Sample records for area community reuse

  1. Personal Property Disposition - Community Reuse Organizations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Owen (signed) Director, Office of Worker and Community Transition Department of Energy Washington, DC 20505 January 22, 2003 Disposition of Excess Personal Property...

  2. Department of Energy Awards $345,000 to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council Community Reuse Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy Awards $345,000 to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council Community Reuse Organization

  3. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This renewal application for a Recycled Water Reuse Permit is being submitted in accordance with the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.17 “Recycled Water Rules” and the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 for continuing the operation of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The permit expires March 16, 2015. The permit requires a renewal application to be submitted six months prior to the expiration date of the existing permit. For the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant, the renewal application must be submitted by September 16, 2014. The information in this application is consistent with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater and discussions with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality personnel.

  4. EA-1915: Conveyance of Approximately 1,641 Acres of Unimproved Land to the Tri-City Development Council, the Local Community Reuse Organization, Richland, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of conveyance of approximately 1,641 acres of unimproved land at DOE’s Hanford Site, Richland, Washington to the Tri-City Development Council (TRIDEC), the local community reuse organization (CRO).

  5. The Ohio Community Reinvestment Area (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio Community Reinvestment Area program is an economic development tool administered by municipal and county government that provides real property tax exemptions for property owners who...

  6. 2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike lewis

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

  7. 2011 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Lewis

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Site description; (2) Facility and system description; (3) Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; (4) Status of special compliance conditions and activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 permit year, approximately 1.22 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

  8. 2012 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2011, through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2012 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant.

  9. Pine Ridge Area Community Wildfire Protection Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Pine Ridge Area Community Wildfire Protection Plan Update 2013 West Ash Fire: Wednesday August 29 the boundary of the original plan to include all the area within the Upper Niobrara White Natural Resource, 2012 #12;Facilitated by: Nebraska Forest Service In cooperation with: Region 23 Fire Protection

  10. 2013 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013. The report contains, as applicable, the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. However, soil samples were collected in October from soil monitoring unit SU-014101.

  11. Paducah-Area Community Reuse Organization To Receive $300,000 Block Grant |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM5 Accretion-of-DutiesPROPERTY3-0127Paducah

  12. Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The George Washington UniversityEnvironmental Resource Policy Graduate Program Capstone ProjectBeneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon SiteFeasibility and Community Support for Photovoltaic ArrayMay 2012

  13. The Uses and Reuses of Major Urban Arterials: A Study of Recycling, Revitalizing, and Restructuring “Gray Area” Transportation Corridors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Allan B.; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Marsh, Diana; Wilson, Clark

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mission Bay and the Hunter's Point area towards Candlestickindustrial areas near Hunter's Point. In the 1960s, asWorld War II, when Hunters Point became the biggest shipyard

  14. Estimating Systems Engineering Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortune, Jared

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems engineering reuse is the utilization of previously developed systems engineering products or artifacts such as

  15. Oxford Area Community School District (Michigan) Bonds Case Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigan’s Oxford Area Community School District entered into an energy savings performance contract and issued limited tax general obligation bonds to fund the up-front costs of almost $3 million of energy-related improvements. Case study is excerpted from Financing Energy Upgrades for K-12 School Districts: A Guide to Tapping into Funding for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Improvements. Author: Merrian Borgeson and Mark Zimring

  16. Types of Reuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

  17. Harrisburg Area Community College Portland State University Updated 8/29/2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latiolais, M. Paul

    Harrisburg Area Community College Portland State University Updated 8/29/2014 Transfer Worksheet College-level transferable academic courses taken at Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC;Harrisburg Area Community College Portland State University Updated 8/29/2014 2. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

  18. Chairman, SRS Community Reuse Organization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMSStaffCerium OxideChair Summaries fromRemarks

  19. area community health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Adult & Community Health July 24, 2006 12;Indicators Landscape Brief history 6 Health Care-Related Volunteer and Community Service Opportunities in the New Haven and...

  20. COOPERATIVE LAND REUSE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to determine what financial return, if any, DOE would realize if they invest solely in removal of the asbestos from these three Hanford steam plants and the associated large bore distribution piping at the site. Once the asbestos was removed the strategy was to bring in companies that specialize in salvage and material re-use and have them remove, at no cost to DOE, the plants and the associated large bore piping. The salvage companies we contacted had said that if they didn't have to remove asbestos, they may be able to realize enough value from these plants to offset their demolition and/or dismantling cost. The results were not what we expected but they do offer DOE some favorable financial alternatives to their present approach. The study concluded that there was very little salvage and/or re-use value remaining in the steam plant material that could be used to offset the demolition and/or dismantling cost. The notable exception to this is the removal of the 24 inch steam piping that runs from 200E to 200W areas (see IDM executive summary under Dismantling cost). It is estimated that the re-use value of the 24-inch piping would more than pay for the dismantling cost of this piping. On a more favorable note, it does appear as though the cost of conventional demolition can be reduced by a factor of 3 to 5 if the asbestos is removed first and the demolition is performed using competitive and commercial practices. Both estimates in this study are similar except that IDM did not include floor slab removal nor remove the same quantity of piping. This is why we are using a range of 3 to 5 as a reduction factor. The IDM estimate (using union labor) for demolition after removal of asbestos was approximately $1.5M versus $10.0M for accomplishing the work using Hanford practices and rates.

  1. A study of offshore benthic communities in natural areas and in areas affected by dredging and dredged material disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Clyde Allan

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY QF OFFSHORE BENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN NATURAL AREAS AND IN AREAS AFFECTED BY DREDGING AND DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL A Thesis by CLYDE ALLAN HENRY e Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Biology A STCDY OF 0-FSHOBE BENTHIC COMKTNITIES IN NATURAL AREAS AND IN AREAS AFFECTED BY DREDGING AND DREDCFD NATERIAL DISPOSAL A Thesis by CLYDE ALLAN HENRY Approved...

  2. Reuse in Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gan

    Reuse in systems engineering is a frequent but poorly understood phenomenon. Nevertheless, it has a significant impact on system development and on estimating the appropriate amount of systems engineering effort with models ...

  3. Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWaranaWater Power ForumGeothermal Area

  4. Microsoft Word - 2014 CO2 Use and Reuse - Intro.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in achieving program goals. Key technology research within the Carbon Use and Reuse Technology Area includes: Polycarbonate Plastics MineralizationCements Chemicals...

  5. Carbon storage and sequestration by trees in urban and community areas of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon storage and sequestration by trees in urban and community areas of the United States David J forestry Tree cover Forest inventory a b s t r a c t Carbon storage and sequestration by urban trees to determine total urban forest carbon storage and annual sequestration by state and nationally. Urban whole

  6. Reuse of Verification Results Conditional Model Checking, Precision Reuse,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyer, Dirk

    further verification runs of the system; information about the level of abstraction in the abstract modelReuse of Verification Results Conditional Model Checking, Precision Reuse, and Verification checker which parts of the system should be verified; thus, later verification runs can use the output

  7. Biomass, Leaf Area, and Resource Availability of Kudzu Dominated Plant Communities Following Herbicide Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.T. Rader

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kudzu is an exotic vine that threatens the forests of the southern U.S. Five herbicides were tested with regard to their efficacy in controlling kudzu, community recover was monitored, and interactions with planted pines were studied. The sites selected were old farm sites dominated by kudzu.These were burned following herbicide treatment. The herbicides included triclopyr, clopyralid, metsulfuron, tebuthiuron, and picloram plus 2,4-D. Pine seedlings were planted the following year. Regression equations were developed for predicting biomass and leaf area. Four distinct plant communities resulted from the treatments. The untreated check continued to be kudzu dominated. Blackberry dominated the clopyradid treatment. Metsulfron, trychlopyr and picloram treated sites resulted in herbaceous dominated communities. The tebuthiuron treatment maintained all vegetation low.

  8. Personal Property Disposition - Community Reuse Organizations (CROs) |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM5Parabolic Trough ParabolicPerformance Audit

  9. Community Reuse Organization | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville EnergyDepartment. CashDay-JuneOfficeFresno U.S.of

  10. Efficiency Projects and Water Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pannell, B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency In A Small Utility Bill Pannell bill.pannell@cleburne.net City of Cleburne ESL-KT-11-11-36 ?Efficiency In A Small Utility Are We As Efficient As We Can Be?? Reduce Water ?Loss? Thru Better Auditing And Metering Improvements... Saving $$$ With Efficient Aeration Question And Answer Session Water Loss Energy Q&A Reuse Expanding Water System Capacity By Creative Reuse Water Development ESL-KT-11-11-36 ? What is ?Loss?? ? What is ?Real loss?? ? ?Apparent Loss...

  11. Automating component reuse and adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Perry; Morel, B.

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by B. Frakes. For information on obtaining reprints of this article, please send e-mail to: tse@computer.org, and reference IEEECS Log Number TSE-0115-0803. 0098-5589/04/$20.00 C223 2004 IEEE Published by the IEEE Computer Society systems. The framework... Ejecutivos (CADE-14), July 1997. [7] W. Frakes and C. Terry, ?Software Reuse: Metrics and Models,? ACM Computing Surveys, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 415-435, June 1996. [8] W.B. Frakes and C.J. Fox, ?Sixteen Questions About Software Reuse,? Comm. ACM, vol. 38, no. 6...

  12. EA-1640: Transfer of Land and Facilities within the East Tennessee Technology Park and Surrounding Area, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Oak Ridge Operations Office issued a final EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to convey DOE property located at the East Tennessee Technology Park and the surrounding area to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee, City of Oak Ridge, other agencies, or private entities for mixed use economic development.Public Comment Opportunities.

  13. Innovative Water Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaber, F. H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concern? Urban BMPs ? Rain garden- bioretention areas ? Porous pavements ? Green roofs ? Rainwater harvesting Home Rain Garden Rain Garden in Parking Lot Types of Permeable Pavement Paver blocks Porous asphalt Porous concrete Turf Paver... management 1.Rain gardens 2.Porous pavement 3.Green roofs Hydrologic Cycle ISSUES ? Water Conservation ? Is there enough? ? Can conservation make a difference? ? Water Quality ? Contamination/pollution due to runoff Eagle...

  14. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobensack, J.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  15. ICT reuse in socio-economic enterprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ongondo, F.O., E-mail: f.ongondo@soton.ac.uk [Centre for Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, Lanchester Building, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Williams, I.D. [Centre for Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, Lanchester Building, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Dietrich, J. [Technische Universität Berlin, Centre for Scientific Continuing Education and Cooperation, Cooperation and Consulting for Environmental Questions (kubus) FH10-1, Fraunhoferstraße 33-36, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Carroll, C. [Centre for Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, Lanchester Building, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • We analyse ICT equipment reuse operations of socio-economic enterprises. • Most common ICT products dealt with are computers and related equipment. • In the UK in 2010, ?143,750 appliances were reused. • Marketing and legislative difficulties are the common hurdles to reuse activities. • Socio-economic enterprises can significantly contribute to resource efficiency. - Abstract: In Europe, socio-economic enterprises such as charities, voluntary organisations and not-for-profit companies are involved in the repair, refurbishment and reuse of various products. This paper characterises and analyses the operations of socio-economic enterprises that are involved in the reuse of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) equipment. Using findings from a survey, the paper specifically analyses the reuse activities of socio-economic enterprises in the UK from which Europe-wide conclusions are drawn. The amount of ICT products handled by the reuse organisations is quantified and potential barriers and opportunities to their operations are analysed. By-products from reuse activities are discussed and recommendations to improve reuse activities are provided. The most common ICT products dealt with by socio-economic enterprises are computers and related equipment. In the UK in 2010, an estimated 143,750 appliances were reused. However, due to limitations in data, it is difficult to compare this number to the amount of new appliances that entered the UK market or the amount of waste electrical and electronic equipment generated in the same period. Difficulties in marketing products and numerous legislative requirements are the most common barriers to reuse operations. Despite various constraints, it is clear that organisations involved in reuse of ICT could contribute significantly to resource efficiency and a circular economy. It is suggested that clustering of their operations into “reuse parks” would enhance both their profile and their products. Reuse parks would also improve consumer confidence in and subsequently sales of the products. Further, it is advocated that industrial networking opportunities for the exchange of by-products resulting from the organisations’ activities should be investigated. The findings make two significant contributions to the current literature. One, they provide a detailed insight into the reuse operations of socio-economic enterprises. Previously unavailable data has been presented and analysed. Secondly, new evidence about the by-products/materials resulting from socio-economic enterprises’ reuse activities has been obtained. These contributions add substantially to our understanding of the important role of reuse organisations.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: domestic reuse of wastewater

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    domestic reuse of wastewater Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research Institute Sponsor Roundtable on Western Water Scarcity On October 4, 2013, in Climate,...

  17. (Draft) Community air pollution and mortality: Analysis of 1980 data from US metropolitan areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 data from up to 149 metropolitan areas were used to define cross-sectional associations between community air pollution and ``excess`` human mortality. The regression model proposed by Ozkaynak and Thurston (1987), which accounted for age, race, education, poverty, and population density, was evaluated and several new models were developed. The new models also accounted for migration, drinking water hardness, and smoking, and included a more detailed description of race. Cause-of-death categories analyzed include all causes, all ``non-external`` causes, major cardiovascular diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Both annual mortality rates and their logarithms were analyzed. Air quality data were obtained from the EPA AIRS database (TSP, SO{sub 4}{sup =}, Mn, and ozone) and from the inhalable particulate network (PM{sub 15}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub 4}{sup =}, for 63{sup 4} locations). The data on particulates were averaged across all monitoring stations available for each SMSA and the TSP data were restricted to the year 1980. The associations between mortality and air pollution were found to be dependent on the socioeconomic factors included in the models, the specific locations included in the data set, and the type of statistical model used. Statistically significant associations were found as follows: between TSP and mortality due to non-external causes with log-linear models, but not with a linear model betweenestimated 10-year average (1980--90) ozone levels and 1980 non-external and cardiovascular deaths; and between TSP and COPD mortality for both linear and log-linear models. When the sulfate contribution to TSP was subtracted, the relationship with COPD mortality was strengthened.

  18. (Draft) Community air pollution and mortality: Analysis of 1980 data from US metropolitan areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 data from up to 149 metropolitan areas were used to define cross-sectional associations between community air pollution and excess'' human mortality. The regression model proposed by Ozkaynak and Thurston (1987), which accounted for age, race, education, poverty, and population density, was evaluated and several new models were developed. The new models also accounted for migration, drinking water hardness, and smoking, and included a more detailed description of race. Cause-of-death categories analyzed include all causes, all non-external'' causes, major cardiovascular diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Both annual mortality rates and their logarithms were analyzed. Air quality data were obtained from the EPA AIRS database (TSP, SO[sub 4][sup =], Mn, and ozone) and from the inhalable particulate network (PM[sub 15], PM[sub 2.5] and SO[sub 4][sup =], for 63[sup 4] locations). The data on particulates were averaged across all monitoring stations available for each SMSA and the TSP data were restricted to the year 1980. The associations between mortality and air pollution were found to be dependent on the socioeconomic factors included in the models, the specific locations included in the data set, and the type of statistical model used. Statistically significant associations were found as follows: between TSP and mortality due to non-external causes with log-linear models, but not with a linear model betweenestimated 10-year average (1980--90) ozone levels and 1980 non-external and cardiovascular deaths; and between TSP and COPD mortality for both linear and log-linear models. When the sulfate contribution to TSP was subtracted, the relationship with COPD mortality was strengthened.

  19. Linear Programming Uses for Recycling and Product Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Linear Programming Uses for Recycling and Product Reuse Tara Demeyer Management Science I #12;Outline Introduction Construction Waste Recycling Paper Waste Recycling Printer Component Reuse #12;Reverse Logistics Returns/ Damaged Product Recycling of waste materials Reuse of product components #12

  20. Reuse Knowns and Unknowns Bill Frakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    . You need to measure reuse and document the payoff. 3. A phased implementation model is often a good plan. 4. You need to provide education. 5. Methods for domain engineering.. 6. Reuse design guidelines measures in finance models. 4. How to assure component safety. 5. How to measure component reliability. 6

  1. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIESCommitteeCommunity Community Berkeley

  2. Software reuse in defense electronics : a study of organization and architecture approaches in a challenging business and technical environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jeffrey (Jeffrey Ethan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although large scale software reuse has been studied and practiced in industry for more than 20 years, there are some practice areas where it has presented both technical and business challenges. A sector notable for ...

  3. Comparison of anuran acoustic communities of two habitat types in the Danum Valley Conservation Area,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hödl, Walter

    Comparison of anuran acoustic communities of two habitat types in the Danum Valley Conservation frequency and demand acoustic adaptations to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Selective logging represents a major threat to stream-breeding anurans in Sabah. Pollution of clear water threatens the stream

  4. Convert! : the adaptive reuse of churches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiley, Christopher John, 1972-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the phenomenon of vacated churches and analyzes the major issues underlying their adaptive reuse in order to help promulgate an awareness of the range of successful strategies and solutions that are ...

  5. Reusing Property Resulting from Analytical Laboratory Closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO 81503 (United States); DePinho, D.; Wetherstein, P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Grand Junction, CO 81503 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) site in Grand Junction, Colorado, faced the problem of reusing an extensive assortment of laboratory equipment and supplies when its on-site analytical chemistry laboratory closed. This challenge, undertaken as part of the Grand Junction site's pollution prevention program, prioritized reuse of as much of the laboratory equipment and supplies as possible during a 9-month period in fiscal year 2004. Reuse remedies were found for approximately $3 million worth of instrumentation, equipment, chemicals, precious metals, and other laboratory items through other Grand Junction site projects, Federal Government databases, and extensive contact with other DOE facilities, universities, and colleges. In 2005, the DOE-LM Grand Junction site received two prestigious DOE pollution prevention awards for reuse of the laboratory's equipment and supplies. (authors)

  6. Community-Minded Interns at Savannah River Site Help Area Residents in Need with Home Repairs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – More than two dozen college interns who worked at the Savannah River Site (SRS) this summer joined other volunteers and headed into area neighborhoods to help people in need with home repairs.

  7. Water quality of some coastal canal communities in the Galveston County area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Ernest Robert

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOUND IN Peae THE CANAL SYSTFMS. 42. COh'IPARISON OF THF. AVFRAGE TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON (TOC) VALUES FOUND IN THE CANAL SYSTFMS. 43. COMPARISON OF THF AVFRAhE BIOCHFhlICAL OXYGEN DFh'lAND (GODS) VALUES FOU"JD IN THE CANAL SYSTFM. 44. COMPARISON... SAMPLES IV. SEDIEMENT VALUES FOUI'ID IN THF CANAL COMMUNITIES. . . V. COMPARISON OF OXYGEN DEMAND AND UPTAKE RATES BETi!EEN DIFFERENT SFCTIONS OF BAYOU VISTA AND JAMAICA BEACH. VI. COMPARISON OF K RATES AND TOTAL OXYGEN DFMAh!D BETNEEN DIFFERENT...

  8. Reusing Personal Computer Devices - Good or Bad for the Environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahni, Sahil

    The energy saving potential of reusing / reselling personal computer (PC) devices was evaluated relative to the choice of buying new. Contrary to the common belief of reuse leading to energy savings, with the advent of ...

  9. The economics of cell phone reuse and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Doctori Blass, Vered

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the disposal of WEEE. EngD Thesis, Centre forphones in the context of WEEE. Proceedings of Going Greena by-product of reuse. Keywords WEEE . Cell phones . Reuse .

  10. FeatureOriented Classification for Software Reuse Jrgen Brstler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Börstler, Jürgen

    (preci­ sion = 100%). A study of typical reuse approaches by Frakes and Pole show numbers in the range

  11. Case Study of Maturing and Reusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    Case Study of Maturing and Reusing a Framework COT/3-32-V1.0 C O T * Centre for Object Technology concerned with research, application and implementation of object technology in Danish companies-data, Rambøll, Danfoss, Systematic Software Engineering, Odense Steel Shipyard, A.P. Møller, University

  12. Reinvention through reuse : strategies for the adaptive reuse of large-scale buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozik, Dana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The practice of adaptive reuse has grown in popularity in the United States over the past few decades, with now about 90% of architect-commissioned work involving some interaction with an existing structure. While the ...

  13. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;' Our Mission The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse aims to advance the science and technology of sustainable water management through fundamental and applied research. Our Vision To be Australia's leading research centre for water reuse

  14. REGIONAL WORKFORCE STUDY PREPARED FOR THE SRS COMMUNITY REUSE ORGANIZATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmart SensorsData - NOREGIONAL

  15. The gated community: residents' crime experience and perception of safety behind gates and fences in the urban area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Suk Kyung

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ' perceptions of safety. Gated community residents reported a higher crime rate than nongated community residents. In addition to gates and fences that define apartment territory, such elements as patrol services, bright lighting, direct emergency buttons...

  16. Community air pollution and mortality: Analysis of 1980 data from US metropolitan areas. 1: Particulate air pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 data from up to 149 metropolitan areas were used to define cross-sectional associations between community air pollution and excess human mortality. The regression model proposed by Oezkaynak and Thurston, which accounted for age, race, education, poverty, and population density, was evaluated and several new models were developed. The new models also accounted for population change, drinking water hardness, and smoking, and included a more detailed description of race. Cause-of-death categories analyzed include all causes, all non-external causes, major cardiovascular diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Both annual mortality rates and their logarithms were analyzed. The data on particulates were averaged across all monitoring stations available for each SMSA and the TSP data were restricted to the year 1980. The associations between mortality and air pollution were found to be dependent on the socioeconomic factors included in the models, the specific locations included din the data set, and the type of statistical model used. Statistically significant associations were found between TSP and mortality due to non-external causes with log-linear models, but not with a linear model, and between TS and COPD mortality for both linear and log-linear models. When the sulfate contribution to TSP was subtracted, the relationship with COPD mortality was strengthened. Scatter plots and quintile analyses suggested a TSP threshold for COPD mortality at around 65 ug/m{sup 3} (annual average). SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}, Mn, PM{sup 15}, and PM{sub 2.5} were not significantly associated with mortality using the new models.

  17. Reuse of steel and aluminium without melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Daniel

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    -of-life metal components that could be reused for each product, the catalogue formed the basis of a set of semi-structured interviews with industrial experts. The results suggest that approximately 30% of steel and aluminium used in current products could... Allwood J.M., Cullen J.M., Cooper D.R., Milford R.L., Patel A.C.H., Carruth M.A., McBrien M., 2010. Conserving our metal energy: avoiding melting steel and aluminium scrap to save energy and carbon. University of Cambridge, ISBN 978-0-903428-30-9 Allwood...

  18. Improving Reuse & Recycling | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important Trinity /EnergyImproving Reuse

  19. Water reuse and technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural PublicRatesAbout Us >WasteWater Reuse

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Pollution Prevention: Reuse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitche Home AboutMeeting: ProgramFebruaryJune 26,RecyclingReuse

  1. El Paso landscape perspective: Researchers study water conservation, plant-tolerance, and water reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, Danielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , reclaimed wastewater is being used on larger public areas as a way to reuse water resources and conserve potable, or drinkable, freshwater supplies. Dr. Ari Michelsen, El Paso center director, recognizes the importance of water as well as managing... limited water resources in El Paso?s desert environment. ?Water is essential and one of the most important resources for human health, economic growth, quality of life, and environment, especially in the desert conditions of El Paso, the #18;#31;h...

  2. What is Community Development?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Greg

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication offers a practical definition of community development for county Extension educators. It also offers examples of goals and objectives for various resource development areas in a community. A list of community development...

  3. Polyhedral-Based Data Reuse Optimization for Configurable Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    Polyhedral-Based Data Reuse Optimization for Configurable Computing Louis-No¨el Pouchet,1 Peng with careful software-based data reuse and communication scheduling techniques. We present a fully automated C Zhang,1 P. Sadayappan,2 Jason Cong1 1 University of California, Los Angeles {pouchet

  4. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;2 The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse was established in 2004 as a joint venture between the South Australian Water Corporation and the University of South Australia (UniSA), adding significant expertise to the water research capability in South

  5. From Local to Global Coordination: Lessons from Software Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grinter, Rebecca Elizabeth

    From Local to Global Coordination: Lessons from Software Reuse Rebecca E. Grinter Xerox PARC 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA grinter@parc.xerox.com http://www.parc by making it possible to share code. However, software reuse in practice has proved much harder. This paper

  6. Reusing Shares in Secret Sharing Schemes Yuliang Zheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yuliang

    Reusing Shares in Secret Sharing Schemes Yuliang Zheng Thomas Hardjono Jennifer Seberry The Centre for The Computer Journal 1 #12;Reusing Shares in Secret Sharing Schemes Abstract A (t w) threshold scheme is a method for sharing a secret among w shareholders so that the collaboration of at least t shareholders

  7. Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert A. Liske

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and organics. Pilot study results indicate that produced water from the San Ardo oilfield can be treated to meet project water quality goals. Approximately 600 mg/l of caustic and 100 mg/l magnesium dosing were required to meet the hardness and silica goals in the warm softening unit. Approximately 30% of the ammonia was removed in the cooling tower; additional ammonia could be removed by ion exchange or other methods if necessary. A brackish water reverse osmosis membrane was effective in removing total dissolved solids and organics at all pH levels evaluated; however, the boron treatment objective was only achieved at a pH of 10.5 and above.

  8. Towards the Net-Zero Data Center: Development and Application of an Energy Reuse Metric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, M. K.; VanGeet, O.; Tschudi, W.; Azevedo, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data Centers are an ever increasing user of energy in our economy. While the performance per watt of our IT equipment continues to increase exponentially, this energy performance improvement is still outstripped by increasing demand. Because of this, the efficiency of data centers must continue to improve. Beyond just efficiency, many data centers now are working towards reuse of their waste energy in other areas in the data center or on the site or campus. How to account for this, through metrics and measurements, is the topic of this paper. The Energy Reuse Effectiveness metric or ERE is discussed; both the development and application of the metric are looked at in detail. The use of ERE in conjunction with PUE (Power Usage Effectiveness) is also considered.

  9. Improving reuse of semiconductor equipment through benchmarking, standardization, and automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silber, Jacob B. (Jacob Bradley)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 6D program at Intel® Corporation was set up to improve operations around capital equipment reuse, primarily in their semiconductor manufacturing facilities. The company was faced with a number of challenges, including ...

  10. Fermilab | Director's Policy Manual | No. 36.000 Facility Reuse...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    36.000 Rev. 0 Facility Reuse Program 2.0 Effective Date 22805 3.0 Scope This policy covers all facilities at Fermilab 4.0 Applicability All Fermilab facilities and operations....

  11. Radical reuse : from the superfluous to the exquisite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marraccini, Marco

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the systematic possibilities for the intricate architectural reuse and reconfiguration of the radial tire and the PET plastic bottle. Both waste products demonstrate significant structural and ...

  12. Walter Baker Chocolate Factory : an adaptive reuse exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Fernando D

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the processes of building evolution and the methods in which old buildings are recycled for continued use. Reuse is the process in which a building's life is extended through a preservation or alteration ...

  13. High temperature ceramic membrane for CO? reuse and syngas production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Le, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, membrane based technologies have attracted much attention thanks to their simplicity in reactor design. The concept proposed is to use mixed ionic-electronic conducting membrane (MIEC) in CO2 reuse and ...

  14. Treatment and reuse of coal conversion wastewaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, R.G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a synopsis of recent experimental activities to evaluate processing characteristics of coal conversion wastewaters. Treatment studies have been performed with high-BTU coal gasification process quench waters to assess enhanced removal of organic compounds via powdered activated carbon-activated sludge treatment, and to evaluate a coal gasification wastewater treatment train comprised of sequential processing by ammonia removal, biological oxidation, lime-soda softening, granular activated carbon adsorption, and reverse osmosis. In addition, treatment studies are in progress to evaluate solvent extraction of gasification process wastewater to recover phenolics and to reduce wastewater loading of priority organic pollutants. Biological oxidation of coal gasification wastewater has shown excellent removal efficiencies of major and trace organic contaminants at moderate loadings, addition of powdered activated carbon provides lower effluent COD and color. Gasification process wastewater treated through biological oxidation, lime-soda softening and activated carbon adsorption appears suitable for reuse as cooling tower make-up water. Solvent extraction is an effective means to reduce organic loadings to downstream processing units. In addition, preliminary results have shown that solvent extraction removes chromatographable organic contaminants to low levels.

  15. It is well known that the West Texas banking community and the Area of Finance in the Rawls College of Business enjoy a long-standing and fruitful relationship. Undergraduate and graduate finance majors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westfall, Peter H.

    It is well known that the West Texas banking community and the Area of Finance in the Rawls College of Business enjoy a long-standing and fruitful relationship. Undergraduate and graduate finance majors from this relationship, the Institute for Banking and Financial Studies, in conjunction with the Area of Finance

  16. A Process Reference Model for Reuse in Industrial Engineering: Enhancing the ISO/IEC 15504 Framework to Cope with Organizational Reuse Maturity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mössenböck, Hanspeter

    A Process Reference Model for Reuse in Industrial Engineering: Enhancing the ISO/IEC 15504 in industrial engineering for solution providers is more and more recognized as a key to economic success for reuse in industrial engineering. Based on an overview and the background of the GDES-Reuse improvement

  17. Reduce, reuse, recycle, for robust cluster state generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clare Horsman; Katherine L. Brown; William J. Munro; Vivien M. Kendon

    2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient generation of cluster states is crucial for engineering large-scale measurement-based quantum computers. Hybrid matter-optical systems offer a robust, scalable path to this goal. Such systems have an ancilla which acts as a bus connecting the qubits. We show that by generating smaller cluster "Lego bricks", reusing one ancilla per brick, the cluster can be produced with maximal efficiency, requiring fewer than half the operations compared with no bus reuse. By reducing the time required to prepare sections of the cluster, bus reuse more than doubles the size of the computational workspace that can be used before decoherence effects dominate. A row of buses in parallel provides fully scalable cluster state generation requiring only 20 CPhase gates per bus use.

  18. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

  19. Analysis of Desalination Processes for Treatment of Produced Water for Re-use as Irrigation Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradt, Laura

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Produced water is a major side product of onshore oil and gas production. This water contains a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds and requires treatment for beneficial reuse. One option for the reuse of this water is irrigation. Treatment...

  20. V-058: Microsoft Internet Explorer CDwnBindInfo Object Reuse...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Microsoft Internet Explorer CDwnBindInfo Object Reuse Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-058: Microsoft Internet Explorer CDwnBindInfo Object Reuse Flaw Lets Remote...

  1. Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composting energy production, composting, or direct reuse. Using wastepathways, to humus via composting, or it can be used

  2. Asset Revitalization Initiative Guide for Sustainable Asset Management and Reuse

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide is intended to assist sites in sustainable planning, management, and reuse of assets that allows effective mission execution, optimizes federal and public resources, and supports local and national goals for economic growth and diversification in support of DOE O 430.1B.

  3. Combined Loop Transformation and Hierarchy Allocation for Data Reuse Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong, Jason "Jingsheng"

    transformation framework was established based on parametric integer linear programming [6-8]. Data dependenceCombined Loop Transformation and Hierarchy Allocation for Data Reuse Optimization Jason Cong, Peng Zhang, Yi Zou Computer Science Department University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095

  4. PRODUCTION PLANNING BASED ON RELIABILITY MODELS FOR PART REUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, Lily H.

    PRODUCTION PLANNING BASED ON RELIABILITY MODELS FOR PART REUSE Takeshi Murayama, Hiroshi Obata, Canada Abstract: This paper describes a production planning procedure addressing the issue that the timings and quantities of returned products and reusable components included in them is unknown

  5. Quality and Reuse in Industrial Software Engineering Greg Butler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Gregory

    Quality and Reuse in Industrial Software Engineering Greg Butler Department of Computer Science on the costs and benefits of the approaches, and the criteria which determine a successful transfer the effort and costs of maintenance and understanding are the primary means to increased productivity

  6. Reusing and Composing Tests with Traits Stphane Ducasse1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , and Damien Cassou2 1 RMoD team, INRIA Lille ­ Nord Europe & University of Lille 1 Parc Scientifique de la developers to duplicate code and logic. This widely recognized situation affects both business code and tests-Testing 1 The Case One fundamental software engineering principle is to favor code reuse over code

  7. General Guidelines for Sustainable Purchasing 3R's -Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    ......................................................... 3R's - Reduce, Reuse, Recycle In order to conserve natural resources and to protect the environment considerations o Made of recycled materials, maximizing post-consumer content. o Remanufactured products, such as laser toner cartridges, tires, furniture, equipment and automotive parts whenever practicable and cost

  8. Software Reuse in High Performance Computing Shirley Browne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongarra, Jack

    Software Reuse in High Performance Computing Shirley Browne University of Tennessee 107 Ayres Hall high performance computing architectures in the form of distributed memory mul­ tiprocessors have and cost of programming applications to run on these machines. Economical use of high performance computing

  9. Software Reuse in High Performance Computing Shirley Browne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawick, Ken

    Software Reuse in High Performance Computing Shirley Browne University of Tennessee 107 Ayres Hall high performance computing architectures in the form of distributed memorymul- tiprocessors have become of programming applications to run on these machines. Economical use of high performance computing and subsequent

  10. Re-using products saves budget dollars and reduces waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Re-using products saves budget dollars and reduces waste Rutgers Environmental Health and Safety Department (REHS) sponsors an unused chemical exchange program to reduce chemical waste and save your recycling program, we have saved over $2,000,000 in landfill costs. We recycled over 32,000 tons of our

  11. HIRICH et al. Wastewater reuse in the Mediterranean region: Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    are also, the most vulnerable to global climate change. Studies have shown that the peopleHIRICH et al. Wastewater reuse in the Mediterranean region: Case of Morocco Abdelaziz HIRICH, Morocco. (E-mail: hirich_aziz@yahoo.fr ; redouane53@yahoo.fr ) Abstract The southern Mediterranean region

  12. Customizing AOSE Methodologies by Reusing AOSE Thomas Juan Leon Sterling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascardi, Viviana

    Customizing AOSE Methodologies by Reusing AOSE Features Thomas Juan Leon Sterling Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering, The University of Melbourne 221 Bouverie Street Carlton engineering support for a diverse range of software quality attributes, such as privacy and openness

  13. Flexible Generators for Software Reuse and Evolution (NIER Track)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarzabek, Stan

    Flexible Generators for Software Reuse and Evolution (NIER Track) Stan Jarzabek and Ha Duy Trung of sync with code, any future re-generation of code overrides manual modifications. We propose a flexible modifications into the generation process, rather than modify already generated code. A flexible generator

  14. Rosemount Orchard is a sustainable development driven by a sense of community. It will offer affordable housing, "green" and local retail, a picking orchard, a community garden, and plenty of open space. The goal of the community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    will have solar panels, passive housing, district heating, will reuse all stormwater and greywater on site affordable housing, "green" and local retail, a picking orchard, a community garden, and plenty of open space everyone! The community will have a variety of different housing and different prices, a variety

  15. Scrap tire reuse through surface-modification technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauman, B.D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing a novel approach for reusing scrap tire rubber. The process involves the combination of scrap tire rubber particles with other materials to form higher value and higher performance composites. The process begins by grinding scrap tire to a fine particle size, and removing steel and fabric. The key to this approach is a proprietary surface-modification step which is critical for enhancing the compatibility with and bonding to other continuous phase matrix materials. Of all approaches for scrap tire rubber reuse, this approach offers the potential to recover (or save) the greatest amount of energy. Furthermore, this is the only approach which is clearly economically viable with current pricing and without a scrap tire tax. The process is environmentally innocuous, and capital requirements for large scale processing plants are projected to be modest. 7 figs.

  16. Reuse and Refactoring of GPU Kernels to Design Complex Applications Santonu Sarkar, Sayantan Mitra, Ashok Srinivasan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Ashok

    Reuse and Refactoring of GPU Kernels to Design Complex Applications Santonu Sarkar, Sayantan Mitra, Ashok Srinivasan Infosys Labs, Infosys Ltd. Bangalore 560100, India Email: {santonu sarkar01,sayantan

  17. Rig-site system allows water reuse, cuts cleanup costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neidhardt, D.

    1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A new well-site treatment system is described which extends the use of solids control equipment to help solve the common drilling problems of water supply and/or wastewater disposal. The new closed-loop system combines water treatment with more conventional solids handling to continuously create clean water. The results include: re-use of water for rig cleaning, mud, and even cement makeup with no need to eject liquid to the environment; greatly reduced water-input requirements; and division of the conventional wastewater pit into an active treatment operations pit and an overflow reserve pit for emergency storage.

  18. Asset Revitalization Guide for Asset Management and Reuse

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the objectives of the Order, the “Asset Revitalization (AR) Guide for Asset Management and Reuse” (AR Guide) was developed to assist DOE and NNSA sites and program offices offer unneeded assets with remaining capacity to the public or other government agencies. DOE continually refines strategies and tools, enabling it to share unique assets, including land, facilities, infrastructure, equipment, and technologies with the public. Real property planning, acquisition, sustainment, and disposal decisions are balanced to accomplish DOE’s mission; reduce risks to workers, the public, and the environment; and minimize lifecycle costs.

  19. Enterprise SRS Past Reuse Success | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof EnergyPublicArticle Enterprise SRS ArticlePast Reuse

  20. Community Energy Planning A Guide for Communities Volume 2 -...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volume 2 - The Community Energy Plan AgencyCompany Organization Natural Resources Canada Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency - Central Plant, Energy Efficiency,...

  1. Environmental assessment for the reuse of TNX as a multi-purpose pilot plant campus at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental and safety impacts of DOE planning to allow asset reuse of the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The proposed action would include providing for a location for the Centers of Excellence at or adjacent to SRS and entering into a cooperative agreement with a non-profit management and operations (management firm) contractor to operate and market the TNX facilities and equipment. The area (formerly TNX) would be called a Multi-Purpose Pilot Plant Campus (MPPC) and would be used: (1) as location for technology research, development, demonstration, and commercial operations; (2) to establish partnerships with industry to develop applied technologies for commercialization; and (3) serve as administrative headquarters for Centers of Excellence in the program areas of soil remediation, radioecology, groundwater contamination, and municipal solid waste minimization.

  2. Honolulu Community College 2014 Distinguished Alumni Awards Nomination Criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Community College in one of the four areas: Transportation and Trades Aeronautics Maintenance Technology

  3. DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED MATERIAL USING EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF LIGHTWEIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    1 DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED MATERIAL USING EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE an environmentally acceptable and economically beneficial reuse option for the management of dredged material is self/UPCYCLE Associates' technological and commercial approach focuses on the utilization of dredged material

  4. CO{sub 2} Reuse in Petrochemical Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Trembly; Brian Turk; Maruthi Pavani; Jon McCarty; Chris Boggs; Aqil Jamal; Raghubir Gupta

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To address public concerns regarding the consequences of climate change from anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is actively funding a CO{sub 2} management program to develop technologies capable of mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions from power plant and industrial facilities. Over the past decade, this program has focused on reducing the costs of carbon capture and storage technologies. Recently, DOE/NETL launched an alternative CO{sub 2} mitigation program focused on beneficial CO{sub 2} reuse to support the development of technologies that mitigate emissions by converting CO{sub 2} into valuable chemicals and fuels. RTI, with DOE/NETL support, has been developing an innovative beneficial CO{sub 2} reuse process for converting CO{sub 2} into substitute natural gas (SNG) by using by-product hydrogen (H{sub 2)-containing fuel gas from petrochemical facilities. This process leveraged commercial reactor technology currently used in fluid catalytic crackers in petroleum refining and a novel nickel (Ni)-based catalyst developed by RTI. The goal was to generate an SNG product that meets the pipeline specifications for natural gas, making the SNG product completely compatible with the existing natural gas infrastructure. RTI's technology development efforts focused on demonstrating the technical feasibility of this novel CO{sub 2} reuse process and obtaining the necessary engineering information to design a pilot demonstration unit for converting about 4 tons per day (tons/day) of CO{sub 2} into SNG at a suitable host site. This final report describes the results of the Phase I catalyst and process development efforts. The methanation activity of several commercial fixed-bed catalysts was evaluated under fluidized-bed conditions in a bench-scale reactor to identify catalyst performance targets. RTI developed two fluidizable Ni-based catalyst formulations (Cat-1 and Cat-3) that demonstrated equal or better performance than that of commercial methanation catalysts. The Cat-1 and Cat-3 formulations were successfully scaled up using commercial manufacturing equipment at the Sud-Chemie Inc. pilot-plant facility in Louisville, KY. Pilot transport reactor testing with RTI's Cat-1 formulation at Kellog Brown & Root's Technology Center demonstrated the ability of the process to achieve high single-pass CO{sub 2} conversion. Using information acquired from bench- and pilot-scale testing, a basic engineering design package was prepared for a 4-ton/day CO{sub 2} pilot demonstration unit, including process and instrumentation diagrams, equipment list, control philosophy, and preliminary cost estimate.

  5. Long-Term Need for New Nuclear Workers The SRS Community Reuse...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear industry capabilities in the nation. This region is at the forefront of new nuclear power production, environmental stewardship, innovative technology and national...

  6. A G E N D A Press Conference Savannah River Site Community Reuse Organization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8threbuildA ComprehensiveachAAAA G

  7. THEORY INTO PRACTICE PAG REGIONAL WORKFORCE STUDY PREPARED FOR THE SRS COMMUNITY REUSE ORGANIZATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...SuccessSurprisingSynchrotronsPlasmaSTANFORDTHEORY INTO

  8. Adaptive reuse and revitalization of water heritage in Nicosia, Cyprus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Marisa (Marisa May-Lan)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bi-communal sewerage system developed for the divided capital of Nicosia, Cyprus has been lauded as a rare example of cooperation between the Turkish Cypriot and Greek Cypriot communities. The story of how the project ...

  9. Boston's South Station : the process and consequences of preservation and reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenney, Daniel Gleason

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines some of the basic issues involved in the preservation and reuse of old buildings. In particular. the work is an exploration in three parts of the ways in which people perceive and respond to the general ...

  10. Considerations for understanding one`s cooling system prior to reuse water implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chmelovski, M.J. [Nalco Chemical Co., Naperville, IL (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water reuse situations are growing due to the need or desire to minimize water discharge from an industrial facility. Most of these applications are retrofits or system redesigns. Many times information is required to make decisions about the reuse application. Real-time or diagnostic studies provide improved information about the water systems. Addition of very low concentrations of a chemical tracer can provide improved information about the system. Useful and unique functions of chemical tracers are that they can provide one with the following information: system volume, quantifying previously unaccounted blowdown, holding time index, water distribution, leakage, and flowrate. These are important parameters when considering water reuse and system redesign. The chemical tracers discussed in this paper represent a significant improvement over compounds previously used in reuse applications.

  11. A preliminary examination of variables which influence the public acceptance of potable water reuse applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Michele Garteiser

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resource management in Texas is maturing from an era of project development to one of water supply management through conservation, reallocation, and reuse as a means of meeting water supply needs. As opportunities for conventional water...

  12. Cooling Water Systems - Energy Savings/Lower Costs By Reusing Cooling Tower Blowdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puckorius, P. R.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reuse of cooling tower blow down cannot only provide energy conservation, but can provide water conservation and chemical conservation. To be effective, it is critical that the water treatment program be coordinated with the treatment of the blow...

  13. Integration of public access : the adaptive re-use of Alcoa's waterworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsigounis, Simone

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is about the re-use of Alcoa's Waterworks. The exciting spatial attributes of the buildings which compose the plant, along with the views they offer to Manhattan, inspired the design of a journey through the ...

  14. CO Capture, Reuse, and Storage Technologies2 for Mitigating Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO Capture, Reuse, and Storage Technologies2 for Mitigating Global Climate Change A White Paper Final Report DOE Order No. DE-AF22-96PC01257 Energy Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 5. Geological Storage Technology

  15. Clean-out and Reuse of GCEP Facilities at Portsmouth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz, William; Hickman, Mark [LATA/Parallax Portsmouth, LLC, 3930 U.S. Rt. 23 South, P.O. Box 855, Piketon, Ohio 45661 (United States); Wiehle, Kristi [U.S. Department of Energy, Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, 3930 U.S. Rt. 23 South, P.O. Box 628, Piketon, Ohio 45661 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    PORTS began operations in 1956 to enrich uranium for both civilian and military use. It operated under Goodyear Atomic Corporation and Lockheed-Martin as a government-owned contractor-operated facility until the formation of the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as a government corporation in 1993. In 1998, USEC was privatized as a publicly traded corporation. USEC leases the Portsmouth and Paducah GDPs from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Enrichment operations were terminated at Portsmouth in 2001, although USEC continues to lease and maintain the Portsmouth GDP in Cold Shutdown and conduct some DOE projects there. LPP found that removal of old equipment to allow reuse of a facility can present unexpected challenges. Classified components create significant logistics issues. In this case, teamwork and attention to detail by USEC, LATA/Parallax, and DOE resulted in solutions and success. Lessons learnt: - Transportation logistics are particularly important when shipping waste streams with special requirements. - Investment in extra equipment yields tangible benefits where other resources (cleared drivers) are scarce. - An early start to providing specially qualified drivers, in this case providing security clearances, is essential. Availability is limited, and the time required to qualify new drivers may be lengthy. - A dedicated communications station, rather than reliance on existing resources (shift superintendent), is invaluable.

  16. Cave swallow (Petrochelidon fulva) nest reuse in east-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byerly, Margaret Elizabeth

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................................................................... 8 2 Number of Cave Swallow nests from each bridge used in analysis along with types and quantities of Barn, Cave, and Cliff Swallow nests present at all 19 study bridges during the 2003 breeding season... reuse, as Cliff Swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonata) (Brown and Brown 1986), Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica) (Samuel 1971, Shields 1984, Barclay 1988), and Cave Swallows (P. fulva) (Kosciuch 2002) all may reuse their mud nests. Collias and Collias...

  17. Design of Recycle/Reuse Networks with Thermal Effects and Variable Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavala Oseguera, Jose Guadalupe

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN OF RECYCLE/REUSE NETWORKS WITH THERMAL EFFECTS AND VARIABLE SOURCES A Thesis by JOSE GUADALUPE ZAVALA OSEGUERA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2009 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering DESIGN OF RECYCLE/REUSE NETWORKS WITH THERMAL EFFECTS AND VARIABLE SOURCES A Thesis by JOSE GUADALUPE ZAVALA OSEGUERA Submitted...

  18. Creating community connections : sociocultural constructionism and an asset-based approach to community technology and community building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinkett, Randal D. (Randal Dike), 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) Through this lens, I examine the early results of the project in the areas of community social capital and community cultural capital, based on quantitative and qualitative data resulting from direct observation, ...

  19. Community computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fulu, 1970-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we lay the foundations for a distributed, community-based computing environment to tap the resources of a community to better perform some tasks, either computationally hard or economically prohibitive, or ...

  20. Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson: Best Management Practice Case Study #14 - Alternate Water Sources (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the water reclamation and reuse program at the U.S. Army's Fort Carson.

  1. Energizing Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents Energize New York's tactics for building trust with community leaders and developing key relationships through social media platforms.

  2. Abstract --The energy saving potential of reusing / reselling personal computer (PC) devices was evaluated relative to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutowski, Timothy

    Abstract -- The energy saving potential of reusing / reselling personal computer (PC) devices personal computer device can lead to relative energy expenditure. We found that in certain scenarios, it is essential to assess the reuse of personal computer devices more critically, incorporating the different

  3. Route Throughput Analysis with Spectral Reuse for Multi-Rate Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    networks (MANETs) have received a lot of attention for its flexible network architecture. While many network (MANET) is a flexible and dynamic architecture that is attractive due to its ease in network1 Route Throughput Analysis with Spectral Reuse for Multi-Rate Mobile Ad Hoc Networks Lien-Wu Chen

  4. DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED ESTUARINE SEDIMENT: THE WESTINGHOUSE PLASMA VITRIFICATION PROCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED ESTUARINE SEDIMENT: THE WESTINGHOUSE PLASMA of the New York/New Jersey Harbor requires regular dredging. The offshore dumping facility has been closed, dredged material disposal, demonstration testing, process design. 1 McLaughlin, D. F., Fellow Engineer

  5. CMDB -Yet Another MIB? On Reusing Management Model Concepts in ITIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMDB - Yet Another MIB? On Reusing Management Model Concepts in ITIL Configuration Management|garschha|sailer|schaaf}@mnm-team.org Abstract. According to ITIL, a CMDB (Configuration Management Database), containing a logical model. To this end, a criteria catalog based on core CMDB concepts and basic information requirements of ITIL

  6. Exploiting Instruction Reuse to Enhance Microprocessor Simulation Ravi Bhargava, Lizy K. John, Francisco Matus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    Exploiting Instruction Reuse to Enhance Microprocessor Simulation Ravi Bhargava, Lizy K. John,ljohn,matusg@ece.utexas.edu Abstract The use of software simulation to model modern high-performance microprocessors is becoming increas- ingly challenging as microprocessors grow in complexity. Accurate and meaningful performance

  7. Recovery and reuse of cellulase catalyst in an enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, J.

    1987-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for recovering cellulase from the hydrolysis of cellulose, and reusing it in subsequent hydrolyois procedures. The process utilizes a commercial adsorbent that efficiently removes cellulase from reaction products which can be easily removed by simple decantation. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. Safety Cases for Software Application Reuse P Fenelon, T P Kelly, J A McDermid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    on an analysis of a reactor protection system. 1 Introduction There is a long-established principle. These principles have been applied retrospectively to the safety case for a reactor protection system (the Stage 9. These principles have been adopted in developing safety-critical software, but often only through the reuse of low

  9. Water conservation and reuse has become a major issue in aquacul-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Water conservation and reuse has become a major issue in aquacul- ture in recent years. Concern enhancing water circula- tion in ponds and developing intensive, recirculating tank sys- tems of water and lower invest- ment and production costs have contributed to the present expanse of pond

  10. The effects of the implementation of grey water reuse systems on construction cost and project schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaduvinal Varghese, Jeslin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of the United States due to their effects on construction cost and project schedules. Even though a project could get one or multiple points upon successful implementation of a grey water reuse system and conserving potable water, the following factors may have...

  11. A Product-Line Approach to Promote Asset Reuse in Multi-Agent Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Robyn R.

    lifecycle so that software assets can be reused in the development lifecycle and during system evolution. We a driving force in significantly reducing both the time and cost of software specification, development specification, development, maintenance and evolution. Industry's continuous demand for shorter software

  12. Information Reuse and System Integration in the Development of a Hurricane Simulation System*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    , the insurance industry was totally shaken to the tune of $15.5 billion losses caused by Hurricane Andrew [20Information Reuse and System Integration in the Development of a Hurricane Simulation System* Shu@fiu.edu * ©©©© 2003 IEEE Abstract - This paper presents our effort in designing and implementing an advanced hurricane

  13. Practices in the Creative Reuse of e-Waste Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankoff, Jennifer

    }@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT E-waste is a generic term embracing various forms of electric and electronic equipmentPractices in the Creative Reuse of e-Waste Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos Human-Computer Interaction that is loosely discarded, surplus, obsolete, or broken [27]. When e-waste is improperly discarded as trash

  14. The water concept in the self-sufficient house Drinking rainwater and reusing wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    the chance to do just that. Lack of drinking water hygiene is one of the main sources of disease transmissionThe water concept in the self-sufficient house Drinking rainwater and reusing wastewater Decentralized systems for drinking water processing could make a significant contribution to the Millennium

  15. Supporting Knowledge Reuse: A Field Study of Service Engineers in a High-Reliability Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutters, Wayne G.

    Supporting Knowledge Reuse: A Field Study of Service Engineers in a High-Reliability Organization. A senior service engineer is already on the phone with the ground crew. She has dropped all other jobs of minutes. The plane is still loaded and sitting at the gate. The engineers at TransGulf and at Global

  16. Supporting Knowledge Reuse: A Field Study of Service Engineers in a High-Reliability Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutters, Wayne G.

    Supporting Knowledge Reuse: A Field Study of Service Engineers in a High-Reliability Organization, lutters@ics.uci.edu Abstract This dissertation examines knowledge work in a high- reliability organization. Specifically, it explores the distributed problem solving behavior of service engineers, and their analytic

  17. REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE by Sukon of percolate from constructed wetland (CW) treating septage in agricultural application with the specific focus CW treating septage could exhibit positive responses of the plant growth which increase seed yield

  18. Empirical Comparison of Incremental Reuse Strategies in Genetic Programming for Keep-Away Soccer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    comparable or better overall fit- ness than monolithic simple GP. A key unresolved issue dealt with hybrid re achieved by identifying goals and fitness functions for subproblems of the overall problem. Solutions. In this paper, we compare monolithic (simple GP and GP with ADFs) and easy missions reuse to two types of GP

  19. T-696: RSA Adaptive Authentication Has Unspecified Remote Authenticated Session Re-use Flaw

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An issue with Adaptive Authentication (On-Premise) was discovered which in certain circumstances might affect the out-of-the-box available authentication methods. In certain circumstances, when authentication information is compromised, and with the knowledge of additional session information, the authentication information might be reused within an active session.

  20. Int. Symposium on Recycling and Reuse of Glass Cullet 19-20 March, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    Int. Symposium on Recycling and Reuse of Glass Cullet 19-20 March, 2001 University of Dundee, Scotland Recycled Glass ­ From Waste Material to Valuable Resource By Christian Meyer Department of Civil are finite. This awareness, coupled with the scarcity of suitable landfills, has led to the increasing

  1. SoC Energy Savings = Reduce+Reuse+Recycle: A Case Study Using a 660MHz DC-DC Converter with Integrated Output Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemieux, Guy

    SoC Energy Savings = Reduce+Reuse+Recycle: A Case Study Using a 660MHz DC-DC Converter, mehdia, samad, prp, shahriar } @ ece.ubc.ca Abstract ­ This paper advocates `reduce, reuse, recycle to emphasize reuse and recycling as well. We design a DC-DC buck converter to demonstrate the 3 techniques

  2. Issues for reuse of gloveboxes at LANL TA-55

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Pinson, P.A.; Miller, C.F.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of issues that face plutonium glovebox designers and users at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 55 (TA-55). Characterizing the issues is a step in the task of enhancing the next generation glovebox design to minimize waste streams while providing the other design functions. This report gives an initial assessment of eight important design and operation issues that can benefit from waste minimization.

  3. Communities: Human Health and Community Development Webinar ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Communities: Human Health and Community Development Webinar Communities: Human Health and Community Development Webinar May 1, 2014 5:00PM to 6:30PM EDT The multi-agency...

  4. Reducing the solid waste stream: reuse and recycling at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, K. L.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) increased its solid waste diversion by 365 percent over FY 1992 in five solid waste categories - paper, cardboard, wood, metals, and miscellaneous. (LLNL`s fiscal year is from October 1 to September 30.) LLNL reused/ recycled 6,387 tons of waste, including 340 tons of paper, 455 tons of scrap wood, 1,509 tons of metals, and 3,830 tons of asphalt and concrete (Table1). An additional 63 tons was diverted from landfills by donating excess food, selling toner cartridges for reconditioning, using rechargeable batteries, redirecting surplus equipment to other government agencies and schools, and comporting plant clippings. LLNL also successfully expanded its demonstration program to recycle and reuse construction and demolition debris as part of its facility-wide, comprehensive solid waste reduction programs.

  5. Tools for Reusing Earth Science Software Robert R. Downs", Neal F. Most#, James J. Marshall#, Chris A. Mattmann$%&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattmann, Chris

    ! ! ! ! Tools for Reusing Earth Science Software Robert R. Downs", Neal F. Most#, James J. Marshall.9 Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 USA James.J.Marshall@nasa.gov 3 Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute

  6. The highest and best use assessment of an adaptive reuse development : a former Agere Systems campus redevelopment plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Jin-Hsiao

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fix it up or give it up and start over? This interviews and case studies based research was conducted to determine important factors in a successful adaptive reuse development and applied them to a sizable and well maintained ...

  7. El Paso landscape perspective: Researchers study water conservation, plant-tolerance, and water reuse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, Danielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -largest city in Texas and the #26;#19;th-largest in the United States,? Michelsen said. El Paso landscape perspective Researchers study water conservation, plant-tolerance, and water reuse 16 tx H2O Summer 2011 El Paso landscape perspective Continued... ?Landscape irrigation typically accounts for half of annual residential water use,? he said. ?Finding and developing low water use, drought- and salt-tolerant plants are critical to conserving and protecting our limited freshwater supplies to ensure...

  8. Main changes to LHC layout for reuse as FCC-hh High Energy Booster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan Goddard; Werner Herr; Philippe Lebrun; Attilio Milanese

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reuse of the LHC is one option being investigated for a High Energy Booster for injection of 3.3 TeV protons (and heavy ions at equivalent rigidity) into the proposed 100 TeV centre of mass FCC-hh collider. In this note the major changes required to the LHC layout are listed, assuming beam transfer to the FCC collider is required from both LHC Points 1 and 8.

  9. Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norm Stanley

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

  10. Design of flexible manufacturing systems with reuse in a KB simulation environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovacs, G.L.; Kopacsi, S.; Kmecs, I. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Croatia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper object-oriented design and the reuse of FMS components in new applications using a hybrid simulation and scheduling system (SSS) will be introduced. The goal of this research is to provide methods and tools to build up FMS simulation models easily, fast and reliable. Simulation is one of the most effective tools for assisting in the design of FMS. SSS has been implemented as a combination of a traditional simulation language (SIMAN/Cinema) and an intelligent expert environment (G2). The application of the real-time, intelligent G2 environment points to one of our recent R&D goal, to intelligent, real-time control of FMS. Reuse in SIMAN/Cinema and in G2 will be analyzed separately and together in general, and in the context of FMS to get acceptable solutions, to build up new simulation models fast and reliable reusing elements of previous, different other models. The design methodology used for model development is based on the object-oriented Rational Rose CASE tool and on use-case design of the OOSE methodology.

  11. Lasting social impact : Community Development Venture Capital investing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silberberg, Hattie Paige

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Community Development Venture Capital Funds (CDVC) funds are an emerging group of Community Development Financial Institutions, that make equity investments in businesses in economically distressed areas. As equity investors, ...

  12. Community Commitment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIESCommitteeCommunity Community

  13. Community Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIESCommitteeCommunityCommunity

  14. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  15. Long-Term Need for New Nuclear Workers The SRS Community Reuse Organization (SRSCRO) Region of Georgia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenterLogging in Logging

  16. Guidance document for multi-facility recycle/reuse/free release of metals from radiological control areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogol, S.; Starke, T.

    1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 15% of the Low Level Waste (LLW) produced at Los Alamos consists of scrap metal equipment and materials. The majority of this material is produced by decommissioning and modification of existing facilities. To address this waste stream, Los Alamos has developed a scrap metal recycling program that is operated by the Environmental Stewardship Office to minimize the amount of LLW metal sent for LLW landfill disposal. Past practice has supported treating all waste metals generated within RCA`s as contaminated. Through the metal recycling project, ESO is encouraging the use of alternatives to LLW disposal. Diverting RSM from waste landfill, disposal protects the environment, reduces the cost of operation, and reduces the cost of maintenance and operation at landfill sites. Waste minimization efforts also results in a twofold economic reward: The RSM has a market value and decontamination reduces the volume and therefore the amount of the radioactive waste to be buried within landfills.

  17. Towards sustainable urban communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haapio, Appu, E-mail: appu.haapio@vtt.fi

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Requirements for the assessment tools of buildings have increased, assessing of building components or separate buildings is not enough. Neighbourhoods, built environment, public transportations, and services, should be considered simultaneously. Number of population living in urban areas is high and increasing rapidly. Urbanisation is a major concern due to its detrimental effects on the environment. The aim of this study is to clarify the field of assessment tools for urban communities by analysing the current situation. The focus is on internationally well known assessment tools; BREEAM Communities, CASBEE for Urban Development and LEED for Neigborhood Development. The interest towards certification systems is increasing amongst the authorities, and especially amongst the global investors and property developers. Achieved certifications are expected to bring measureable publicity for the developers. The assessment of urban areas enables the comparison of municipalities and urban areas, and notably supports decision making processes. Authorities, city planners, and designers would benefit most from the use of the tools during the decision making process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The urban assessment tools have strong linkage to the region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tools promote complementary building and retrofitting existing sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sharing knowledge and experiences is important in the development of the tools.

  18. Reducing biosolids disposal costs using land application in forested areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffines, R.L.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Switching biosolids land application from a reclamation site to a forested site significantly reduced the cost of biosolids disposal at the Savannah River Site. Previous beneficial reuse programs focused on reclamation of existing borrow pits. While extremely beneficial, this program became very costly due to the regulatory requirements for groundwater monitoring, soil monitoring and frequent biosolids analyses. A new program was developed to reuse biosolids in forested areas where the biosolids could be used as a soil conditioner and fertilizer to enhance timber yield. The forested land application site was designed so that groundwater monitoring and soil monitoring could be eliminated while biosolids monitoring and site maintenance were minimized. Monitoring costs alone were reduced by 80%. Capital costs for site preparation were also significantly reduced since there was no longer a need for expensive groundwater monitoring wells.

  19. Community, Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov1 COMMUNITY SHAREDCommunity,

  20. Beneficial reuse of oilfield waste outside of the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinello, S.A.; Herbert, B.F.; Lillo, H. [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    If a beneficial reuse of an oilfield waste can be found, that specific byproduct is no longer a waste, but a product. With such downstream use, the environmental liabilities of the former waste are, except for any packaging or transportation requirements, potentially eliminated. There is a problem, however, with the lack of an active infrastructure to implement the process. Some states have limited programs, but participation is a problem. It is apparent that a {open_quotes}Waste Clearinghouse{close_quotes} addressing oilfield waste in conjunction with major industrial waste and feed streams is needed, but implementation remains in the future. An active network of participating suppliers and users would be the goal of such action. The benefits for industry would be a reduction in waste disposal and associated liabilities and {open_quotes}virgin{close_quotes} feedstock requirements. From the operators viewpoint, this scenario would require a compilation of the different waste/byproduct streams and their characteristics and a prioritizing of those wastes by characteristics that might affect their reuse potential. These might include: (1) the greatest likelihood of finding a market; (2) the highest potential waste volume reduction; (3) the highest cost of disposal and (4) the greatest associated hazards. For the industry as a whole, an inventorying of these byproducts and characteristics would be tied to the identification of consumers/outlets for specific byproducts. This might be accomplished through the funding of consultants/contractors specializing in clearinghouse activities and/or research into potential applications and uses. The industry needs to change it`s view of waste/byproduct streams in order to be more aware of potential downstream uses. Existing examples of reuse can be used as models for further efforts.

  1. Reusing Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources Resources About1 Sign In About | Careers

  2. Community Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov1 COMMUNITY SHARED SOLAR

  3. annapurna conservation area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contains several scientifically interesting geologic features and plant communities and rare plants and animals in a compact area. Author Glenn Patrick Juday is associate...

  4. area hot embossing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contains several scientifically interesting geologic features and plant communities and rare plants and animals in a compact area. Author Glenn Patrick Juday is associate...

  5. area vadose zone: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contains several scientifically interesting geologic features and plant communities and rare plants and animals in a compact area. Author Glenn Patrick Juday is associate...

  6. Investigation of a pulsed current annealing method in reusing MOSFET dosimeters for in vivo IMRT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Guang-Wen; Qi, Zhen-Yu, E-mail: qizhy@sysucc.org.cn; Deng, Xiao-Wu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)] [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of pulsed current annealing in reusing metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters forin vivo intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry. Methods: Several MOSFETs were irradiated atd{sub max} using a 6 MV x-ray beam with 5 V on the gate and annealed with zero bias at room temperature. The percentage recovery of threshold voltage shift during multiple irradiation-annealing cycles was evaluated. Key dosimetry characteristics of the annealed MOSFET such as the dosimeter's sensitivity, reproducibility, dose linearity, and linearity of response within the dynamic range were investigated. The initial results of using the annealed MOSFETs for IMRT dosimetry practice were also presented. Results: More than 95% of threshold voltage shift can be recovered after 24-pulse current continuous annealing in 16 min. The mean sensitivity degradation was found to be 1.28%, ranging from 1.17% to 1.52%, during multiple annealing procedures. Other important characteristics of the annealed MOSFET remained nearly consistent before and after annealing. Our results showed there was no statistically significant difference between the annealed MOSFETs and their control samples in absolute dose measurements for IMRT QA (p = 0.99). The MOSFET measurements agreed with the ion chamber results on an average of 0.16% ± 0.64%. Conclusions: Pulsed current annealing provides a practical option for reusing MOSFETs to extend their operational lifetime. The current annealing circuit can be integrated into the reader, making the annealing procedure fully automatic.

  7. community | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifang SwisselectronicXianEquipments Jump to:community

  8. community.layout2.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COMMUNITY COMMITMENT PLAN LANS COMMUNITY MODEL FOUNDATION Mutually Bene cial Regional Sustainable Education Investments Community Giving Investments Economic Development...

  9. Cost Effective Recovery of Low-TDS Frac Flowback Water for Re-use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claire Henderson; Harish Acharya; Hope Matis; Hareesh Kommepalli; Brian Moore; Hua Wang

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The project goal was to develop a cost-effective water recovery process to reduce the costs and envi-ronmental impact of shale gas production. This effort sought to develop both a flowback water pre-treatment process and a membrane-based partial demineralization process for the treatment of the low-Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) portion of the flowback water produced during hydrofracturing operations. The TDS cutoff for consideration in this project is < 35,000 {approx} 45,000 ppm, which is the typical limit for economic water recovery employing reverse osmosis (RO) type membrane desalination processes. The ultimate objective is the production of clean, reclaimed water suitable for re-use in hydrofracturing operations. The team successfully compiled data on flowback composition and other attributes across multiple shale plays, identified the likely applicability of membrane treatment processes in those shales, and expanded the proposed product portfolio to include four options suitable for various reuse or discharge applications. Pretreatment technologies were evaluated at the lab scale and down-selected based upon their efficacy in removing key contaminants. The chosen technologies were further validated by performing membrane fouling studies with treated flowback water to demonstrate the technical feasibility of flowback treatment with RO membranes. Process flow schemes were constructed for each of the four product options based on experimental performance data from actual flowback water treatment studies. For the products requiring membrane treatment, membrane system model-ing software was used to create designs for enhanced water recovery beyond the typical seawater desalination benchmark. System costs based upon vendor and internal cost information for all process flow schemes were generated and are below target and in line with customer expectations. Finally, to account for temporal and geographic variability in flowback characteristics as well as local disposal costs and regulations, a parametric value assessment tool was created to assess the economic attractiveness of a given flowback recovery process relative to conventional disposal for any combination of anticipated flowback TDS and local disposal cost. It is concluded that membrane systems in combination with appropriate pretreatment technologies can provide cost-effective recovery of low-TDS flow-back water for either beneficial reuse or safe surface discharge.

  10. Learning Communities Peer Mentor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    , focused communities in which students, staff, and faculty can learn and grow together. Intended Outcomes Experience -Student Evaluations Archive Materials -Reflections of Previous Peer Mentors -Learning Community Activities -Student Evaluation Archives -Former Mentor Contact list #12;Learning Communities Vision Statement

  11. 104 October 1996/Vol. 39, No. 10 COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM LTHOUGH reuse is assumed to be especially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basili, Victor R.

    in an OO framework in light of currently available technology. Data was collected for four months against a quantitative and objective base- line of comparison. Software reuse can help produce quality a reusable artifact · Adapting it to the purpose of the application · Integrating it into the software

  12. Integrating Software Process Reuse and Automation Emmanuelle Rouill, Benot Combemale, Olivier Barais, David Touzet and Jean-Marc Jzquel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Integrating Software Process Reuse and Automation Emmanuelle Rouillé, Benoît Combemale, Olivier that captures their commonalities and variabilities) and automating their execution is a way to reduce is to automate the execution of a process whose variability is only partially resolved (i.e., a value is not set

  13. Article DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0394.2012.00631.x Reusing knowledge in embedded systems modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieringa, Roel

    ) Neopost Technologies, Drachten, The Netherlands Email: Y.Lucas@neopost.com Abstract: Model-based design. Keywords: model-based design, plant modelling, reuse 1. Introduction Embedded software is part of a larger the parts of the composite system outside the embedded software the plant. The purpose of the embedded

  14. DRAFT - DOE G 430.1-8, Asset Revitalization Initiative Guide for Sustainable Asset Management and Reuse

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The Guide is intended to assist sites in sustainable planning, management, and reuse of assets that allows effective mission execution, optimizes federal and public resources, and supports local and national goals for economic growth and diversification in support of DOE O 430.1B.

  15. 978-1-4244-2794-9/09/$25.00 2009 IEEE SMC 2009 Open and Scalable Accumulation and Reuse of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Cheng

    978-1-4244-2794-9/09/$25.00 ©2009 IEEE SMC 2009 Open and Scalable Accumulation and Reuse of Common-intensive systems. A new method, called Modelbase, accumulates reusable models (e.g., information, mathematical resources. Every significant company can be assumed to have accumulated a vast amount of slides (charts

  16. Evaluation of Membrane Treatment Technology to Optimize and Reduce Hypersalinity Content of Produced Brine for Reuse in Unconventional Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eboagwu, Uche

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 18 billion barrels of waste fluids are generated annually from oil and gas production in the United States. As a large amount of water is used for oilfield operations, treating and reusing produced water can cut the consumption of fresh water...

  17. Radiation dose assessments to support evaluations of radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of materials and equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing Environmental Protection Support and Assistance to the USDOE, Office of Environmental Guidance. Air, Water, and Radiation Division. As part of this effort, PNL is collecting data and conducting technical evaluations to support DOE analyses of the feasibility of developing radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of metals, concrete, or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The radiological control levels will be risk-based, as developed through a radiation exposure scenario and pathway analysis. The analysis will include evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and both health and non-health-related impacts. The main objective of this report is to develop a methodology for establishing radiological control levels for recycle or reuse. This report provides the results of the radiation exposure scenario and pathway analyses for 42 key radionuclides generated during DOE operations that may be contained in metals or equipment considered for either recycling or reuse. The scenarios and information developed by the IAEA. Application of Exemption Principles to the Recycle and Reuse of Materials from Nuclear Facilities, are used as the initial basis for this study. The analyses were performed for both selected worker populations at metal smelters and for the public downwind of a smelter facility. Doses to the public downwind were estimated using the US (EPA) CAP88-PC computer code with generic data on atmospheric dispersion and population density. Potential non-health-related effects of residual activity on electronics and on film were also analyzed.

  18. FOILFEST :community enabled security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Judy Hennessey; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Whitley, John B.; Drayer, Darryl Donald; Cummings, John C., Jr. (.,; .)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Concepts Group of Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop, ''FOILFest: Community Enabled Security'', on July 18-21, 2005, in Albuquerque, NM. This was a far-reaching look into the future of physical protection consisting of a series of structured brainstorming sessions focused on preventing and foiling attacks on public places and soft targets such as airports, shopping malls, hotels, and public events. These facilities are difficult to protect using traditional security devices since they could easily be pushed out of business through the addition of arduous and expensive security measures. The idea behind this Fest was to explore how the public, which is vital to the function of these institutions, can be leveraged as part of a physical protection system. The workshop considered procedures, space design, and approaches for building community through technology. The workshop explored ways to make the ''good guys'' in public places feel safe and be vigilant while making potential perpetrators of harm feel exposed and convinced that they will not succeed. Participants in the Fest included operators of public places, social scientists, technology experts, representatives of government agencies including DHS and the intelligence community, writers and media experts. Many innovative ideas were explored during the fest with most of the time spent on airports, including consideration of the local airport, the Albuquerque Sunport. Some provocative ideas included: (1) sniffers installed in passage areas like revolving door, escalators, (2) a ''jumbotron'' showing current camera shots in the public space, (3) transparent portal screeners allowing viewing of the screening, (4) a layered open/funnel/open/funnel design where open spaces are used to encourage a sense of ''communitas'' and take advantage of citizen ''sensing'' and funnels are technological tunnels of sensors (the tunnels of truth), (5) curved benches with blast proof walls or backs, (6) making it easy for the public to report, even if not sure/''non-event'' (e.g. ''I'm uncomfortable'') and processing those reports in aggregate not individually, (7) transforming the resident working population into a part-time undercover security/sensor force through more innovative training and (8) adding ambassadors/security that engage in unexpected conversation with the public. The group recommended that we take actions to pursue the following ideas next: (a) A concept for a mobile sensor transport (JMP); (b) Conduct a follow-on workshop; (c) Conduct social experiments/activities to see how people would react to the concepts related to community and security; (d) Explore further aesthetically pleasing, blast-resistance seating areas; and (e) The Art of Freedom (an educational, multi-media campaign).

  19. Effort minimization in UI development by reusing existing DGML based UI design for qualitative software development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suri, P K

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the methodology for achieving the user interface design reusability of a qualitative software system and effort minimization by applying the inference on the stored design documents. The pictorial design documents are stored in a special format in the form of keyword text [DGML tag based design]. The design document storage mechanism will expose the keywords per design stored. This methodology is having an inference engine. Inference mechanism search for the requirements and find the match for them in the available design repository. A match found will success in reusing it after checking the quality parameters of the found design module in the result set. DGML notations produces qualitative designs which helps in minimizing the efforts of software development life cycle.

  20. Green Communities Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The Green Communities Grant Program is not currently accepting applications. The application deadline to receive a Green Communities designation was October 17, 2014. For designated...

  1. CT Clean Energy Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance & Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

  2. CT Clean Energy Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

  3. Functional gene array-based analysis of microbial community structure in groundwaters with a gradient of contaminant levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldron, P.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    communities for bioremediation. Detection, characterizationextensive research in the bioremediation of heavy metals duefor successful bioremediation of this area. Despite the

  4. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  5. Redeveloping Lawrence, Massachusetts' [sic] Historic Mill District : insights into adaptive reuse in untested residential markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Heather, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence, Massachusetts is one of a number of post-industrial cities in the northeastern United States that has the potential to convert underutilized industrial buildings into a valuable community asset, namely housing. ...

  6. Right-Sized Reuse - Use a Systematic Process, and Design for a Specialized, Yet Flexible Result - 13558

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cusick, Lesley T. [Restoration Services, Inc. - RSI, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)] [Restoration Services, Inc. - RSI, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Schiesswohl, Steven R. [Pheasant Tail Consulting LLC, Boulder Colorado (United States)] [Pheasant Tail Consulting LLC, Boulder Colorado (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of transferring real property from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is always the same - except when it's not. The most frequently asked questions in the process are: how can this take so long and be so complex, and why is it different every time? The process of transferring real property from the Department of Energy is always the same - except when it's not. Repeat as needed. The authority for DOE to transfer property is found in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA). Specifically, the transfer of real property for mission-related purposes is done pursuant to the AEA Section 161(g). Another rule that can provide certain unique benefits to the transferee is found in 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 770, Transfer of Real Property at Defense Nuclear Facilities for Economic Development; it can be followed for economic development purposes at defense nuclear facilities. All federal real property transfers include at minimum a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review and a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) chap. 120(h) environmental due diligence evaluation. The end-point objective is to be able to demonstrate that a transfer is protective of human health and the environment - typically attained via a risk evaluation. That's it...mostly. None of these requirements are new; their processes are well-known. So, why is it different every time there is a transfer and what can be done to move things along? Time and the perception of open-ended schedules kill projects. Economic development projects that are proposed by Community Reuse Organizations (CROs) and others or by parties who need private capital are especially time-sensitive. It is not reasonable to expect business interests or investors to wait two years while the property transfer process is carried out. Lenders are also risk-sensitive and not solely business-risk sensitive. After all, these are federal properties where contamination is a factor. What are some of the things you can do to address those time and risk issues? Issues of time and complexity arise from several variables. Short-sighted vision and lack of project definition lead to wasted effort and lengthy delays. Some variability on the input side of the process can be controlled in a way that will save you time and actually work to your advantage. Steps can be taken to systematize the transfer process on the agency's part and on the requester/grantee's part. Having the right mix of dedicated people from the beginning, planning with flexibility, coordinating with the clean-up program at your site, knowing the interests and issues of your stakeholders, and working with the CRO/economic development authorities - all of these measures and others can and will help you. The key is not simply knowing the steps and making a punch-list, but understanding the steps and how to work with and use them. These concepts can be applied to create a vision of success for those engaged in real property transfer. (authors)

  7. Cost and Performance Report for the ASTD Reuse of Concrete Within DOE from D&D Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamboj, S.; Arnish, J.; Chen, S. Y.; Phillips, Ann Marie; Meservey, Richard Harlan; Tripp, Julia Lynn

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This cost and performance report describes the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment project that developed the Protocol for Development of Authorized Release Limits for Concrete at U.S. DOE Sites, which identifies the steps for obtaining approval to reuse concrete from Deactivation and Decommissioning of facilities. This protocol compares the risk and cost of various disposition paths for the concrete and follows the authorized release approach described in the DOE's draft handbook, Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material. This approach provides for the development of authorized release limits through a series of prescribed steps before approval for release is granted. A case study was also completed on a previously decommissioned facility.

  8. Community Economic Profile In the southern United States, communities with in-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    and Clay counties are near the Jacksonville metropolitan area, and while they contain some of the city, are nationally recognized as Tree City USA communities. These counties are for- tunate to contain areas and nearby forests may be able to consider using woody biomass to generate energy. A vari- ety of other

  9. Radiation Impact of Very Low Level Radioactive Steel Reused in Building Industry with Emphasis on External Exposure Pathway - 12569

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panik, Michal; Hrncir, Tomas; Necas, Vladimir [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable quantities of various materials are accumulated during the decommissioning process of nuclear installations. Some of arising materials are activated or contaminated. However, many of them continue to have an economic value and exist in a form that can be recycled or reused for special purposes. Furthermore much of the material generated during decommissioning process will contain only small amounts of radionuclides. For these materials there exist environmental and economic incentives to maximize the use of the concept of clearance from further regulatory control. This impact analysis is devoted to mentioned incentives. The aim is to conditionally clear maximum amount of the scrap steel and consequently recycle and reuse it in form of reinforcing components in tunnel and bridge building scenarios. Recent calculations relevant for external exposure pathway indicate that concept of conditional clearance represent a feasible option for the management of radioactive materials. Even in chosen specific industrial applications it is possible to justify new, approximately one order of magnitude higher, clearance levels. However analysis of other possible exposure pathways relevant for particular scenario of reuse of conditionally cleared materials has to be performed in order to confirm indications from partially obtained results. Basically, the concept of conditional clearance can bring two basic benefits. Firstly it is saving of considerable funds, which would be otherwise used for treatment, conditioning and disposal of materials at appropriate radioactive waste repository. Moreover materials with intrinsic value (particularly metals) can be recycled and reused in industrial applications instead of investing resources on mining and production process in order to obtain new, 'fresh' materials. (authors)

  10. Community College Institute (CCI) Program Description The Community...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community College Institute (CCI) Program Description The Community College Internship (CCI) program seeks to encourage community college students to enter technical careers...

  11. Preozonation of primary-treated municipal wastewater for reuse in biofuel feedstock generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondala, Andro H.; Hernandez, Rafael; French, William Todd; Estevez, L. Antonio; Meckes, Mark; Trillo, Marlene; Hall, Jacqueline

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a laboratory scale investigation on ozone pretreatment of primary-treated municipal wastewater for potential reuse in fermentation processes for the production of biofuels and bio-based feedstock chemicals were presented. Semi-batch preozonation with 3.0% (w/w) ozone at 1 L min -1 resulted into a considerable inactivation of the indigenous heterotrophic bacteria in the wastewater with less than 0.0002% comprising the ozone-resistant fraction of the microbial population. The disinfection process was modeled using first-order inactivation kinetics with a rate constant of 4.39 Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 10 -3 s -1. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels were reduced by 30% in 1-h experiments. COD depletion was also modeled using a pseudo-first-order kinetics at a rate constant of 9.50 Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 10 -5 s -1. Biological oxygen demand (BOD 5) values were reduced by 60% up to 20 min of ozonation followed by a plateau and some slight increases attributed to partial oxidation of recalcitrant materials. Ozone also had no substantial effect on the concentration of ammonium and phosphate ions, which are essential for microbial growth and metabolism. Preliminary tests indicated that oleaginous microorganisms could be cultivated in the ozonated wastewater, resulting in relatively higher cell densities than in raw wastewater and comparable results with autoclave-sterilized wastewater. This process could potentially produce significant quantities of oil for biofuel production from municipal wastewater streams.

  12. Thermokinetic/mass-transfer analysis of carbon capture for reuse/sequestration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stechel, Ellen Beth; Brady, Patrick Vane; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Luketa, Anay Josephine

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective capture of atmospheric carbon is a key bottleneck preventing non bio-based, carbon-neutral production of synthetic liquid hydrocarbon fuels using CO{sub 2} as the carbon feedstock. Here we outline the boundary conditions of atmospheric carbon capture for recycle to liquid hydrocarbon fuels production and re-use options and we also identify the technical advances that must be made for such a process to become technically and commercially viable at scale. While conversion of atmospheric CO{sub 2} into a pure feedstock for hydrocarbon fuels synthesis is presently feasible at the bench-scale - albeit at high cost energetically and economically - the methods and materials needed to concentrate large amounts of CO{sub 2} at low cost and high efficiency remain technically immature. Industrial-scale capture must entail: (1) Processing of large volumes of air through an effective CO{sub 2} capture media and (2) Efficient separation of CO{sub 2} from the processed air flow into a pure stream of CO{sub 2}.

  13. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  14. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  15. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References by WebsitehomeResearch Areas

  16. Ark-Tex Area Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ark-Tex Council of Governments

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ? 30 corridor. The transportation network in the Ark-Tex area is managed and operated through two transit providers, a variety of organizations that provide or fund transportation in support of their primary programs (including public entities... and Texarkana proper. 3. Ark-Tex Area Agency on Aging (AAA) ? Senior transportation throughout the service area to meals and other services. 4. Northeast Texas Community College ? Service from Mt. Pleasant to the community college is provided by TRAX...

  17. AMALGAMATED SECURITY COMMUNITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Andrew Stephen

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the process of the formation and dissolution of Amalgamated Security Communities, a topic that has been ignored by the academic community except as a side note when the origins of Pluralistic ...

  18. ENDOPHYTIC FUNGAL COMMUNITIES OF BROMUS TECTORUM: MUTUALISMS, COMMUNITY ASSEMBLAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENDOPHYTIC FUNGAL COMMUNITIES OF BROMUS TECTORUM: MUTUALISMS, COMMUNITY ASSEMBLAGES in Environmental Science and titled "ENDOPHYTIC FUNGAL COMMUNITIES OF BROMUS TECTORUM: MUTUALISMS, COMMUNITY with endophytic fungi. Cheatgrass populations were sampled across North America and endophytes were isolated from

  19. COMMUNITY PROFILE Greenland, New Hampshire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    GREENLAND COMMUNITY PROFILE REPORT Greenland, New Hampshire February 3 & 4, 2006 #12;TABLE......................................................................................................................................3 Creating a Community Profile in Greenland

  20. School and Community Psychology Division of Theoretical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    School and Community Psychology Division of Theoretical and Behavioral Foundations College of Education Detroit, MI 48202 Phone: (313) 577-1614 Fax: (313) 577-5235 SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM The Wayne State University Educational Psychology Program Area offers a graduate program in School

  1. Wireless Social Community Networks: A Game-Theoretic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marbach, Peter

    Wireless Social Community Networks: A Game-Theoretic Analysis Mohammad Hossein Manshaei, Julien: marbach@cs.toronto.edu Abstract--Wireless social community networks have been cre- ated as an alternative to cellular wireless networks to provide wireless data access in urban areas. By relying on access points

  2. Factors Associated with Ethnic Minority Human Service Utilization: A Community and Organizational Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vu, Catherine M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    American mental health service utilization. Community Mentalthe use of mental health services in poverty areas. AmericanD.E. (1999). Mental health service utilization by African

  3. An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-Traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Rodgers; James Castle

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assessed opportunities for improving water quality associated with coal-fired power generation including the use of non-traditional waters for cooling, innovative technology for recovering and reusing water within power plants, novel approaches for the removal of trace inorganic compounds from ash pond effluents, and novel approaches for removing biocides from cooling tower blowdown. This research evaluated specifically designed pilot-scale constructed wetland systems for treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters for reuse in thermoelectric power generation and other purposes. The overall objective of this project was to decrease targeted constituents in non-traditional waters to achieve reuse criteria or discharge limitations established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Clean Water Act (CWA). The six original project objectives were completed, and results are presented in this final technical report. These objectives included identification of targeted constituents for treatment in four non-traditional water sources, determination of reuse or discharge criteria for treatment, design of constructed wetland treatment systems for these non-traditional waters, and measurement of treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters, as well as determination of the suitability of the treated non-traditional waters for reuse or discharge to receiving aquatic systems. The four non-traditional waters used to accomplish these objectives were ash basin water, cooling water, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water, and produced water. The contaminants of concern identified in ash basin waters were arsenic, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. Contaminants of concern in cooling waters included free oxidants (chlorine, bromine, and peroxides), copper, lead, zinc, pH, and total dissolved solids. FGD waters contained contaminants of concern including arsenic, boron, chlorides, selenium, mercury, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and zinc. Similar to FGD waters, produced waters contained contaminants of concern that are predominantly inorganic (arsenic, cadmium, chlorides, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, sulfide, zinc, total dissolved solids), but also contained some organics (benzene, PAHs, toluene, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and oil and grease). Constituents of concern that may cause chemical scaling, biofouling and corrosion, such as pH, hardness and ionic strength, and nutrients (P, K, and N) may also be found in all four non-traditional waters. NPDES permits were obtained for these non-traditional waters and these permit limits are summarized in tabular format within this report. These limits were used to establish treatment goals for this research along with toxicity values for Ceriodaphnia dubia, water quality criteria established by the US EPA, irrigation standards established by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and reuse standards focused on minimization of damage to the power plant by treated waters. Constructed wetland treatment systems were designed for each non-traditional water source based on published literature reviews regarding remediation of the constituents of concern, biogeochemistry of the specific contaminants, and previous research. During this study, 4 non-traditional waters, which included ash basin water, cooling water, FGD water and produced water (PW) were obtained or simulated to measure constructed wetland treatment system performance. Based on data collected from FGD experiments, pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems can decrease aqueous concentrations of elements of concern (As, B, Hg, N, and Se). Percent removal was specific for each element, including ranges of 40.1% to 77.7% for As, 77.6% to 97.8% for Hg, 43.9% to 88.8% for N, and no measureable removal to 84.6% for Se. Other constituents of interest in final outflow samples should have aqueous characteristics sufficient for discharge, with the exception of chlorides (<2000 mg/L). Based on total dissolved solids, co-

  4. Transforming stand-alone expert system into a community of cooperating agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennings, N R; Aarnts, R P; Fuchs, J; Skarek, Paul

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed Artificial Intelligence (DAI) systems in which multiple problem solving agents cooperate to achieve a common objective is a rapidly emerging and promising technology. However, as yet, there have been relatively few reported cases of such systems being employed to tackle real-world problems in realistic domains. One of the reasons for this is that DAI researchers have given virtually no consideration to the process of incorporating pre-existing systems into a community of cooperating agents. Yet reuse is a primary consideration for any organisation with a large software base. To redress the balance, this paper reports on an experiment undertaken at the CERN laboratories, in which two pre-existing and standalone expert systems for diagnosing faults in a particle accelerator were transformed into a community of cooperating agents. The experiences and insights gained during this process provide a valuable first step towards satisfying the needs of potential users of DAI technology - identifying the ty...

  5. areas united states: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and sequestration by trees in urban and community areas of the United States David J forestry Tree cover Forest inventory a b s t r a c t Carbon storage and sequestration by urban...

  6. Why Microbial Communities?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, Jim (PNNL)

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Microbial Communities Initiative is a 5-year investment by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that integrates biological/ecological experimentation, analytical chemistry, and simulation modeling. The objective is to create transforming technologies, elucidate mechanistic forces, and develop theoretical frameworks for the analysis and predictive understanding of microbial communities. Dr. Fredrickson introduces the symposium by defining microbial communities and describing their scientific relevance as they relate to solving problems in energy, climate, and sustainability.

  7. West Central North East Area of Tucson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    a, b) in urbanized areas. The Tucson Hummingbird Project (THP) is a citizen-science, reconciliation for migrating ones. Citizen Science and OutreachCitizen Science and Outreach The latter was achieved with citizen scientists via large-scale outreach to the local community. Projects such as the THP can

  8. Community Relations Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Permittees and the public are documented during the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Community Relations Plan development. Contact Environmental Communication & Public...

  9. area bird community: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    significantly varied along the forest management cycle. Seven new species appeared after harvest, but the total number did not vary by the end of the forest management cycle, and...

  10. OpenEI Community - Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff thedrivingGiven Utility

  11. Supplemental Release Limits for the Directed Reuse of Steel in Road Barriers and Lead in Shielding Products by the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, RL

    2006-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle (NMR) proposes to define and implement a complex-wide directed reuse strategy for surplus radiologically impacted lead (Pb) and steel as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's commitment to the safe and cost-effective recycle or reuse of excess materials and equipment across the DOE complex. NMR will, under this proposal, act on behalf of the DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Technical Program Integration (specifically EM-22), as the Department's clearinghouse for DOE surplus lead, steel and products created from these materials by developing and maintaining a cost-effective commercially-based contaminated lead and steel recycle program. It is NMR's intention, through this directed reuse strategy, to mitigate the adverse environmental and economic consequences of managing surplus lead and steel as a waste within the complex. This approach promotes the safe and cost-effective reuse of scrap metals in support of the Department's goals of resource utilization, energy conservation, pollution prevention and waste minimization. This report discusses recommendations for supplemental radiological release limits for the directed reuse of contaminated lead and steel by the DOE within the nuclear industry. The limits were originally selected from the American National Standards Institute and Health Physics Society standard N13.12 titled ''Surface and Volume Radioactivity Standards for Clearance'' (Health Physics Society, 1999) but were subsequently modified as a result of application-specific issues. Both the health and measurement implications from the adoption and use of the limits for directed reuse scenarios are discussed within this report.

  12. Community is Live!! | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCityCoatedCommunity ElectricPreliminaryCommunity is Live!!

  13. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  14. Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

  15. Your Community With Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powering Your Community With Solar: Overcoming Market and Implementation Barriers Lessons from successful Solarize campaigns help communities seize volume discounts through collective purchasing The first Solarize program began in Portland, Oregon, as a grassroots campaign for collective SunShot will work

  16. Reclaiming a valuable, clean resource Texas cities increasingly embracing potable reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in this increased interest, Dr. Ellen McDonald, a principal at Alan Plummer Associates, Inc., said because of research conducted over the last #29;#30; to #29;#26; years, the research and profes- sional community has become more comfortable with the fact... disease and to remove organic and inorganic compounds that might be toxic,? he said. #27;e treatment processes used at the Big Spring plant ?have been tested and used elsewhere and shown to be e#21;ective,? McDonald said. As interest in direct...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - area washington volume Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    perfect model59 studies with the Community Climate System Model version 4... -Arctic sea ice area or volume (henceforth refered to as just area93 or volume) and the indexes j...

  18. Community Energy Planning A Resource Guide for Remote Communities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Canada Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Energy Planning A Resource Guide for Remote Communities in Canada AgencyCompany Organization Natural Resources Canada Sector...

  19. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  20. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  1. Using the Conceptual Site Model to Remediate Two Sites in New England and Reach License Termination and Site Reuse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glucksberg, Nadia; Peters, Jay [MACTEC Engineering and Consulting, Inc., Portland, Maine, 04112 and Wakefield, Massachusetts, 01880 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Conceptual Site Model (CSM) is a powerful tool for understanding the link between contamination sources, cleanup objectives, and ultimate site reuse. The CSM describes the site setting, geology, hydrogeology, potential sources, release mechanisms and migration pathways of contaminants. The CSM is needed to understand the extent of contamination and how receptors may be exposed to both radiological and chemical constituents. A key component of the CSM that is often overlooked concerns how the regulatory requirements drive remediation and how each has to be integrated into the CSM to ensure that all stakeholder requirements are understood and addressed. This paper describes how the use of the CSM helped reach closure and reuse at two facilities in Connecticut that are pursuing termination of their Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. The two facilities are the Combustion Engineering Site, located in Windsor, Connecticut, (CE Windsor Site) and the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, located in Haddam Neck, Connecticut (CYAPCO). The closure of each of these facilities is regulated by four agencies: - Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - which requires cleanup levels for radionuclides to be protective of public health; - US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) - which requires cleanup levels for chemicals to be protective of public health and the environment; - Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) Bureau of Air Management, Radiation Division - which requires cleanup levels for radionuclides to be protective of public health; and - Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) Bureau of Water Protection and Land Reuse - which requires cleanup levels for chemicals to be protective of public health and the environment. Some of the radionuclides at the CE Windsor Site are also regulated under the Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) under the Army Corps of Engineers. The remainder of this paper presents the similarities and differences between the CSMs for these two sites and how each site used the CSM to reach closure. Although each of these site have unique histories and physical features, the CSM approach was used to understand the geology, hydrogeology, migration and exposure pathways, and regulatory requirements to successfully characterize and plan closure of the sites. A summary of how these attributes affected site closure is provided.

  2. Community Energy Stategic Planning Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Community Energy Strategic Planning Resources Technical Assistance Program January 24 th , 2013 2 Agenda 1. Welcome & overview 2. What is a community energy strategic plan and why...

  3. Community-oriented information integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsis, Ioannis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.6.1 Community-oriented Integration . . 2.6.2Chapter 5 Integration Conclusions and FutureFigure Community-oriented Integration Architecture . . . .

  4. Community Capacity Building, Community Development and Health: A Case Study of ‘Health Issues in the Community’ 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Richard

    This research project aimed to further knowledge regarding the relationship between community capacity building (CCB), community development and health within the context of the Health Issues in the Community (HIIC) ...

  5. Community Feature Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIESCommitteeCommunity CommunityCommunity

  6. Recycling Guide: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Recycling Information Call 301-496-7990 or visit the NEMS Website at http://www.nems.nih.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Recycling Guide: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Recycling Information ­ Call 301-496-7990 or visit the NEMS in COMMINGLED bin Rinse food/beverage containers before recycling No Pyrex or Styrofoam Printer and Copier Toner Cartridges in TONER CARTRIDGE bin Recycle packaging material in appropriate bin NIH charities

  7. Reuse Tools to Help Enable Climate Research in NASA Missions Chris A. Mattmann"#$, Robert R. Downs%, James J. Marshall&, Neal F. Most&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattmann, Chris

    the mission lifecycle. Exploring and incorporating software assets into a software development project also development lifecycles and to form a framework for the effective and efficient development of mission software of the development of mission software. Incorporating reuse practices in the software development process enables its

  8. Quantum Cryptography II: How to re-use a one-time pad safely even if P=NP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles H. Bennett; Gilles Brassard; Seth Breidbart

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    When elementary quantum systems, such as polarized photons, are used to transmit digital information, the uncertainty principle gives rise to novel cryptographic phenomena unachievable with traditional transmission media, e.g. a communications channel on which it is impossible in principle to eavesdrop without a high probability of being detected. With such a channel, a one-time pad can safely be reused many times as long as no eavesdrop is detected, and, planning ahead, part of the capacity of these uncompromised transmissions can be used to send fresh random bits with which to replace the one-time pad when an eavesdrop finally is detected. Unlike other schemes for stretching a one-time pad, this scheme does not depend on complexity-theoretic assumptions such as the difficulty of factoring.

  9. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No Name

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT This renewal application for the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (IWRP) WRU-I-0160-01 at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Industrial Waste Ditch (IWD) and Industrial Waste Pond (IWP) is being submitted to the State of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). This application has been prepared in compliance with the requirements in IDAPA 58.01.17, Recycled Water Rules. Information in this application is consistent with the IDAPA 58.01.17 rules, pre-application meeting, and the Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater (September 2007). This application is being submitted using much of the same information contained in the initial permit application, submitted in 2007, and modification, in 2012. There have been no significant changes to the information and operations covered in the existing IWRP. Summary of the monitoring results and operation activity that has occurred since the issuance of the WRP has been included. MFC has operated the IWP and IWD as regulated wastewater land treatment facilities in compliance with the IDAPA 58.01.17 regulations and the IWRP. Industrial wastewater, consisting primarily of continuous discharges of nonhazardous, nonradioactive, routinely discharged noncontact cooling water and steam condensate, periodic discharges of industrial wastewater from the MFC facility process holdup tanks, and precipitation runoff, are discharged to the IWP and IWD system from various MFC facilities. Wastewater goes to the IWP and IWD with a permitted annual flow of up to 17 million gallons/year. All requirements of the IWRP are being met. The Operations and Maintenance Manual for the Industrial Wastewater System will be updated to include any new requirements.

  10. Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radisav Vidic; David Dzombak; Ming-Kai Hsieh; Heng Li; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Yinghua Feng; Indranil Chowdhury; Jason Monnell

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using three impaired waters - secondary treated municipal wastewater, passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD), and effluent from ash sedimentation ponds at power plants - for use as makeup water in recirculating cooling water systems at thermoelectric power plants. The evaluation included assessment of water availability based on proximity and relevant regulations as well as feasibility of managing cooling water quality with traditional chemical management schemes. Options for chemical treatment to prevent corrosion, scaling, and biofouling were identified through review of current practices, and were tested at bench and pilot-scale. Secondary treated wastewater is the most widely available impaired water that can serve as a reliable source of cooling water makeup. There are no federal regulations specifically related to impaired water reuse but a number of states have introduced regulations with primary focus on water aerosol 'drift' emitted from cooling towers, which has the potential to contain elevated concentrations of chemicals and microorganisms and may pose health risk to the public. It was determined that corrosion, scaling, and biofouling can be controlled adequately in cooling systems using secondary treated municipal wastewater at 4-6 cycles of concentration. The high concentration of dissolved solids in treated AMD rendered difficulties in scaling inhibition and requires more comprehensive pretreatment and scaling controls. Addition of appropriate chemicals can adequately control corrosion, scaling and biological growth in ash transport water, which typically has the best water quality among the three waters evaluated in this study. The high TDS in the blowdown from pilot-scale testing units with both passively treated mine drainage and secondary treated municipal wastewater and the high sulfate concentration in the mine drainage blowdown water were identified as the main challenges for blowdown disposal. Membrane treatment (nanofiltration or reverse osmosis) can be employed to reduce TDS and sulfate concentrations to acceptable levels for reuse of the blowdown in the cooling systems as makeup water.

  11. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk [KAERI] [KAERI; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL] [ORNL; Maloy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3 145 dpa at 380 503 C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm 3mm 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa ffiffiffiffiffi m p at 350 450 C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperatureP430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  12. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3–145 dpa at 380–503 degrees*C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm *3mm* 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 *degreesC, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180—200 MPa*m^.5 at 350–450 degrees*C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature >430 degrees*C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 *degreesC and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  13. Anacostia Community Hirshhorn Museum &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    Anacostia Community Museum Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden American History Museum African Art Museum African American History & Culture Folklife & Cultural Heritage Portrait Gallery Latino Center Cooper-Hewitt American Art Museum & Renwick Gallery National Museum of the American Indian Asian Pacific

  14. General com Technology community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Campus IT General com m unity Technology community ITsystem owners Campus Council for Information Technology (CCFIT) · ~30 members · Advisory evaluation and review role · Input from faculty, staff, students formal representation on steering team and subcommittees Technology Support Program · Technology support

  15. Modeling Diverse Communities of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    , Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139. Such models are suited to considering ecological questions, such as the regulation of patterns of biodiversity). Microbial community structure, in turn, regulates the environment and biogeochemical pathways including

  16. Forschungsverbund community medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    10:15 Uhr Prof. Dr. R. Biffar / Prof. Dr. W. Hoffmann Entwicklung des Forschungsverbundes CM 10. Hoffmann / Dr. N. van den Berg Community Medicine: Forschung für den Patienten ,Bevölkerung` ­ Konzepte

  17. Community Health & Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Community Health & Public Health Preparedness in the Marcellus Shale Era 2011 Pennsylvania Public Photo credit: Pittsburgh Tribune- Review, Keith Hodan #12;Safety by the Numbers PA Marcellus Citations. Conference presentation, Spain. · County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania (CCAP). (2010). Marcellus

  18. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  19. Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open EnergyInformation Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec.HexHi FRED

  20. Community Wind Benefits (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet explores the benefits of community wind projects, including citations to published research.

  1. Economic and Technical Feasibility Study of Utility-Scale Wind Generation for the New York Buffalo River and South Buffalo Brownfield Opportunity Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic and technical feasibility of utilizing contaminated lands in the Buffalo, New York, area for utility-scale wind development is explored. The study found that there is available land, electrical infrastructure, wind resource, and local interest to support a commercial wind project; however, economies of scale and local electrical markets may need further investigation before significant investment is made into developing a wind project at the Buffalo Reuse Authority site.

  2. Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development...

  3. EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office is preparing an EA for a proposal to convey DOE land and facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, to the Paducah Area Community Reuse Organization and potentially...

  4. The Downtown Area of Jonestown, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booth, Geoffrey; Molina, Daniel; Santos, Alexander; Garcia, Laura; Garcia, Sarah; Olivarez, Cristopher; Wolff, Alec; Richarson, Jennifer; Romero, Megan; Beckett, Katherine; Strom, Robert; Cheek, Joseph; Davis, Zachary; Guerra, Daniel; McIntyre, Scott; Bishop, William; Hoff, Austin; Hernandez, Alex; Stewart, Sean; Kulka, William; Whitis, Dillon; Couvillion, Sarah; English, Garrett; Vasylyeva, Anastasiya; Allen, Jacob; Jorgenson, Davis; Kaska, Michael; Terrazas, Nathan; Barnete, Beau; Garcia, Karina; Cruz, Sarah; Harwell, Ethan

    2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    for walking and running Research (including source): No name trail was about half a mile long and Jones Brothers Park is a huge 32 acre park. Source- (Personal experience and City of Jonestown website) Analysis: On my visit to Jonestown we got to walk... of public parks and exercise areas Research (including source): Jones Brother Park, Firemen’s Park, Veterans Park, No name trial- Source (Marilee Pfannstiel, City of Jonestown Website) Analysis: All three parks are great for community gatherings...

  5. FIVE-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN 2003-2007 USDA FOREST SERVICE NORTHEAST CENTER FOR URBAN & COMMUNITY FORESTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    FORESTRY United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Area #12;Page 2 D R AFT BACKGROUND AND MISSION The Northeast Center for Urban and Community Forestry was estab- lished in October. The Northeast Center for Urban and Community Forestry responds to urban and community forestry information needs

  6. Enabling Coalition-Based Community Networking M.Lad, S.Bhatti, S.Hailes and P.Kirstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatti, Saleem N.

    interconnection of machines or local networks between community members. However, such interconnection, or peering to facilitate the formation of these community-area networks. Each peering agreement between pairs of community members is unique. We propose that some struc- ture should be added to the ad hoc peering agreements

  7. Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

  8. AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE The Office of Housing and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University is seeking applicants for an Area Coordinator. The Area Coordinator is responsible for assisting in the management and operation of a residential area

  9. Community Outreach Resources | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIESCommitteeCommunityCommunity Outreach

  10. 2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Frederick

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  11. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Frederick

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000160-01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of special compliance conditions; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 reporting year, an estimated 6.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. Using the dissolved iron data, the concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  12. 2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2012 through October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2013 reporting year, an estimated 9.64 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the applicable Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s groundwater quality standard levels.

  13. 2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 reporting year, an estimated 11.84 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  14. Metacommunities: Spatial Community Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Andrew

    to large spatial scales. Explanations based only on processes operating at local scales do not fully. The metacommunity concept asserts that the characteristics of a local community are the joint effect of local by a population of individuals. Not all sites may be occupied at any one point in time. The environment may

  15. Building the conflicted community 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiegelhauer, Jacob Lyle

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    that a community such as Hegel?s was not possible. I will examine why John Dewey drew this conclusion, as it did not take into account individuals, and how they have experience, as personal and ever changing. And finally the thesis will question...

  16. Community Energy Partnerships Program (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Community Energy Partnerships Program (CEPP) provides financial grants to community groups who are developing renewable energy projects in Ontario. These grants provide funding to community...

  17. Community Service Block Grant Loan Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Community Service Block Grant Loan Program is a partnership among the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, community action agencies, and the Illinois Ventures for Community Action. The...

  18. Community Renewable Energy Deployment Webinars | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community Renewable Energy Deployment Webinars Community Renewable Energy Deployment Webinars Watch these previously recorded webinars to learn about successful community renewable...

  19. 2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  20. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  1. How to reuse a one-time pad and other notes on authentication, encryption, and protection of quantum information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oppenheim, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Theoretical Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Gdansk (Poland); Horodecki, Michal [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Gdansk (Poland)

    2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum information is a valuable resource which can be encrypted in order to protect it. We consider the size of the one-time pad that is needed to protect quantum information in a number of cases. The situation is dramatically different from the classical case: we prove that one can recycle the one-time pad without compromising security. The protocol for recycling relies on detecting whether eavesdropping has occurred, and further relies on the fact that information contained in the encrypted quantum state cannot be fully accessed. We prove the security of recycling rates when authentication of quantum states is accepted, and when it is rejected. We note that recycling schemes respect a general law of cryptography which we introduce relating the size of private keys, sent qubits, and encrypted messages. We discuss applications for encryption of quantum information in light of the resources needed for teleportation. Potential uses include the protection of resources such as entanglement and the memory of quantum computers. We also introduce another application: encrypted secret sharing and find that one can even reuse the private key that is used to encrypt a classical message. In a number of cases, one finds that the amount of private key needed for authentication or protection is smaller than in the general case.

  2. Community architecture : myth and reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mongold, Neal J. (Neal Joseph)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the origins and the claims of the community architecture movement. Community architecture, which has recently attracted considerable professional attention in the U.K., is a movement that argues for ...

  3. USDA Community Connect Program Grants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is accepting applications to serve rural communities where broadband service is least likely to be available. The projects funded by the Community Connect Grants...

  4. ISIS Project Upgrade Campus Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    ISIS Project Upgrade Campus Community Page Navigation Page | 1 Page navigation has changed in the ISIS Application. This document provides you with the new location of all your key Campus Community the Navigation Pagelets": ISIS.UML..EDU #12;

  5. Feasibility study 100 K East Area water purification pools fish-rearing program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betsch, M.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the feasibility study, a design analysis was conducted to determine the usefulness of the existing sand filters and associated media for reuse. The sand filters which were studied for potential reuse are located on the northern end of the 100-K East Area water filtration plant on the Hanford Site. This plant is located about one- half mile from the Columbia River. The sand filters were originally part of a system which was used to provide cooling water to the nearby plutonium production K Reactors. This Cold War operation took place until 1971, at which time the K Reactors were closed for eventual decontamination and decommissioning. Recently, it was decided to study the concept of putting the sand filter structures back into use for fish-rearing purposes. Because the water that circulated through the water purification pools (K Pools) and associated sand filters was clean river water, there is little chance of the structures being radioactively contaminated. To date, separate K Pools have been used for raising a variety of cold water fish species, including white sturgeon and fall chinook salmon, as well as for providing potable water to the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site for fire and service water purposes.

  6. Massachusetts Community Shared Solar Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar provides an overview of Massachusetts community shared solar policy, and touches on key community shared solar models currently being utilized across the Commonwealth. Additionally, the webinar outlines key resources individuals and municipalities can use in order to pursue a community shared solar project.

  7. Community Solar Program Comparison Chart

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chart is a supplement to the "Utility Community Solar Handbook: Understanding and Supporting Utility Program Development," provides the utility's perspective on community solar program development and is a resource for government officials, regulators, community organizers, solar energy advocates, non-profits, and interested citizens who want to support their local utilities in implementing projects.

  8. Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

  9. Microbial Community Changes in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Produced Water from Shale Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Bibby, Kyle J.; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial communities associated with produced water from hydraulic fracturing are not well understood, and their deleterious activity can lead to significant increases in production costs and adverse environmental impacts. In this study, we compared the microbial ecology in prefracturing fluids (fracturing source water and fracturing fluid) and produced water at multiple time points from a natural gas well in southwestern Pennsylvania using 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries, pyrosequencing, and quantitative PCR. The majority of the bacterial community in prefracturing fluids constituted aerobic species affiliated with the class Alphaproteobacteria. However, their relative abundance decreased in produced water with an increase in halotolerant, anaerobic/facultative anaerobic species affiliated with the classes Clostridia, Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Bacteroidia, and Fusobacteria. Produced water collected at the last time point (day 187) consisted almost entirely of sequences similar to Clostridia and showed a decrease in bacterial abundance by 3 orders of magnitude compared to the prefracturing fluids and produced water samplesfrom earlier time points. Geochemical analysis showed that produced water contained higher concentrations of salts and total radioactivity compared to prefracturing fluids. This study provides evidence of long-term subsurface selection of the microbial community introduced through hydraulic fracturing, which may include significant implications for disinfection as well as reuse of produced water in future fracturing operations.

  10. Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, ?-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

  11. PERSPECTIVE What is microbial community ecology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERSPECTIVE What is microbial community ecology? Allan Konopka Biological Sciences Division for rigorous progress in the field. Important elements of research in microbial community ecology include by a `microbial community' and identification of important characteristics specific to community ecology. What

  12. Protected Areas Stacy Philpott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    · Convention of Biological Diversity, 1992 #12;IUCN Protected Area Management Categories Ia. Strict Nature. Protected Landscape/ Seascape VI. Managed Resource Protected Area #12;Ia. Strict Nature Preserves and Ib. Wilderness Areas · Natural preservation · Research · No · No #12;II. National Parks · Ecosystem protection

  13. Service Entry Delivery Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Catheter Lab Boiler House Main Entry Short Street ChapelStreet Vehicle Exit 23. Gray Street Car ParkingService Entry Waste Handling Area Delivery Area Admissions Entrance Inquiries Desk Cafeteria Coffee in July 2000 Vehicle Entry Emergency Main Entrance TOKOGARAHRAILWAYSTATION LEGEND Areas under construction

  14. Community Readiness Assessments | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Community Readiness Assessments Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call Series: Community Readiness Assessments, Call Slides and...

  15. Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at Hydrothermal Vents Using Osmotically Driven Continuous Fluid Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at...

  16. Flood Risk Management Every year floods sweep through communities across the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management #12;Every year floods sweep through communities across the United States risk management activities of communities in both urban and rural areas throughout the United States management activities. At the direction of Congress, the Corps studies and implements flood risk management

  17. Digging the New York City Skyline: Soil Fungal Communities in Green Roofs and City Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fierer, Noah

    microbes across the greater New York City area is locally variable. Green roof fungal communities wereDigging the New York City Skyline: Soil Fungal Communities in Green Roofs and City Parks Krista L a number of benefits, including decreased urban heat island effects and reduced energy costs for buildings

  18. SAMPLE INTERNSHIP DESCRIPTION NOT CURRENTLY OPEN FOR INFORMATION ONLY Community Partnership Internship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAMPLE INTERNSHIP DESCRIPTION ­ NOT CURRENTLY OPEN ­ FOR INFORMATION ONLY Community Partnership Internship Free Geek Interested in learning about and working with a variety of businesses and non-profits in the area and telling them about Free Geek? Our Community Partnerships Internship is a great short

  19. Affordable housing and upward mobility : bridging the divide at The Community Builders, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadegar, Daniel Aziz

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing austerity at all levels of government has propelled a heightened focus on more efficient models of housing delivery, human service delivery and community development. One area of increased attention, with ...

  20. An analysis of community assessments: the perceived relationship between funding resourses and survey scope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Sarah Boswell

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interviews were conducted with spokespersons from graphics. seven area health service organizations regarding recent community assessments conducted by their organizations. Specifically, the participants were asked to explain the process by which...

  1. Tree Community Patterns and Soil Texture Characteristics of a Meander Bend, Lower Trinity River, Southeast Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyikos, Sarah Ildiko

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    rather than examining fluvial-related and vegetation dynamics individually will benefit science and the management of river systems. Tree communities in riparian areas, although consisting mainly of bottomland hardwood species, can be very diverse...

  2. Edmund G. Brown, Jr. ENERGY-EFFICIENT COMMUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commission Elaine Hebert Project Manager Chris Scruton Program Area Lead Buildings Energy End-Use Efficiency Remp ­ City of Chula Vista, California · Larisa Dobriansky ­ National Energy Center for SustainableEdmund G. Brown, Jr. Governor ENERGY-EFFICIENT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN CALIFORNIA: CHULA VISTA

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - area utah characterization Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Awards to Members of the University Community 1. University of Utah Health... Care is the No. 1 health care system in the Salt Lake City metro area, according to ......

  4. Cleaning Up Groundwater in Areas South and Southeast of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleaning Up Groundwater in Areas South and Southeast of Brookhaven National Laboratory This pamphlet summarizes the questions you or your neighbors raised about groundwater treatment systems National Laboratory have been listening to the concerns of the community about groundwater

  5. Groundwater Management Areas (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation,...

  6. Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    ..............................................................................................................19 Bruce Hoagland, Oklahoma Biological Survey and the University of Oklahoma Forest Management Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook E-952 Oklahoma Cooperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma Conservation Commission Management Handbook #12

  7. Community Events | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation TheCommunications andConnectionsCommunity

  8. Community Leaders Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation TheCommunicationsLeaders Survey Community

  9. Community Relations Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation TheCommunicationsLeadersCommunity

  10. Community Connections: April 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ Community

  11. Community Connections: August 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ Community

  12. Community Connections: February 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ Community

  13. Community Connections: February 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ Community

  14. Community Connections: July 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ Community

  15. Community Connections: June 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ Community

  16. Community Connections: March 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ Community

  17. Community Connections: March 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ Community

  18. Community Connections: May 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ CommunityMay

  19. Community Connections: November 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ CommunityMay

  20. Community Connections: October 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ CommunityMay

  1. Community Connections: September 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ CommunityMay

  2. Community Issues - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIESCommitteeCommunity

  3. What can I do with this major? AREAS EMPLOYERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    STRATEGIES What can I do with this major? AREAS EMPLOYERS LINGUISTICS EDUCATION Teaching Research Language institutes Community education programs Testing companies, e.g. ETS To teach in higher education, historical linguis- tics, sociolinguistics, dialectology, pragmatics, and language acquisition. Earn relevant

  4. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Eureka Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vaccaro. 2007. Community Profiles for West Coast and North76. Eureka Fishing Community Profile Gotshall, D. W. 1966.Eureka Fishing Community Profile Monroe, G. M. , S. J.

  5. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Mesozoic granite granodiorite Aurora Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region MW Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot...

  6. Renewable Energy Community: Key Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, N.; Elling, J.; Penney, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing new communities using a renewable energy systems approach--with sustainable planning, zero-energy homes, advanced vehicles, and innovative utility interconnections--can reduce energy use.

  7. Community Renewable Energy Deployment Webinars

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Watch these previously recorded webinars to learn about successful community renewable energy projects, including how challenges and barriers faced during development were addressed. Accompanying...

  8. LEADERSHIP HANDBOOK FOR REGIONAL COMMUNITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    LEADERSHIP HANDBOOK FOR REGIONAL COMMUNITIES JOHNS HOPKINS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION & THE OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS #12;Leadership Handbook for Regional Chapters 2 CONTENTS Contents .......................................................................................................................9 Chapter Leadership

  9. Community Energy Strategic Planning Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Community Energy Stategic Planning Resources webinar, presented on January 24, 2013 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Technical Assistance Program (TAP).

  10. Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

  11. Innovative Water Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Conditioning & Refrigeration ? Energy Meets Water H.W. (Bill)Hoffman, P.E. H.W. (Bill)Hoffman & Associates, LLC 512-294-7193 billhoffmantx@earthlink.net Cooling Towers The purpose of a cooling tower is to get rid of unwanted... energy! By evaporating Water! Cooling Towers 43% Boilers 4%Toilets 20% Other Plumbing 8% Food Service 8% Sterilizers 6% Dialysis 3% Leaks 3% Cleaning 3% Other 2% A Large Hospital in Florida Cooling 50% Indoor 40% Irrigation 10...

  12. Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

    This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

  13. Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

  14. Waste incineration and the community -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , metals, plastics, paper and hazardous materials from the organic portion of household waste, together the volumes collected have often exceeded the recycling capacity. Composting the organic portion has also beenWaste incineration and the community - The Amsterdam experience The successful community relations

  15. Harnessing Sustainability to Uplift Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Harnessing Sustainability to Uplift Communities Thursday, February 28, 2013 12:00 - 1:30 p sustainable can also be applied to solve other problems. In this way, sustainability creates value sustainability is being applied locally to uplift communities from poverty and malnutrition. Brooks is a founder

  16. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BORGHESE JV

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    {sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  17. Physics Thrust Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum ReservesThrust Areas Physics Thrust Areas

  18. An assessment and evaluation for recycle/reuse of contaminated process and metallurgical equipment at the DOE Rocky Flats Plant Site -- Building 865. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An economic analysis of the potential advantages of alternatives for recycling and reusing equipment now stored in Building 865 at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado has been conducted. The inventory considered in this analysis consists primarily of metallurgical and process equipment used before January 1992, during development and production of nuclear weapons components at the site. The economic analysis consists of a thorough building inventory and cost comparisons for four equipment dispositions alternatives. The first is a baseline option of disposal at a Low Level Waste (LLW) landfill. The three alternatives investigated are metal recycling, reuse with the government sector, and release for unrestricted use. This report provides item-by-item estimates of value, disposal cost, and decontamination cost. The economic evaluation methods documented here, the simple cost comparisons presented, and the data provided as a supplement, should provide a foundation for D&D decisions for Building 865, as well as for similar D&D tasks at RFP and at other sites.

  19. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  20. Definition of a 'Zero Net Energy' Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, N.; Van Geet, O.; Pless, S.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a definition for a net zero-energy community. A community that offsets all of its energy use from renewables available within the community's built environment.

  1. Community Leadership Certificate Program Program Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Community Leadership Certificate Program Program Overview The undergraduate Community Leadership Certificate Program is an interdisciplinary program where students from any major can explore leadership in community engagement and leadership. The program is based on a social justice model of leadership

  2. Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological Wastewater Treatment of the microbial communities within biological wastewater treatment reactors is incomplete due to limitations microbial community composition in five biological wastewater treatment reactors in China and the United

  3. Implications of solar energy alternatives for community design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, A.; Steinitz, C.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graduate-level studio at the Harvard School of Design explored how a policy of solar-based energy independence will influence the design of a new community of approximately 4500 housing units and other uses. Three large sites outside Tucson (a cooling problem), Atlanta (a humidity problem), and Boston (a heating problem) were selected. Each is typical of its region. A single program was assumed and designed for. Each site had two teams, one following a compact approach and one following a more dispersed approach. Each was free to choose the most appropriate mix of (solar) technology and scale, and was free to integrate energy and community in the design as it saw fit. These choice and integration issues are key areas where our experience may be of interest to those involved in community design and solar energy.

  4. Thermoelectric Activities of European Community within Framework...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of European Community within Framework Programme 7 and additional activities in Germany Thermoelectric Activities of European Community within Framework Programme 7 and...

  5. Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Print Tuesday, 22 January 2013 00:00 A cold sulfur...

  6. People of Color and Disenfranchised Communities Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    People of Color and Disenfranchised Communities Environmental Health Network (the Coalition) People of Color and Disenfranchised Communities Environmental Health Network (the...

  7. Quality New Mexico recognizes Community Programs Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quality New Mexico recognizes Community Programs Office March 6, 2012 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 6, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Community Programs Office received...

  8. Community Renewable Energy Success Stories Webinar: Renewable...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Community Renewable Energy Success Stories Webinar: Renewable Energy Parks (text version) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories Webinar: Renewable Energy Parks (text version)...

  9. Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel...

  10. Renewable Energy Project Development and Financing: Community...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Community Course Outline What we will cover... About the DOE Office of Indian Energy Education Initiative Community-Scale Process: Hypothetical Example - Project...

  11. Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy Projects Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy...

  12. Santa Cruz Harbor Commercial Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2002). Socio-economic profile of the California wetfishCommercial Fishing Community Profile, July 2008 Mangelsdorf,Commercial Fishing Community Profile, July 2008 Santa Cruz

  13. Tag: community | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    community Tag: community Displaying 1 - 10 of 57... Category: Employees & Retirees CNS Running Crew conquers marathon "Amazing" is how Y-12 employee Barbara King described her...

  14. Hull Wind: A Community Gets Green

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hull Wind A Community Gets Green Community Wind Power National Renewable Energy Laboratory September 18, 2012 Andrew Stern Executive Director Action for Clean Energy, Inc. www....

  15. Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranski, Micahel J [self

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Oak Ridge Reservation, encompassing 33,639 acres in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province of East Tennessee, has long been known for its unfragmented forests and high biodiversity. Many areas on the Reservation have been recognized as important natural areas, but no comprehensive treatment has been performed to evaluate the relative significance and importance of these areas compared to each other. The present study was conducted to develop a set of guidelines for evaluating the natural value of specific areas, to evaluate all the terrestrial areas that are currently delineated, and to rank all areas according to their relative biodiversity importance. All available data, reports and site-specific information relevant to Reservation lands, including Tennessee Division of Natural Areas database information, were evaluated and field work was conducted. Methodologies and criteria for assessment and evaluation of areas were developed; categories of criteria were devised; and a ranking system for evaluation of natural areas was produced. There were 70 areas evaluated during the study. The system is flexible, dynamic and easily revised to reflect updated and new information and interpretations. Eight categories of evaluation factors were established and used to characterize each site. These were the following: size of area, number or status taxa present, number of Endangered and Threatened taxa present, rarity of the Endangered and Threatened taxa on the Reservation, community diversity, site integrity and quality, disturbance and threat levels, and other significant features and factors. Each category generally consisted of a 5-point ranking scale from 0-4, allowing for a possible composite score of 32, with higher ranked, more important, sites attaining higher scores. Highly ranked sites are representative of regional natural diversity; contain outstanding natural features, communities or geology and/or very rare taxa or other elements; are relatively large in size with mature or old-growth community composition; lack current disturbance factors or potential threats and disturbances; are in excellent condition with good buffers; are places where ecological and evolutionary processes can occur relatively unaffected by humans; and can be reasonably defended and maintained as natural areas in an undeveloped condition. Highly ranked sites are the most significant and should receive the greatest protections. Composite scores of the ranked areas ranged from 1-25.5, with a mean score of 12. The ranked areas were divided into three Priority Groups. Group I, the most highly ranked group, included 20 sites and covered 5189 acres or 15.4% of Reservation lands; Group II included 31 sites and covered 4108 acres; Group III included 19 sites covering 400 acres of Reservation lands. All sites together comprise 9697 acres or 28.8% of Reservation lands. Six sites emerged as clearly the most significant natural areas on the Reservation. The study developed a number of recommendations that should be implemented in order to enhance and refine the natural areas data for the Reservation. There is a clear need for better and standardized ecological community classification and identification. Several areas are proposed for merger into larger units, and some new areas are proposed for inclusion and recognition in a natural areas system. Various gaps and discrepancies in the existing data are described and should be corrected. Other recommendations are made, including the development of a corollary system that can accommodate aquatic natural areas. The study relied primarily on the synthesis of information from many sources and from limited reconnaissance and direct observation during field work to produce a methodology for assessing natural area importance and assigning priorities for protection. Many instances of incomplete, missing or conflicting information made it difficult to complete thorough analysis. Further review and discussion among natural resources personnel will likely reveal possibilities for refinement and

  16. Community Renewables: Model Program Rules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) has worked closely with The Vote Solar Initiative to develop model program rules for community-scale renewables that consider many of the basic issues facing community renewables programs. IREC’s model program rules address such issues as renewable system size, interconnection, eligibility for participation, allocation of the benefits flowing from participation, net metering of system production, and other essential features of a community renewables program. The goal of this effort is to provide stakeholders with program rules they can tailor to the individual circumstances and policy preferences of their state without having to reinvent the wheel at each turn.

  17. Systems biology of Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navid, A; Ghim, C; Fenley, A; Yoon, S; Lee, S; Almaas, E

    2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbes exist naturally in a wide range of environments, spanning the extremes of high acidity and high temperature to soil and the ocean, in communities where their interactions are significant. We present a practical discussion of three different approaches for modeling microbial communities: rate equations, individual-based modeling, and population dynamics. We illustrate the approaches with detailed examples. Each approach is best fit to different levels of system representation, and they have different needs for detailed biological input. Thus, this set of approaches is able to address the operation and function of microbial communities on a wide range of organizational levels.

  18. An overview of the Nuclear Materials Focus Area research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROBERSON,GARY D.; POLANSKY,GARY F.; OSBORNE,KEN K.; RANDALL,VIRGINIA

    2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) is responsible for providing comprehensive needs identification, integration of technology research and development activities, and technology deployment for stabilization, packaging, and interim storage of surplus nuclear materials within the DOE complex. The NMFA was chartered in April 1999 by the Office of Science and Technology (OST), an organizational component of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). OST manages a national program to conduct basic and applied research, and technology development, demonstration, and deployment assistance that is essential to completing a timely and cost-effective cleanup of the DOE nuclear weapons complex. DOE/EM provides environmental research results, as well as cleanup technologies and systems, to meet high-priority end-user needs, reduce EM's major cost centers and technological risks, and accelerate technology deployments. The NMFA represents the segment of EM that focuses on technological solutions for re-using, transforming, and disposing excess nuclear materials and is jointly managed by the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office and the DOE Idaho Operations Office.

  19. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  20. Inner Area Principles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News linkThermalInner Area Principles The Inner Area

  1. Community Development Block Grant (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Community Development Block Grant provides funds aimed at creating or retaining permanent jobs, which must be filled by a majority of low- and moderate-income persons. Eligible small city and...

  2. Promising Practices in Community Colleges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Levin, J.  S. , & Montero?Hernandez, V.  (2009).  Community J.  S. , Cerven, C. , Montero?Hernandez, V. , & Shaker, Lindsey Malcom  Virginia Montero?Hernandez  Joyce Roys 

  3. 4-H and the Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The strength and success of a local 4-H club are directly related to the amount of support provided by local people. To strengthen community support and participation, follow these guidelines when planning activities....

  4. Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Treasury is accepting applications on the Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, which has opened the fiscal year 2015 funding round for the CDFI Program...

  5. Innovation Community Call for Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossak, Wilhelm R.

    the foundations for economic prosperity. Germany's "Science City 2008" will provide an ex- cellent venue for I for communities Distributed algorithms and simulation models Game theory, graph theory and cost models

  6. Community Water Demand in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Ronald C.; Chang, Chan

    Solutions to Texas water policy and planning problems will be easier to identify once the impact of price upon community water demand is better understood. Several important questions cannot be addressed in the absence of such information...

  7. Confucians and Dewey on community 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Hui

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis offers a comparison between liberalism, Dewey’s pragmatism, and Confucianism on their views of community. Today, as China struggles with the influences of modernity, the relations between its Confucian heritage and liberal democracy have...

  8. 4, 30893121, 2007 Gross community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Gross community production and metabolic balance in the South Pacific Gyre, using a non intrusive bio describe a non-intrusive bio-optical method to quantify the various terms of a production budget (Gross

  9. PROTECTED AREAS AMENDMENTS AND.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as critical fish and wildlife habitat. The "protected areas" amendment is a major step in the Council's efforts to rebuild fish and wildlife populations that have been damaged by hydroelectric development. Low also imposed significant costs. The Northwest's fish and wildlife have suffered extensive losses

  10. MSL ENTERANCE REFERENCE AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    MSL ENTERANCE LOBBY ELEV STAIRS SSL-019 REFERENCE AREA SSL-021 GROUP STUDY SSL-018 STUDY ROOM SSL-029 SSL-020 COPY ROOM SSL-022 GROUP STUDY SSL-026 STACKS SSL-023 GROUP STUDY SSL-024 GROUP STUDY SSL TBL-014 TBL-014A STAIRS SSL-007 GIS/ WORKROOM SSL-011 SSL-008 SSL-009 SSL-010 SSL-014 SSL-017 STAIRS

  11. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  12. Understanding Energy Code Acceptance within the Alaska Building Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mapes, Terry S.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the technical assistance provided to the Alaska Home Financing Corporation on behalf of PNNL regarding the assessment of attitudes toward energy codes within the building community in Alaska. It includes a summary of the existing situation and specific assistance requested by AHFC, the results of a questionnaire designed for builders surveyed in a suburban area of Anchorage, interviews with a lender, a building official, and a research specialist, and recommendations for future action by AHFC.

  13. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 11:12am Addthis...

  14. IIFET 2006 Portsmouth Proceedings COMMUNITY FISHERY RIGHTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    CANADIAN CASE STUDIES Anthony Charles, Saint Mary's University, tony.charles@smu.ca ABSTRACT Community

  15. Soc. 869: Communities and Conservation Course Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that process. We will look at the definition of community, the definition of conservation, and how we, but are often in silos within disparate institutional and regulatory settings. These sectors include: energy-Place Community: Contributions to the Debate about the Definition of Community." Community Development: Journal

  16. Community-Based Social Marketing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollander, A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presents how to create effective community weatherization assistance programs to foster sustainable behavior.

  17. Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2010-October 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Frederick

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (No.LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  18. Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: May 1, 2010-October 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Frederick

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (#LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  19. Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2012-October 31, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  20. Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2011-October 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike lewis

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  1. Milk is a common ingredient in many fried foods. Allergen cross contact can occur through the use of shared frying oil. Analytical methods are needed to determine the level of protein contamination in re-used oil. This study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    the use of shared frying oil. Analytical methods are needed to determine the level of protein contamination in re-used oil. This study evaluated the performance of four ELISA test kits in comparison with a total protein assay for detection of milk protein residues in spiked oils that have been subjected

  2. Assessment of Reusing 14-ton, Thin-Wall, Depleted UF{sub 6} Cylinders as LLW Disposal Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, D.G.

    2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 700,000 MT of DUF{sub 6} is stored, or will be produced under a current agreement with the USEC, at the Paducah site in Kentucky, Portsmouth site in Ohio, and ETTP site in Tennessee. On July 21, 1998, the 105th Congress approved Public Law 105-204 (Ref; 1), which directed that facilities be built at the Kentucky and Ohio sites to convert DUF{sub 6} to a stable form for disposition. On July 6, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued the ''Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride as Required by Public Law 105-204 (Ref. 2), in which DOE committed to develop a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap''. On September 1, 2000, DOE issued the Draft Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap (Ref. 3) (Roadmap), which provides alternate paths for the long-term storage, beneficial use, and eventual disposition of each product form and material that will result from the DUF{sub 6} conversion activity. One of the paths being considered for DUF{sub 6} cylinders is to reuse the empty cylinders as containers to transport and dispose of LLW, including the converted DU. The Roadmap provides results of the many alternate uses and disposal paths for conversion products and the empty DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders. As a part of the Roadmap, evaluations were conducted of cost savings, technical maturity, barriers to implementation, and other impacts. Results of these evaluations indicate that using the DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders as LLW disposal containers could provide moderate cost savings due to the avoided cost of purchasing LLW packages and the avoided cost of disposing of the cylinders. No significant technical or institutional issues were identified that would make using cylinders as LLW packages less effective than other disposition paths. Over 58,000 cylinders have been used, or will be used, to store DUF{sub 6}. Over 51,000 of those cylinders are 14TTW cylinders with a nominal wall thickness of 5/16-m (0.79 cm). These- 14TTW cylinders, which have a nominal diameter of 48 inches and nominally contain 14 tons (12.7 MT) of DUF{sub 6}, were originally designed and fabricated for temporary storage of DUF{sub 6}. They were fabricated from pressure-vessel-grade steels according to the provisions of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Ref. 4). Cylinders are stored in open yards at the three sites and, due to historical storage techniques, were subject to corrosion. Roughly 10,000 of the 14TTW cylinders are considered substandard (Ref. 5) due to corrosion and other structural anomalies caused by mishandling. This means that approximately 40,000 14TTW cylinders could be made available as containers for LLW disposal In order to demonstrate the use of 14TTW cylinders as LLW disposal containers, several qualifying tasks need to be performed. Two demonstrations are being considered using 14TTW cylinders--one demonstration using contaminated soil and one demonstration using U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The objective of this report are to determine how much information is known that could be used to support the demonstrations, and how much additional work will need to be done in order to conduct the demonstrations. Information associated with the following four qualifying tasks are evaluated in this report. (1) Perform a review of structural assessments that have been conducted for 14TTW. (2) Develop a procedure for filling 14TTW cylinders with LLW that have been previously washed. (3) Evaluate the transportation requirements for shipping 14TTW cylinders containing LLW. (4) Evaluate the WAC that will be imposed by the NTS. Two assumptions are made to facilitate this evaluation of using DUF{sub 6} cylinders as LLW disposal containers. (1) Only 14TTW cylinders will be considered for use as LLW containers, and (2) The NTS will be the LLW disposal site.

  3. Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain scientific and natural areas are established throughout the state for the purpose of preservation and protection. Construction and new development is prohibited in these areas.

  4. Community Leadership: Best Practices for Brazos Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Johnathan; Harlow, Evan; Dorshaw, Carlie; Brower, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Community Leadership: Best Practices for Brazos Valley Report for the Brazos Community Foundation Executive Summary May 7, 2008 This report was prepared as part of a graduate student capstone project at the George Bush School of Government... and Public Service for our client, the Brazos Community Foundation (BCF). We believe the report has implications for the BCF and the broader nonprofit community in the Brazos Valley. The project team identified ten potential community leadership roles...

  5. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community CentralOpenEI Community

  6. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community CentralOpenEI CommunityOpenEI

  7. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community CentralOpenEIOpenEI Community

  8. Large area bulk superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Field, Michael B. (Jersey City, NJ)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  9. Strategic Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiralingSecurity217,354Strategic Focus Areas Lockheed

  10. How does renewable energy drive community economic development, improve air quality & contribute to healthy families & communities?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    · How does renewable energy drive community economic development, improve air quality & contribute to healthy families & communities? · How does renewable energy revitalize agricultural communities, provide energy self-sufficiency & protect the environment? · How do renewable energy & sustainable food create

  11. Community Shared Solar: Expansions Underway in Solar America Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Community shared solar is expanding rapidly as a model ownership structure for solar PV. By offering customers an option to purchase or lease part of a larger solar array instead of having to purchase the entire system, the model greatly expands participatory opportunities to a large new market segment of citizens and customers, with very low or no cost to local government.

  12. Community Renewable Energy Success Stories Webinar: Net Zero Energy Communities (text version)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Below is the text version of the Webinar titled "Community Renewable Energy Success Stories – Net Zero Energy Communities," originally presented on October 16, 2012.

  13. The Library-Community Convergence Framework for Community Action: Libraries as Catalysts of Social Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehra, Bharat; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and locally sustainable communities where libraries are nolibraries and marginalized community stakeholders and the changing multicultural publics that is democratic and equitable, participatory and sustainable, and

  14. Community-Driven Homeless Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    Community-Driven Homeless Housing Programs: Best Practices Report Prepared for City of Champaign Anne Householder Latonya Jones Maria Kaidas Rebecca Long Huong Phu #12;Homeless Housing Best Practices 2 Table of Contents Introduction 3 Emergency Family Housing Introduction 8 Case Studies 9 Discussion

  15. Web Mining for Hyperlinked Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wen-Chen

    Web Mining for Hyperlinked Communities Gary William Flake flake@research.nj.nec.com NEC Research Institute #12;Motivation for Web Mining More than 1B web pages and 20TB of raw data. Even more content will always be disorganized (or at best self-organized). In the future, everything will be on the web

  16. Community Impact Analysis Emerging Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    to require preparation of an environmental impact statement. When an environmental impact statement, then the environmental impact statement will discuss all of these effects on the human environment. #12;PrioritiesCommunity Impact Analysis Emerging Approaches #12;1960s · 1964 Title VI of Civil Rights Act of 1964

  17. POLICIES TO SUPPORT COMMUNITY SOLAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    POLICIES TO SUPPORT COMMUNITY SOLAR INITIATIVES: BEST PRACTICES TO ENHANCE NET METERING FINAL and Environmental Policy University of Delaware February 2012 #12;Mailing Address: John Byrne Director Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware Newark, DE 19716-7381 Email: jbbyrne

  18. Public Participation and Community Relations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure that public participation and community outreach are integral and effective parts of DOE activities and that decisions are made with the benefit of significant public perspectives. Cancels DOE P 1210.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.104,

  19. Innovation Community Call for Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossak, Wilhelm R.

    -Charlottenburg. The Auditorium, our conference location on floor 20, offers a marvelous view over the city. Berlin-Tegel airport intelligence and collaborative behaviour Smart world models and clouds Technology ­ Distributed architectures and frameworks Service-oriented architectures for communities Peer-to-peer and grid architectures Distributed

  20. CORNELL UNIVERSITY Community Energy Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    of Caroline to help small communities develop new energy use and production models centered around "green to be similar to the Township of Caroline in New York State to help make the report more applicable to its .................................................................................................17 Appendix B: Economics of New Energy Systems

  1. Economic Architecture and Sustainable Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Economic Architecture and Sustainable Communities Wednesday, January 30, 2013 12:00 ­ 1:30 p and investment conditions during the sustainability movement. Join scientist and Green Sense radio show host Robert Colangelo and author and economic developer Mark Lautman to discuss how economic architecture

  2. APPLICATION FOR COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    APPLICATION FOR COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARDS DUE DATE: APRIL 15 In accordance with the Freedom an individual's name, Faculty, program, and award information. McMaster University publishes the names and other award publications. Further information can be found in the General Academic Regulations section

  3. Functional Area Assessments Project Charter Workstream Name Functional Area Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    with Huron on detailed project plan. Subject Experts Subject Expert Role Functional leadership Administrative1 of 2 Functional Area Assessments ­ Project Charter Workstream Name Functional Area Assessments - Internal Budgeting - Human Resources These diagnostics will be performed using interviews, surveys, data

  4. Environmental Health Education in Underserved Hispanic Communities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Jennifer Ann

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this study was to use environmental health education to improve topic-specific health literacy in two underserved Hispanic communities, Webb County and San Antonio. Hispanic communities may have disparities ...

  5. APPALACHIAN COLLEGES COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jonathan

    customized community economic development engagement strategies. · Provide on-site Partnership evaluation to undertake new economic development programs. Communication, Sustainability, and Evaluation--Years 1, 2 and 3APPALACHIAN COLLEGES COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIP The UNC-Chapel Hill Office

  6. Is Your Community Ready for Economic Development?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldana, Luis

    2003-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    System ? College Station,Texas Dear Community Leader: I hope the information I have collected will help you and your community groups prepare yourselves for success! Luis H. Salda?a County Extension Agent? Urban Development Willacy...

  7. Environmental Health Education in Underserved Hispanic Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Jennifer Ann

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this study was to use environmental health education to improve topic-specific health literacy in two underserved Hispanic communities, Webb County and San Antonio. Hispanic communities may have disparities in income, health care...

  8. COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND COMMUNITY SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Studies, Applied Behavior Analysis, Audiology, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Criminology, and the communities in which we live. The College offers undergraduate programs in Communication SciencesCOLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND COMMUNITY SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 2013-2014 UNDERGRADUATE

  9. Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interagency Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice The Interagency Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) was formed to provide a forum to...

  10. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Trinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Harbor Fishing Community Profile Ralston, S. 2002. WestTrinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile Endnotes http://information. Trinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile

  11. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Crescent City Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vaccaro. 2007. Community Profiles for West Coast and NorthCity Fishing Community Profile Leidersdorf, C. 1975.City Fishing Community Profile Woodbury, D. 1999. Reduction

  12. NOvA Experiment - The Local Community

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Deb Wieber

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Local proprietors Steve and Deb Wieber discuss the impact of the NOvA experiment on their community.

  13. Learning Community Peer Mentor Supervisor's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Learning Community Peer Mentor Supervisor's Manual #12;Table of Contents Introduction.........................................................................................................................................4 Timeline for Hiring Mentors.......................................................................................................7 Supervision of Mentors

  14. Community-Based Social Marketing (Presentation)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar, Community-Based Social Marketing, presented at the DOE Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers on Jan. 11, 2011.

  15. NOvA Experiment - The Local Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deb Wieber

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Local proprietors Steve and Deb Wieber discuss the impact of the NOvA experiment on their community.

  16. Letters of Outreach to Partner Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Letters of Outreach to Partner Communities, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  17. Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

  18. Boundary Waters Canoe Area (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Boundary Waters Canoe Area occupies a large section of northern Minnesota, and is preserved as a primitive wilderness area. Construction and new development is prohibited. A map of the...

  19. Overlapping Community Detection by Online Cluster Aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozdoba, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new online algorithm for detecting overlapping communities. The main ingredients are a modification of an online k-means algorithm and a new approach to modelling overlap in communities. An evaluation on large benchmark graphs shows that the quality of discovered communities compares favorably to several methods in the recent literature, while the running time is significantly improved.

  20. STUDENTS CROSSING BORDERS (SCB) COMMUNITY APPLICATION FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    STUDENTS CROSSING BORDERS (SCB) COMMUNITY APPLICATION FORM The Students Crossing Borders community of Minnesota. This document is a supplemental application for the SCB community only. Current U of M Housing this application to: scb@umn.edu or Students Crossing Borders c/o Kevin Dostal Dauer Comstock Hall East 210

  1. Mesoscale Model Development and the Meteorological Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mass, Clifford F.

    Mesoscale Model Development and the Meteorological Community Cliff Mass University of Washington: Although the U.S. remains a leader in mesoscale model development and application, the community is not fulfilling its potential. The resources of the U.S. mesoscale forecasting community are considerable

  2. COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT PLAN APRIL 15, 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GEIGER,K.

    1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Community Involvement Plan has been prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Community Involvement Office with the input of the community, Laboratory employees and representatives of the U.S. Department of Energy. The process to develop the plan began with the formation of a focus group consisting of representatives from: the community at large; special interest groups within the community; the business community; Laboratory retirees; senior and line management from the Laboratory; and the U.S. Department of Energy. The focus group reviewed an initial outline developed by the Office of Community involvement, held in-depth roundtable discussions of community involvement needs, and created a draft plan based on their discussions. A workshop was held to present the draft Community Involvement Plan to a wider audience for their input and insights on how Brookhaven should involve the community in decision making. This workshop was advertised in local newspapers and within the Laboratory. It was attended by community members, special interest group representatives, Laboratory employees and managers, U.S. Department of Energy-Brookhaven Group management, and members of the Laboratory's Community Advisory Council. The results of the workshop discussions are incorporated in this plan.

  3. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used in area like smart buildings, street light controls andbuilding. This section focuses on HAN design to address two smart

  4. SF State | Residential Life Community Living Standards Page 1 COMMUNITY LIVING STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SF State | Residential Life Community Living Standards Page 1 COMMUNITY LIVING STANDARDS A How-To Guide to Living in the SF State Residential Community 2014-2015 #12;SF State | Residential Life Community Philosophy Residential Life Staff Campus Resources One Stop Your Roommate Your Living Space

  5. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  6. 2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2012–October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Noncompliance issues • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater was discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  7. 2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mike lewis

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  8. Thomas Roser Community Advisory Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    for RHIC #12;2 RHIC NSRL LINAC Booster AGS Tandems STAR 6:00 o'clock PHENIX 8:00 o'clock 10:00 o'clock Jet Proton beam in AGS: July 1960 (50 years) Ion beam in AGS: 1987 AGS Booster: 1991 RHIC Construction: 1993Thomas Roser Community Advisory Council October 14, 2010 Collisions of Uranium at RHIC Discoveries

  9. Community Loblolly Pine Slash Pine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference,Community

  10. Month HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc Recovered Landfilled Total Diversion Jan-09 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.0%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    ) Diversion Diversion Rate (Recycled / Total) SS Secure Shredding Scrap Scrap Metals (All) CG&MP Cans, GlassMonth HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc: Month HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc Recovered

  11. Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'Community wind' refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. The extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers, businesses, Native American tribes, universities, cooperatives, or any other local entity seeking to invest in wind energy. The opposite of community wind is an 'absentee' project, in which ownership is completely removed from the state and community surrounding the facility. Thus, there is little or no ongoing direct financial benefit to state and local populations aside from salaries for local repair technicians, local property tax payments, and land lease payments. In recent years, the community wind sector has been inhibited by manufacturers' preference for larger turbine orders. This often puts smaller community wind developers and projects at a competitive disadvantage. However, state policies specifically supporting community wind may become a more influential market factor as turbines are now more readily available given manufacturer ramp-ups and the slow-down in the industry that has accompanied the recent economic and financial crises. This report examines existing literature to provide an overview of economic impacts resulting from community wind projects, compares results, and explains variability.

  12. Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

  13. Composition of Fish Communities in a European Macrotidal Salt Marsh (the Mont Saint-Michel Bay,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Composition of Fish Communities in a European Macrotidal Salt Marsh (the Mont Saint-Michel Bay At least 100 fish species are known to be present in the intertidal areas (estuaries, mudflats and salt, such as estuaries and lagoons, play a nursery role for many fish species. However, in Europe little attention has

  14. Community-Based Electric Micro-Grids Can Contribute to Rural Development: Evidence from Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    an ability to charge and enforce cost-reflective tariffs and when electricity consumption is closely linked and distribute electricity in rural areas (Government of Kenya, 2006). As an incentive measure, systems below 3Community-Based Electric Micro-Grids Can Contribute to Rural Development: Evidence from Kenya

  15. A Workflows Roadmap for the Geosciences NSF EarthCube Workflows Community Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil, Yolanda

    A Workflows Roadmap for the Geosciences NSF EarthCube Workflows Community Group September 15, 2012 to addressing those challenges. The group was asked to produce a roadmap for workflows in geosciences. Three to create a roadmap in their area. NSF guidance for the roadmap was to structure it in the following ten

  16. Targeted Discovery of Glycoside Hydrolases from a Switchgrass-Adapted Compost Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    Targeted Discovery of Glycoside Hydrolases from a Switchgrass-Adapted Compost Community Martin avenue of research in this area. Here we added a green-waste compost inoculum to switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and simulated thermophilic composting in a bioreactor to select for a switchgrass

  17. Sustainability Scientists and Scholars at Arizona State University: A Community of Scholars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Sustainability Scientists and Scholars at Arizona State University: A Community of Scholars of sustainability is a new and growing area of university responsibility and scholarly research called "sustainability science." This new field is a vital element of Arizona State University's research portfolio

  18. Climate adaptation, local institutions, and rural livelihoods: A comparative study of herder communities in Mongolia and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Daniel G.

    communities in Mongolia and Inner Mongolia, China Jun Wang *, Daniel G. Brown, Arun Agrawal School of Natural, including most parts of Mongolia and the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region (IMAR), China. About 84% (1.26 mil- lion km2 ) and 66% (0.78 million km2 ) of the total areas of Mongolia and Inner Mongolia, respectively

  19. July 18, 2014 Dear members of the McMaster community,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    by Shahid Naeem, Energy Management and Sustainability Engineer, Facility Services. Shahid, reportingJuly 18, 2014 Dear members of the McMaster community, McMaster's Office of Sustainability has undergone reorganization and has been developed into two distinct areas: campus operational sustainability

  20. COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gawlik, Dale E.

    COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA TYLER J. BECK of treatment wetlands called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) have been constructed on agricultural land greatly decreased, the creation of constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment has been increasing since

  1. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    twelve years. The Mid-Atlantic Area National Corridor includes certain counties in Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland, Virginia, and all of New Jersey,...

  2. area spoil area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 25 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  3. Data Archive and Portal Thrust Area Strategy Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Stephan, Eric G.; Macduff, Matt C.; Hagler, Clay D.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Data Archive and Portal (DAP), a key capability of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electron (A2e) initiative. The DAP Thrust Area Planning Group was organized to develop a plan for deploying this capability. Primarily, the report focuses on a distributed system--a DOE Wind Cloud--that functions as a repository for all A2e data. The Wind Cloud will be accessible via an open, easy-to-navigate user interface that facilitates community data access, interaction, and collaboration. DAP management will work with the community, industry, and international standards bodies to develop standards for wind data and to capture important characteristics of all data in the Wind Cloud.

  4. Community Characteristics and Demographic Development: Three Württemberg Communities, 1558 - 1914

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogilvie, Sheilagh; Küpker, M; Maegraith, J

    rates (often over 300 per 1000) caused the population of the Kingdom of Württemberg to rise only very gradually in the course of the nineteenth century.8 By the standards of other territories of German-speaking central Europe, it remained a ‘territory... of the second rank’ demographically as well as politically. The population development of our three communities, outlined in numbers in Table 1 to set them in a broader context, can more easily be interpreted by the graphical display in Figure 1. The town...

  5. Community College Institute (CCI) Program Description The Community College Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation TheCommunications and PublicCommunity

  6. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community Central Home > OpenEI

  7. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community Central Home >

  8. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community Central Home >OpenEI

  9. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community Central Home >OpenEIOpenEI

  10. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community Central Home

  11. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community Central Homechallenge Type

  12. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community Central Homechallenge

  13. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community Central HomechallengeOpenEI

  14. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community Central

  15. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community CentralOpenEI

  16. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community CentralOpenEIOpenEI

  17. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community CentralOpenEIOpenEIcomfort

  18. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEI Community

  19. Community Energy Planning A Guide for Communities Volume 1 - Introduction |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCityCoatedCommunity Electric Coop Jump to: navigation,Open

  20. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia Green FuelsperCivicVersion 2 isOpenEI Community

  1. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation TheCommunications and Public

  2. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ ".~ -.

  3. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ ".~

  4. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ ".~ _

  5. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\ ".~ _*

  6. community

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A en

  7. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and implementation of smart home energy management systemsStandard Technologies for Smart Home Area Networks EnablingInteroperability framework for smart home systems”, Consumer

  8. Tags | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:Shrenik IndustriesStateTags Home > Community

  9. NREL in the Community | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide CaptureSee theOilNREL in the Community NREL

  10. community.layout2.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires mayYuan T. Lee's www.rsc.org/loc Volumecoal015 COMMUNITY

  11. Community Energy Strategic Planning - Introduction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the WhiteNational| DepartmentCommunities Plug InEnergy

  12. Community Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York:GovernorCommons Capital Jump to:Community Fuels

  13. Conservation justice in metropolitan Cape Town: A study at the Macassar Dunes Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silander Jr., John A.

    Stakeholder analysis a b s t r a c t Conservation justice, a concept analogous to environmental justiceConservation justice in metropolitan Cape Town: A study at the Macassar Dunes Conservation Area J xxxx Keywords: Conservation justice Community-based conservation South Africa Urban conservation

  14. Tech Area II: A history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullrich, R. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories` Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy`s compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission`s integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area`s primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on high-explosive components outside of the original Area II diamond-shaped parcel. Most of the buildings in the area are vacant and Sandia has no plans to use them. They are proposed for decontamination and demolition as funding becomes available.

  15. The relationship between small learning communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turnbo, Bobbie Jo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    /vocational pathways. In the 1970s, schools progressed toward developing magnet programs, career academies, and mini-schools (Oxley, 2006). Charter schools became part of the high school evolution in the 1980s - 1990s, and are still strong advocates for small... traditional campus. Small Learning Communities Models and Strategies Sammon (2000) describes small learning communities by clustering them into six main models: career academies, houses, small learning community (SLC)/school- within-school, magnet schools...

  16. Mutual Gains and Distributive Ideologies in South Africa: Theorizing Negotiations between Communities and Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Derick A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    work on negotiation from psychology and management studies,work on negotiation from psychology and management studies.work on negotiation from psychology and management studies.

  17. Food For Thought: The Social Impact of Community Gardens in the Greater Cleveland Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flachs, Andrew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    identity – one of sustainable living, group values, andliving – a sort of utopian agrarianism in which food is both environmentally sustainable and

  18. Determining areas appropriate to indigenous plant communities and those appropriate to a more traditional collegiate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    management, "best management practices," which call for infiltration rather than conveyance of stormwater facilities into either the sanitary sewer or the storm water management system. Because greater than 10 as infiltration basins. · Furthering a holistic view of water resource management considering the entire "water

  19. Arthropod communities on decomposing fruit in agricultural and forested areas on Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starrs, Genoa Ione

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mellifica Hemiptera A Hemiptera B Hymenoptera A HymenopteraHomalodisca coagulata (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae): A newA Diptera? Larva B Hemiptera? Larva C Larva D Dermaptera

  20. Job Title Ryan White Medical Case Manager (LMSW/LBSW) Employer/ Agency Houston Areas Community Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    and formulates diagnosis of social, emotional and substance abuse problems, develops treatment plans for each to mental health treatment, substance abuse treatment, medications, housing, and other client services, medications, and health care adherence particularly in regarding to HIV and other medical diagnoses

  1. Des Moines Area Community College | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortalToDepth Profile ofDeputy SecretaryScientific and

  2. Arlington County, Virginia: Community Energy Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation features Richard Dooley, community energy coordinator with Arlington County's Office of Sustainability and Environmental Management. Dooley provides an overview of the development...

  3. Sharing Metadata: Building Collections and Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandler, Robin L.; Westbrook, Bradley D.; Rundblad, Kevin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metadata: Building Collections  and Communities Robin afford to think about collections only in  the context of an  institution's collections. Sharing Metadata: Building 

  4. Quality New Mexico recognizes Community Programs Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CPO receives Pion recognition Quality New Mexico recognizes Community Programs Office LANL has received 14 Pion and Roadrunner recognitions from Quality New Mexico since 1997....

  5. FINAL_LANL_Community Leaders 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and listening and responding to the needs of the communities in Northern New Mexico under its contractor, Los Alamos National Security, LLC. The study also measures...

  6. Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    bottom-line savings for businesses in the community. A local energy services company (ESCO), 1 MacDonald-Miller Facility Solutions, identified an opportunity for energy...

  7. Building the VOLTTRON Community: Expanding Transactive Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    knowledge Pool intellectual assets and skill sets Solve intricate problems that require brain power of many individuals 3 Examples of Technology Communities The Eclipse Project...

  8. NFWF Environmental Solutions for Communities Grant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wells Fargo and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) are accepting applications for approximately $2.5 million in Environmental Solutions for Communities grants.

  9. Community Energy Planning A Guide for Communities Volume 2 - The Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCityCoatedCommunity Electric Coop Jump to:

  10. The Community Activeness/Consciousness Matrix: A Tool for Community Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodori, Gene L.

    2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Citizens wishing to address social, economic and/or environmental issues in their region often ask county Extension agents for help in planning community development programs. The Community Activeness/Consciousness Matrix can help agents...

  11. Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters (text version)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters," originally presented on April 16, 2013.

  12. Identification of community power structure using the reputational approach: a comparative analysis of two Texas communities.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiekerman, Ruth Danette Hill

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IDENTIFICATION OF COMMUNITY POWER STRUCTURE USING THE REPUTATIONAL APPROACH: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF TWO TEXAS COMMUNITIES A Thesis RUTH DANETTE HILL SPIEKERMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1968 Major Subject: Sociology IDENTIFICATION OF COMMUNITY POWER STRUCTURE USING THE REPUTATIONAL APPROACH: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF TWO TEXAS COMMUNITIES A Thesis by RUTH...

  13. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  14. Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Daly, K.S.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan (Development Plan) is to guide the physical development of the 200 Areas (which refers to the 200 East Area, 200 West Area, and 200 Area Corridor, located between the 200 East and 200 West Areas) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4320.lB (DOE 1991a) by performing the following: Establishing a land-use plan and setting land-use categories that meet the needs of existing and proposed activities. Coordinating existing, 5-year, and long-range development plans and guiding growth in accordance with those plans. Establishing development guidelines to encourage cost-effective development and minimize conflicts between adjacent activities. Identifying site development issues that need further analysis. Integrating program plans with development plans to ensure a logical progression of development. Coordinate DOE plans with other agencies [(i.e., Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)]. Being a support document to the Hanford Site Development Plan (DOE-RL 1990a) (parent document) and providing technical site information relative to the 200 Areas.

  15. Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushman, Chris

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2011 the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. was awarded an Energy Efficiency Development and Deployment in Indian Country grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Energy Program. This grant aimed to study select Bay Mills Indian Community community/government buildings to determine what is required to reduce each building’s energy consumption by 30%. The Bay Mills Indian Community (BMIC) buildings with the largest expected energy use were selected for this study and included the Bay Mills Ellen Marshall Health Center building, Bay Mills Indian Community Administration Building, Bay Mills Community College main campus, Bay Mills Charter School and the Waishkey Community Center buildings. These five sites are the largest energy consuming Community buildings and comprised the study area of this project titled “Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community”. The end objective of this study, plan and the Tribe is to reduce the energy consumption at the Community’s most energy intensive buildings that will, in turn, reduce emissions at the source of energy production, reduce energy expenditures, create long lasting energy conscious practices and positively affect the quality of the natural environment. This project’s feasibility study and resulting plan is intended to act as a guide to the Community’s first step towards planned energy management within its buildings/facilities. It aims to reduce energy consumption by 30% or greater within the subject facilities with an emphasis on energy conservation and efficiency. The energy audits and related power consumption analyses conducted for this study revealed numerous significant energy conservation and efficiency opportunities for all of the subject sites/buildings. In addition, many of the energy conservation measures require no cost and serve to help balance other measures requiring capital investment. Reoccurring deficiencies relating to heating, cooling, thermostat setting inefficiencies, powering computers, lighting, items linked to weatherization and numerous other items were encountered that can be mitigated with the energy conservation measures developed and specified during the course of this project.

  16. Center for Community Health At the Center for Community Health (CCH),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Center for Community Health At the Center for Community Health (CCH), the community is our patient. Our focus is on disease prevention and improving access to care, especially for at-risk populations, to prevent health problems before they start. Partnering with the URMC, our research- based interventions

  17. Disaster: would your community bounce back?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sims, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    What makes some communities or organizations able to quickly bounce back from a disaster, while others take a long time to recover? This question has become very important for emergency planners in federal, state, and local government - particularly since the 9/11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina, which nearly destroyed New Orleans five years ago. These events have made people aware that we can't always prevent disasters, but might be able to improve the ability of communities and regions to respond to and bounce back from major disruptions. Social scientists have found that most communities are, in fact, quite resilient to most disasters. People tend to work together, overcome divisions, identify problems, and develop improvised solutions. This often leads to a greater sense of community and a sense of personal accomplishment. Long-term recovery can be harder, but rebuilding can create jobs and stimulate economies. Communities may even end up better than they were before. But there are some disturbing exceptions to this trend, including Hurricane Katrina. The hurricane killed many people, the federal and local emergency response was not effective, people who could not evacuate were housed in the Superdome and Convention Center in terrible conditions, crime was prevalent, and local government did not appear to have control over the situation. A significant portion of the population was eventually evacuated to other cities. Even five years later, many people have not returned, and large parts of the city have not been rebuilt. Clearly, New Orleans lacked sufficient resilience to overcome a disaster of the magnitude of Katrina. There are four factors that social scientists are beginning to agree are important for community resilience: (1) A strong, diverse economy - Stable jobs, good incomes, diversity of industries, personal savings; (2) Robust social networks - Community members know each other, help each other, and have connections outside the community; (3) Competent organizations - Government, health care, community service, and religious organizations are competent and trustworthy, and have resources to handle community needs; and (4) High-quality infrastructure - Road, power, and water systems (etc.) are in good condition and are designed to provide service even if some connections are destroyed. To explore how these factors make communities resilient, I will tell two stories of disasters. The first is the Buffalo Creek flood, which wiped out a coal mining community in West Virginia in 1972. This is a classic example of community that was not resilient in the aftermath of a disaster. The second example is the Vietnamese immigrant community in the Versailles neighborhood of New Orleans. In spite of being relatively poor and culturally isolated, this community was one of the first to fully rebound following Hurricane Katrina.

  18. Development of a Model, Metal-reducing Microbial Community for a System Biology Level Assessment of Desulfovibrio vulgaris as part of a Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elias, Dwayne; Schadt, Christopher; Miller, Lance; Phelps, Tommy; Brown, S. D.; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Drake, Megin; Yang, Z.K.; Podar, Mircea

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the largest experimental gaps is between the simplicity of pure cultures and the complexity of open environmental systems, particularly in metal-contaminated areas. These microbial communities form ecosystem foundations, drive biogeochemical processes, and are relevant for biotechnology and bioremediation. A model, metal-reducing microbial community was constructed as either syntrophic or competitive to study microbial cell to cell interactions, cell signaling and competition for resources. The microbial community was comprised of the metal-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Additionally, Methanococcus maripaludis S2 was added to study complete carbon reduction and maintain a low hydrogen partial pressure for syntrophism to occur. Further, considerable work has been published on D. vulgaris and the D. vulgaris/ Mc. maripaludis co-culture both with and without stress. We are extending this work by conducting the same stress conditions on the model community. Additionally, this comprehensive investigation includes physiological and metabolic analyses as well as specially designed mRNA microarrays with the genes for all three organisms on one slide so as to follow gene expression changes in the various cultivation conditions as well as being comparable to the co- and individual cultures. Further, state-of -the-art comprehensive AMT tag proteomics allows for these comparisons at the protein level for a systems biology assessment of a model, metal-reducing microbial community. Preliminary data revealed that lactate oxidation by D. vulgaris was sufficient to support both G. sulfurreducens and M. maripaludis via the excretion of H2 and acetate. Fumarate was utilized by G. sulfurreducens and reduced to succinate since neither of the other two organisms can reduce fumarate. Methane was quantified, suggesting acetate and H2 concentrations were sufficient for M. maripaludis. Steady state community cultivation will allow for a comprehensive, system biology level analysis of a metal-reducing microbial community.

  19. COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, a board computational accelerator physics initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cary, J.R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale project for AcceleratorNational Laboratory. COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascalefor materials studies. COMPASS, the Community Petascale

  20. AREA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 of 5) ALARA TrainingANDREW W.categoricalHSS/UNIONAREA

  1. The Program Area Committee Chairperson.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Mary; Richardson, Burl B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    worksheets and others. Prepared by Mary G. Marshall and Burl B. RichardsQ Extension program development specialists, The Texas A&M University System. THE PROGRAM AREA COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSON You Hold an Important Position! Whenever people gather...

  2. Focus Area Tax Credits (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Focus Area Tax Credits for businesses in Baltimore City or Prince George’s County enterprise zones include: (1) Ten-year, 80% credit against local real property taxes on a portion of real property...

  3. Security Area Vouching and Piggybacking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Security Area practice of "vouching" or "piggybacking" access by personnel. DOE N 251.40, dated 5-3-01, extends this directive until 12-31-01.

  4. Progress Update: M Area Closure

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The celebration of the first area cleanup completion with the help of the Recovery Act.

  5. Protected Water Area System (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Natural Resource Commission maintains a state plan for the design and establishment of a protected water area system and those adjacent lands needed to protect the integrity of that system. A...

  6. Wellhead Protection Area Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section regulates activities which can occur on or below the land surface of the area surrounding a wellhead. The purpose of these regulations is to limit well contamination and preserve...

  7. Partners for a Caring Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    's disease or heart disease; or struggling with prob- lems such as homelessness, domestic abuse or illiteracy served by organizations such as Matthew House and Crisis Nursery in Champaign and the Mahom- et Area Boys or more organizations if you want to support specific causes that are close to your heart. Dear

  8. A Phase I Cultural Resources Survey of the Walker County Jail and Office Expansion Area Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    documents the results of a Phase I assessment of a 12.82 acre tract on land owned by the County of Walker in central Walker County, Texas (Figure 1). The site area is on a high clay ridge overlooking a low area to the north. The project area is bounded... as defined by the United States Forest Service for the four National Forests in East Texas. According to Ippolito (1983:6-7), the major forest cover types in this community include loblolly pine, shortleaf pine, slash pine, post oak, southern red oak...

  9. Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The DOE/NREL Approach NREL is a national: The DOE/NREL Approach Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The DOE/NREL Approach HelpingVoss, Sarah Busche, Eric Lantz, Lynn Billman, and Dan Beckley. The layout and technical editing were

  10. Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities Johnson Foundation at Wingspread · Precipitation and high water · Adapting to our changing climate · Assisting coastal communities Photo: WDNR #12 source of risk from changing climate. City of Green Bay watershed - #12;Predicted climate includes

  11. Variable area fuel cell cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

  12. Biological Inventory Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Inventory of the Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area Prepared by: Joe Stevens .............................. 12 Identify Targeted Inventory Areas

  13. Social significance of community structure: Statistical view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui-Jia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Community structure analysis is a powerful tool for social networks, which can simplify their topological and functional analysis considerably. However, since community detection methods have random factors and real social networks obtained from complex systems always contain error edges, evaluating the significance of community structure partitioned is an urgent and important question. In this paper, integrating the specific characteristics of real society, we present a novel framework analyzing the significance of social community specially. The dynamics of social interactions are modeled by identifying social leaders and corresponding hierarchical structures. Instead of a direct comparison with the average outcome of a random model, we compute the similarity of a given node with the leader by the number of common neighbors. To determine the membership vector, an efficient community detection algorithm is proposed based on the position of nodes and their corresponding leaders. Then, using log-likelihood sco...

  14. Energy Management A Program of Energy Conservation for the Community College Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heater, and may be reused. Rinse water may also be partially recycled in a two-tankheaters and require a larger tank to keep an adequate supply of water

  15. Facilitating communities in designing and using their own community health impact assessment tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, Colleen, E-mail: accamero@stfx.c [Coady International Institute, St. Francis Xavier University, P.O. Box 5000, Antigonish NS B2G 2W5 (Canada); Ghosh, Sebanti, E-mail: sebantiasha@rediffmail.co [Association for Social and Health Advancement (ASHA), BE-135, Sector-1, Salt Lake City, Kolkata-700 064 (India); Eaton, Susan L., E-mail: susan.eaton@ns.sympatico.c [People Assessing Their Health (PATH) Network, 61 Brookland Street, Antigonish NS B2G 1V8 (Canada)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing health inequities and improving the health of communities require an informed public that is aware of the social determinants of health and how policies and programs have an impact on the health of their communities. People Assessing Their Health (PATH) is a process that uses community-driven health impact assessment to build the capacity of people to become active participants in the decisions that affect the well-being of their community. The PATH process is both a health promotion and a community development approach that builds people's ability to bring critical analysis to a situation and to engage in effective social action to bring about desired change. Because it increases analytical skills and provides communities with their own unique tool to assess the potential impact of projects, programs or policies on the health and well-being of their community it is an empowering process. PATH was originally used in three communities in northeastern Nova Scotia, Canada in 1996 when the Canadian health care system was being restructured to a more decentralized system. Since then it has been used in other communities in Nova Scotia and India. This paper will describe the PATH process and the use of the community health impact assessment as well as the methodology used in the PATH process. The lessons learned from PATH's experiences of building capacity among the community in Canada and India will be presented.

  16. Chapter 11. Community analysis-based methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Y.; Wu, C.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Holden, P.A.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial communities are each a composite of populations whose presence and relative abundance in water or other environmental samples are a direct manifestation of environmental conditions, including the introduction of microbe-rich fecal material and factors promoting persistence of the microbes therein. As shown by culture-independent methods, different animal-host fecal microbial communities appear distinctive, suggesting that their community profiles can be used to differentiate fecal samples and to potentially reveal the presence of host fecal material in environmental waters. Cross-comparisons of microbial communities from different hosts also reveal relative abundances of genetic groups that can be used to distinguish sources. In increasing order of their information richness, several community analysis methods hold promise for MST applications: phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), cloning/sequencing, and PhyloChip. Specific case studies involving TRFLP and PhyloChip approaches demonstrate the ability of community-based analyses of contaminated waters to confirm a diagnosis of water quality based on host-specific marker(s). The success of community-based MST for comprehensively confirming fecal sources relies extensively upon using appropriate multivariate statistical approaches. While community-based MST is still under evaluation and development as a primary diagnostic tool, results presented herein demonstrate its promise. Coupled with its inherently comprehensive ability to capture an unprecedented amount of microbiological data that is relevant to water quality, the tools for microbial community analysis are increasingly accessible, and community-based approaches have unparalleled potential for translation into rapid, perhaps real-time, monitoring platforms.

  17. Remote Area Power Supply (RAPS) load and resource profiles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giles, Lauren (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC); Skolnik, Edward G. (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC); Marchionini, Brian (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC); Fall, Ndeye K. (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, an international team interested in the development of Remote Area Power Supply (RAPS) systems for rural electrification projects around the world was organized by the International Lead Zinc Research Organization (ILZRO) with the support of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The team focused on defining load and resource profiles for RAPS systems. They identified single family homes, small communities, and villages as candidates for RAPS applications, and defined several different size/power requirements for each. Based on renewable energy and resource data, the team devised a ''strawman'' series of load profiles. A RAPS system typically consists of a renewable and/or conventional generator, power conversion equipment, and a battery. The purpose of this report is to present data and information on insolation levels and load requirements for ''typical'' homes, small communities, and larger villages around the world in order to facilitate the development of robust design practices for RAPS systems, and especially for the storage battery component. These systems could have significant impact on areas of the world that would otherwise not be served by conventional electrical grids.

  18. Beneficial Reuse | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:WhetherNovember 13, 2009OakDepartment of

  19. Collection, evaluation, and diffusion of information in online communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamas, Evangelos

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I study a number of online information communities to understand how open practices are currently used in supporting community functions. By examining how communities operate, I hope to provide individuals ...

  20. EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson Valley Clean Communities, Inc. (NY, MA, PA); NYSERDA (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC) EV Community...