Blunt, D.

    1997-11-01

    This report summarizes the underlying historical and regulatory framework supporting the concept of authorizing release for restricted or unrestricted reuse or recycle of real and non-real U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) properties containing residual radioactive material. Basic radiation protection principles as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection are reviewed, and international initiatives to investigate radiological clearance criteria are reported. Applicable requirements of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency, DOE, and the State of Washington are discussed. Several processes that have been developed for establishing cleanup and release criteria for real and non-real DOE property containing residual radioactive material are presented. Examples of DOE real property for which radiological cleanup criteria were established to support unrestricted release are provided. Properties discussed include Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Project sites, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites, the Shippingport decommissioning project, the south-middle and south-east vaults in the 317 area at Argonne National Laboratory, the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at DOE`s Savannah River Site, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory, and the Weldon Spring site. Some examples of non-real property for which DOE sites have established criteria to support unrestricted release are also furnished. 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Serving as Chair of the SRS Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Serving as Chair of the SRS Community Reuse Organization (SRSCRO) has been an honor. Actually, this is my second time to hold this position. When I reflect on the past two years and the progress made since my last term as Chair of this organization in 2007, I realize just how much we have accomplished. I truly feel a tremendous sense of achievement. Working with our leadership team and staff to position the organization for sustainable growth has been nothing short of inspiring. As my current

  18. SRS Budget and Funding Community Forum 3-30-2015 - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Forum DOE-EM & NNSA Savannah River Site Operations will be held on Thursday, March 3 from 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. at Aiken Technical College Amphitheater (2276 Jefferson Davis Highway, Graniteville, SC 29829) Presenters will include senior management from both the Department of Energy, Environmental Management and the National Nuclear Security Administration, Savannah River Site operations. PUBLIC IS WELCOME. NO RSVP REQUIRED. The event is sponsored by the SRS Community Reuse Organization

  19. Analysis of the Reuse of Uranium Recovered from the Reprocessing of Commercial LWR Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DelCul, Guillermo Daniel; Trowbridge, Lee D; Renier, John-Paul; Ellis, Ronald James; Williams, Kent Alan; Spencer, Barry B; Collins, Emory D

    2009-02-01

    This report provides an analysis of the factors involved in the reuse of uranium recovered from commercial light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuels (1) by reenrichment and recycling as fuel to LWRs and/or (2) by recycling directly as fuel to heavy-water-reactors (HWRs), such as the CANDU (registered trade name for the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor). Reuse is an attractive alternative to the current Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) baseline plan, which stores the reprocessed uranium (RU) for an uncertain future or attempts to dispose of it as 'greater-than-Class C' waste. Considering that the open fuel cycle currently deployed in the United States already creates a huge excess quantity of depleted uranium, the closed fuel cycle should enable the recycle of the major components of spent fuel, such as the uranium and the hazardous, long-lived transuranic (TRU) actinides, as well as the managed disposal of fission product wastes. Compared with the GNEP baseline scenario, the reuse of RU in the uranium fuel cycle has a number of potential advantages: (1) avoidance of purchase costs of 11-20% of the natural uranium feed; (2) avoidance of disposal costs for a large majority of the volume of spent fuel that is reprocessed; (3) avoidance of disposal costs for a portion of the depleted uranium from the enrichment step; (4) depending on the {sup 235}U assay of the RU, possible avoidance of separative work costs; and (5) a significant increase in the production of {sup 238}Pu due to the presence of {sup 236}U, which benefits somewhat the transmutation value of the plutonium and also provides some proliferation resistance.

  20. NEW - DOE G 430.1-8, Asset Revitalization Guide for Asset Management and Reuse

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    Pursuant to the objectives of the Order, the Asset Revitalization (AR) Guide for Asset Management and Reuse (AR Guide) was developed to assist DOE and NNSA sites and program offices offer unneeded assets with remaining capacity to the public or other government agencies. DOE continually refines strategies and tools, enabling it to share unique assets, including land, facilities, infrastructure, equipment, and technologies with the public. Real property planning, acquisition, sustainment, and disposal decisions are balanced to accomplish DOEs mission; reduce risks to workers, the public, and the environment; and minimize lifecycle costs.

  1. Energizing Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents Energize New York's tactics for building trust with community leaders and developing key relationships through social media platforms.

  2. Characterization of LaVerkin Springs water and methods for its reuse in energy development. [Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenhauer, R.J.

    1981-11-01

    Analytical water data obtained from a 9-month test program at the LVS (LaVerkin Springs) site, which is located in Washington County, Southwestern Utah, were evaluated. Fresh water and the water after processing through various pretreatment steps and after ED (electrodialysis) desalting were characterized. Upgrading water quality by various physical and chemical treatment methods and by desalting processes was demonstrated by the LVS site test program. The relative merit of different methods of treatment, disposal, and reuse of LVS water were studied. The objectives of the study were to evaluate methods for preventing high salinity LVS water from entering the Virginia River and for utilizing the processed water in energy development. The disposal of water by (1) deep well injection, (2) use as a secondary coolant in a binary cooling tower, (3) use in solar salt-gradient ponds, and (4) use as a transport media for coal slurry pipelines were found to be technically feasible. Use of LVS water to transport coal to a consuming powerplant and subsequent reuse in a binary cooling tower and/or solar salt-gradient ponds would achieve both objectives of salt reduction and energy conservation. Because LVS water has a salt content of 9500 mg/L and a boron content of 5 mg/L, it cannot be directly used for irrigation.

  3. Numerical Modeling of the Lake Mary Road Bridge for Foundation Reuse Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sitek, M. A.; Bojanowski, C.; Lottes, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    This project uses numerical techniques to assess the structural integrity and capacity of the bridge foundations and, as a result, reduces the risk associated with reusing the same foundation for a new superstructure. Nondestructive test methods of different types were used in combination with the numerical modeling and analysis. The onsite tests included visual inspection, tomography, ground penetrating radar, drilling boreholes and coreholes, and the laboratory tests on recovered samples. The results were utilized to identify the current geometry of the structure with foundation, including the hidden geometry of the abutments and piers, and soil and foundation material properties. This data was used to build the numerical models and run computational analyses on a high performance computer cluster to assess the structural integrity of the bridge and foundations including the suitability of the foundation for reuse with a new superstructure and traffic that will increase the load on the foundations. Computational analysis is more cost-effective and gives an advantage of getting more detailed knowledge about the structural response. It also enables to go beyond non-destructive testing and find the failure conditions without destroying the structure under consideration.

  4. Community, Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community, Events Community, Events Our good neighbor pledge: to contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico through economic development, excellence in education, and active employee engagement in our communities. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets James TenCate James TenCate elected Acoustical Society of America fellow TenCate's research focuses on nonlinear acoustics and elasticity, seismology and nonlinear imaging. -

  5. Cost Effective Recovery of Low-TDS Frac Flowback Water for Re-use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claire Henderson; Harish Acharya; Hope Matis; Hareesh Kommepalli; Brian Moore; Hua Wang

    2011-03-31

    The project goal was to develop a cost-effective water recovery process to reduce the costs and envi-ronmental impact of shale gas production. This effort sought to develop both a flowback water pre-treatment process and a membrane-based partial demineralization process for the treatment of the low-Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) portion of the flowback water produced during hydrofracturing operations. The TDS cutoff for consideration in this project is < 35,000 {approx} 45,000 ppm, which is the typical limit for economic water recovery employing reverse osmosis (RO) type membrane desalination processes. The ultimate objective is the production of clean, reclaimed water suitable for re-use in hydrofracturing operations. The team successfully compiled data on flowback composition and other attributes across multiple shale plays, identified the likely applicability of membrane treatment processes in those shales, and expanded the proposed product portfolio to include four options suitable for various reuse or discharge applications. Pretreatment technologies were evaluated at the lab scale and down-selected based upon their efficacy in removing key contaminants. The chosen technologies were further validated by performing membrane fouling studies with treated flowback water to demonstrate the technical feasibility of flowback treatment with RO membranes. Process flow schemes were constructed for each of the four product options based on experimental performance data from actual flowback water treatment studies. For the products requiring membrane treatment, membrane system model-ing software was used to create designs for enhanced water recovery beyond the typical seawater desalination benchmark. System costs based upon vendor and internal cost information for all process flow schemes were generated and are below target and in line with customer expectations. Finally, to account for temporal and geographic variability in flowback characteristics as well as local

  6. FRED | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dbrodt FRED Overview Slides Posted by: Dbrodt 2 Jul 2012 - 10:43 2 comment(s) Dbrodt Hi FRED Team Welcome to our community area Posted by: Dbrodt 22 Jun 2012 - 08:35 I created...

  7. CTG Sustainable Communities Model | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Communities Model AgencyCompany Organization: CTG Energetics Inc. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Develop Goals Topics:...

  8. Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Haxtun Wind Project |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Haxtun Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Haxtun Wind Project AgencyCompany Organization US Department of Energy Focus Area...

  9. Community Environmental Council | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Council Name: Community Environmental Council Address: 26 W. Anapamu Place: Santa Barbara, California Zip: 93101 Region: Southern CA Area Number of Employees: 11-50...

  10. Treatment and Reuse of Wastewaters Discharged by Petroleum Industries (HMD/Algeria)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellami, MH; Loudiyi, K; Boubaker, MC; Habbaz, H

    2015-12-23

    Industrial wastewaters discharged by petroleum industries contains: oil, heavy metals and chemicals used in the process of oil separation and treatment. These waters are a source of soil, water and air pollution, and lead a mortal danger to the ecosystem. Our aim in this work has an aspect that can contribute to the collective effort to address the enormous amount of water purges storage bins and reuse them to avoid any environmental damage. This was achieved by chemical treating of these wastewaters discharged from three different locations of Hassi Messaoud (HMD) petroleum field by flocculation with (C-5563) followed by coagulation with (C-2061) using two different acids as sequestering namely: Ascorbic and Citric acid. After experiments, the results showed that the wastewater can be treated without sequestering by adding 40 ppm of activated silicates. The best result was obtained by addition of 160 ppm of Ascorbic acid as sequestering agent and 20 ppm of activated silicates; resulting in removal of 92.81 % of suspended matter and 95.53 % of turbidity. Finally we concluded that this wastewater was satisfactorily treated and we recommend either inject it for enhanced oil recovery in industrial closest field (North field) to maintain the reservoir pressure and the improved rate recovery of oil reserves or reuse it in garden irrigation. In order to see the impact of the treated water on plants, irrigation tests have conducted on two types of plants (date palm and shaft apocalyptic) for one year. The tests showed that the thick layer of 5 cm and 0.08mm of particles diameter of dune sand removes most of remaining oil. The sand layer that fills the basin surrounding the shaft is removed and replaced every 06 months. So, Dune sand plays the role of natural filter. The garden plants appear and grow normally.

  11. DRAFT - DOE G 430.1-8, Asset Revitalization Initiative Guide for Sustainable Asset Management and Reuse

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The Guide is intended to assist sites in sustainable planning, management, and reuse of assets that allows effective mission execution, optimizes federal and public resources, and supports local and national goals for economic growth and diversification in support of DOE O 430.1B.

  12. Clean Cities: Alamo Area Clean Cities (San Antonio) coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alamo Area Clean Cities (San Antonio) Coalition The Alamo Area Clean Cities (San Antonio) coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other...

  13. Clean Cities: Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities Coalition The Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and...

  14. Energy Datapalooza Community | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Datapalooza Community Home > Energy Datapalooza Community > Posts by term > Energy Datapalooza Community Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: EDI Type Term Title...

  15. Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norm Stanley

    2011-02-01

    This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

  16. Community Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Community Events Learn about our science, take classes, listen to lectures, meet peers and share ideas...have fun at the Bradbury Science Museum. Sep 27 Tue 7:00 AM Systems Approaches in Immunology Inn and Spa at Loretto - Santa Fe, NM Advancements in immunology can be made through the development of theoretical and experimental techniques supplying models that bring together phenomena at different levels of complexity to study mechanisms that arise at the systems level. Sep 25 Sun

  17. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Areas Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions ⇒ Navigate Section Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions Biosciences The Biosciences Area forges multidisciplinary teams to solve national challenges in energy, environment and health issues; and to advance the engineering of biological systems for sustainable manufacturing. Biosciences Area research is coordinated through three divisions and is enabled by Berkeley

  18. community | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 14 April, 2014 - 09:48 National Day of Civic Hacking code community data Event hacking international national OpenEI The National Day of...

  19. Community Relations Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Stewardship Environmental Protection Community Relations Plan Community Relations Plan Consultations, communications, agreements, and disagreements...

  20. Community Connections: April 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2016 Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit IN THIS ISSUE RoboRave brings science to life More than 300 students build robots, discover STEM fields Major Subcontractors Consortium sharpens its focus Area businesses gain more value in MSC collaboration with Lab in 2016 Los Alamos's portable MRI machine may benefit New Mexicans New technology may serve New Mexico's rural

  1. Community Connections: August 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit IN THIS ISSUE From Los Alamos summer student to Lab scientist Product Realization Team lead Nate Sanchez shares his success story Area teachers benefit from professional development Math and Science Academy encourages collaborative work environments Flow Science gifts back $50K award Money goes to Venture Acceleration Fund TEDxLANL talks

  2. Community Connections: May 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2016 Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit IN THIS ISSUE Youth receive $570K for higher education The Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund honors 95 area students Poeh Cultural Center wins grant Native American Venture Acceleration Fund helps increase education and tourism Water trees to beat drought and global warming Large trees are at risk in Northern New Mexico

  3. Community Connections: September 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2016 Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit IN THIS ISSUE Great opportunity for Native American-owned businesses Proposals for Native American Venture Acceleration Fund due October 18 900 backpacks donated to local youth Area schools benefit from Back to School Drive Computer modeling helps manage wildfires Technology increases preparedness, improves firefighting

  4. Preozonation of primary-treated municipal wastewater for reuse in biofuel feedstock generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondala, Andro H.; Hernandez, Rafael; French, W. Todd; Estévez, L. Antonio; Meckes, Mark; Trillo, Marlene; Hall, Jacqueline

    2010-11-09

    The results of a laboratory scale investigation on ozone pretreatment of primary-treated municipal wastewater for potential reuse in fermentation processes for the production of biofuels and bio-based feedstock chemicals were presented. Semi-batch preozonation with 3.0% (w/w) ozone at 1 L min -1 resulted into a considerable inactivation of the indigenous heterotrophic bacteria in the wastewater with less than 0.0002% comprising the ozone-resistant fraction of the microbial population. The disinfection process was modeled using first-order inactivation kinetics with a rate constant of 4.39 10 -3 s -1. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels were reduced by 30% in 1-h experiments. COD depletion was also modeled using a pseudo-first-order kinetics at a rate constant of 9.50 10 -5 s -1. Biological oxygen demand (BOD 5) values were reduced by 60% up to 20 min of ozonation followed by a plateau and some slight increases attributed to partial oxidation of recalcitrant materials. Ozone also had no substantial effect on the concentration of ammonium and phosphate ions, which are essential for microbial growth and metabolism. Preliminary tests indicated that oleaginous microorganisms could be cultivated in the ozonated wastewater, resulting in relatively higher cell densities than in raw wastewater and comparable results with autoclave-sterilized wastewater. This process could potentially produce significant quantities of oil for biofuel production from municipal wastewater streams.

  5. Recovery and reuse of MEK from paint stripping operation emissions using specialized adsorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blystone, P.G.; Goltz, H.R.; Springer, J. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    The reduction of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions is a significant goal of the 1990 Clean Air Act. Industrial operations relating to surface preparation, surface coating and paint striping operations constitute one of the largest industrial sources of VOC emissions. This paper describes a new emission control system offered by Purus, Inc. which captures and recovers VOCs from paint stripping operations. The system is based on an on-site adsorption-desorption process which utilizes a specialized polymeric resin adsorbent. Adsorbent beds are regenerated through a computer controlled pressure-temperature swing process (PTSA). The adsorbent resin offers significant operational advantages over conventional activated carbon adsorbents with respect to treating air laden with methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) vapors. Treatment of MEK with activated carbon can be problematic due to reactivity (degradation) and high heats of adsorption of ketones with carbon. The Purus process was successfully demonstrated at Tinker Air Force Base in or under the EPA`s Waste Reduction Evaluation at Federal Sites program. MEK emissions from a paint stripping booth vent were controlled at greater than 95% reduction levels. The recovered solvent was returned to depainting process and reused with no loss in paint stripping efficiency.

  6. Thermokinetic/mass-transfer analysis of carbon capture for reuse/sequestration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stechel, Ellen Beth; Brady, Patrick Vane; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Luketa, Anay Josephine

    2010-09-01

    Effective capture of atmospheric carbon is a key bottleneck preventing non bio-based, carbon-neutral production of synthetic liquid hydrocarbon fuels using CO{sub 2} as the carbon feedstock. Here we outline the boundary conditions of atmospheric carbon capture for recycle to liquid hydrocarbon fuels production and re-use options and we also identify the technical advances that must be made for such a process to become technically and commercially viable at scale. While conversion of atmospheric CO{sub 2} into a pure feedstock for hydrocarbon fuels synthesis is presently feasible at the bench-scale - albeit at high cost energetically and economically - the methods and materials needed to concentrate large amounts of CO{sub 2} at low cost and high efficiency remain technically immature. Industrial-scale capture must entail: (1) Processing of large volumes of air through an effective CO{sub 2} capture media and (2) Efficient separation of CO{sub 2} from the processed air flow into a pure stream of CO{sub 2}.

  7. Tag: community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    able to serve a record breaking 2,808 children, providing necessary school supplies to students in 29 area schools in a 345-square-mile service area.

  8. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  9. Radiation Impact of Very Low Level Radioactive Steel Reused in Building Industry with Emphasis on External Exposure Pathway - 12569

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panik, Michal; Hrncir, Tomas; Necas, Vladimir

    2012-07-01

    Considerable quantities of various materials are accumulated during the decommissioning process of nuclear installations. Some of arising materials are activated or contaminated. However, many of them continue to have an economic value and exist in a form that can be recycled or reused for special purposes. Furthermore much of the material generated during decommissioning process will contain only small amounts of radionuclides. For these materials there exist environmental and economic incentives to maximize the use of the concept of clearance from further regulatory control. This impact analysis is devoted to mentioned incentives. The aim is to conditionally clear maximum amount of the scrap steel and consequently recycle and reuse it in form of reinforcing components in tunnel and bridge building scenarios. Recent calculations relevant for external exposure pathway indicate that concept of conditional clearance represent a feasible option for the management of radioactive materials. Even in chosen specific industrial applications it is possible to justify new, approximately one order of magnitude higher, clearance levels. However analysis of other possible exposure pathways relevant for particular scenario of reuse of conditionally cleared materials has to be performed in order to confirm indications from partially obtained results. Basically, the concept of conditional clearance can bring two basic benefits. Firstly it is saving of considerable funds, which would be otherwise used for treatment, conditioning and disposal of materials at appropriate radioactive waste repository. Moreover materials with intrinsic value (particularly metals) can be recycled and reused in industrial applications instead of investing resources on mining and production process in order to obtain new, 'fresh' materials. (authors)

  10. Right-Sized Reuse - Use a Systematic Process, and Design for a Specialized, Yet Flexible Result - 13558

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cusick, Lesley T.; Schiesswohl, Steven R.

    2013-07-01

    The process of transferring real property from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is always the same - except when it's not. The most frequently asked questions in the process are: how can this take so long and be so complex, and why is it different every time? The process of transferring real property from the Department of Energy is always the same - except when it's not. Repeat as needed. The authority for DOE to transfer property is found in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA). Specifically, the transfer of real property for mission-related purposes is done pursuant to the AEA Section 161(g). Another rule that can provide certain unique benefits to the transferee is found in 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 770, Transfer of Real Property at Defense Nuclear Facilities for Economic Development; it can be followed for economic development purposes at defense nuclear facilities. All federal real property transfers include at minimum a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review and a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) chap. 120(h) environmental due diligence evaluation. The end-point objective is to be able to demonstrate that a transfer is protective of human health and the environment - typically attained via a risk evaluation. That's it...mostly. None of these requirements are new; their processes are well-known. So, why is it different every time there is a transfer and what can be done to move things along? Time and the perception of open-ended schedules kill projects. Economic development projects that are proposed by Community Reuse Organizations (CROs) and others or by parties who need private capital are especially time-sensitive. It is not reasonable to expect business interests or investors to wait two years while the property transfer process is carried out. Lenders are also risk-sensitive and not solely business-risk sensitive. After all, these are federal properties where contamination is a

  11. Bay Area

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8%2A en NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiological Surveys Over San Francisco, Pacifica, Berkeley, And Oakland, CA Areas http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesamsca

  12. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in diverse research areas such as cell biology, lithography, infrared microscopy, radiology, and x-ray tomography. Time-Resolved These techniques exploit the pulsed nature of...

  13. community solar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    community solar Home Aimeebailey's picture Submitted by Aimeebailey(5) Member 3 July, 2014 - 10:38 RFP154855 - A Local Community Solar Program for the City of Palo Alto community...

  14. Community, Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Jr., in this October 1998 photo taken in Midland, Texas. ... experiences as a U.S. Air Force pilot flying B-1 and B-2 ... increase their revenue base and help diversify the area ...

  15. 2016 News | Community | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for 2016 yet. Archives 2015 | 2014 Mission & Programs Impact Leadership Community Education Center Community Involvement Economic Impact Sustainability Environment, Health, &...

  16. An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-Traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Rodgers; James Castle

    2008-08-31

    This study assessed opportunities for improving water quality associated with coal-fired power generation including the use of non-traditional waters for cooling, innovative technology for recovering and reusing water within power plants, novel approaches for the removal of trace inorganic compounds from ash pond effluents, and novel approaches for removing biocides from cooling tower blowdown. This research evaluated specifically designed pilot-scale constructed wetland systems for treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters for reuse in thermoelectric power generation and other purposes. The overall objective of this project was to decrease targeted constituents in non-traditional waters to achieve reuse criteria or discharge limitations established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Clean Water Act (CWA). The six original project objectives were completed, and results are presented in this final technical report. These objectives included identification of targeted constituents for treatment in four non-traditional water sources, determination of reuse or discharge criteria for treatment, design of constructed wetland treatment systems for these non-traditional waters, and measurement of treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters, as well as determination of the suitability of the treated non-traditional waters for reuse or discharge to receiving aquatic systems. The four non-traditional waters used to accomplish these objectives were ash basin water, cooling water, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water, and produced water. The contaminants of concern identified in ash basin waters were arsenic, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. Contaminants of concern in cooling waters included free oxidants (chlorine, bromine, and peroxides), copper, lead, zinc, pH, and total dissolved solids. FGD waters contained contaminants of concern including arsenic, boron, chlorides, selenium, mercury

  17. Community Management Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community Management Company Address: 1 St. Nicholas Terrace Place: New York, New York Zip: 10029 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Coordinates: 40.812561, -73.952389 Show...

  18. Community impact documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community » Community impact documents Community impact documents Fact sheets, program summaries, and other documents provide insight into the Laboratory's community efforts and impact in Northern New Mexico. Contacts Kathy Keith Community Partnerships Office (505) 665-4400 Email Making a difference in Northern New Mexico Fact sheets by county Los Alamos (pdf) Rio Arriba (pdf) San Miguel and Mora (pdf) Santa Fe (pdf) Taos (pdf) General Community Commitment Plan (pdf) | Archive Community Leaders

  19. Area teachers benefit from professional development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area teachers benefit from professional development Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Area teachers benefit from professional development Math and Science Academy encourages collaborative work environments. August 2, 2016 Santa Fe Community College's Early Childhood Center of Excellence Director Dr. Jennifer Duran-Sallee (left) gives a tour of the Kids Campus to Cabinet

  20. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and Community Engagement | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Engagement Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and Community Engagement Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Best...

  1. Solar Energy Assessment for Community Energy Planning (Webinar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Planning (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Solar Energy Assessment for Community Energy Planning (Webinar) Focus Area: Solar Topics:...

  2. Community Economic Analysis: A How To Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Community Economic Analysis: A How To Guide AgencyCompany Organization: Ronald J. Hustedde Partner: Ron Shaffer Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Phase:...

  3. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  4. Community is Live!! | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 25 June, 2012 - 16:10 imported OpenEI OpenEI Community section is now...

  5. Using the Conceptual Site Model to Remediate Two Sites in New England and Reach License Termination and Site Reuse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glucksberg, Nadia; Peters, Jay

    2008-01-15

    The Conceptual Site Model (CSM) is a powerful tool for understanding the link between contamination sources, cleanup objectives, and ultimate site reuse. The CSM describes the site setting, geology, hydrogeology, potential sources, release mechanisms and migration pathways of contaminants. The CSM is needed to understand the extent of contamination and how receptors may be exposed to both radiological and chemical constituents. A key component of the CSM that is often overlooked concerns how the regulatory requirements drive remediation and how each has to be integrated into the CSM to ensure that all stakeholder requirements are understood and addressed. This paper describes how the use of the CSM helped reach closure and reuse at two facilities in Connecticut that are pursuing termination of their Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. The two facilities are the Combustion Engineering Site, located in Windsor, Connecticut, (CE Windsor Site) and the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, located in Haddam Neck, Connecticut (CYAPCO). The closure of each of these facilities is regulated by four agencies: - Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - which requires cleanup levels for radionuclides to be protective of public health; - US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) - which requires cleanup levels for chemicals to be protective of public health and the environment; - Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) Bureau of Air Management, Radiation Division - which requires cleanup levels for radionuclides to be protective of public health; and - Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) Bureau of Water Protection and Land Reuse - which requires cleanup levels for chemicals to be protective of public health and the environment. Some of the radionuclides at the CE Windsor Site are also regulated under the Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) under the Army Corps of Engineers. The remainder of this paper

  6. FOILFEST :community enabled security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Judy Hennessey; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Whitley, John B.; Drayer, Darryl Donald; Cummings, John C., Jr.

    2005-09-01

    The Advanced Concepts Group of Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop, ''FOILFest: Community Enabled Security'', on July 18-21, 2005, in Albuquerque, NM. This was a far-reaching look into the future of physical protection consisting of a series of structured brainstorming sessions focused on preventing and foiling attacks on public places and soft targets such as airports, shopping malls, hotels, and public events. These facilities are difficult to protect using traditional security devices since they could easily be pushed out of business through the addition of arduous and expensive security measures. The idea behind this Fest was to explore how the public, which is vital to the function of these institutions, can be leveraged as part of a physical protection system. The workshop considered procedures, space design, and approaches for building community through technology. The workshop explored ways to make the ''good guys'' in public places feel safe and be vigilant while making potential perpetrators of harm feel exposed and convinced that they will not succeed. Participants in the Fest included operators of public places, social scientists, technology experts, representatives of government agencies including DHS and the intelligence community, writers and media experts. Many innovative ideas were explored during the fest with most of the time spent on airports, including consideration of the local airport, the Albuquerque Sunport. Some provocative ideas included: (1) sniffers installed in passage areas like revolving door, escalators, (2) a ''jumbotron'' showing current camera shots in the public space, (3) transparent portal screeners allowing viewing of the screening, (4) a layered open/funnel/open/funnel design where open spaces are used to encourage a sense of ''communitas'' and take advantage of citizen ''sensing'' and funnels are technological tunnels of sensors (the tunnels of truth), (5) curved benches with blast proof walls or backs, (6

  7. Green Communities Grant Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Note: The Green Communities Grant Program is not currently accepting applications. The application deadline to receive a Green Communities designation was October 23, 2015. For designated...

  8. Community College Internships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Community College Internship (CCI) program seeks to encourage community college students to enter technical careers relevant to the DOE mission by providing technical training experiences at...

  9. WINDExchange: Rural Communities

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Rural Communities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, & Businesses Resources & Tools Rural Communities Agricultural lands in the United States are...

  10. Community Connections: April 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partner with our neighbors on strengthening math and science learning, diversifying the economy and expanding community giving in northern New Mexico. CONTACTS Community Programs...

  11. CT Clean Energy Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance & Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

  12. Community Leaders Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab that helps measure perceived progress in maintaining community relationships and listening and responding to the needs of Northern New Mexico communities. Results help shape...

  13. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3145 dpa at 380503 degrees*C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm *3mm* 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 *degreesC, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180200 MPa*m^.5 at 350450 degrees*C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature >430 degrees*C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 *degreesC and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  14. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No Name

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT This renewal application for the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (IWRP) WRU-I-0160-01 at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Industrial Waste Ditch (IWD) and Industrial Waste Pond (IWP) is being submitted to the State of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). This application has been prepared in compliance with the requirements in IDAPA 58.01.17, Recycled Water Rules. Information in this application is consistent with the IDAPA 58.01.17 rules, pre-application meeting, and the Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater (September 2007). This application is being submitted using much of the same information contained in the initial permit application, submitted in 2007, and modification, in 2012. There have been no significant changes to the information and operations covered in the existing IWRP. Summary of the monitoring results and operation activity that has occurred since the issuance of the WRP has been included. MFC has operated the IWP and IWD as regulated wastewater land treatment facilities in compliance with the IDAPA 58.01.17 regulations and the IWRP. Industrial wastewater, consisting primarily of continuous discharges of nonhazardous, nonradioactive, routinely discharged noncontact cooling water and steam condensate, periodic discharges of industrial wastewater from the MFC facility process holdup tanks, and precipitation runoff, are discharged to the IWP and IWD system from various MFC facilities. Wastewater goes to the IWP and IWD with a permitted annual flow of up to 17 million gallons/year. All requirements of the IWRP are being met. The Operations and Maintenance Manual for the Industrial Wastewater System will be updated to include any new requirements.

  15. Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radisav Vidic; David Dzombak; Ming-Kai Hsieh; Heng Li; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Yinghua Feng; Indranil Chowdhury; Jason Monnell

    2009-06-30

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using three impaired waters - secondary treated municipal wastewater, passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD), and effluent from ash sedimentation ponds at power plants - for use as makeup water in recirculating cooling water systems at thermoelectric power plants. The evaluation included assessment of water availability based on proximity and relevant regulations as well as feasibility of managing cooling water quality with traditional chemical management schemes. Options for chemical treatment to prevent corrosion, scaling, and biofouling were identified through review of current practices, and were tested at bench and pilot-scale. Secondary treated wastewater is the most widely available impaired water that can serve as a reliable source of cooling water makeup. There are no federal regulations specifically related to impaired water reuse but a number of states have introduced regulations with primary focus on water aerosol 'drift' emitted from cooling towers, which has the potential to contain elevated concentrations of chemicals and microorganisms and may pose health risk to the public. It was determined that corrosion, scaling, and biofouling can be controlled adequately in cooling systems using secondary treated municipal wastewater at 4-6 cycles of concentration. The high concentration of dissolved solids in treated AMD rendered difficulties in scaling inhibition and requires more comprehensive pretreatment and scaling controls. Addition of appropriate chemicals can adequately control corrosion, scaling and biological growth in ash transport water, which typically has the best water quality among the three waters evaluated in this study. The high TDS in the blowdown from pilot-scale testing units with both passively treated mine drainage and secondary treated municipal wastewater and the high sulfate concentration in the mine drainage blowdown water were identified as the main challenges for blowdown disposal

  16. Lessons learned at West Valley during facility decontamination for re-use (1982--1988)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tundo, D.; Gessner, R.F.; Lawrence, R.E.

    1988-11-01

    The primary mission of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is to solidify a large volume of high-level liquid waste (2.3 million liters -- 600,000 gallons) produced during reprocessing plant operations and stored in underground tanks. This is to be accomplished through the maximum use of existing facilities. This required a significant effort to remove existing equipment and to decontaminate areas for installation of liquid and cement processing systems in a safe environment while maintaining exposure to workers as low as reasonably achievable. The reprocessing plant occupied a building of about 33,000 m/sup 2/ (350,000 ft/sup 2/). When the WVDP was initiated, approximately 6 percent of the plant area was in a non-contaminated condition where personnel could function without protective clothing or radiological controls. From 1982 to 1988, an additional 64 percent of the plant was cleaned up and much of this converted to low- and high-level waste processing areas. The high-level liquid and resulting low-level liquids are now being treated in these areas using an Integrated Radwaste Treatment System (IRTS). The Project has now focused attention on installation, qualification and operation of a vitrification system which will convert the remaining high-level waste into borosilicate glass logs. The stabilized waste will be sent to a Federal Repository for long-term storage. From 1982 to 1988, about 70 technical reports were dealing with specific tasks and cleanup efforts. This report provides an overview of the decontamination and decommissioning work done in that period. The report emphasizes lessons learned during that effort. Significant advances were made in: remote and contact decontamination technology; personnel protection and training; planning and procedures; and radiological controls. 62 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-07

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  18. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  19. Community Leaders Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Leaders Survey Community Leaders Survey This survey is a tracking study commissioned by the Lab that helps measure perceived progress in maintaining community relationships and listening and responding to the needs of Northern New Mexico communities. Results help shape and direct the Lab's contributions to the region's future. Latest results show nine-in-ten of the community leaders express satisfaction with LANL's economic impact on the region. Study measures changes in leaders'

  20. Community Commitment Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extends Community Commitment Plan September 18, 2012 LANS Board of Governors extends Community Commitment Plan The Los Alamos National Security, LLC Board of Governors recently voted to extend its Community Commitment Plan for one year. The plan invests $3 million of the company's management fee each year in regional education, economic development and community giving programs. It is managed by LANL's Community Programs Office and was launched in 2006 when LANS won the prime contract to manage

  1. Energy Datapalooza Community | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by term > Energy Datapalooza Community Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: APIs Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry APIs Datapalooza...

  2. Energy Datapalooza Community | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    > Energy Datapalooza Community Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Global Atlas Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Global Atlas IRENA...

  3. Community | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Community With approximately 5,000 employees and nearly 2,000 subcontractors, the sheer magnitude of Y-12 has a significant economic impact on the surrounding community. By contributing billions of dollars to East Tennessee through operating revenues, wages, taxes and pensions, Y-12 helps generate thousands of area jobs. In fiscal 2012, Y-12 paid $407 million in wages, spent $390 million on goods and services and paid the state of Tennessee $12.2 million in taxes, a portion of which

  4. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  5. 2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  6. Community Chest | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Chest Community Chest Y-12 volunteers put up Community Chest banner

  7. Weaving Community and Science

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Weaving Community and Science: Former Summer Intern Is Investigating Plant Uptake of Contaminants on Disposal Cell Covers

  8. Community Relations Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community, Environment » Environmental Stewardship » Environmental Protection » Community Relations Plan Community Relations Plan Consultations, communications, agreements, and disagreements between the Permittees and the public are documented during the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Community Relations Plan development. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement PO Box 1663, MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87544 (505) 667-0216 Email We welcome your comments and suggestions on how

  9. Community Organizing and Outreach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Community Organizing and Outreach, call slides and discussion summary, April 23, 2015.

  10. Community Relations Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Relations Plan Community Relations Plan The Laboratory maintains an open working relationship with communities and interested members of the public. August 1, 2013 Guests listen to Lab historian Ellen McGhee on tour of historical sites Guests listen to Laboratory historian Ellen McGhee on a tour of historical sites. What the plan does Establishes a productive government-to-government relationship with local tribes and pueblos Keeps communities and interested members of the public

  11. 2014 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike

    2015-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2013 through October 31, 2014. The report contains the following information; Facility and system description; Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; Groundwater monitoring data; Status of special compliance conditions; Noncompliance issues; and Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2014 reporting year, an estimated 10.11 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the applicable Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s groundwater quality standard levels.

  12. 2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 reporting year, an estimated 11.84 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  13. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Frederick

    2012-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000160-01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of special compliance conditions; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 reporting year, an estimated 6.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. Using the dissolved iron data, the concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  14. 2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Frederick

    2011-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  15. Community Action Partnership of the Greater Dayton Area … Weatherizat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 OAS-RA-11-18 September 2011 Department of Energy ... OAS-RA-11-18 CUSTOMER RESPONSE FORM The Office of Inspector General has a continuing ...

  16. Energy Datapalooza Community | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Groups > Groups > Energy Datapalooza Community Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds There are no feeds from external sites for this group. Groups Menu You must login in order...

  17. Gravitational Waves Community Lecture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gravitational Waves Community Lecture Gravitational Waves Community Lecture WHEN: Sep 19, 2016 7:30 PM - 8:30 PM WHERE: Grand Ballroom at the Eldorado Hotel 309 W San Francisco St Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 USA (505) 988-4455 SPEAKER: Gabriela Gonzalez CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of New Mexico, St. John's College and Santa Fe Community College The Los Alamos National

  18. Why Microbial Communities?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, Jim (PNNL)

    2012-02-29

    The Microbial Communities Initiative is a 5-year investment by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that integrates biological/ecological experimentation, analytical chemistry, and simulation modeling. The objective is to create transforming technologies, elucidate mechanistic forces, and develop theoretical frameworks for the analysis and predictive understanding of microbial communities. Dr. Fredrickson introduces the symposium by defining microbial communities and describing their scientific relevance as they relate to solving problems in energy, climate, and sustainability.

  19. Community Feature Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Feature Stories Community Feature Stories Our good neighbor pledge: to contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico through economic development, excellence in education, and active employee engagement in our communities. Northern New Mexico Micro Grape Growers Association Grape Growers Association enlivens agriculture Growers association unites small parcels of land, enlivens production, protects water rights for Northern New Mexico agriculturists. - 8/6/12 Jacob Leyba,

  20. Tank Farm Area Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Long-Term Stewardship Program to ensure continued ... U.S. Department of Energy, Environmental Protection ... f or the surrounding communities as they transition their ...

  1. Remote Alaskan Communities Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Remote Alaskan Communities Energy Efficiency Competition (RACEE) Technical Assistance ... X Alaska Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program Seafood processor plant energy audits, ...

  2. Community Relations Plan Update

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... (LTSM) Program. Transfer is expected to occur on October 1, 2001. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand ... Utah * Native American communities * General public using ...

  3. Community Relations Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Establishes a productive government-to-government relationship with local tribes and pueblos Keeps communities and interested members of the public informed Minimizes disputes...

  4. A Community of Electrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plutonium's missing magnetism also provides a groundbreaking insight into the overall nature of matter. November 20, 2015 A Community of Electrons With electronic correlations,...

  5. Community Unsubscribe | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unsubscribe Unsubscribe here to stop receiving emails related to the local community. Email (required) Unsubscribe Subscribe If you have any questions about this online ...

  6. Community Connections: August 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partner with our neighbors on strengthening math and science learning, diversifying the economy and expanding community giving in northern New Mexico. PERSONAL MESSAGE Kurt...

  7. Community Connections: October 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partner with our neighbors on strengthening math and science learning, diversifying the economy and expanding community giving in northern New Mexico. PERSONAL MESSAGE Duncan...

  8. Growing and Sustaining Communities with Bioenergy- Text-Alt Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From Vero Beach, Florida, to Hugoton, Kansas, to Emmetsburg, Iowa, cellulosic ethanol biorefineries have had major impacts on communities and their residents. In other areas, bioenergy has significant potential to transform current and establish new industry. This short video illustrates how biorefineries and other bioenergy developments can benefit citizens, businesses, and whole communities, helping America’s rural economies grow and thrive.

  9. Welcome New York City Data Jammers! | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    entrepreneurs and professionals who are participating in the NYC Data Jam Please feel free to use this Data Jam Community area to share ideas and create sub groups of your own....

  10. FRED+free energy database | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FRED+free energy database Home Dbrodt's picture Submitted by Dbrodt(77) Contributor 22 June, 2012 - 08:35 Hi FRED Team Welcome to our community area FRED+free energy database I...

  11. Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    > FRED Dbrodt's picture Submitted by Dbrodt(77) Contributor 22 June, 2012 - 08:35 FRED+free energy database I created this group so our FRED team can collaborate. I would also...

  12. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: citing Type Term Title Author...

  13. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: clean tech Type Term Title...

  14. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: clean-tech Type Term Title...

  15. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: CES Type Term Title Author...

  16. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: car Type Term Title Author...

  17. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: consumer behavior Type Term...

  18. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: 2015 Type Term Title Author...

  19. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: building load Type Term Title...

  20. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: adoption Type Term Title Author...

  1. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: compound queries Type Term...

  2. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: building load data Type Term...

  3. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: datasets Type Term Title Author...

  4. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: 2016 Type Term Title Author...

  5. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: dataset Type Term Title Author...

  6. Economic and Technical Feasibility Study of Utility-Scale Wind Generation for the New York Buffalo River and South Buffalo Brownfield Opportunity Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2014-04-01

    Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic and technical feasibility of utilizing contaminated lands in the Buffalo, New York, area for utility-scale wind development is explored. The study found that there is available land, electrical infrastructure, wind resource, and local interest to support a commercial wind project; however, economies of scale and local electrical markets may need further investigation before significant investment is made into developing a wind project at the Buffalo Reuse Authority site.

  7. Sweet Surface Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sweet Surface Area Sweet Surface Area Create a delicious root beer float and learn sophisticated science concepts at the same time. Sweet Surface Area Science is all around us, so ...

  8. 300 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 AreaFast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim ...

  9. 200 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 AreaFast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim ...

  10. 700 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 AreaFast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim ...

  11. Community Energy Planning A Guide for Communities Volume 1 -...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 - Introduction Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Energy Planning A Guide for Communities Volume 1 - Introduction AgencyCompany Organization Natural Resources Canada...

  12. AREA 5 RWMS CLOSURE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    153 CLOSURE STRATEGY NEVADA TEST SITE AREA 5 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT SITE Revision 0 ... Closure Strategy Nevada Test Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management ...

  13. Strategic Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strategic Focus Areas Lockheed Martin on behalf of Sandia National Laboratories will consider grant requests that best support the Corporation's strategic focus areas and reflect ...

  14. An assessment and evaluation for recycle/reuse of contaminated process and metallurgical equipment at the DOE Rocky Flats Plant Site -- Building 865. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    An economic analysis of the potential advantages of alternatives for recycling and reusing equipment now stored in Building 865 at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado has been conducted. The inventory considered in this analysis consists primarily of metallurgical and process equipment used before January 1992, during development and production of nuclear weapons components at the site. The economic analysis consists of a thorough building inventory and cost comparisons for four equipment dispositions alternatives. The first is a baseline option of disposal at a Low Level Waste (LLW) landfill. The three alternatives investigated are metal recycling, reuse with the government sector, and release for unrestricted use. This report provides item-by-item estimates of value, disposal cost, and decontamination cost. The economic evaluation methods documented here, the simple cost comparisons presented, and the data provided as a supplement, should provide a foundation for D&D decisions for Building 865, as well as for similar D&D tasks at RFP and at other sites.

  15. 2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2012 through October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2013 reporting year, an estimated 9.64 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the applicable Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s groundwater quality standard levels.

  16. Bolton Community Leaders’ Institute Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bolton Community Leaders Institute (CLI) held a conference on February 22 and 23 at the Southeastern Community College in Whiteville, North Carolina.

  17. town | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    town Home OpenEI Community Central Description: The central OpenEI community for students, scientists, researchers, enthusiasts, analysts and developers. central OpenEI town...

  18. central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    central Home OpenEI Community Central Description: The central OpenEI community for students, scientists, researchers, enthusiasts, analysts and developers. central OpenEI town...

  19. Building Safer Communities: The Integrated Community Safety Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kerr, Thomas A; Jordan, Steven Albert

    2001-03-01

    This paper discusses an integrated community safety approach to creating safer communities. It defines community broadly to include two categories of community members: “industry” and “neighbors.” Potential community members within the “industry” category include facilities, government/regulators, customers, stockholders, and suppliers. Within the “neighbors” category are towns, cities, counties, states; people/commodity flow systems; news media and special interest groups; environment; and families of employees. Each of these potential community members and its characteristics are discussed. The integrated community safety approach consists of three major activities: (1) define the boundaries of the community; (2) facilitate the sense of community; and (3) address the needs of the community. Defining the boundaries of the community includes determining the geographical and social boundaries; this is accomplished through conducting a hazard analysis and community involvement to identify all of the community members. Facilitating the sense of community includes conducting a capability/needs assessment and continuing community involvement to identify the issues and concerns of community members. Addressing the needs of the community involves master planning to consider safety issues in all community development actions and continuing community education and involvement. The integrated community safety approach is a workable approach for existing industries and their neighbors as well as new projects that industries and their neighbors might be considering. By using this socio-technical approach to integrating industry and all of its neighbors into a safer community, the integrated community safety approach will better assure the viability and safety of industry and its neighbors while maintaining or improving the overall quality of life.

  20. Remote Alaskan Communities Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Remote Alaskan Communities Energy Efficiency Competition (RACEE) Technical Assistance Guide March 2016 2 Technical Assistance Table of Contents How to Use this Guide ......................................................... Page 2 Technical Assistance Provider Network ..........................................................Page 2 * Regional Liaisons ..........................................................Page 4 * Regional Liaison Contact List

  1. Community Conservation Challenge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Office of Energy Development (OED) is offering grants under the CCC  program. Non-residential entities may apply to receive $25,000-$100,000 for community energy conservation projects...

  2. Community Issues - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In recent months, significant SRS-related community issues have included the Department of Energy's decision to abandon its long-standing commitment to Yucca Mountain in Nevada as ...

  3. SNL Community Relations Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... of concern CRP Community Relations Plan DOD U.S. Department of Defense DOE U.S. ... Tours DOE and the Department of Defense (DOD) provide information about ongoing ...

  4. Community Connections: July 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2016 Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit IN THIS ISSUE Small business and Lab honored for mentoring partnership RG Construction Services wins DOE award First endowed position created at Santa Fe Community College Early Childhood Center for Excellence director's position now funded $390K raised for youth scholarships Lab employees give to LAESF Lab engineer moonlights as

  5. Community Connections: March 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2016 Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit IN THIS ISSUE The STEM Path to Antarctica Careers in a science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) The value of volunteering Volunteers make a difference in communities throughout the region Easing the pain of grant writing Free grant-writing assistance is offered to small business, nonprofit organizations and local

  6. Community Environmental Monitoring Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services » Community Engagement Community Engagement Oak Ridge’s EM program hosts numerous events throughout the year to interact with local residents and stakeholders. Oak Ridge's EM program hosts numerous events throughout the year to interact with local residents and stakeholders. We strive to maintain a strong, cooperative relationship with local residents, municipalities, and stakeholders. Since the 33,500-acre Oak Ridge Reservation spans Anderson and Roane counties and contains the

  7. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  8. 100 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    00 Area About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility F Reactor H

  9. Community Loblolly Pine Slash Pine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community _ Loblolly Pine _ Slash Pine oMixed Pine/Hardwood D Upland Hardwod LJ Bottomland Hardwood IJ::J Carolina Bay Wetland * Wastesites N Streams I)iI, Utility ROW /l\W Roads oTES Plants (2) o SRS Bays D Three Rivers Landfill E2J Hydric Soils 280 o Soils Soil Series and Phase D BcB 1iii0g DOrA _ OrB D Rm _ TrB D WaB 280 I Il~ I ~ Figure 23-1. Plant cOllllllunities and soils associated with the Dry Bay Set-Aside Area. 23-7 Set-Aside 23: Dry Bay

  10. Community Leaders Dedicated to Building and Sustaining Healthy Communities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Community Leaders Dedicated to Building and Sustaining Healthy Communities Community Leaders Dedicated to Building and Sustaining Healthy Communities July 10, 2014 - 4:20pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment. More than 150 participants attended the 2014 Community Leaders Institute (CLI) in Montgomery, Alabama, on April 25 and 26. The event was sponsored by the Medical University of South Carolina; U.S. Department of

  11. Community Wind Benefits (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    This fact sheet explores the benefits of community wind projects, including citations to published research.

  12. Archive: LANL Community Commitment Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Archive Archive: LANL Community Commitment Plan Our good neighbor pledge: to contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico through economic development, excellence in education, and active employee engagement in our communities. Contact Community Relations & Partnerships (505) 665-4400 Community Commitment Plans 2014 (pdf) 2013

  13. Technical Area 21

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Area 21 Technical Area 21 Technical Area 21 was the site of chemical research for refining plutonium and plutonium metal production from 1945 to 1978. August 1, 2013 Technical Area 21 in 2011 Technical Area 21 in 2011 Technical Area 21 (TA-21), also known as DP Site was the site of chemical research for refining plutonium and plutonium metal production from 1945 to 1978. Between 2008 and 2011, MDAs B, U, and V were excavated and removed. 24 buildings were demolished in 2010 and 2011

  14. Assessment of Reusing 14-ton, Thin-Wall, Depleted UF{sub 6} Cylinders as LLW Disposal Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, D.G.

    2000-11-30

    Approximately 700,000 MT of DUF{sub 6} is stored, or will be produced under a current agreement with the USEC, at the Paducah site in Kentucky, Portsmouth site in Ohio, and ETTP site in Tennessee. On July 21, 1998, the 105th Congress approved Public Law 105-204 (Ref; 1), which directed that facilities be built at the Kentucky and Ohio sites to convert DUF{sub 6} to a stable form for disposition. On July 6, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued the ''Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride as Required by Public Law 105-204 (Ref. 2), in which DOE committed to develop a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap''. On September 1, 2000, DOE issued the Draft Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap (Ref. 3) (Roadmap), which provides alternate paths for the long-term storage, beneficial use, and eventual disposition of each product form and material that will result from the DUF{sub 6} conversion activity. One of the paths being considered for DUF{sub 6} cylinders is to reuse the empty cylinders as containers to transport and dispose of LLW, including the converted DU. The Roadmap provides results of the many alternate uses and disposal paths for conversion products and the empty DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders. As a part of the Roadmap, evaluations were conducted of cost savings, technical maturity, barriers to implementation, and other impacts. Results of these evaluations indicate that using the DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders as LLW disposal containers could provide moderate cost savings due to the avoided cost of purchasing LLW packages and the avoided cost of disposing of the cylinders. No significant technical or institutional issues were identified that would make using cylinders as LLW packages less effective than other disposition paths. Over 58,000 cylinders have been used, or will be used, to store DUF{sub 6}. Over 51,000 of those cylinders are 14TTW cylinders with a nominal wall thickness of 5/16-m (0.79 cm). These

  15. Fire victim helped by area programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fire victim helped by area programs Fire victim helped by local nonprofit organizations A perennial helper, didn't realize that she might someday need help herself. April 3, 2012 Beatrice Dubois is grateful for the help she received from Lab-supported Beatrice Dubois is grateful for the help she received from Lab-supported, local nonprofits during her time of need. Contact Kathy Keith Community Relations & Partnerships (505) 665-4400 Email Beatrice Dubois, dedicated fundraiser, assisted

  16. community.layout2.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    015 COMMUNITY COMMITMENT PLAN 2 LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY (LANS), LLC 2015 COMMUNITY COMMITMENT PLAN LANS COMMUNITY MODEL FOUNDATION Mutually Bene cial Regional Sustainable Education Investments Community Giving Investments Economic Development Investments Proud Legacy, Bold Future Los Alamos National Laboratory's mission is to solve national security challenges through scientifi c excellence, and we do so by serving our country, our partners, and our community. With support from the

  17. Community Atmosphere Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is an atmospheric general circulation model that solves equations for atmospheric dynamics and physics. CAM is an outgrowth of the Community Climate Model at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and was developed as a joint collaborative effort between NCAR and several DOE laboratories, including LLNL. CAM contains several alternative approaches for advancing the atmospheric dynamics. One of these approaches uses a finite-volume method originally developed by personnel atmore » NASNGSFC, We have developed a scalable version of the finite-volume solver for massively parallel computing systems. FV-CAM is meant to be used in conjunction with the Community Atmosphere Model. It is not stand-alone.« less

  18. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maps Individual Permit: Site Monitoring Area Maps Each Site Monitoring Area Map is updated whenever the map information is updated. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email What do these maps show? The Individual Permit for Storm Water site monitoring area maps display the following information: Surface hydrological features Locations of the Site(s) assigned to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring

  19. Ecological Communities by Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2015-06-25

    In synthetic ecology, a nascent offshoot of synthetic biology, scientists aim to design and construct microbial communities with desirable properties. Such mixed populations of microorganisms can simultaneously perform otherwise incompatible functions. Compared with individual organisms, they can also better resist losses in function as a result of environmental perturbation or invasion by other species. Synthetic ecology may thus be a promising approach for developing robust, stable biotechnological processes, such as the conversion of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. However, achieving this will require detailed knowledge of the principles that guide the structure and function of microbial communities.

  20. Community | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Social media is a great way to stay in touch with what's going on at Argonne and to interact with us. Ask questions, give us your opinion and become a part of our ever-expanding community of thinkers and explorers. Argonne leads by example as it works to meet its sustainability goals by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and electricity and water use. Community Argonne's role as a world leader in science and engineering depends on the trust and support of our neighbors. One of the top scientific

  1. Local community strategies for successful military base conversions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yim, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    Military base closures are a paradox. On one hand, the scale and the rate of present base closures is unique historically. Since 1988, the US has closed 56 major military installations and over 60 minor facilities. Under the 1993 round of base closures, another 35 major installations and 95 smaller facilities nationwide were closed. Yet, for the most part, each base itself does not present unique problems. Common questions of environmental contamination remediation, infrastructure improvement, and reuse and redevelopment strategies are shared by each closing base. The challenge for the communities is to simultaneously recognize the uniqueness of the military base closure process, and adopt common but novel approaches to resolutions of the similar issues. Thus while the property disposal or economic development mechanisms which have historically been used may no longer be appropriate, new and innovative common strategies may be developed to expedite successful conversions. The purpose of this article is to examine the paradox presented by military base closures, to identify those outdated processes no longer appropriate for the unique nature of base closures, and to recommend innovative and common solutions to those issues found at all closing bases.

  2. 2014 News | Community | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 News Below are news stories related to Community. RSS Learn about RSS. September 19, 2014 NREL Interns Look Toward the Future Forty-four interns spend summer at NREL researching topics from genetic engineering to technologies for hydrokinetic turbines. Archives Current News | 2014

  3. Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2012-October 31, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  4. Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2011-October 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  5. Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: May 1, 2010-October 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Frederick

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (#LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  6. Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2010-October 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Frederick

    2012-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (No.LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  7. Puget Sound Communities Promote Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Puget Sound Communities Promote Energy Efficiency Puget Sound Communities Promote Energy Efficiency April 2, 2010 - 4:50pm Addthis Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers What does this project do? Identifies wasted energy Frees up money for cash strapped programs in the area. Four organizations on Washington state's Kitsap Peninsula are joining forces to improve their energy efficiency. Led by the City of Bremerton, the largest participant city by population and energy needs, the four will hire

  8. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: csp land use Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post...

  9. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home > OpenEI Community Central > Posts by term > OpenEI Community Central Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: acres Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort...

  10. Energy Datapalooza Community - Q & A | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community - Q & A Home > Energy Datapalooza Community Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds No questions have been added to this group yet. Groups Menu You must login in order...