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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Centimeter  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended. Therefore, the...

2

Centimeter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStanding Friedel Waves,TheoryParliament' | ArgonneCenters

3

Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The 2011 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

4

r:lCM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:March_ ,' .' ft.3200:'. 'r:lCM ' ~.

5

Construction of a polarization sensitive planar antenna for microwaves in the centimeter range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Construction of a polarization sensitive planar antenna for microwaves in the centimeter range the construction of the actual antenna circuit took place, a number of tests were performed to develop of various techniques. Following these tests, a prototype antenna circuit was constructed and measurements

6

Accelerating into the Future Zero to 1GeV in a Few Centimeters  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

July 8, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

LBNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

APPLICATION CM CARES PROJECT REQUEST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-learning program sponsored by the Department of Construction Management. The goal of CM Cares is to infuse

Stephens, Graeme L.

8

AREA  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South Valley ResponsibleSubmissionofDepartmentNo.7-052 ofFocusAREA FAQ #

9

Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

10

Design and engineering of low-cost centimeter-scale repeatable and accurate kinematic fixtures for nanomanufacturing equipment using magnetic preload and potting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper introduces a low-cost, centimeter-scale kinematic coupling fixture for use in nanomanufacturing equipment. The fixture uses magnetic circuit design techniques to optimize the magnetic preload required to achieve ...

Watral, Adrienne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1< D[M2+-O]< 532 kJ mol-1 -- such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic O-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+ and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

Cross section for {sup 246}Cm subbarrier fission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross section for {sup 246}Cm fission induced by neutrons of energy in the range 0.1 eV-20 keV was measured by the neutron lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS-100) of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The parameters of the resonance area and of the fission width were evaluated for several low-lying s-wave neutron resonances. The parameters of the intermediate structure in the cross section for the subbarrier fusion of {sup 246}Cm nuclei were found. The results obtained in this way were compared with available experimental data and with recommended evaluated data.

Alekseev, A. A.; Bergman, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Koptelov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Samylin, B. F.; Trufanov, A. M.; Fursov, B. I.; Shorin, V. S., E-mail: shorin@ippe.r [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Cross section for the subbarrier fission of {sup 244}Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross section for {sup 244}Cm fission induced by neutrons of energy in the range between 0.07 eV and 20 keV was measured by using the lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS-100) of the Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The parameters of the resonance areas were determined for the lowest eight s-wave neutron resonances, and the respective fission widths were evaluated. Also, the parameters of the intermediate structure in the cross section for the subbarrier fission of {sup 244}Cm nuclei were evaluated. The results were compared with available data and recommendations based on evaluations.

Alekseev, A. A.; Bergman, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Koptelov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Samylin, B. F.; Svirin, M. I.; Trufanov, A. M.; Fursov, B. I.; Shorin, V. S., E-mail: shorin@ippe.r [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fission-barrier parameters of the compound nuclei /sup 245/Cm, /sup 247/Cm, and /sup 249/Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross section for fission of /sup 248/Cm by neutrons has been measured in the energy interval 0.3< or =E/sub n/< or =5.5 MeV. The measurements were made by the time-of-flight method with use of an underground nuclear explosion as a pulsed neutron source. From the experimental data for the compound nuclei /sup 245/Cm, /sup 247/Cm, and /sup 249/Cm we have evaluated the following characteristics of the fission probability: the inner barrier height E/sup A//sub f/, the curvature parameter h..omega../sub A/ and the ratio of the average neutron and fission widths. Some features of the fission probability curves obtained are discussed, and also the question of the applicability of the systematics for prediction of fission characteristics of heavy nuclei with neutron number N>152.

Fomushkin, E.F.; Novoselov, G.F.; Vinogradov, Y.I.; Gavrilov, V.V.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Chilled Mirror Dew Point Hygrometer (CM) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CM systems have been developed for the ARM Program to act as a moisture standard traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are three CM systems that are each fully portable, self-contained, and require only 110 V AC power. The systems include a CM sensor, air sampling and filtration system, a secondary reference (Rotronic HP043 temperature and relative humidity sensor) to detect system malfunctions, a data acquisition system, and data storage for more than one month of 1-minute data. The CM sensor directly measures dew point temperature at 1 m, air temperature at 2 m, and relative humidity at 2 m. These measurements are intended to represent self-standing data streams that can be used independently or in combinations.

Ritsche, MT

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Overcoming the Challenges of 21cm Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 Opening the 21cm EoR Window: Measurements of with PAPERthe Epoch of Reionization (EoR) begin operation, includingspace, leaving an “EoR window” free from contamination. For

Pober, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Final construction quality assurance report for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V, Area 2, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) has finished construction of Area 2 of the Y-12 Plant Industrial Landfill (ILF-V), classified as a Class 2 Landfill. This final Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report provides documentation that Area 2 was constructed in substantial compliance with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved design, as indicated and specified in the permit drawings, approved changes, and specifications. This report applies specifically to the Area 2 excavation, compacted clay soil liner, geomembrane liner, granular leachate collection layer, protective soil cover, and the leachate collection system. An ``As-Built`` survey was performed and is included. The drawings provide horizontal and vertical information for Area 2, the anchor trench, the leachate collection pipe, the temporary access road, and cross-sections of Area 2. This report provides documentation of the following items: the excavation activities of Area 2; the maximum recompacted coefficient of hydraulic conductivity or permeability of the soil is less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} centimeters per second (cm/sec); the total thickness of the compacted clay soil liner equals a minimum of 2 feet; a 40 mil impermeable geomembrane (polypropylene) flexible membrane liner (FML) and 16 oz. geotextile fabric was placed in direct contact with the compacted clay soil liner; a 12 inch granular leachate collection layer was installed and covered with a 8 oz. geotextile separation fabric; the installation of the leachate collection piping; and the two foot protective clay soil cover.

Bessom, W.H. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

21cm Forest with the SKA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An alternative to both the tomography technique and the power spectrum approach is to search for the 21cm forest, that is the 21cm absorption features against high-z radio loud sources caused by the intervening cold neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) and collapsed structures. Although the existence of high-z radio loud sources has not been confirmed yet, SKA-low would be the instrument of choice to find such sources as they are expected to have spectra steeper than their lower-z counterparts. Since the strongest absorption features arise from small scale structures (few tens of physical kpc, or even lower), the 21cm forest can probe the HI density power spectrum on small scales not amenable to measurements by any other means. Also, it can be a unique probe of the heating process and the thermal history of the early universe, as the signal is strongly dependent on the IGM temperature. Here we show what SKA1-low could do in terms of detecting the 21cm forest in the redshift range z = 7.5-15.

Ciardi, Benedetta; Mack, Katherine J; Xu, Yidong; Bernardi, Gianni

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Magnetic susceptibility of curium pnictides. [/sup 248/CmP, /sup 248/CmSb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetic susceptibility of microgram quantities of /sup 248/CmP and /sup 248/CmSb has been determined with the use of a SQUID micromagnetic susceptometer over the temperature range 4.2 to 340 K and in the applied magnetic field range of 0.45 to 1600 G. The fcc (NaCl-type) samples yield magnetic transitions at 73K and 162 K for the phosphide and antimonide, respectively. Together with published magnetic data for CmN and CmAs, these results indicate spatially extended exchange interactions between the relatively localized 5f electrons of the metallic actinide atoms.

Nave, S.E.; Huray, P.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Damien, D.A.; Haire, R.G.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nevada National Security Site 2012 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2012 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2012; 2013a; 2013b). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below Derived Concentration Standards for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. Leachate samples collected from the leachate collection system at the mixed low-level waste cell were below established contaminant regulatory limits. The 133.9 millimeters (mm) (5.27 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2012 is 12% below the average of 153.0 mm (6.02 in.), and the 137.6 mm (5.42 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2012 is 11% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2012, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2012 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

Hudson, David B.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nevada National Security Site 2013 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) within the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2013 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2013; 2014a; 2014b). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are close to detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below Derived Concentration Standards for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. Leachate samples collected from the leachate collection system at the mixed low-level waste cell were below established contaminant regulatory limits. The 105.8 millimeters (mm) (4.17 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2013 is 30% below the average of 150.3 mm (5.92 in.), and the 117.5 mm (4.63 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2013 is 5% below the average of 123.6 mm (4.86 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2013, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3-times natural precipitation. All 2013 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

Hudson, D. B.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

22

Nevada National Security Site 2010 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2010 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2010a; 2010b; 2011). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. All gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below the minimum detectable concentrations, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. The 246.9 millimeters (mm) (9.72 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2010 is 56 percent above the average of 158.7 mm (6.25 in.), and the 190.4 mm (7.50 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2010 is 50 percent above the average of 126.7 mm (4.99 in.). Soil-gas tritium monitoring at borehole GCD-05 continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 61 cm (2 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2010, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Water drained from both the bare-soil drainage lysimeter and the invader species drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2010 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Data Catalogs based on Images from FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, from the Very Large Array (VLA) First Survey  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 27 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and cleaned using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). Data were collected from 1993 through 2002, with enhanced images produced up through 2011. The Data Catalogs have been cleaned and reissued over time, with the latest version coming out in March, 2014. They contain maps, images, and binary data. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

24

Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2007. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2007. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. Two additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2007. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during these additional inspections are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2007 are included in Appendix C.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Determination of the half-life of /sup 243/ Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors determine the half life of Cm 243 (T/sub alpha 243/) relative to the half-life of Cm 244 (whose value is known with high accuracy) from the molar ratios of the mixture of the nuclide studied with Cm 244 and the nuclides of plutonium, forming as a result of the alpha decay of curium nuclides. The results of the calculations of T/sub alpha 243/ based on the formula presented are shown. The random error for the average value of T/sub alpha 243/ is presented with a confidence probability of 0.95.

Timofeev, G.A.; Kalygin, V.V.; Privalova, P.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

High Throughput Ultralong (20 cm) Nanowire Fabrication Using a Wafer-Scale Nanograting Template  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-gu, Daejeon, 305-701, Republic of Korea LG Innotek Components & Materials R&D Center, 55 Hanyang Daehak actively explored as promising nanostructured materials for high performance flexible electronics (centimeter- long) nanowires are highly attractive from the perspective of electronic performance, device

27

An Improved Method for 21cm Foreground Removal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21-cm tomography is expected to be difficult in part because of serious foreground contamination. Previous studies have found that line-of-sight approaches are capable of cleaning foregrounds to an acceptable level on large ...

Liu, Adrian

28

Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999-October 2000 period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in August 2000. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began seven years ago. The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. Precipitation for the period October 1999 through October 2000 was 10.44 centimeters (cm) (4.11 inches [in.]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2000). The prior year annual rainfall (January 1999 through December 1999) was 10.13cm (3.99 in.). The highest 30-day cumulative rainfall occurred on March 8, 2000, with a total of 6.63 cm (2.61 in.). The heaviest daily precipitation occurred on February 23,2000, with a total of 1.70 cm (0.67 in.) falling in that 24-hour period. The recorded average annual rainfall for this site, from 1972 to January 1999, is 15.06 cm (5.93 in.). All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the trenches.

D. F. Emer

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Evolution of the 21 cm signal throughout cosmic history  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential use of the redshifted 21 cm line from neutral hydrogen for probing the epoch of reionization is motivating the construction of several low-frequency interferometers. There is also much interest in the possibility of constraining the initial conditions from inflation and the nature of the dark matter and dark energy by probing the power-spectrum of density perturbations in three dimensions and on smaller scales than probed by the microwave background anisotropies. Theoretical understanding of the 21 cm signal has been fragmented into different regimes of physical interest. In this paper, we make the first attempt to describe the full redshift evolution of the 21 cm signal between 0neutral fraction, as well as the Lyman alpha flux, and allow for a post-reionization signal from damped Ly alpha systems. Our comprehensive analysis provides a useful foundation for optimizing the design of future arrays whose goal is to separate the particle physics from the astrophysics, either by probing the peculiar velocity distortion of the 21 cm power spectrum, or by extending the 21 cm horizon to z > 25 before the first galaxies had formed, or to z < 6 when the residual pockets of hydrogen trace large scale structure.

Jonathan R. Pritchard; Abraham Loeb

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Influence of primordial magnetic fields on 21 cm emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic fields in the early universe can significantly alter the thermal evolution and the ionization history during the dark ages. This is reflected in the 21 cm line of atomic hydrogen, which is coupled to the gas temperature through collisions at high redshifts, and through the Wouthuysen-Field effect at low redshifts. We present a semi-analytic model for star formation and the build-up of a Lyman alpha background in the presence of magnetic fields, and calculate the evolution of the mean 21 cm brightness temperature and its frequency gradient as a function of redshift. We further discuss the evolution of linear fluctuations in temperature and ionization in the presence of magnetic fields and calculate the effect on the 21 cm power spectrum. At high redshifts, the signal is increased compared to the non-magnetic case due to the additional heat input into the IGM from ambipolar diffusion and the decay of MHD turbulence. At lower redshifts, the formation of luminous objects and the build-up of a Lyman alpha background can be delayed by a redshift interval of 10 due to the strong increase of the filtering mass scale in the presence of magnetic fields. This tends to decrease the 21 cm signal compared to the zero-field case. In summary, we find that 21 cm observations may become a promising tool to constrain primordial magnetic fields.

Dominik R. G. Schleicher; Robi Banerjee; Ralf S. Klessen

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

31

Evolution of the 21 cm signal throughout cosmic history  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential use of the redshifted 21 cm line from neutral hydrogen for probing the epoch of reionization is motivating the construction of several low-frequency interferometers. There is also much interest in the possibility of constraining the initial conditions from inflation and the nature of the dark matter and dark energy by probing the power-spectrum of density perturbations in three dimensions and on smaller scales than probed by the microwave background anisotropies. Theoretical understanding of the 21 cm signal has been fragmented into different regimes of physical interest. In this paper, we make the first attempt to describe the full redshift evolution of the 21 cm signal between 0 25 before the first galaxies had formed, or to z < 6 when the residual pockets of hydrogen trace large scale structure.

Pritchard, Jonathan R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Selection between foreground models for global 21-cm experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The precise form of the foregrounds for sky-averaged measurements of the 21-cm line during and before the epoch of reionization is unknown. We suggest that the level of complexity in the foreground models used to fit global 21-cm data should be driven by the data, under a Bayesian model selection methodology. A first test of this approach is carried out by applying nested sampling to simplified models of global 21-cm data to compute the Bayesian evidence for the models. If the foregrounds are assumed to be polynomials of order n in log-log space, we can infer the necessity to use n=4 rather than n=3 with <2h of integration with limited frequency coverage, for reasonable values of the n=4 coefficient. Using a higher-order polynomial does not necessarily prevent a significant detection of the 21-cm signal. Even for n=8, we can obtain very strong evidence distinguishing a reasonable model for the signal from a null model with 128h of integration. More subtle features of the signal may, however, be lost if the...

Harker, Geraint

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

ORIGINAL PAPER M. Grosell C.M. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER M. Grosell á C.M. Wood Branchial versus intestinal silver toxicity and uptake Hogstrand and Wood 1998; Wood et al. 1999 for reviews), much less is known about the exact toxic mechanisms primarily through the apical Na+ channel (Bury and Wood 1999) and targets the basolateral Na/K-AT- Pase

Grosell, Martin

34

Chancellor's Memorandum CM-59 Safety and Environmental Policy and Responsibilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chancellor's Memorandum CM-59 ­ Safety and Environmental Policy and Responsibilities To: LSU Health Chancellor February 10, 2014 Purpose This document provides the Chancellor's safety and environmental policy statement, and sets forth responsibilities associated with these programs. Policy Statement The LSU Health

35

Area 6 Decontamination Pond Corrective Action Unit 92 Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report for the Period January 2000-December 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Corrective Action Unit 92, was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP, 1995]) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (NDEP, 1996) on May 11, 1999. Historically the Decontamination Pond was used for the disposal of partially treated liquid effluent discharged from the Decontamination Facility (Building 6-05) and the Industrial Laundry (Building 6-07) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1996). The Decontamination Pond was constructed and became operational in 1979. Releases of RCRA-regulated hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents have not been discharged to the Decontamination Pond since 1988 (DOE/NV, 1996). The pipe connecting the Decontamination Pond and Decontamination Facility and Industrial Laundry were cut and sealed at the Decontamination Pad Oil/Water Separator in 1992. The Decontamination Pond was closed in place by installing a RCRA cover. Fencing was installed around the periphery to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring at the site consists of quarterly inspections of the RCRA cover and fencing, and a subsidence survey. Additional inspections are conducted if: Precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period, or An earthquake occurs with a magnitude exceeding 4.5 on the Richter scale within 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) of the closure.

J. L. Traynor

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Studying 21cm power spectrum with one-point statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The redshifted 21cm line signal from neutral hydrogens is a promising tool to probe the cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization (EoR). Ongoing and future low-frequency radio experiments are expected to detect its fluctuations, especially through the power spectrum. In this paper, we give a physical interpretation of the time evolution of the power spectrum of the 21cm brightness temperature fluctuations, which can be decomposed into dark matter density, spin temperature and neutral fraction of hydrogen fluctuations. From the one-point statistics of the fluctuations, such as variance and skewness, we find that the peaks and dips in the time evolution are deeply related to X-ray heating of the intergalactic gas, which controls the spin temperature. We suggest the skewness of the brightness temperature distribution is a key observable to identify the onset of X-ray heating.

Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Energy (cm-1 MolarExtinctionCoefficient(M-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chloroform Dichloromethane Acetonitrile -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 -1 Time (ps) OD(mOD) -0.8 -0.6 -0.4 -0.2 0 0.2 0 in acetonitrile following photoexcitation at 266 nm. Measured at probe frequencies ranging from1820 cm-1 to 1920- stretch fundamental transition of ClNO dis- solved in acetonitrile following 266-nm pho- tolysis

Reid, Philip J.

38

BRIGHT SOURCE SUBTRACTION REQUIREMENTS FOR REDSHIFTED 21 cm MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The H I 21 cm transition line is expected to be an important probe into the cosmic dark ages and epoch of reionization. Foreground source removal is one of the principal challenges for the detection of this signal. This paper investigates the extragalactic point source contamination and how accurately bright sources ({approx}>1 Jy) must be removed in order to detect 21 cm emission with upcoming radio telescopes such as the Murchison Widefield Array. We consider the residual contamination in 21 cm maps and power spectra due to position errors in the sky model for bright sources, as well as frequency-independent calibration errors. We find that a source position accuracy of 0.1 arcsec will suffice for detection of the H I power spectrum. For calibration errors, 0.05% accuracy in antenna gain amplitude is required in order to detect the cosmic signal. Both sources of subtraction error produce residuals that are localized to small angular scales, k{sub perpendicular} {approx}> 0.05 Mpc{sup -1}, in the two-dimensional power spectrum.

Datta, A. [New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Bowman, J. D. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Carilli, C. L., E-mail: adatta@nrao.ed [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

2010-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

39

ARM - Campaign Instrument - pyran-kandz-cm11  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformationbudapest Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below orkandz-cm11 Comments?

40

Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to discuss the findings of the Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration carried out at TNX during December 1995. This demonstration consisted of two steps: oxalate precipitation and precipitate washing. The first step reacted Am/Cm stimulant solution with oxalic acid resulting in the formation of insoluble lanthanide oxalates and soluble metal oxalates. The second step consisted of washing the precipitate with equal volumes of a nitric acid/oxalic acid solution to remove unwanted cations (miscellaneous metals) from the slurry. Quantitative results consist of: the solubility of the metallic impurities and lanthanide oxalates under process conditions, the settling rate of the oxalates, the specific volume of the oxalate precipitate, and the minimum distance the solution transfer jet can be place from the oxalate solids to prevent entrainment. Finally, discussion of how to decrease lanthanide losses is presented in terms of transfer jet location, initial nitric acid concentration, and wash nitric acid concentration. Solubilizing the precipitate and adjusting the nitric acid concentration prior to vitrification were not performed in this demonstration.

Beck, S.B.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON POND FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by the NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2005. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2005. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Five additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in) within a 24-hour period during 2005. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2005 are included in Appendix C.

NA

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 110: AREA 3 WMD U-3AX/BL CRATER, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA FOR THE PERIOD JULY 2004 - JUNE 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring report provides the results of inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110, Area 3 Waste Management Division (WMD) U-3ax/bl Crater. This report includes an analysis and summary of the site inspections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110, for the annual period July 2004 through June 2005. Site inspections of the cover were performed quarterly to identify any significant changes to the site requiring action. The overall condition of the cover, cover vegetation, perimeter fence, and use restriction warning signs was good. Settling was observed that exceeded the action level as specified in Section VII.B.7 of the Hazardous Waste Permit Number NEV HW009 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 2000). This permit states that cracks or settling greater than 15 centimeters (cm) (6 inches [in]) deep that extend 1.0 meter (m) (3 feet [ft]) or more on the cover will be evaluated and repaired within 60 days of detection.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Large area bulk superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Field, Michael B. (Jersey City, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Modeling the behavior of Cm and Am during separation by complexing extraction chromatography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Certain heavy rare earths (REE), Cm, and Am are separated by complexing extraction chromatography using solutions of DTPA and DTPA-citric acid as eluents. The separation coefficients of REE from Cm and Am are calculated. Tracers are proposed for the Cm and Am separations. These are Tm for Cm elution using 0.025 M DTPA and Ho for Cm elution using 0.025 M DTPA with 0.025 citric acid. The tracer for Am in both instances is Tb.

Chuveleva, E.A.; Kharitonov, O.V.; Firsova, L.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

c : solute concentration in solution, mol or g solutes/ cm3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by a finite difference, a finite element or a boundary element technique. Then a discretization scheme) algebraic equations that can be solved by different methods. The operation by means of such a mathematical : soil bulk density, g/cm3 : source/sink term, µ mol/cm3 /h or µg/cm3 /h INTRODUCTION In many arid

Kumar, C.P.

46

POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 112: AREA 23 HAZARDOUS WASTE TRENCHES, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 2003 - SEPTEMBER 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit located in Area 23 of the NTS. This annual Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report provides the results of inspections and monitoring for CAU 112. This report includes a summary and analysis of the site inspections, repair and maintenance, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 112 for the current monitoring period, October 2003 through September 2004. Inspections of the CAU 112 RCRA unit were performed quarterly to identify any significant physical changes to the site that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit. The overall condition of the covers and facility was good, and no significant findings were observed. The annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted on August 23, 2004, and the results indicated that no cover subsidence4 has occurred at any of the markers. The elevations of the markers have been consistent for the past 11 years. The total precipitation for the current reporting period, october 2003 to September 2004, was 14.0 centimeters (cm) (5.5 inches [in]) (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, Special Operations and Research Division, 2004). This is slightly below the average rainfall of 14.7 cm (5.79 in) over the same period from 1972 to 2004. Post-closure monitoring verifies that the CAU 112 trench covers are performing properly and that no water is infiltrating into or out of the waste trenches. Sail moisture measurements are obtained in the soil directly beneath the trenches and compared to baseline conditions for the first year of post-closure monitoring, which began in october 1993. neutron logging was performed twice during this monitoring period along 30 neutron access tubes to obtain soil moisture data and detect any changes that may indicate moisture movement beneath each trench. Soil moisture results obtained to date indicate that the compliance criterion of less than 5% Residual Volumetric Moisture Content was met. Soil conditions remain dry and stable beneath the trenches, and the cover is functioning as designed within the compliance limits.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Heat Transfer -1 Consider a composite pipe of inner diameter 10 cm and outer diameter 10.6 cm subjected to an external  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a composite pipe of inner diameter 10 cm and outer diameter 10.6 cm subjected to an external constant uniform heat flux of 100,000 W/m2 . The composite material of the pipe has/mK in the axial direction. Both ends of the pipe are insulated from any heat loss. The pipe is cooled by water

Virginia Tech

48

Similarity of structuring in the range 10^{-5} cm to 10^23 cm hints at a baryonic cold dark skeleton of the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The presence of skeletal structures of the same distinctive topology (cartwheels, tubules, etc.), in the range 10^{-5} - 10^23 cm, and a trend toward self-similarity of these structures are found. These evidences come from the electron micrography of dust deposits in tokamak (10^{-6} - 10^{-3}cm), the images of plasma taken in laboratory electric discharges -- tokamaks, Z-pinches, plasma focus and vacuum spark (10^{-2} - 10 cm), hail particles (1-10 cm), the images of tornado (10^3 - 10^5 cm), the Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Observatory public archives' images (up to 10^23 cm). The redshift surveys of galaxies and quasars suggests the possibility to draw the above similarity farther, up to 10^26 cm. The above similarity hints at the presence of a baryonic cold dark skeleton (BCDS) of the Universe, which -- in the entire range 10^{-5} - 10^26 cm -- may contain ordinary matter in a fractal condensed form like that in the above-mentioned dust skeletons and hail particles. The probable compatibility of the BCDS with the major cosmological facts (Hubble's expansion and cosmic microwave background) is suggested. Our former hypotheses (and the respective proof-of-concept studies) for the probable microscopic mechanisms of skeleton's assembling, chemical composition, and survivability in ambient hot plasmas are discussed briefly. The respective major cosmological implication is that the purely gravitational description of the large-scale structure of the Universe is likely to be appended with a contribution of quantum electromagnetism, presumably in the form of a skeleton self-assembled from tubular nanostructures (carbon nanotubes or similar nanostructures of other chemical elements).

A. B. Kukushkin; V. A. Rantsev-Kartinov

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

G. Wu, K.L. More, C.M. Johnston, and P. Zelenay, "High-Performance Electrocatalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours,FrequentlyFundedWu, K.L. More, C.M.

50

Research Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our Vision National User Facilities

51

Research Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our Vision National User

52

Magnesium isotopic fractionation in chondrules from the Murchison and Murray CM2 carbonaceous chondrites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnesium isotopic fractionation in chondrules from the Murchison and Murray CM2 carbonaceous. Investigation of the magnesium isotopic compositions of chondrules can place stringent constraints on the timing

Grossman, Lawrence

53

All--to--All Communication on the Connection Machine CM200  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All--to--All Communication on the Connection Machine CM­200 Kapil K. Mathur S. Lennart Johnsson TR. #12; All--to--All Communication on the Connection Machine CM--200 Kapil K. Mathur and S. Lennart@think.com Abstract Detailed algorithms for all--to--all broadcast and reduction are given for arrays mapped by binary

Johnsson, S. Lennart

54

Detectability of the 21 cm-CMB cross-correlation from the EoR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 21-cm line fluctuations and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are powerful probes of the epoch of reionisation of the universe. We study the potential of the cross-correlation between 21-cm line fluctuations and CMB anisotropy to obtain further constraints on the reionisation history. We compute analytically the 21-cm cross-correlation with the CMB temperature anisotropy and polarisation, and we calculate the signal-to-noise (SN) ratio for its detection with Planck together with LOFAR, MWA and SKA. We find, on the one hand, that the 21-cm cross-correlation signal with CMB polarisation from the instant reionisation can be detected with an SN ratio of $\\sim 1$ for LOFAR and $\\sim 10$ for SKA. On the other hand, we confirm that the detection of the 21-cm cross-correlation with CMB polarisation is practically infeasible.

Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Langer, Mathieu; Douspis, Marian; Zaroubi, Saleem; Jelic, Vibor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

TESTING AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NASA 5 CM BY 5 CM BI-SUPPORTED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS OPERATED IN BOTH FUEL CELL AND STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of 5 cm by 5 cm bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 cm by 5 cm SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.

R. C. O'Brien; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; X. Zhang; S. C. Farmer; T. L. Cable; J. A. Setlock

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Southeast Idaho Area Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Area Attractions and Events Area Geography Area History Area Links Driving Directions Idaho Falls Attractions and Events INL History INL Today Research Park Sagebrush Steppe...

57

Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2006. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2006. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. One additional inspection was performed after a precipitation event that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2006. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during this inspection, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklist and field notes completed during this additional inspection is included in Appendix A of this report. Precipitation records for 2006 are included in Appendix C of this report.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Initial exploration of 21-cm cosmology with imaging and power spectra from the Murchison Widefield Array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency radio array under construction in Western Australia with a primary goal of measuring the power spectrum of the 21-cm signal from neutral hydrogen during the Epoch ...

Williams, Christopher Leigh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Probing the epoch of reionization with redshifted 21 cm HI emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emission and absorption features in the spectrum of the diffuse radio background below 200 MHz due to the 21 cm hyperfine transition line of neutral hydrogen gas in the high redshift intergalactic medium offer a new and ...

Bowman, Judd D. (Judd David)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF LOWER-DENSITY CM-SCALE CAPILLARY CHANNELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF LOWER-DENSITY CM-SCALE CAPILLARY CHANNELSÂŁ P. MessmerĂť , D and the wavelength. In order to sustain the interaction between these strong wakefields and the accel- erating

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Study of the high-[ital j] states in [sup 249]Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed the reaction [sup 248]Cm([sup 4]He,[sup 3]He) using 98.5-MeV alpha particles from the IUCF cyclotron to populate high-[ital j] states in [sup 249]Cm. A tentative assignment of the k[sub 17/2] component of the 1/2[sup +][880] Nilsson state has been made. [copyright] [ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.

Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B.; Chasman, R.R.; Greene, J.P.; Ishii, T.; Morss, L.R. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)); Foster, C.C.; Lozowski, W.R.; Schmitt, W.; Stephenson, E.J.; Yamanaka, T. (Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States))

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Site Monitoring Area Maps  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

63

Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

64

Reconstructing the nature of the first cosmic sources from the anisotropic 21-cm signal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The redshifted 21-cm background is expected to be a powerful probe of the early Universe, carrying both cosmological and astrophysical information from a wide range of redshifts. In particular, the power spectrum of fluctuations in the 21-cm brightness temperature is anisotropic due to the line-of-sight velocity gradient, which in principle allows for a simple extraction of this information in the limit of linear fluctuations. However, recent numerical studies suggest that the 21-cm signal is actually rather complex, and its analysis likely depends on detailed model fitting. We present the first realistic simulation of the anisotropic 21-cm power spectrum over a wide period of early cosmic history. We show that on observable scales, the anisotropy is large and thus measurable at most redshifts, and its form tracks the evolution of 21-cm fluctuations as they are produced early on by Lyman-a radiation from stars, then switch to X-ray radiation from early heating sources, and finally to ionizing radiation from s...

Fialkov, Anastasia; Cohen, Aviad

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Spin-orbit holds the heavyweight title for Pu and Am: Exchange regains it for Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conclusions of this paper are: (1) The 5f electrons in Cm are near an LS coupling scheme. (2) This coupling scheme allows for a large spin polarization of the 5f electrons, which in turn stabilizes the Cm III crystal structure. (3) Results for Cm show us the recipe for magnetic stabilization of the crystal structure of metals: (A) The metal must be near the itinerant-localized transition where multiple crystal structures have close energies; (B) The metal is just on the magnetic side of the transition; and (C) There must be a magnetic moment large enough to overcome the energy difference between crystal structures, thus dictating the atomic geometry. (4) These results solidify our understanding of magnetically-stabilized metals, showing us where to look for engineered materials with magnetic applications.

Moore, K; der Laan, G v; Soderlind, P

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

66

Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

67

A Cluster of 1.3 cm Continuum Sources in OMC1 South  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present sensitive 1.3 cm radio continuum observations of the region OMC1 South (OMC-1S) in Orion using the Very Large Array in its B configuration. We detect eleven radio sources clustered in a $30{''} \\times 30{''}$ region, of which only three had been detected previously at radio wavelengths in deep 3.6 cm observations. The eight new radio sources are compact ($\\theta_s \\leq 0\\rlap.{''}1$) and we set lower limits to their spectral indices, $\\alpha > 0.8 \\pm 0.3$ (with $S_\

Luis A. Zapata; Luis F. Rodriguez; Stanley E. Kurtz; C. R. O'Dell; Paul T. P. Ho

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

2Name ________________________________ Question 1: What is the usable area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the area of a satellite solar panel and estimate the total electrical power that can be generated. Students, the maximum panel area is 12,240 sq. cm, so (8100/12240)x100% = 66% of the panel is covered by solar cells shown below? Question 2: What electrical power can be generated by the panel? Question 3: If there are 8

69

UV pumping of hyperfine transitions in the light elements, with application to 21-cm hydrogen and 92-cm deuterium lines from the early universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new analytic calculations of the coupling between ultraviolet resonance photons and the population of the hyperfine states in the light elements (H, D, He3+) which include several previously neglected physical processes. Among these are the backreaction of resonant scattering on the pumping radiation, the scattering of Ly_beta photons and the effect of local departure from pure Hubble flow. The application of the new treatment to the redshifted hydrogen 21 and deuterium 92 cm lines from the high-redshift universe results in an amplitude correction of up to an order of magnitude. We further show that the standard assumption that ultraviolet pumping drives the spin temperature towards the kinetic temperature does not hold for deuterium, whose spin temperature is generally negative.

Leonid Chuzhoy; Paul R. Shapiro

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Parallelizable Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient Methods for the Cray Y-MP and the TMC CM-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallelizable Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient Methods for the Cray Y-MP and the TMC CM-2 William preconditioned conjugate gradient methods to the numerical solution of the diffusion equation governing the flow provides a comparison of the performance characteristics of several preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG

Navon, Michael

71

Estimation of /sup 244/Cm intake by bioassay measurements following a contamination incident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An employee was contaminated with radioactive material consisting primarily of /sup 244/Cm and /sup 246/Cm as a consequence of handling a curium nitrate solution at a reprocessing facility. In vivo gamma analysis and in vitro (urine and fecal) analysis were initiated soon after the incident. Further in vivo measurements were performed regularly through hour 528, and in vitro bioassay measurements were obtained through day 74. A sample of the curium solution from the workplace was obtained to confirm that the nitrate was the chemical form and to identify the curium isotopes present. The mass ratio of /sup 244/Cm:/sup 246/Cm was determined to be 91:7. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) was administered on hours 33 and 71. Observed excretion rates were consistent with available information for curium in the literature. In this paper, the results of the in vivo and in vitro measurements are presented and intake estimates for the incident are developed using various excretion rate functions. 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Thein, M.; Bogard, J.S.; Eckerman, K.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Load Distribution Problem in a Processor Ring Francis C.M. Lau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the load balancing procedure into the following phases: load measurement, calculation of load averageThe Load Distribution Problem in a Processor Ring Francis C.M. Lau Department of Computer Science picture of the system load and the average load, the load distribution problem is to find a suitable

Lau, Francis C.M.

73

The Load Distribution Problem in a Ring of Processors Francis C.M. Lau \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the following phases: load measurement, calculation of load average, generation of load distribution scheduleThe Load Distribution Problem in a Ring of Processors Francis C.M. Lau \\Lambda Department of Computer Science The University of Hong Kong March 1998 Abstract Given a global picture of the system load

Lau, Francis C.M.

74

Preliminary evaluation of Am/Cm melter feed preparation process upset recovery flowsheets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results from the development of flowsheets to recover from credible processing errors specified in TTR 99-MNSS/SE-006. The proposed flowsheets were developed in laboratory scale equipment and will be utilized with minor modifications for full scale demonstrations in the Am/Cm Pilot Facility.

Stone, M.E.

2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Abstract--Thirty-three skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) (53-73 cm fork  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

379 Abstract--Thirty-three skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) (53-73 cm fork length) were caught) Vertical movement patterns of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, California 92037-1508 Limited information on the vertical movements of skipjack tuna (Kat- suwonus pelamis

76

Nuclear transparency in 90c.m. quasielastic A,,p,2p... reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear transparency in 90c.m. ° quasielastic A,,p,2p... reactions J. Aclander,7 J. Alster,7 G Synchrotron of BNL to measure the nuclear transparency of nuclei measured in the A p,2p quasielastic of the energy dependence of the nuclear transparency. In E850 the angular dependence of the nuclear transparency

Christensen, Nelson

77

IMPLEMENTING MULTIPLE CHANNELS OVER SSL Yong Song, Victor C.M. Leung, Konstantin Beznosov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPLEMENTING MULTIPLE CHANNELS OVER SSL Yong Song, Victor C.M. Leung, Konstantin Beznosov:{yongs,vleung,beznosov}@ece.ubc.ca Keywords: Communication security, Mobile security, Multiple channels, SSL Abstract: Multiple-Channel SSL (MC-SSL) is our model and protocol for the security of client-server communication. In contrast to SSL

78

Not to be cited without prior reference to the authors. ICES CM 2006 / H:12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Not to be cited without prior reference to the authors. ICES CM 2006 / H:12 Theme session H the male phase and reproduce as females already in their first reproductive season) responds is parameterized for Epinephelus fuscoguttatus (common names: brown #12;marbled grouper or flowery cod

Heino, Mikko

79

INTERPRETING THE GLOBAL 21 cm SIGNAL FROM HIGH REDSHIFTS. I. MODEL-INDEPENDENT CONSTRAINTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sky-averaged (global) 21 cm signal is a powerful probe of the intergalactic medium (IGM) prior to the completion of reionization. However, so far it has been unclear whether it will provide more than crude estimates of when the universe's first stars and black holes formed, even in the best case scenario in which the signal is accurately extracted from the foregrounds. In contrast to previous work, which has focused on predicting the 21 cm signatures of the first luminous objects, we investigate an arbitrary realization of the signal and attempt to translate its features to the physical properties of the IGM. Within a simplified global framework, the 21 cm signal yields quantitative constraints on the Ly? background intensity, net heat deposition, ionized fraction, and their time derivatives without invoking models for the astrophysical sources themselves. The 21 cm absorption signal is most easily interpreted, setting strong limits on the heating rate density of the universe with a measurement of its redshift alone, independent of the ionization history or details of the Ly? background evolution. In a companion paper, we extend these results, focusing on the confidence with which one can infer source emissivities from IGM properties.

Mirocha, Jordan; Harker, Geraint J. A.; Burns, Jack O., E-mail: jordan.mirocha@colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Campus Box 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Cosmic Reionization and the 21-cm signal: Comparison between an analytical model and a simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure several properties of the reionization process and the corresponding low-frequency 21-cm signal associated with the neutral hydrogen distribution, using a large volume, high resolution simulation of cosmic reionization. The brightness temperature of the 21-cm signal is derived by post-processing this numerical simulation with a semi-analytical prescription. Our study extends to high redshifts (z ~ 25) where, in addition to collisional coupling, our post-processed simulations take into account the inhomogeneities in the heating of the neutral gas by X-rays and the effect of an inhomogeneous Lya radiation field. Unlike the well-studied case where spin temperature is assumed to be significantly greater than the temperature of the cosmic microwave background due to uniform heating of the gas by X-rays, spatial fluctuations in both the Lya radiation field and X-ray intensity impact predictions related to the brightness temperature at z > 10, during the early stages of reionization and gas heating. The statistics of the 21-cm signal from our simulation are then compared to existing analytical models in the literature and we find that these analytical models provide a reasonably accurate description of the 21-cm power spectrum at z 10 and, with upcoming interferometric data, these differences in return can provide a way to better understand the astrophysical processes during reionization.

Mario G. Santos; Alexandre Amblard; Jonathan Pritchard; Hy Trac; Renyue Cen; Asantha Cooray

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hydrous mineralogy of CM and CI chondrites from infrared spectroscopy and their relationship with low albedo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrous mineralogy of CM and CI chondrites from infrared spectroscopy and their relationship), The Natural History Museum, Mineralogy Department, London SW7 5BD, UK d Universite´ de Grenoble, IsTerre, OSUG molecules in rocks. This method has been used to characterize the mineralogy of hydrated

82

HI 21cm Absorption at $z \\sim 2.347$ towards PKS B0438-436  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the detection of redshifted HI~21cm absorption in the $z \\sim 2.347$ damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorber (DLA) towards PKS B0438-436, with the Green Bank Telescope. This is the second-highest redshift at which 21cm absorption has been detected in a DLA. The absorption extends over $\\sim 60$ km/s and has two distinct components, at $z = 2.347477 (12)$ and $z = 2.347869 (20)$. A similar velocity structure is seen in optical metal lines, although the peak absorption here is offset by $\\sim 11$ km/s from the peak in the 21cm line. We obtain a high spin temperature $T_s \\sim (886 \\pm 248) \\times (f/0.58)$ K, using a covering factor estimated from 2.3 GHz VLBI data. However, the current data cannot rule out a low spin temperature. The non-detection of CO 3-2 absorption places the upper limit $N_{CO} < 3.8 \\times 10^{15} \\times (T_x/10)$ cm$^{-2}$ on the CO column density.

N. Kanekar; R. Subrahmanyan; S. L. Ellison; W. M. Lane; J. N. Chengalur

2006-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

83

H I SHELLS AND SUPERSHELLS IN THE I-GALFA H I 21 cm LINE SURVEY. I. FAST-EXPANDING H I SHELLS ASSOCIATED WITH SUPERNOVA REMNANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We search for fast-expanding H I shells associated with Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) in the longitude range l ? 32° to 77° using 21 cm line data from the Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array (I-GALFA) H I survey. Among the 39 known Galactic SNRs in this region, we find such H I shells in 4 SNRs: W44, G54.4-0.3, W51C, and CTB 80. All four were previously identified in low-resolution surveys, and three of those (excluding G54.4-0.3) were previously studied with the Arecibo telescope. A remarkable new result, however, is the detection of H I emission at both very high positive and negative velocities in W44 from the receding and approaching parts of the H I expanding shell, respectively. This is the first detection of both sides of an expanding shell associated with an SNR in H I 21 cm emission. The high-resolution I-GALFA survey data also reveal a prominent expanding H I shell with high circular symmetry associated with G54.4-0.3. We explore the physical characteristics of four SNRs and discuss what differentiates them from other SNRs in the survey area. We conclude that these four SNRs are likely the remnants of core-collapse supernovae interacting with a relatively dense (?> 1 cm{sup –3}) ambient medium, and we discuss the visibility of SNRs in the H I 21 cm line.

Park, G.; Koo, B.-C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Gibson, S. J.; Newton, J. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Kang, J.-H.; Lane, D. C.; Douglas, K. A. [Arecibo Observatory, HC 3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); Peek, J. E. G. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Korpela, E. J. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heiles, C., E-mail: koo@astro.snu.ac.kr [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Facilities...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

95F (35C). Ambient air temperature will be measured in the shade, protected from wind, at a height of 2 inches (5 centimeters) above the ground surface. No desert tortoise...

85

NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: 109, 341-349 (1991) Fission Cross-Section Measurements of 247Cm,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sections of the even curium iso- topes 242Cm,244Cm,246Cm,and 248Cmwere measured at Rensselaer Polytechnic-section measurement set for the curium isotopes. Einsteinium-254 has a short half-life of 276 days and therefore has a high alpha-particle activity. The fission cross section of such a heavy odd-odd nucleus is interesting

Danon, Yaron

86

Rotational bands in odd-A Cm and Cf isotopes: Exploring the highest neutron orbitals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rotational bands have been identified up to high spins ({approx_equal}28({h_bar}/2{pi})) in the odd-A nuclei {sup 247,249}Cm and {sup 249}Cf through inelastic excitation and transfer reactions around the Z=100 region where stability results from shell effects. The [620]1/2 Nilsson configuration in {sup 249}Cm is the highest-lying neutron orbital, from above the N=164 spherical subshell gap, for which high-spin rotational behavior has been established. The data allow for an unambiguous experimental assignment of configurations to the observed bands, unusual for odd-A nuclei near Z=100. The high-spin properties are described in terms of Woods-Saxon cranking calculations.

Tandel, S. K.; Chowdhury, P.; Lakshmi, S.; Tandel, U. S. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Gros, S.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Greene, J. P.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Peterson, D.; Robinson, A.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Hartley, D. J. [Department of Physics, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland 21402 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

MA092 Geometria plana e analitica Comprimento da circunfer^encia -Area de superficies planas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA092 ­ Geometria plana e anal´itica Comprimento da circunfer^encia - ´Area de superf´icies planas uma volta: 2R = D 61, 5 cm Dist^ancia total: 10.000.000 cm N´umero de voltas: 10.000.000/(61, 5) 51 - IMECC)MA092 ­ Geometria plana e anal´itica Agosto de 2013 5 / 22 ´Areas Ret^angulo ´Area AR = b · h

Gomes, Francisco A. M.

88

A PER-BASELINE, DELAY-SPECTRUM TECHNIQUE FOR ACCESSING THE 21 cm COSMIC REIONIZATION SIGNATURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A critical challenge in measuring the power spectrum of 21 cm emission from cosmic reionization is compensating for the frequency dependence of an interferometer's sampling pattern, which can cause smooth-spectrum foregrounds to appear unsmooth and degrade the separation between foregrounds and the target signal. In this paper, we present an approach to foreground removal that explicitly accounts for this frequency dependence. We apply the delay transformation introduced in Parsons and Backer to each baseline of an interferometer to concentrate smooth-spectrum foregrounds within the bounds of the maximum geometric delays physically realizable on that baseline. By focusing on delay modes that correspond to image-domain regions beyond the horizon, we show that it is possible to avoid the bulk of smooth-spectrum foregrounds. We map the point-spread function of delay modes to k-space, showing that delay modes that are uncorrupted by foregrounds also represent samples of the three-dimensional power spectrum, and can be used to constrain cosmic reionization. Because it uses only spectral smoothness to differentiate foregrounds from the targeted 21 cm signature, this per-baseline analysis approach relies on spectrally and spatially smooth instrumental responses for foreground removal. For sufficient levels of instrumental smoothness relative to the brightness of interfering foregrounds, this technique substantially reduces the level of calibration previously thought necessary to detect 21 cm reionization. As a result, this approach places fewer constraints on antenna configuration within an array, and in particular, facilitates the adoption of configurations that are optimized for power-spectrum sensitivity. Under these assumptions, we demonstrate the potential for the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) to detect 21 cm reionization at an amplitude of 10 mK{sup 2} near k {approx} 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1} with 132 dipoles in 7 months of observing.

Parsons, Aaron R.; Pober, Jonathan C. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Carilli, Christopher L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); Jacobs, Daniel C. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tucson, AZ (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

89

OPENING THE 21 cm EPOCH OF REIONIZATION WINDOW: MEASUREMENTS OF FOREGROUND ISOLATION WITH PAPER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present new observations with the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization with the aim of measuring the properties of foreground emission for 21 cm epoch of reionization (EoR) experiments at 150 MHz. We focus on the footprint of the foregrounds in cosmological Fourier space to understand which modes of the 21 cm power spectrum will most likely be compromised by foreground emission. These observations confirm predictions that foregrounds can be isolated to a {sup w}edge{sup -}like region of two-dimensional (k , k{sub Parallel-To })-space, creating a window for cosmological studies at higher k{sub Parallel-To} values. We also find that the emission extends past the nominal edge of this wedge due to spectral structure in the foregrounds, with this feature most prominent on the shortest baselines. Finally, we filter the data to retain only this ''unsmooth'' emission and image its specific k{sub Parallel-To} modes. The resultant images show an excess of power at the lowest modes, but no emission can be clearly localized to any one region of the sky. This image is highly suggestive that the most problematic foregrounds for 21 cm EoR studies will not be easily identifiable bright sources, but rather an aggregate of fainter emission.

Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Ali, Zaki [Astronomy Department, U. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, U. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bradley, Richard F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, U. Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Carilli, Chris L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); DeBoer, Dave; Dexter, Matthew; MacMahon, Dave [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, U. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gugliucci, Nicole E. [Department of Astronomy, U. Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jacobs, Daniel C. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State U., Tempe, AZ (United States); Klima, Patricia J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Manley, Jason; Walbrugh, William P. [Square Kilometer Array, South Africa Project, Cape Town (South Africa); Stefan, Irina I. [Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

90

Low cost, large area silicon detectors for calorimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trapezoidal detectors with 28 cm{sup 2} active area have been fabricated on >2500 {Omega}cm, 4 in. diameter n-type silicon wafers. Instead of the commonly used ion implantation method, low-cost, high volume solid state diffusion technology along with phosphosilicate-glass and TCA gettering was adopted for boron and phosphorus doping. Typically the diode dark current was 15 {mu}A {at} 100 volts. Efforts are being made to obtain a finished device yield of 80% to meet the $2/cm{sup 2} price goal of SSC semiconductor detector group. 20 refs., 4 figs.

Korde, R. (International Radiation Detectors, Torrance, CA (USA)); Furuno, K.; Hwang, H.; Brau, J.E. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA)); Bugg, W.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

Walter, M.Todd

92

AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE The Office of Housing and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University is seeking applicants for an Area Coordinator. The Area Coordinator is responsible for assisting in the management and operation of a residential area

Bordenstein, Seth

93

An evaluation of the relationship of the leaf area index of forage grasses to the survival of Haemonchus contortus third stage larvae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Percentage larval recovery versus time of collection . . 21 Percentage larval recovery versus number of days after seeding on 10-20 cm flats. Percentage larval recovery versus number of days after seeding on 20-30 cm flats. Percentage larval recovery... versus number of days after seeding on 30-40 cm flats. 22 23 24 Leaf area index versus number of days after seeding on 10-20 cm flats. 26 Leaf area index versus number of days after seeding on 20-30 cm flats. 27 Leaf area index versus number...

Jewell, Roxanne Elizabeth

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Fission product yields for fast-neutron fission of /sup 243,244,246,248/Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent measurements of relative yields for /sup 95/Zr, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 141/Ce, /sup 144/Ce, and /sup 155/Eu for fast-neutron fission of samples enriched in the actinides /sup 243,244,246,248/Cm have been combined with a simple mass-distribution model to predict complete mass distributions for fast-neutron fission of each of these four curium actinides. Complete descriptions of the data analysis and of the model and its application and limitations are given.

Dickens, J.K.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Utilization of Local Law Enforcement Aerial Resources in Consequence Management (CM) Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past decade the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was instrumental in enhancing the nation’s ability to detect and prevent a radiological or nuclear attack in the highest risk cities. Under the DHS Securing the Cities initiative, nearly 13,000 personnel in the New York City region have been trained in preventive radiological and nuclear detection operations, and nearly 8,500 pieces of radiological detection equipment have been funded. As part of the preventive radiological/nuclear detection (PRND) mission, several cities have received funding to purchase commercial aerial radiation detection systems. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Aerial Measuring System (AMS) program started providing Mobile Aerial Radiological Surveillance (MARS) training to such assets, resulting in over 150 HAZMAT teams’ officers and pilots from 10 law enforcement organizations and fire departments being trained in the aerial radiation detection. From the beginning, the MARS training course covered both the PRND and consequence management (CM) missions. Even if the law enforcement main focus is PRND, their aerial assets can be utilized in the collection of initial radiation data for post-event radiological CM response. Based on over 50 years of AMS operational experience and information collected during MARS training, this presentation will focus on the concepts of CM response using aerial assets as well as utilizing law enforcement/fire department aerial assets in CM. Also discussed will be the need for establishing closer relationships between local jurisdictions’ aerial radiation detection capabilities and state and local radiation control program directors, radiological health department managers, etc. During radiological events these individuals may become primary experts/advisers to Incident Commanders for radiological emergency response, especially in the early stages of a response. The knowledge of the existence, specific capabilities, and use of local aerial radiation detection systems would be critical in planning the response, even before federal assets arrive on the scene. The relationship between local and federal aerial assets and the potential role for the further use of the MARS training and expanded AMS Reachback capabilities in facilitating such interactions will be discussed.

Wasiolek, Piotr T.; Malchow, Russell L.

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

97

Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm.sup.2 emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm.sup.2 at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing.

Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Quigley, Gerard P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

21CMMC: An MCMC analysis tool enabling astrophysical parameter studies of the cosmic 21cm signal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce 21CMMC: a parallelized, Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis tool, incorporating the epoch of reionization (EoR) semi-numerical simulation 21CMFAST. 21CMMC estimates astrophysical parameter constraints from 21cm EoR experiments, accommodating a variety of EoR models, as well as priors on model parameters and the reionization history. To illustrate its utility, we consider two different EoR scenarios, one with a single population of galaxies (with a mass-independent ionizing efficiency) and a second, more general model with two different, feedback-regulated populations (each with mass-dependent ionizing efficiencies). As an example, combining three observations (z=8, 9 and 10) of the 21cm power spectrum with a conservative noise estimate and uniform model priors, we find that LOFAR/HERA/SKA can constrain common reionization parameters: the ionizing efficiency (or similarly the escape fraction), the mean free path of ionizing photons, and the log of the minimum virial temperature of star-forming halos...

Greig, Bradley

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Opening the 21cm EoR Window: Measurements of Foreground Isolation with PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new observations with the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) with the aim of measuring the properties of foreground emission for 21cm Epoch of Reionization experiments at 150 MHz. We focus on the footprint of the foregrounds in cosmological Fourier space to understand which modes of the 21cm power spectrum will most likely be compromised by foreground emission. These observations confirm predictions that foregrounds can be isolated to a "wedge"-like region of 2D (k-perendicular, k-parallel)-space, creating a window for cosmological studies at higher k-parallel values. We also find that the emission extends past the nominal edge of this wedge due to inherent spectral structure in the foregrounds themselves, with this feature most prominent on the shortest baselines. Finally, we filter the data to retain only this "unsmooth" emission and image it. The resultant image shows an excess of power on large angular scales, but no emission can be clearly localized to any one region...

Pober, Jonathan C; Aguirre, James E; Ali, Zaki; Bradley, Richard F; Carilli, Chris L; DeBoer, Dave; Dexter, Matthew; Gugliucci, Nicole E; Jacobs, Daniel C; MacMahon, Dave; Manley, Jason; Moore, David F; Stefan, Irina I; Walbrugh, William P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

On the Detectability of the Hydrogen 3-cm Fine Structure Line from the EoR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A soft ultraviolet radiation field, 10.2 eV EoR) excites the 2p (directly) and 2s (indirectly) states of atomic hydrogen. Because the 2s state is metastable, the lifetime of atoms in this level is relatively long, which may cause the 2s state to be overpopulated relative to the 2p state. It has recently been proposed that for this reason, neutral intergalactic atomic hydrogen gas may be detected in absorption in its 3-cm fine-structure line (2s_1/2 -> 2p_3/2) against the Cosmic Microwave Background out to very high redshifts. In particular, the optical depth in the fine-structure line through neutral intergalactic gas surrounding bright quasars during the EoR may reach tau~1e-5. The resulting surface brightness temperature of tens of micro K (in absorption) may be detectable with existing radio telescopes. Motivated by this exciting proposal, we perform a detailed analysis of the transfer of Lyman beta,gamma,delta,... radiation, and re-analyze the detectability of the fine-structure line in neutral intergalactic gas surrounding high-redshift quasars. We find that proper radiative transfer modeling causes the fine-structure absorption signature to be reduced tremendously to tauEoR cannot reveal its presence in the 3-cm fine-structure line to existing radio telescopes.

Mark Dijkstra; Adam Lidz; Jonathan R. Pritchard; Lincoln J. Greenhill; D. A. Mitchell; S. M. Ord; Randal B. Wayth

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The 21cm power spectrum and the shapes of non-Gaussianity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider how measurements of the 21cm radiation from the epoch of reionization (z = 8?12) can constrain the amplitudes of various 'shapes' of primordial non-Gaussianity. The limits on these shapes, each parametrized by the non-linear parameter f{sub NL}, can reveal whether the physics of inflation is more complex than the standard single-field, slow-roll scenario. In this work, we quantify the effects of the well-known local, equilateral, orthogonal and folded types of non-Gaussianities on the 21cm power spectrum, which is expected to be measured by upcoming radio arrays such as the Square-Kilometre Array (SKA). We also assess the prospects of the SKA in constraining these non-Gaussianities, and found constraints that are comparable with those from cosmic-microwave-background experiments such as Planck. We show that the limits on various f{sub NL} can be tightened to O(1) using a radio array with a futuristic but realistic set of specifications.

Chongchitnan, Sirichai, E-mail: s.chongchitnan@abertay.ac.uk [School of Engineering, Computing and Applied Mathematics, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell St., Dundee, DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Design of a 10**36 CM-2 S-1 Super-B Factory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parameters have been studied for a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at the Upsilon 4S that would deliver a luminosity of 1 to 4 x 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s. This collider, called a Super-B Factory, would use a combination of linear collider and storage ring techniques. In this scheme an electron beam and a positron beam are stored in low-emittance damping rings similar to those designed for a Linear Collider (LC) or the next generation light source. A LC style interaction region is included in the ring to produce sub-millimeter vertical beta functions at the collision point. A large crossing angle (+/- 24 mrad) is used at the collision point to allow beam separation. A crab-waist scheme is used to reduce the hourglass effect and restore peak luminosity. Beam currents of 1.8 A at 4 x 7 GeV in 1251 bunches can produce a luminosity of 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s with upgrade possibilities. Such a collider would produce an integrated luminosity of about 10,000 fb{sup -1} (10 ab{sup -1}) in a running year (10{sup 7} sec) at the {gamma}(4S) resonance. Further possibilities include having longitudinally polarized e- at the IR and operating at the J/Psi and Psi beam energies.

Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Guiducci, S.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Bertsche, Kirk J.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC; Bettoni, S.; /CERN; Paoloni, E.; Marchiori, G.; /Pisa U.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

103

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basalt K Eburru Geothermal Area Eburru Geothermal Area East African Rift System Kenya Rift Basalt Fukushima Geothermal Area Fukushima Geothermal Area Northeast Honshu Arc...

104

1.2 What pressure difference must be generated across the length of a 15 cm vertical drinking straw in order to drink a water-like liquid of density 1.0 g cm-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in order to drink a water-like liquid of density 1.0 g cm-3 ? 1.6 Charles' law is sometimes expressed1.2 What pressure difference must be generated across the length of a 15 cm vertical drinking straw

Findley, Gary L.

105

METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA OUTLOOK MORGANTOWN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS Bureau to be repeated over the next five years. The Morgantown Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) had an average annual

Mohaghegh, Shahab

106

Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

107

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely restricted in these areas. Some of these species are also...

108

Influence of electron injection into 27 cm audio plasma cell on the plasma diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, the plasma is created in a Pyrex tube (L = 27 cm, ?= 4 cm) as a single cell, by a capacitive audio frequency (AF) discharge (f = 10–100 kHz), at a definite pressure of ?0.2 Torr. A couple of tube linear and deviating arrangements show plasma characteristic conformity. The applied AF plasma and the injection of electrons into two gas mediums Ar and N{sub 2} revealed the increase of electron density at distinct tube regions by one order to attain 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}. The electrons temperature and density strengths are in contrast to each other. While their distributions differ along the plasma tube length, they show a decaying sinusoidal shape where their peaks position varies by the gas type. The electrons injection moderates electron temperature and expands their density. The later highest peak holds for the N{sub 2} gas, at electrons injection it changes to hold for the Ar. The sinusoidal decaying density behavior generates electric fields depending on the gas used and independent of tube geometry. The effect of the injected electrons performs a responsive impact on electrons density not attributed to the gas discharge. Analytical tools investigate the interaction of the plasma, the discharge current, and the gas used on the electrodes. It points to the emigration of atoms from each one but for greater majority they behave to a preferred direction. Meanwhile, only in the linear regime, small percentage of atoms still moves in reverse direction. Traces of gas atoms revealed on both electrodes due to sheath regions denote lack of their participation in the discharge current. In addition, atoms travel from one electrode to the other by overcoming the sheaths regions occurring transportation of particles agglomeration from one electrode to the other. The electrons injection has contributed to increase the plasma electron density peaks. These electrons populations have raised the generated electrostatic fields assisting the elemental ions emigration to a preferred electrode direction. Regardless of plasma electrodes positions and plasma shape, ions can be departed from one electrode to deposit on the other one. In consequence, as an application the AF plasma type can enhance the metal deposition from one electrode to the other.

Haleem, N. A.; Ragheb, M. S.; Zakhary, S. G. [Accelerators Department, Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Cairo 13759 (Egypt)] [Accelerators Department, Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Cairo 13759 (Egypt); El Fiki, S. A.; Nouh, S. A. [Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt)] [Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); El Disoki, T. M. [Faculty of Girls, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt)] [Faculty of Girls, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Protected Areas Stacy Philpott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Convention of Biological Diversity, 1992 #12;IUCN Protected Area Management Categories Ia. Strict Nature. Protected Landscape/ Seascape VI. Managed Resource Protected Area #12;Ia. Strict Nature Preserves and Ib. Wilderness Areas · Natural preservation · Research · No · No #12;II. National Parks · Ecosystem protection

Gottgens, Hans

110

Direct measurement of the cosmic acceleration by 21cm absorption systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

So far there is only indirect evidence that the universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The evidence for cosmic acceleration is based on the observation of different objects at different distances, and requires invoking the Copernican cosmological principle, and Einstein's equations of motion. We examine the direct observability using recession velocity drifts (Sandage-Loeb effect) of 21cm hydrogen absorption systems in upcoming radio surveys. This measures the change in velocity of the {\\it same} objects separate by a time interval and is a model-independent measure of acceleration. We forecast that for a CHIME-like survey with a decade time span, we can detect the acceleration of a $\\Lambda$CDM universe with $\\sim 6\\sigma$ confidence. This acceleration test requires modest data analysis and storage changes from the normal processing, and cannot be recovered retroactively.

Yu, Hao-Ran; Pen, Ue-Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Transmission infrared spectra (225 lm) of carbonaceous chondrites (CI, CM, CVCK, CR, C2 ungrouped): Mineralogy, water, and asteroidal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transmission infrared spectra (2­25 lm) of carbonaceous chondrites (CI, CM, CV­CK, CR, C2 ungrouped t In this work, infrared transmission spectra (2­25 lm range, 5000­400 cm�1 ) of 40 carbonaceous chon- drites. The variability in the silicate features is correlated with the intensity of an ­OH related absorption at 3-lm

Montes-Hernandez, German

112

Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5 J relevant to the climate system, it may be referred to as an Earth System Model. However, the IPSL-CM5 model climate and Earth System Models, both developed in France and contributing to the 5th coupled model

Codron, Francis

113

Figure 2: The mercury jet target geometry. The proton beam and mercury jet cross at z=-37.5 cm.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 2: The mercury jet target geometry. The proton beam and mercury jet cross at z=-37.5 cm. Figure 3: The layout of multiple proton beam entry directions relative to mercury jet at z=-75 cm. A PION of a free liquid mercury jet with an intense proton beam. We study the variation of meson production

McDonald, Kirk

114

THE IMPACT OF POINT-SOURCE SUBTRACTION RESIDUALS ON 21 cm EPOCH OF REIONIZATION ESTIMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precise subtraction of foreground sources is crucial for detecting and estimating 21 cm H I signals from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). We quantify how imperfect point-source subtraction due to limitations of the measurement data set yields structured residual signal in the data set. We use the Cramer-Rao lower bound, as a metric for quantifying the precision with which a parameter may be measured, to estimate the residual signal in a visibility data set due to imperfect point-source subtraction. We then propagate these residuals into two metrics of interest for 21 cm EoR experiments-the angular power spectrum and two-dimensional power spectrum-using a combination of full analytic covariant derivation, analytic variant derivation, and covariant Monte Carlo simulations. This methodology differs from previous work in two ways: (1) it uses information theory to set the point-source position error, rather than assuming a global rms error, and (2) it describes a method for propagating the errors analytically, thereby obtaining the full correlation structure of the power spectra. The methods are applied to two upcoming low-frequency instruments that are proposing to perform statistical EoR experiments: the Murchison Widefield Array and the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization. In addition to the actual antenna configurations, we apply the methods to minimally redundant and maximally redundant configurations. We find that for peeling sources above 1 Jy, the amplitude of the residual signal, and its variance, will be smaller than the contribution from thermal noise for the observing parameters proposed for upcoming EoR experiments, and that optimal subtraction of bright point sources will not be a limiting factor for EoR parameter estimation. We then use the formalism to provide an ab initio analytic derivation motivating the 'wedge' feature in the two-dimensional power spectrum, complementing previous discussion in the literature.

Trott, Cathryn M.; Wayth, Randall B.; Tingay, Steven J., E-mail: cathryn.trott@curtin.edu.au [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Bentley, WA (Australia) and ARC Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) (Australia)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

115

AREA 5 RWMS CLOSURE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

TRU material in the trench because there is no groundwater pathway under foreseeable climate conditions. The Area 5 RWMS probabilistic PA model can be modified and used to...

116

Groundwater Management Areas (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation,...

117

Mass Transfer Testing of a 12.5-cm Rotor Centrifugal Contactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TRUEX mass transfer tests were performed using a single stage commercially available 12.5 cm centrifugal contactor and stable cerium (Ce) and europium (Eu). Test conditions included throughputs ranging from 2.5 to 15 Lpm and rotor speeds of 1750 and 2250 rpm. Ce and Eu extraction forward distribution coefficients ranged from 13 to 19. The first and second stage strip back distributions were 0.5 to 1.4 and .002 to .004, respectively, throughout the dynamic test conditions studied. Visual carryover of aqueous entrainment in all organic phase samples was estimated at < 0.1 % and organic carryover into all aqueous phase samples was about ten times less. Mass transfer efficiencies of = 98 % for both Ce and Eu in the extraction section were obtained over the entire range of test conditions. The first strip stage mass transfer efficiencies ranged from 75 to 93% trending higher with increasing throughput. Second stage mass transfer was greater than 99% in all cases. Increasing the rotor speed from 1750 to 2250 rpm had no significant effect on efficiency for all throughputs tested.

D. H. Meikrantz; T. G. Garn; J. D. Law; N. R. Mann; T. A. Todd

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The effect of peculiar velocities on the epoch of reionization (EoR) 21-cm signal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used semi-numerical simulations of reionization to study the behaviour of the power spectrum of the EoR 21-cm signal in both real and redshift space. We have considered two models of reionization, one which has homogeneous recombination (HR) and the other incorporating inhomogeneous recombination (IR). Considering the large scales first, we find that the predictions of these two models are similar. Both the real space HI power spectrum P^r(k) and the monopole moment of the redshift space HI power spectrum P^s_0(k), fall sharply to a minima as the neutral fraction declines from x_{HI} =1 to 0.8 in the early stages of reionization. As reionization proceeds, P^r and P^s_0 subsequently rise to a maxima at x_{HI} ~ 0.4-0.5, and then declines in the later stages of reionization. In the early stages of reionization (x_{HI} >= 0.8) the quadrupole moment of the HI power spectrum has a value consistent with P^s_2 /P^s_0=50/49 predicted by the linear theory of redshift space distortion. This ratio falls abruptly...

Majumdar, Suman; Choudhury, T Roy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Nevada National Security Site 2011 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2011 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. During the last 2 weeks of March 2011, gamma spectroscopy results for air particles showed measurable activities of iodine-131 (131I), cesium-134 (134Cs), and cesium-137 (137Cs). These results are attributed to the release of fission products from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi power plant in Japan. The remaining gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below minimum detectable concentrations. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. The 86.3 millimeters (mm) (3.40 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2011 is 44% below the average of 154.1 mm (6.07 in.), and the 64.8 mm (2.55 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2011 is 47% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 RWMS operational waste covers was not done during 2011 due to construction of the final evapotranspiration cover at these monitoring locations. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 122 centimeters (4 feet) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2011, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 feet) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Ten percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2011 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Coupling of a regional atmospheric model (RegCM3) and a regional oceanic model (FVCOM) over the maritime continent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climatological high resolution coupled climate model simulations for the maritime continent have been carried out using the regional climate model (RegCM) version 3 and the finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) ...

Wei, Jun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

thorium en quilibre radioactif. Le thorium X donne le parcours 5 cm. 7, et l'manation du thorium, pour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

181 thorium en équilibre radioactif. Le thorium X donne le parcours 5 cm. 7, et l'émanation du thorium, pour laquelle on a été obligé d'employer une méthode de scintillations, le parcours 5,5 cm. Les parcours des rayions a émis par le thorium et ses produits sont réu- nis dans le tableau ci-contre, ou l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

122

Wouthuysen-Field coupling strength and application to high-redshift 21 cm radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first UV sources in the universe are expected to have coupled the HI spin temperature to the gas kinetic temperature via scattering in the Lyman-alpha resonance [the Wouthuysen-Field (WF) effect]. By establishing an HI spin temperature different from the temperature of the CMB, the WF effect should allow observations of HI during the reionization epoch in the redshifted 21 cm line. This paper investigates four mechanisms that can affect the strength of the WF effect that were not previously considered: (1) Photons redshifting into the HI Lyman resonances may excite an H atom and result in a radiative cascade terminating in two-photon 2s->1s emission, rather than always degrading to Lyman-alpha as usually assumed. (2) The fine structure of the Lyman-alpha resonance alters the photon frequency distribution and leads to a suppression of the scattering rate. (3) The spin-flip scatterings change the frequency of the photon and cause the photon spectrum to relax not to the kinetic temperature of the gas but to a temperature between the kinetic and spin temperatures, effectively reducing the strength of the Wouthuysen-Field coupling. (4) Near line centre, a photon can change its frequency by several times the line width in a single scattering event, thus potentially invalidating the usual calculation of the Lyman-alpha spectral distortion based on the diffusion approximation. It is shown that (1) suppresses the WF coupling strength by a factor of up to ~2, while (2) and (3) are important only at low kinetic temperatures. Effect (4) has a =2K. If the pre-reionization IGM was efficiently heated by X-rays, only effect (1) is important. Fitting formulae are provided for the range of T_k>=2K and Gunn-Peterson optical depth 10^5--10^7. [ABRIDGED

Christopher M. Hirata

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

123

A FLUX SCALE FOR SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE 21 cm EPOCH OF REIONIZATION EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a catalog of spectral measurements covering a 100-200 MHz band for 32 sources, derived from observations with a 64 antenna deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. For transit telescopes such as PAPER, calibration of the primary beam is a difficult endeavor and errors in this calibration are a major source of error in the determination of source spectra. In order to decrease our reliance on an accurate beam calibration, we focus on calibrating sources in a narrow declination range from –46° to –40°. Since sources at similar declinations follow nearly identical paths through the primary beam, this restriction greatly reduces errors associated with beam calibration, yielding a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of derived source spectra. Extrapolating from higher frequency catalogs, we derive the flux scale using a Monte Carlo fit across multiple sources that includes uncertainty from both catalog and measurement errors. Fitting spectral models to catalog data and these new PAPER measurements, we derive new flux models for Pictor A and 31 other sources at nearby declinations; 90% are found to confirm and refine a power-law model for flux density. Of particular importance is the new Pictor A flux model, which is accurate to 1.4% and shows that between 100 MHz and 2 GHz, in contrast with previous models, the spectrum of Pictor A is consistent with a single power law given by a flux at 150 MHz of 382 ± 5.4 Jy and a spectral index of –0.76 ± 0.01. This accuracy represents an order of magnitude improvement over previous measurements in this band and is limited by the uncertainty in the catalog measurements used to estimate the absolute flux scale. The simplicity and improved accuracy of Pictor A's spectrum make it an excellent calibrator in a band important for experiments seeking to measure 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization.

Jacobs, Daniel C.; Bowman, Judd [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Parsons, Aaron R.; Ali, Zaki; Pober, Jonathan C. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bradley, Richard F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Carilli, Chris L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); DeBoer, David R.; Dexter, Matthew R.; MacMahon, Dave H. E. [Radio Astronomy Lab., University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gugliucci, Nicole E.; Klima, Pat [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Manley, Jason R.; Walbrugh, William P. [Square Kilometer Array, South Africa Project, Cape Town (South Africa); Stefan, Irina I. [Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

124

Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience 28 (2010) 259270 259 DOI 10.3233/RNN-2010-0488  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; kHz: kilohertz; LED: light emitting diode; cd: candela; m: meter; cm: centimeter; ms: millisecond; d

Wallace, Mark

125

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Geographic Area Month  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuels by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for...

127

The Fundamental Multi-Baseline Mode-Mixing Foreground in 21 cm EoR Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary challenge for experiments measuring the neutral hydrogen power spectrum from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) are mode-mixing effects where foregrounds from very bright astrophysical sources interact with the instrument to contaminate the EoR signal. In this paper we identify a new type of mode-mixing that occurs when measurements from non-identical baselines are combined for increased power spectrum sensitivity. This multi-baseline effect dominates the mode-mixing power and can contaminate the EoR window, an area in Fourier space previously identified to be relatively free of foreground power. Multi-baseline mode-mixing introduces characteristic shapes into the three dimensional Fourier space that are determined by the instrumental configuration and we develop an iterative approach to identifying and removing mode-mixed power based on these instrumental shapes.

Hazelton, Bryna J; Sullivan, Ian S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

300 Area Disturbance Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

129

Second order cross-correlation between kSZ and 21 cm fluctuations from the EoR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurement of the brightness temperature fluctuations of neutral hydrogen 21 cm lines from the Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) is expected to be a powerful tool for revealing the reionisation process. We study the 21 cm cross-correlation with Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropies, focusing on the effect of the patchy reionisation. We calculate, up to second order, the angular power spectrum of the cross-correlation between 21 cm fluctuations and the CMB kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (kSZ) from the EoR, using an analytical reionisation model. We show that the kSZ and the 21 cm fluctuations are anti-correlated on the scale corresponding to the typical size of an ionised bubble at the observed redshift of the 21 cm fluctuations. The amplitude of the angular power spectrum of the cross-correlation depends on the fluctuations of the ionised fraction. Especially, in a highly inhomogeneous reionisation model, the amplitude reaches the order of $100 \\mu K^2$ at $\\ell \\sim 3000$. We also show...

Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Langer, Mathieu; Douspis, Marian; Zaroubi, Saleem; Jelic, Vibor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Enthalpy of formation and magnetic susceptibility of curium sesquioxide, Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monoclinic Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has been prepared from the long-lived isotope /sup 248/Cm (t/sub 1///sub 2/ = 3.4 x 10/sup 5/ y), and its enthalpy of formation has been determined at 298 K to be -1682 +/- 12 kJ mol/sup -1/ from solution calorimetry measurements on four different samples. The magnetic susceptibility of three of these samples has been measured on a Faraday balance between 2 and 298 K. Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/ exhibits Curie-Weiss behavior from 100 to 300 K with ..mu../sub eff/ = 7.89 +/- 0.04 ..mu../sub B/ and THETA = -130 +/- 2 K. The compound appears to order magnetically as the temperature decreases and has an antiferromagnetic transition at 13 +/- 2 K. The results are interpreted by comparison with similar properties of related lanthanide and actinide compounds.

Morss, L.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Fuger, J.; Goffart, J.; Haire, G.

1983-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

131

Accumulation of Am-241 and Cm-244 from water and sediments by Hyalella sp. and Tubifex spp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the bioaccumulation of americium and curium by freshwater invertebrates in laboratory experiments. Uptake by benthic invertebrates will affect both the biogeochemical cycling of these elements and the potential exposure of man through accumulation in aquatic food chains. Am and Cm isotopes are produced by nuclear reactions in commercial reactors and are major components of high level wastes. Both elements bind strongly to sediments which may be the principal source for uptake by benthic organisms in freshwater and marine environments. The principal objectives of this research were: (1) to determine the extent of bioaccumulation of Am and Cm for freshwater species; (2) to compare bioaccumulation from water with bioaccumulation from various types of sediment particles; and (3) to evaluate the similarities and differences in the behavior of Am and Cm.

Sibley, T.H.; Stohr, J.S. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

OLED area illumination source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

133

SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

length scales . . . . . . . Josephson Junction and SQUIDin nanoscale weak link josephson junction oscillators. Phys.cation by unbiased Josephson junctions. Journ. Appl. Phys. ,

Hatridge, Michael Jonathan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

Hatridge, Michael J.

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

135

MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Common Use Areas All floored areas in the building for circulation and standard facilities provided and the like. These are extracts of NWPC standard method of measurement of building areas with an addition fromSection S ANNEXURE 4 MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS 1. GROSS BUILDING

Wang, Yan

136

Subsurface contaminants focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

MSL ENTERANCE REFERENCE AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSL ENTERANCE LOBBY ELEV STAIRS SSL-019 REFERENCE AREA SSL-021 GROUP STUDY SSL-018 STUDY ROOM SSL-029 SSL-020 COPY ROOM SSL-022 GROUP STUDY SSL-026 STACKS SSL-023 GROUP STUDY SSL-024 GROUP STUDY SSL TBL-014 TBL-014A STAIRS SSL-007 GIS/ WORKROOM SSL-011 SSL-008 SSL-009 SSL-010 SSL-014 SSL-017 STAIRS

Aalberts, Daniel P.

138

Plutonium focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Energy of the quasi-free electron in supercritical argon near the critical point C.M. Evans1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy of the quasi-free electron in supercritical argon near the critical point C.M. Evans1 to the interaction between argon and the quasi-free electron arising from field ionization of the dopant. The energy by the ionic core, V0(P) is the quasi-free electron energy in the perturbing medium, and P is the perturber

Evans, Cherice M.

140

MODELING OF LIQUID WATER ON CM PARENT BODIES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR AMINO ACID RACEMIZATION. B. A. Cohen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the most recent tem- perature-dependent expressions for thermal conductiv- ity, heat capacity, densityMODELING OF LIQUID WATER ON CM PARENT BODIES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR AMINO ACID RACEMIZATION. B. A and duration of a liquid water phase [1]. The characteris- tics of the liquid water phase are critical

Cohen, Barbara Anne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 11:12am Addthis...

142

The CLAS12 large area RICH detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large area RICH detector is being designed for the CLAS12 spectrometer as part of the 12 GeV upgrade program of the Jefferson Lab Experimental Hall-B. This detector is intended to provide excellent hadron identification from 3 GeV/c up to momenta exceeding 8 GeV/c and to be able to work at the very high design luminosity-up to 1035 cm2 s?1. Detailed feasibility studies are presented for two types of radiators, aerogel and liquid C6F14 freon, in conjunction with a highly segmented light detector in the visible wavelength range. The basic parameters of the RICH are outlined and the resulting performances, as defined by preliminary simulation studies, are reported.

M. Contalbrigo, E. Cisbani, P. Rossi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain scientific and natural areas are established throughout the state for the purpose of preservation and protection. Construction and new development is prohibited in these areas.

144

2002 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental, subsidence, and meteorological monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)(refer to Figure 1). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater,meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada (BN) reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorological data indicate that 2002 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 26 mm (1.0 in) at the Area 3 RWMS and 38 mm (1.5 in) at the Area 5 RWMS. Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 2002 rainfall infiltrated less than 30 cm (1 ft) before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium monitoring data indicate slow subsurface migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were lower than in previous years. Special investigations conducted in 2002 included: a comparison between waste cover water contents measured by neutron probe and coring; and a comparison of four methods for measuring radon concentrations in air. All 2002 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility Performance Assessments (PAs).

Y. E. Townsend

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible -Laser Focus World http://www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/print/volume-47/issue-8/world-news/metamaterials-large-area-printed-3d-negative-index-metamaterial-is-flexible.html[8/1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible - Laser Focus World-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative, with the advent of a printing process that produces large-area 3D multilayer optical NIMs --8.7 Ă? 8.7 cm square

Rogers, John A.

146

Interacting delayed critical 38.1-cm-diam uranium (93.2) metal cylinders at large distance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A delayed critical experiment was performed with two 38.10-cm-diam, {approximately}7.62-cm-thick unmoderated and unreflected uranium metal cylinders to study the interaction of two loosely coupled large flat cylinders. Previously tightly coupled, two component uranium metal assemblies of 27.93-cm-diam cylinders had been assembled to delayed criticality and the results reported. For this experiment, the uranium metal density was 18.75 g U/cm{sup 3}, and the enrichment was 93.15 wt% {sup 235}U. The two right circular cylinders were coaxial and separated 1.3 m; thus the fractional solid angle subtended by one cylinder as seen from the other is {approximately}5 X 10{sup -3}. This delayed critical configuration is a useful experiment for assessing the convergence of Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron multiplication factor because it is a very loosely coupled system, a problem that has been designated as {open_quotes}k{sub eff} of the world{close_quotes}. The neutron multiplication factor of one of the interacting cylinders is 0.994, and the solid angle seen by the other cylinder is such that very few neutrons starting in one cylinder reach the other cylinder. This assembly was configured on a vertical assembly machine in the east cell of the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in 1965 and was unreported until this paper. The east cell of this facility is a 10.6- x 10.6- x 9.1-m room with thick concrete walls. The lower cylinder of this assembly was located 3.5 m from the 1.5-m-thick west wall, 3.9 m from the 0.61-m-thick north wall, and 2.8 m above the concrete floor. The calculation of two such loosely coupled cylinders by Monte Carlo methods can be a problem because the interaction between cylinders is so small.

Mihalczo, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fire patterns in central semiarid Argentina M.A. Fischer a,*, C.M. Di Bella a,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire patterns in central semiarid Argentina M.A. Fischer a,*, C.M. Di Bella a,b , E.G. Jobbágy b Cabañas S/N, Hurlingham (1686), Buenos Aires, Argentina b Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina c Grupo de Estudios Ambientales e IMASL, Universidad Nacional de San

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

148

The cross correlation between the 21-cm radiation and the CMB lensing field: a new cosmological signal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations through the 21-cm intensity mapping technique at redshift z {<=} 4 has the potential to tightly constrain the evolution of dark energy. Crucial to this experimental effort is the determination of the biasing relation connecting fluctuations in the density of neutral hydrogen (HI) with the ones of the underlying dark matter field. In this work I show how the HI bias relevant to these 21-cm intensity mapping experiments can successfully be measured by cross-correlating their signal with the lensing signal obtained from CMB observations. In particular I show that combining CMB lensing maps from Planck with 21-cm field measurements carried out with an instrument similar to the Cylindrical Radio Telescope, this cross-correlation signal can be detected with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of more than 5. Breaking down the signal arising from different redshift bins of thickness {Delta}z = 0.1, this signal leads to constraining the large scale neutral hydrogen bias and its evolution to 4{sigma} level.

Vallinotto, Alberto [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Combined Ethanol Injection Therapy and Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy in Percutaneous Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Larger than 4 cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background. Optimal treatment of large-sized hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still debated, because percutaneous ablation therapies alone do not always achieve complete necrosis. Objective. To report our experience in the treatment of patients with HCC larger than 4 cm in diameter by combined percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency thermal ablation. Methods. In a 5-year period there were 40 consecutive patients meeting the inclusion criteria (24 men and 16 women; age range 41-72 years, mean 58 years). These subjects had a single HCC larger than 4 cm. Twelve subjects also had one or two additional nodules smaller than 4 cm (mean 1.2 nodules per patient). Patients were submitted to one to three sessions consisting of ethanol injection at two opposite tumor poles (mean 12 ml) and then of radiofrequency application through one or two electrodes placed at the tumor center (mean treatment duration 30 min). Results. Complete necrosis was obtained in all cases with one to three sessions (mean 1.3 sessions per patient). All patients experienced pain and fever but one only subject had a major complication requiring treatment (abscess development and fistulization). Overall follow-up was 7-69 months. Two patients showed local recurrence and 9 developed new etherotopic HCC nodules. Seven subjects died during follow-up while 33 were free from recurrence 8-69 months after treatment. Conclusion. A combination of ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation is effective in the treatment of large HCC.

Vallone, Paolo; Catalano, Orlando [National Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology (Italy)], E-mail: orlandcat@tin.it; Izzo, Francesco [National Cancer Institute, Department of Surgical Oncology 'D' (Italy); Siani, Alfredo [National Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology (Italy)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Western Area Power Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun Deng Associate ResearchWestern Area Power

151

700 Area - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011 Mon, Next2025Steps to MakingImportance of700 Area

152

CEES - Focus Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating the Past - VisualizingFocus Areas

153

100 Area - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | BlandinePrincetonOPT Optics MetrologyDepartment of00 Area

154

T-1 Training Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

None

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

T-1 Training Area  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

156

CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT (CM)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety systems and mission critical systems are defined and a comprehensive Configuration Management systemprocedure to maintain control over the design and modifications of these...

157

1 , , cm wk Aini }  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. de Toro Negro 113 Evaluación de biclusters mediante intra-fluctuaciones mínimas: un enfoque multi de asignación conjunta mediante GRASP, Saúl I. Caballero Hernández, Roger Z. Ríos Mercado, Fabián

Granada, Universidad de

158

License Iso. CM35  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of iemzaace of thie llcenee, you are required to maintain ; mcordd of ymir inventories, receipts and cranefers of refined source m- urirl. I lhlr license ia subject to...

159

Utah_cm_smith  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctional Materials for 2Cindy and Mack

160

License Iso. CM35  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGYELIkNATIONHEALXH:LTS Plan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Low local recurrence rate without postmastectomy radiation in node-negative breast cancer patients with tumors 5 cm and larger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the need for adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with node-negative breast tumors 5 cm or larger. Methods and Materials: Between 1981 and 2002, a total of 70 patients with node-negative breast cancer and tumors 5 cm or larger were treated with mastectomy and adjuvant systemic therapies but without radiotherapy at three institutions. We retrospectively assessed rates and risk factors for locoregional failure (LRF), overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) in these patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 85 months, the 5-year actuarial LRF rate was 7.6% (95% confidence interval, 3%-16%). LRF was primarily in the chest wall (4/5 local failures), and lymphatic-vascular invasion (LVI) was statistically significantly associated with LRF risk by the log-rank test (p = 0.017) and in Cox proportional hazards analysis (p 0.038). The 5-year OS and DFS rates were 83% and 86% respectively. LVI was also significantly associated with OS and DFS in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This series demonstrates a low LRF rate of 7.6% among breast cancer patients with node-negative tumors 5 cm and larger after mastectomy and adjuvant systemic therapy. Our data indicate that further adjuvant radiation therapy to increase local control may not be indicated by tumor size alone in the absence of positive lymph nodes. LVI was significantly associated with LRF in our series, indicating that patients with this risk factor require careful consideration with regard to further local therapy.

Floyd, Scott R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Goldberg, Saveli [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Raad, Rita Abi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Oswald, Mary J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sullivan, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Strom, Eric A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Katz, Angela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: ataghian@partners.org

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Directional correlation between. alpha. particles and L x rays in the decay of sup 238 Pu and sup 244 Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anisotropy in the directional correlation of nuclear radiations and {ital L} x rays has been clearly identified for the first time. {ital L}{sub 3} x-ray groups, {ital L}{sub {ital l}} and {ital L}{alpha}, are observed to be directionally correlated with {alpha} particles in the decays of {sup 238}Pu and {sup 244}Cm. The ratio of anisotropy for {ital L}{sub {ital l}} and {ital L}{alpha} is consistent with the recent observation that {ital L}{sub {ital l}} has a much greater admixture of {ital M}2 than predicted by relativistic calculations.

Johnston, P.N. (Department of Applied Physics, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2476V, Melbourne 3001 (Australia))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Study of Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections of U, Am, and Cm at n{sub T}OF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron induced fission cross sections of several isotopes have been measured at the CERN n{sub T}OF spallation neutron facility. Between them some measurements involve isotopes ({sup 233}U, {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 245}Cm) relevant for applications to nuclear technologies. The n{sub T}OF facility delivers neutrons with high instantaneous flux and in a wide energy range, from thermal up to 250 MeV. The experimental apparatus consists of an ionization chamber that discriminates fission fragments and {alpha} particles coming from natural radioactivity of the samples. All the measurements were performed referring to the standard cross section of {sup 235}U.

Milazzo, P. M.; Abbondanno, U.; Belloni, F.; Fujii, K. [INFN, Trieste (Italy); Aerts, G.; Andriamonje, S.; Berthoumieux, E.; Dridi, W.; Ferrant, L.; Gunsing, F.; Pancin, J.; Perrot, L.; Plukis, A.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L. [CNRS/IN2P3-IPN, Orsay (France); Alvarez, H.; Duran, I.; Paradela, C. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Cano-Ott, D. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

164

Is a Classical Language Adequate in Assessing the Detectability of the Redshifted 21cm Signal from the Early Universe?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The classical radiometer equation is commonly used to calculate the detectability of the 21cm emission by diffuse cosmic hydrogen at high redshifts. However, the classical description is only valid in the regime where the occupation number of the photons in phase space is much larger than unity and they collectively behave as a classical electromagnetic field. At redshifts zenergy, of 68/(1+z) mK, the occupation number of the signal photons is smaller than unity. Neverethless, the radiometer equation can still be used in this regime because the weak signal is accompanied by a flood of foreground photons with a high occupation number (involving the synchrotron Galactic...

Loeb, Abraham

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Experimental Cross Sections for Reactions of Heavy Ions and 208Pb, 209Bi, 238U, and 248Cm Targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

particular area of the chart of nuclides in greater detail.a given region of the Chart of Nuclides, like the heaviestsection of the Chart of Nuclides to make cross section

Patin, Joshua B.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at INL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5 cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at the INL Troy G. Garn, Dave H. Meikrantz, Nick R. Mann, Jack D. Law, Terry A. Todd Idaho National Laboratory Commercially available, Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACC) are currently being evaluated for processing dissolved nuclear fuel solutions to selectively partition integrated elements using solvent extraction technologies. These evaluations include hydraulic and clean-in-place (CIP) testing of a commercially available 12.5 cm unit. Data from these evaluations is used to support design of future nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. Hydraulic testing provides contactor throughput performance data on two-phase systems for a wide range of operating conditions. Hydraulic testing results on a simple two-phase oil and water system followed by a 30 % Tributyl phosphate in N-dodecane / nitric acid pair are reported. Maximum total throughputs for this size contactor ranged from 20 to 32 liters per minute without significant other phase carryover. A relatively new contactor design enhancement providing Clean-in-Place capability for ACCs was also investigated. Spray nozzles installed into the central rotor shaft allow the rotor internals to be cleaned, offline. Testing of the solids capture of a diatomaceous earth/water slurry feed followed by CIP testing was performed. Solids capture efficiencies of >95% were observed for all tests and short cold water cleaning pulses proved successful at removing solids from the rotor.

Troy G. Garn; David H. Meikrantz; Nick R. Mann; Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Detection of significant cm to sub-mm band radio and gamma-ray correlated variability in Fermi bright blazars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The exact location of the gamma-ray emitting region in blazars is still controversial. In order to attack this problem we present first results of a cross-correlation analysis between radio (11 cm to 0.8 mm wavelength, F-GAMMA program) and gamma-ray (0.1-300 GeV) ~ 3.5 year light curves of 54 Fermi-bright blazars. We perform a source stacking analysis and estimate significances and chance correlations using mixed source correlations. Our results reveal: (i) the first highly significant multi-band radio and gamma-ray correlations (radio lagging gamma rays) when averaging over the whole sample, (ii) average time delays (source frame: 76+/-23 to 7+/-9 days), systematically decreasing from cm to mm/sub-mm bands with a frequency dependence tau_r,gamma (nu) ~ nu^-1, in good agreement with jet opacity dominated by synchrotron self-absorption, (iii) a bulk gamma-ray production region typically located within/upstream of the 3 mm core region (tau_3mm,gamma=12+/-8 days), (iv) mean distances between the region of gamma-...

Fuhrmann, L; Chiang, J; Angelakis, E; Zensus, J A; Nestoras, I; Krichbaum, T P; Ungerechts, H; Sievers, A; Pavlidou, V; Readhead, A C S; Max-Moerbeck, W; Pearson, T J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Is a classical language adequate in assessing the detectability of the redshifted 21 cm signal from the early Universe?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The classical radiometer equation is commonly used to calculate the detectability of the 21 cm emission by diffuse cosmic hydrogen at high redshifts. However, the classical description is only valid in the regime where the occupation number of the photons in phase space is much larger than unity and they collectively behave as a classical electromagnetic field. At redshifts z{approx}<20, the spin temperature of the intergalactic gas is dictated by the radiation from galaxies and the brightness temperature of the emitting gas is in the range of mK, independently from the existence of the cosmic microwave background. In regions where the observed brightness temperature of the 21 cm signal is smaller than the observed photon energy, h{nu} = 68(1+z){sup -1} mK, the occupation number of the signal photons is smaller than unity. Nevertheless, the radiometer equation can still be used in this regime because the weak signal is accompanied by a flood of foreground photons with a high occupation number (involving the synchrotron galactic emission and the cosmic microwave background). As the signal photons are not individually distinguishable, the combined signal+foreground population of photons has a high occupation number, thus justifying the use of the radiometer equation.

Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Astronomy Department, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

170

Communication in Home Area Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used in area like smart buildings, street light controls andbuilding. This section focuses on HAN design to address two smart

Wang, Yubo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

172

Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

Tsai, Chin-Chi (Oak Ridge, TN); Gorbatkin, Steven M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Berry, Lee A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Astronomical Images from the Very Large Array (VLA) FIRST Survey Images from the STScI Archive (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters was a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid. The binary data are available in detailed source catalogs, but the full images themselves, developed through special techniques, are also available for public access. Note that the images are fairly large, typically 1150x1550 pixels. Access to the images is simple through the search interface; the images are also available via anonymous ftp at ftp://archive.stsci.edu/pub/vla_first/data. Another convenient way to obtain images is through the FIRST Cutout Server, which allows an image section to be extracted from the coadded image database at a user-specified position. The cutout server is also linked to the FIRST Search Engine, so that the catalog can be searched for sources of interest and then images can be obtained for those objects. All images taken through 2011 are available through the cutout server at http://third.ucllnl.org/cgi-bin/firstcutout.

174

THE CM-, MM-, AND SUB-MM-WAVE SPECTRUM OF ALLYL ISOCYANIDE AND RADIOASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATIONS IN ORION KL AND THE SgrB2 LINE SURVEYS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic isocyanides have an interesting astrochemistry and some of these molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, rotational spectral data for this class of compounds are still scarce. We provide laboratory spectra of the four-carbon allyl isocyanide covering the full microwave region, thus allowing a potential astrophysical identification in the ISM. We assigned the rotational spectrum of the two cis (synperiplanar) and gauche (anticlinal) conformations of allyl isocyanide in the centimeter-wave region (4-18 GHz), resolved its {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) hyperfine structure, and extended the measurements into the millimeter and submillimeter-wave (150-900 GHz) ranges for the title compound. Rotational constants for all the monosubstituted {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopologues are additionally provided. Laboratory observations are supplemented with initial radioastronomical observations. Following analysis of an extensive dataset (>11000 rotational transitions), accurate ground-state molecular parameters are reported for the cis and gauche conformations of the molecule, including rotational constants, NQC parameters, and centrifugal distortion terms up to octic contributions. Molecular parameters have also been obtained for the two first excited states of the cis conformation, with a dataset of more than 3300 lines. The isotopic data allowed determining substitution and effective structures for the title compound. We did not detect allyl isocyanide either in the IRAM 30 m line survey of Orion KL or in the PRIMOS survey toward SgrB2. Nevertheless, we provided an upper limit to its column density in Orion KL.

Haykal, I.; Margulčs, L.; Huet, T. R.; Motyienko, R. A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes, et Molécules, UMR CNRS 8523, Université de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cédex (France); Écija, P.; Cocinero, E. J.; Basterretxea, F.; Fernández, J. A.; Castańo, F. [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del País Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, E-48940 Leioa (Spain); Lesarri, A. [Departamento de Química Física y Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); Guillemin, J. C. [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6226, Allče de Beaulieu, CS 50837, F-35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J., E-mail: laurent.margules@univ-lille1.fr [Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Laboratory of Molecular Astrophysics, Department of Astrophysics, Ctra. De Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850 Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effect of quartz on thermal stability of AmO/sub 2/ and CmO/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors study the thermal stability of Am-243 and Cm-244 dioxides as single-phase powders and as mixtures with fused quartz powder by the x-ray diffraction technique. The studies show that addition of fused quartz powder appreciably reduces the thermal stability AmO/sub 2/ in a closed space as compared to the stability of AmO/sub 2/ heated without SiO/sub 2/. The authors prove the hypothesis that the observed phenomenon arises from the creation of a reducing atmosphere in the closed space. The appearance of the ordered i-form AmO /SUB 1.71/ in the system Am-O is observed for the first time.

Lyalyushkin, N.V.; Baranov, A.Y.; Kapshukov, I.I.; Shimbarev, E.V.; Sudakov, L.V.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Effect of quartz on thermal stability of AmO/sub 2/ and CmO/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper studies the effect of powdered fused quartz on the thermal staility of /sup 243/ AmO/sub 2/ and /sup 244/CmO/sub 2/. (I and II respectively). The I and II dioxide synthesis operations involved dissolution of the starting oxides in conc. HNO/sub 3/, precipitation of the oxalates, and their calcination in air. The synthesis temperature and the starting parameters of the crystal lattices (PCL) of the test dioxides are given. Individual phases with a composition intermediate between AmO/sub 2/ and AmO /SUB 1.5/ were noted in the course of decomposition of AmO/sub 2/ heated with quarts at not more-500 C. This phase was identified as the alpha-form AmO /SUB 1.71/ .

Lyalyoshkin, N.V.; Baronov, A.Y.; Kapshokov, I.I.; Shimbarev, E.V.; Sudakov, L.V.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Yield of delayed neutrons in the thermal-neutron-induced reaction {sup 245}Cm(n, f)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The yield of delayed neutrons, v{sub d}, from thermal-neutron-induced fission of {sup 245}Cm is measured. Experiments aimed at studying the properties of delayed neutrons from the fission of some reactor isotopes and initiated in 1997 were continued at the upgraded Isomer-M facility by a method according to which a periodic irradiation of a sample with a pulsed neutron beam from the IBR-2 reactor was accompanied by recording emitted neutrons in the intervals between the pulses. The accuracy of the resulting total delayed-neutron yield v{sub d} = (0.64 {+-} 0.02)% is two times higher than that in previous measurements. This work was performed at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna).

Andrianov, V. R. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Vyachin, V. N. [All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) (Russian Federation); Gundorin, N. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Druzhinin, A. A. [All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) (Russian Federation); Zhdanova, K. V.; Lihachev, A. N.; Pikelner, L. B.; Rebrova, N. V.; Salamatin, I. M.; Furman, V. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Particle-number conserving analysis of rotational bands in {sup 247,249}Cm and {sup 249}Cf  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recently observed high-spin rotational bands in odd-A nuclei {sup 247,249}Cm and {sup 249}Cf[Tandel et al., Phys. Rev. C 82, 041301(R) (2010)] are investigated by using the cranked-shell model (CSM) with the pairing correlations treated by a particle-number conserving (PNC) method in which the blocking effects are taken into account exactly. The experimental moments of inertia and alignments and their variations with the rotational frequency {omega} are reproduced very well by the PNC-CSM calculations. By examining the {omega} dependence of the occupation probability of each cranked Nilsson orbital near the Fermi surface and the contributions of valence orbitals to the angular momentum alignment in each major shell, the level crossing and upbending mechanism in each nucleus is understood clearly.

Zhang Zhenhua [Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zeng Jinyan [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao Enguang [Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhou Shangui [Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Is a Classical Language Adequate in Assessing the Detectability of the Redshifted 21cm Signal from the Early Universe?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The classical radiometer equation is commonly used to calculate the detectability of the 21cm emission by diffuse cosmic hydrogen at high redshifts. However, the classical description is only valid in the regime where the occupation number of the photons in phase space is much larger than unity and they collectively behave as a classical electromagnetic field. At redshifts zenergy, of 68/(1+z) mK, the occupation number of the signal photons is smaller than unity. Neverethless, the radiometer equation can still be used in this regime because the weak signal is accompanied by a flood of foreground photons with a high occupation number (involving the synchrotron Galactic emission and the cosmic microwave background). As the signal photons are not individually distinguishable, the combined signal+foreground population of photons has a high occupation number, thus justifying the use of the radiometer equation.

Abraham Loeb

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

180

Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Pulse Height of MIP's in an nside Silicon Microstrip Detector after Proton Irradiation with a Fluence of 1 \\Theta 10 15 p cm \\Gamma2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

detector after those fluences is projected to be in excess of 1000 V at an operating temperature of \\Gamma to damage due to high energy protons, which we will call ''MIP's''. The beam was collimated with a carbon block to a diameter of 1 cm and had an intensity of about 10 14 p cm \\Gamma2 hr \\Gamma1 of 55 Me

California at Santa Cruz, University of

182

S. Saarelma, P. Hill, A. Bottino, G. Colyer, A.R. Field, B. McMillan, A. Peeters, C.M. Roach and MAST team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S. Saarelma, P. Hill, A. Bottino, G. Colyer, A.R. Field, B. McMillan, A. Peeters, C.M. Roach , B. McMillan 3 , A. Peeters 4 , C.M. Roach 1 and MAST team 1 1 EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association

183

Experimental Cross Sections for Reactions of Heavy Ions and 208Pb, 209Bi, 238U, and 248Cm Targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of the reactions between heavy ions and {sup 208}Pb, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 238}U, and {sup 248} Cm targets was performed to look at the differences between the cross sections of hot and cold fusion reactions. Experimental cross sections were compared with predictions from statistical computer codes to evaluate the effectiveness of the computer code in predicting production cross sections. Hot fusion reactions were studied with the MG system, catcher foil techniques and the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS). 3n- and 4n-exit channel production cross sections were obtained for the {sup 238}U({sup 18}O,xn){sup 256-x}Fm, {sup 238}U({sup 22}Ne,xn){sup 260-x}No, and {sup 248}Cm({sup 15}N,xn){sup 263-x}Lr reactions and are similar to previous experimental results. The experimental cross sections were accurately modeled by the predictions of the HIVAP code using the Reisdorf and Schaedel parameters and are consistent with the existing systematics of 4n exit channel reaction products. Cold fusion reactions were examined using the BGS. The {sup 208}Pb({sup 48}Ca,xn){sup 256-x}No, {sup 208}Pb({sup 50}Ti,xn){sup 258-x}Rf, {sup 208}Pb({sup 51}V,xn){sup 259-x}Db, {sup 209}Bi({sup 50}Ti,xn){sup 259-x}Db, and {sup 209}Bi({sup 51}V,xn){sup 260-x}Sg reactions were studied. The experimental production cross sections are in agreement with the results observed in previous experiments. It was necessary to slightly alter the Reisdorf and Schaedel parameters for use in the HIVAP code in order to more accurately model the experimental data. The cold fusion experimental results are in agreement with current 1n- and 2n-exit channel systematics.

Patin, Joshua B.

2002-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

184

Spectral content of buried Ag foils at 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser illumination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sources of 5–12 keV thermal He? x-rays are readily generated by laser irradiation of mid-Z foils at intensities >10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, and are widely used as probes for inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density experiments. Higher energy 17–50 keV x-ray sources are efficiently produced from “cold” K? emission using short pulse, petawatt lasers at intensities >10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} [H.-S. Park, B. R. Maddox et al., “High-resolution 17–75 keV backlighters for high energy density experiments,” Phys. Plasmas 15(7), 072705 (2008); B. R. Maddox, H. S. Park, B. A. Remington et al., “Absolute measurements of x-ray backlighter sources at energies above 10 keV,” Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 056709 (2011)]. However, when long pulse (>1 ns) lasers are used with Z > 30 elements, the spectrum contains contributions from both K shell transitions and from ionized atomic states. Here we show that by sandwiching a silver foil between layers of high-density carbon, the ratio of K?:He? in the x-ray spectrum is significant increased over directly illuminated Ag foils, with narrower lines from K-shell transitions. Additionally, the emission volume is more localized for the sandwiched target, producing a more planar x-ray sheet. This technique may be useful for generating probes requiring spectral purity and a limited spatial extent, for example, in incoherent x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

Huntington, C. M., E-mail: huntington4@llnl.gov; Maddox, B. R.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S.; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Physics 123 Homework Problems, Spring 2011 1-1. The small piston of a hydraulic lift has a cross-sectional area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics 123 Homework Problems, Spring 2011 1-1. The small piston of a hydraulic lift has a cross-sectional area of A1 = 3.24 cm2 , and its large piston has a cross-sectional area of A2 = 235 cm2 (see figure). What force F1 must be applied to the small piston for it to raise a load of [01] kN? (In service

Hart, Gus

186

ERRATA SHEET for ''Lithology and Stratigraphy of Holes Drilled in LANL-Use Areas of the Nevada Test Site''  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conversion error has been discovered in the physical property data table for Emplacement Hole U-19bg (Supplemental Data) presented on Page 89. Data in the column labeled ''Bulk Density (g/cc)'' are actually presented in pounds per cubic foot rather than grams per cubic centimeter. The following table presents the bulk density values for U-19bg in pounds per cubic foot and grams per cubic centimeter.

L. B. Prothro; S. L. Drellack, Jr.; B. M. Allen

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - area csi photocathodes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

window then N pe 60 is estimated for the 100 cm C 4 F 10 radiator... mm 2 for the AerogelC 4 F 10 detector, 4 Theta 4 mm 2 for the CF 4 detector. ffl Cover large area...

188

Graphene Transistors Fabricated via Transfer-Printing In Device Active-Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene Transistors Fabricated via Transfer-Printing In Device Active-Areas on Large Wafer Xiaogan graphene islands from a graphite and then uses transfer printing to place the islands from the stamp from the printed graphene. The transistors show a hole and electron mobility of 3735 and 795 cm2/V

189

Northwest Area Foundation Horizons Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwest Area Foundation Horizons Program Final Evaluation Report ­ Executive Summary Diane L by the Northwest Area Foundation in partnership with two national organizations and delivered by a number to remember that Horizons was not designed to reduce poverty, but instead to contribute to the Foundations

Amin, S. Massoud

190

Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

226 Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area / Assessment Unit DI Prod. N(eq) Sum Total Cumu subbasin, Washington. Geographic Area / Assessment Unit IntegratedPriorityRestoration Category Habitat% (unscaled results) of the combined protection benefit for summer steelhead within the Methow basin, and 51

191

tight environment high radiation area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Irradiation Studies of Optical Components - II CERN, week of Oct. 24, 2005 1.4 GeV proton beam 4 x· tight environment · high radiation area · non-serviceable area · passive components · optics only, no active electronics · transmit image through flexible fiber bundle Optical Diagnostics 01-13-2006 1 #12

McDonald, Kirk

192

Proposed Laser-driven, Dielectric Microstructure Few-cm Long Undulator for Attosecond Coherent X-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents the concept of an all-dielectric laser-driven undulator for the generation of coherent X-rays. The proposed laser-driven undulator is expected to produce internal deflection forces equivalent to a several-Tesla magnetic field acting on a speed-of-light particle. The key idea for this laser-driven undulator is its ability to provide phase synchronicity between the deflection force and the electron beam for a distance that is much greater than the laser wavelength. The potential advantage of this undulator is illustrated with a possible design example that assumes a small laser accelerator which delivers a 2 GeV, 1 pC, 1 kHz electron bunch train to a 10 cm long, 1/2 mm period laser-driven undulator. Such an undulator could produce coherent X-ray pulses with {approx}10{sup 9} photons of 64 keV energy. The numerical modeling for the expected X-ray pulse shape was performed with GENESIS, which predicts X-ray pulse durations in the few-attosecond range. Possible applications for nonlinear electromagnetic effects from these X-ray pulses are briefly discussed.

Plettner, T; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

193

Backward-propagating MeV electrons from $10^{18}$ W/cm$^2$ laser interactions with water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an experimental study of the generation of $\\sim$MeV electrons opposite to the direction of laser propagation following the relativistic interaction at normal incidence of a $\\sim$3 mJ, $10^{18}$ W/cm$^2$ short pulse laser with a flowing 30 $\\mu$m diameter water column target. Faraday cup measurements record hundreds of pC charge accelerated to energies exceeding 120 keV, and energy-resolved measurements of secondary x-ray emissions reveal an x-ray spectrum peaking above 800 keV, which is significantly higher energy than previous studies with similar experimental conditions and more than five times the $\\sim$110 keV ponderomotive energy scale for the laser. We show that the energetic x-rays generated in the experiment result from backward-going, high-energy electrons interacting with the focusing optic and vacuum chamber walls with only a small component of x-ray emission emerging from the target itself. We also demonstrate that the high energy radiation can be suppressed through the attenuation of...

Morrison, J T; Frische, K D; Feister, S; Ovchinnikov, V M; Nees, J A; Orban, C; Freeman, R R; Roquemore, W M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Synthesis of the isotopes of elements 118 and 116 in the 249Cf and 245Cm+48Ca fusion reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decay properties of {sup 290}116 and {sup 291}116, and the dependence of their production cross sections on the excitation energies of the compound nucleus, {sup 293}116, have been measured in the {sup 245}Cm({sup 48}Ca,xn){sup 293-x}116 reaction. These isotopes of element 116 are the decay daughters of element 118 isotopes, which are produced via the {sup 249}Cf+{sup 48}Ca reaction. They performed the element 118 experiment at two projectile energies, corresponding to {sup 297}118 compound nucleus excitation energies of E* = 29.2 {+-} 2.5 and 34.4 {+-} 2.3 MeV. During an irradiation with a total beam dose of 4.1 x 10{sup 19} {sup 48}Ca projectiles, three similar decay chains consisting of two or three consecutive {alpha} decays and terminated by a spontaneous fission (SF) with high total kinetic energy of about 230 MeV were observed. The three decay chains originated from the even-even isotope {sup 294}118 (E{sub {alpha}} = 11.65 {+-} 0.06 MeV, T{sub {alpha}} = 0.89{sub -0.31}{sup +1.07} ms) produced in the 3n-evaporation channel of the {sup 249}Cf+{sup 48}Ca reaction with a maximum cross section of 0.5{sub -0.3}{sup +1.6} pb.

Oganessian, Y T; Utyonkov, V K; Lobanov, Y V; Abdullin, F S; Polyakov, A N; Sagaidak, R N; Shirokovsky, I V; Tsyganov, Y S; Voinov, A A; Gulbekian, G G; Bogomolov, S L; Gikal, B N; Mezentsev, A N; Iliev, S; Subbotin, V G; Sukhov, A M; Subotic, K; Zagrebaev, V I; Vostokin, G K; Itkis, M G; Moody, K J; . Patin, J B; Shaughnessy, D A; Stoyer, M A; Stoyer, N J; Wilk, P A; Kenneally, J M; Landrum, J H; Wild, J F; Lougheed, R W

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

20to2-3T5m2+5: 16-cm I.R., 46-cm O.D., 8.6 MW, Optimized Cooling Robert J. Weggel; Magnet Optimization Research Engineering (M.O.R.E.), LLC; 1/26/2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Research Engineering (M.O.R.E.), LLC; 1/26/2014 Fig. 1. On-axis field profiles of 20-T magnets20to2-3T5m2+5: 16-cm I.R., 46-cm O.D., 8.6 MW, Optimized Cooling Robert J. Weggel; Magnet of 16-cm I.R. The copper magnet generates 5 T at 8.6 MW with five tightly-nested two-layer coils

McDonald, Kirk

196

IDS120M20to2T5m: 16-cm I.R., 46-cm O.D., 8.6 MW, Optimized Cooling Robert J. Weggel; Magnet Optimization Research Engineering (M.O.R.E.), LLC; 1/21/2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Research Engineering (M.O.R.E.), LLC; 1/21/2014 Fig. 1. On-axis field profile of 20-T magnet of 16IDS120M20to2T5m: 16-cm I.R., 46-cm O.D., 8.6 MW, Optimized Cooling Robert J. Weggel; Magnet-cm inner radius. The copper magnet generates 5 T at 8.6 MW with five tightly-nested two-layer coils

McDonald, Kirk

197

Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan (Development Plan) is to guide the physical development of the 200 Areas (which refers to the 200 East Area, 200 West Area, and 200 Area Corridor, located between the 200 East and 200 West Areas) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4320.lB (DOE 1991a) by performing the following: Establishing a land-use plan and setting land-use categories that meet the needs of existing and proposed activities. Coordinating existing, 5-year, and long-range development plans and guiding growth in accordance with those plans. Establishing development guidelines to encourage cost-effective development and minimize conflicts between adjacent activities. Identifying site development issues that need further analysis. Integrating program plans with development plans to ensure a logical progression of development. Coordinate DOE plans with other agencies [(i.e., Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)]. Being a support document to the Hanford Site Development Plan (DOE-RL 1990a) (parent document) and providing technical site information relative to the 200 Areas.

Rinne, C.A.; Daly, K.S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Research Areas Research Areas High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP) Research Areas During open solicitations proposals are sought...

199

RECTANGULARLY SHAPED LARGE AREA PLASMA SOURCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The consideration of the ion optica as well as the voltageof 10- by 40-cm. The optica of the ion accelerating array

Ehlers, K.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate-Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States. Part II. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from records for 1961-1990. The scenario runs for 2025-2034 and 2090-2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the NE. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn yields were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward yield trends under scenarios of climate change. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization.

Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Progress Update: M Area Closure  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The celebration of the first area cleanup completion with the help of the Recovery Act.

Cody, Tom

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

202

Wellhead Protection Area Act (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates activities which can occur on or below the land surface of the area surrounding a wellhead. The purpose of these regulations is to limit well contamination and preserve...

203

Controlling Bats in Urban Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to avoid obstacles and capture insects. Bats also emit audible sounds that may be used for communi- cation. L-1913 4-08 Controlling BATS Damage In urban areas, bats may become a nuisance becauseoftheirsqueaking,scratchingandcrawl- inginattics...

Texas Wildlife Services

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Protected Water Area System (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Natural Resource Commission maintains a state plan for the design and establishment of a protected water area system and those adjacent lands needed to protect the integrity of that system. A...

205

The Program Area Committee Chairperson.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

worksheets and others. Prepared by Mary G. Marshall and Burl B. RichardsQ Extension program development specialists, The Texas A&M University System. THE PROGRAM AREA COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSON You Hold an Important Position! Whenever people gather...

Marshall, Mary; Richardson, Burl B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Security Area Vouching and Piggybacking  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Security Area practice of "vouching" or "piggybacking" access by personnel. DOE N 251.40, dated 5-3-01, extends this directive until 12-31-01.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

207

Focus Area Tax Credits (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Focus Area Tax Credits for businesses in Baltimore City or Prince George’s County enterprise zones include: (1) Ten-year, 80% credit against local real property taxes on a portion of real property...

208

Transforming Parks and Protected Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforming Parks and Protected Areas Policy and governance in a changing world Edited by Kevin S from the British Library Library of Congress Cataloging In Publication Data Transforming parks

Bolch, Tobias

209

Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique...

210

Biological Inventory Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological Inventory of the Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area Prepared by: Joe Stevens .............................. 12 Identify Targeted Inventory Areas

211

100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Plutonium focus area: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A 915 MHz/2. 45 GHz ECR plasma source for large area ion beam and plasma processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technology for producing uniform, high density (10{sup 11}--10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3}) microwave discharges over cross sections of 50 cm{sup 2} is well established. The present challenge is to extend the high density, and electrodeless benefits of microwave discharges to produce uniform densities over an area of 300--700 cm{sup 2}. Such discharges have important applications for 6 to 8-in. single wafer processing and as large surface, broad beam, high current density ion sources. The design principles for scaling the 18 cm diam MPDR ECR cavity applicator technology to 38--47 cm diam are reviewed. Microwave discharges with diameters of 20--30 cm can be created when these applicators are excited with either 2.45 GHz or 915 MHz. The design and construction of a prototype cavity applicator with a 20 cm diam discharge is described. The discharge is enclosed with a 12-pole multicusp static magnetic field produced by 2-in. by 2-in. by 1-in. rare-earth magnets. Each magnet has a pole face field strength of 3 kG. The experimental test of this plasma source in argon gas excited with 2.45 GHz energy is reviewed.

Asmussen, J.; Hopwood, J.; Sze, F.C. (Department of Electrical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1226 (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Simulation and design of various configurations of silicon detectors for high irradiation tolerance up to 6x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} in LHC application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various new configurations (n{sup +}/p/p{sup +}, n{sup +}/n/p{sup +}, and p{sup +}/n/n{sup +}) of silicon detector designs have been simulated using processing and device simulation tools, before and after irradiation to various fluences. The aim of material selection and detector design is to ensure adequate charge collection after being irradiated up to 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} (or 6x10{sup 14}{pi}/cm{sup 2}) in LHC environment, which corresponds to a net increase (with long term anneal) of space charge of 7x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. Starting materials selected for simulations include high resistivity p-type silicon, medium and low resistivity n-type silicon. Design of multi-guard-rings structure for high voltage operation is also considered. First irradiation data of low resistivity silicon detector is presented.

Li, Z.; Chen, W.; Beuttenmuller, R. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Clean-in-Place and Reliability Testing of a Commercial 12.5 cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at the INL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The renewed interest in advancing nuclear energy has spawned the research of advanced technologies for recycling nuclear fuel. A significant portion of the advanced fuel cycle includes the recovery of selected actinides by solvent extraction methods utilizing centrifugal contactors. Although the use of centrifugal contactors for solvent extraction is widely known, their operation is not without challenges. Solutions generated from spent fuel dissolution contain unknown quantities of undissolved solids. A majority of these solids will be removed via various methods of filtration. However, smaller particles are expected to carry through to downstream solvent extraction processes and equipment. In addition, solids/precipitates brought about by mechanical or chemical upsets are another potential area of concern. During processing, particulate captured in the rotor assembly by high centrifugal forces eventually forms a cake-like structure on the inner wall introducing balance problems and negatively affecting phase separations. One of the features recently developed for larger engineering scale Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACCs) is the Clean-In-Place (CIP) capability. Engineered spray nozzles were installed into the hollow central rotor shaft in all four quadrants of the rotor assembly. This arrangement allows for a very convenient and effective method of solids removal from within the rotor assembly.

N. R. Mann; T. G. Garn; D. H. Meikrantz; J. D. Law; T. A. Todd

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Clean-in-Place and Reliability Testing of a Commercial 12.5-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at the INL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The renewed interest in advancing nuclear energy has spawned the research of advanced technologies for recycling nuclear fuel. A significant portion of the advanced fuel cycle includes the recovery of selected actinides by solvent extraction methods utilizing centrifugal contactors. Although the use of centrifugal contactors for solvent extraction is widely known, their operation is not without challenges. Solutions generated from spent fuel dissolution contain unknown quantities of undissolved solids. A majority of these solids will be removed via various methods of filtration. However, smaller particles are expected to carry through to downstream solvent extraction processes and equipment. In addition, solids/precipitates brought about by mechanical or chemical upsets are another potential area of concern. During processing, particulate captured in the rotor assembly by high centrifugal forces eventually forms a cake-like structure on the inner wall introducing balance problems and negatively affecting phase separations. One of the features recently developed for larger engineering scale Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACCs) is the Clean-In-Place (CIP) capability. Engineered spray nozzles were installed into the hollow central rotor shaft in all four quadrants of the rotor assembly. This arrangement allows for a very convenient and effective method of solids removal from within the rotor assembly.

N. R. Mann; T. G. Garn; D. H. Meikrantz; J. D. Law; T. A. Todd

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Probing First Galaxies and Their Impact on the Intergalactic Medium through the 21-cm Observation of the Cosmic Dawn with the SKA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an overview of the theory of high-redshift star and X-ray source formation, and how they affect the 21-cm background. Primary focus is given to Lyman alpha pumping and X-ray heating mechanisms at cosmic dawn, opening a new observational window for high-redshift astrophysics by generating sizable fluctuations in the 21-cm background. We describe observational prospects for power spectrum analysis and 3D tomography (imaging) of the signature of these early astrophysical sources by SKA1-LOW and SKA2.

Ahn, Kyungjin; Alvarez, Marcelo A; Chen, Xuelei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Scaling of EPR spectral-spatial images with size of sample: Images of a sample greater than 5 cm in linear dimension  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have obtained spectral-spatial EPR images of a phantom significantly larger than those previously obtained. Images of a homogeneous phantom 4.2 cm in diameter and 6.5 cm in length with B{sub 1} equivalent to that used for smaller samples give a similar linewidth resolution both with linewidth population distributions of width 0.1 {mu}T. Spatial resolution appeared to have modest degradation. Images of the large homogeneous phantom provide maps of the magnetic field of a partially shimmed magnet.

Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Subramanian, V. S.; Halpern, Howard J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 and Center for EPR Imaging in Vivo Physiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Evaluating a Radar-Based, Non Contact Streamflow Measurement System in the San  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center Denver, CO 80225 #12;iii CONVERSION FACTORS Multiply By To obtain inch (in.) 2.54 centimeter (cm Program #12;iv CONTENTS CONVERSION FACTORS

220

EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Large area silicon drift detectors for x-rays -- New results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large area silicon drift detectors, consisting of 8 mm and 12 mm diameter hexagons, were fabricated on 0.35 mm thick high resistivity n-type silicon. An external FET and a low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier were used for testing the prototype detectors. The detector performance was measured in the range 75 to 25 C using Peltier cooling, and from 0.125 to 6 {micro}s amplifier shaping time. Measured energy resolutions were 159 eV FWHM and 263 eV FWHM for the 0.5 cm{sup 2} and 1 cm{sup 2} detectors, respectively (at 5.9 keV, {minus}75 C, 6 {micro}s shaping time). The uniformity of the detector response over the entire active area (measured using 560 nm light) was < 0.5%.

Iwanczyk, J.S.; Patt, B.E.; Tull, C.R.; Segal, J.D. [Photon Imaging, Inc., Northridge, CA (United States); Kenney, C.J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Bradley, J. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

The instrumental record goes back to about 1850. A few areas of the globe have not warmed in recent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the historical rise in temperatures. #12;Are there other indicators of the warming? Global sea level has risen of land and other factors. Global sea levels have risen about 20cm over the past 100 years ­ a rateThe instrumental record goes back to about 1850. A few areas of the globe have not warmed in recent

Allan, Richard P.

223

Accurate determination of Curium and Californium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) in 248Cm samples for transmutation studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments including the mini-INCA (INcineration of Actinides) project for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron fluxes, in view of proposing solutions to reduce the radiotoxicity of long-lived nuclear wastes. In this context, a Cm sample enriched in {sup 248}Cm ({approx}97 %) was irradiated in thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). This work describes a quadrupole ICP-MS (ICP-QMS) analytical procedure for precise and accurate isotopic composition determination of Cm before sample irradiation and of Cm and Cf after sample irradiation. The factors that affect the accuracy and reproducibility of isotopic ratio measurements by ICP-QMS, such as peak centre correction, detector dead time, mass bias, abundance sensitivity and hydrides formation, instrumental background, and memory blank were carefully evaluated and corrected. Uncertainties of the isotopic ratios, taking into account internal precision of isotope ratio measurements, peak tailing, and hydrides formations ranged from 0.3% to 1.3%. This uncertainties range is quite acceptable for the nuclear data to be used in transmutation studies.

Gourgiotis, A.; Isnard, H.; Aubert, M.; Dupont, E.; AlMahamid, I.; Cassette, P.; Panebianco, S.; Letourneau, A.; Chartier, F.; Tian, G.; Rao, L.; Lukens, W.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

pubs.acs.org/cmPublished on Web 03/31/2010r 2010 American Chemical Society Chem. Mater. 2010, 22, 24272433 2427  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the presence of lithium ions and films consisting of these aggregates for dye-sensitized solar cell, many studies in the past 2 decades have been focused on the development of dye-sensitized solar cells, 2427­2433 2427 DOI:10.1021/cm9009942 Effects of Lithium Ions on Dye-Sensitized ZnO Aggregate Solar

Cao, Guozhong

225

Aerogels: stiff foams composed of up to 99.8% air Silica aerogel is the world's lowest-density solid: 1 mg/cm3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Aerogels: stiff foams composed of up to 99.8% air Silica aerogel is the world's lowest-density solid: 1 mg/cm3 Aerogels hold 15 different records for material properties, including best insulator 2.38 g piece of aerogel supports a 2.5 kg brick. #12;#12;#12;l = m Ă? n unit vector in orbital space

Fominov, Yakov

226

To obtain representative temperatures, sensors were made with a length of 35 cm. The stainless steel needles have a diameter of 3 mm. Inside are five  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To obtain representative temperatures, sensors were made with a length of 35 cm. The stainless steel needles have a diameter of 3 mm. Inside are five Platinum Pt-100 sensors, that are cascaded in series to obtain a Pt-500 sensor. The sensors are calibrated to retrieve individual calibration

Haak, Hein

227

pubs.acs.org/cmPublished on Web 12/08/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Chem. Mater. 2010, 22, 579584 579  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 579­584 579 DOI:10.1021/cm903164k Dye-Sensitized TiO2 Nanotube Solar Cells with Markedly Enhanced sensitized with ruthenium dye N-719 to yield dye-sensitized TiO2 nanotube solar cells. Rational surface, in conjunction with oxygen plasma exposure under optimized conditions, dye-sensitized TiO2 nanotube solar cells

Lin, Zhiqun

228

pubs.acs.org/cmPublished on Web 08/04/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Chem. Mater. 2009, 21, 38893897 3889  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 3889­3897 3889 DOI:10.1021/cm9014223 A Systematic Study on Zinc Oxide Materials Containing Group I Widebandgapsemiconductorsarestillreceivinggrowing attention because of the wide spectrum of properties and applications.1 Among them, zinc oxide (Zn-emitting diodes, in photovoltaic solar cells, in UV photodetectors, for varistors, sensors, and even in hetero

Nabben, Reinhard

229

A FOURTH H I 21 cm ABSORPTION SYSTEM IN THE SIGHT LINE OF MG J0414+0534: A RECORD FOR INTERVENING ABSORBERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the detection of a strong H I 21 cm absorption system at z = 0.5344, as well as a candidate system at z = 0.3389, in the sight line toward the z = 2.64 quasar MG J0414+0534. This, in addition to the absorption at the host redshift and the other two intervening absorbers, takes the total to four (possibly five). The previous maximum number of 21 cm absorbers detected along a single sight line is two and so we suspect that this number of gas-rich absorbers is in some way related to the very red color of the background source. Despite this, no molecular gas (through OH absorption) has yet been detected at any of the 21 cm redshifts, although, from the population of 21 cm absorbers as a whole, there is evidence for a weak correlation between the atomic line strength and the optical-near-infrared color. In either case, the fact that so many gas-rich galaxies (likely to be damped Ly{alpha} absorption systems) have been found along a single sight line toward a highly obscured source may have far-reaching implications for the population of faint galaxies not detected in optical surveys, a possibility which could be addressed through future wide-field absorption line surveys with the Square Kilometer Array.

Tanna, A.; Webb, J. K. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Curran, S. J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Whiting, M. T. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Bignell, C., E-mail: sjc@physics.usyd.edu.au [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Rt. 28/92 Green Bank, WV 24944-0002 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

pubs.acs.org/cm Published on Web 08/26/2009 r 2009 American Chemical Society 4090 Chem. Mater. 2009, 21, 40904092  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 21, 4090­4092 DOI:10.1021/cm9016134 Solar Cells from a Solution Processable Pentacene with Improved-oxidation of the pentacene donor.16 This situation is exacerbated by the fact that nearly all organic solar cells necessi- tate complex structures, low work function cathodes, and/or extensive encapsulation to achieve peak per

Hone, James

231

pubs.acs.org/cmPublished on Web 07/01/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Chem. Mater. 2009, 21, 30333035 3033  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 3033­3035 3033 DOI:10.1021/cm901280w Synthesis, Properties, and Gas Separation Studies of a Robust of appropriate size and composition to capture CO2 from mixtures with methane. Based on condensation of cheap diffraction analysis of the as-synthesized solid polymer 5 revealed no diffraction, implying that 5

232

GLOBAL EMISSIONS INVENTORIES OF ACID-RELATED COMPOUNDS T.E. GRAEDEL t , C.M. BENKOVITZ 2, W.C. KEENE 3, D.S. LEE 4,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL EMISSIONS INVENTORIES OF ACID-RELATED COMPOUNDS T.E. GRAEDEL t , C.M. BENKOVITZ 2, W, and future rely in part on inventories of emissions constructed on appropriate spatial and temporal scales and the regulatory and policy communities. The production of global emissions inventories is the task of the GlobalEmissionsInventory

233

pubs.acs.org/cm Published on Web 06/25/2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society 4120 Chem. Mater. 2010, 22, 41204122  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pubs.acs.org/cm Published on Web 06/25/2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society 4120 Chem. Mater. 2010 the solvated metal-organic framework as a dark red precipitate. X-ray powder diffraction data show the solid

234

A MOMENT EQUATION APPROACH TO A MUON COLLIDER COOLING C.M. Celata and A. M. Sessler, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA P. B. Lee, B. A. Shadwick, and J. SA MOMENT EQUATION APPROACH TO A MUON COLLIDER COOLING LATTICE C.M. Celata and A. M. Sessler, Ernest. Wurtele, Univ. of CA at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA Abstract Equations are derived which describe

Wurtele, Jonathan

235

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1) Host institution: University of Oxford Cartwright Project description: Recovery of natural gas from mudstone (shale) formations has triggered

Henderson, Gideon

236

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

Howard, T.C.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

238

Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 provides for the designation and establishment of a system of natural areas in order to preserve the natural ecosystems of these areas. Designated natural...

239

Innovation investment area: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Latera area, Tuscany, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

242

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hvalfjordur Fjord area, re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

243

Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma Photo of Comfort Station at the Chickasaw National Recreation...

244

Effects of cell area on the performance of dye sensitized solar cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have significant advantage over the current silicon cells by having low manufacturing cost and potentially high conversion efficiency. Therefore, DSCs are expected to be used as the next generation solar cell device that covers wide range of new applications. In order to achieve highly efficient DSCs for practical application, study on the effect of increasing the cell’s area on the performance of dye sensitized solar need to be carried out. Three different DSC cell areas namely, 1, 12.96 and 93.5 cm{sup 2} respectively were fabricated and analyzed through solar simulator and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). From the analysis of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), it was observed that the cell’s electron lifetime was influenced significantly by the cell’s area. Although the collection efficiency of all cells recorded to be approximately 100% but higher recombination rate with increased cell area reduced the performance of the cell.

Khatani, Mehboob, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com; Mohamed, Norani Muti, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com; Hamid, Nor Hisham, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com; Sahmer, Ahmad Zahrin, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com; Samsudin, Adel, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices (COINN), UTP (Malaysia)

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

RHIC | New Areas of Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 MediaBrookhavenBlackA New Area of

246

History of 100-B Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial three production reactors and their support facilities were designated as the 100-B, 100-D, and 100-F areas. In subsequent years, six additional plutonium-producing reactors were constructed and operated at the Hanford Site. Among them was one dual-purpose reactor (100-N) designed to supply steam for the production of electricity as a by-product. Figure 1 pinpoints the location of each of the nine Hanford Site reactors along the Columbia River. This report documents a brief description of the 105-B reactor, support facilities, and significant events that are considered to be of historical interest. 21 figs.

Wahlen, R.K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Surrounding Area Restaurants...Hungry  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof theRestoration at Young -Final»EnergySupportSurrounding Area

248

Resource Areas of Texas: Land.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prairie (Coastal ~~~(l), soils are less acid and some are calcareous. Main series: lrictoria, Orelia, Clareville. ~ight, acid sands and darker, loamy to clayey soils-some $;dine and sodic-lie in a narrow band along the coast. Main aeries: Harris...). Mai series: Truce, Waurika, Brown, moderately deep 11 shallow, calcareous, clay1 a1 oils are alg common. Main series: (: 1 to alk nts; somt Bonti. ey soils >wens. over sh Bottomlands-minor areas or brown to clam gray, loam1 1 Main senes 3...

Godfrey, Curtis L.; Carter, Clarence R.; McKee, Gordon S.

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Carlsbad Area Office strategic plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This edition of the Carlsbad Area Office Strategic Plan captures the U.S. Department of Energy`s new focus, and supercedes the edition issued previously in 1995. This revision reflects a revised strategy designed to demonstrate compliance with environmental regulations earlier than the previous course of action; and a focus on the selected combination of scientific investigations, engineered alternatives, and waste acceptance criteria for supporting the compliance applications. An overview of operations and historical aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico is presented.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The ALFALFA HI Absorption Pilot Survey: A Wide-Area Blind Damped Lyman Alpha System Survey of the Local Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a pilot survey for neutral hydrogen (HI) 21 cm absorption in the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-Band Feed Array (ALFALFA) Survey. This project is a wide-area "blind" search for HI absorption in the local universe, spanning -650 km/s = 2x10^20 cm^-2) is Delta z = 7.0 (129 objects, assuming T_s = 100 K and covering fraction unity); for super-DLAs (N_HI >= 2x10^21 cm^-2) it is Delta z= 128.2 (2353 objects). We re-detect the intrinsic HI absorption line in UGC 6081 but detect no intervening absorption line systems. We compute a 95% confidence upper limit on the column density frequency distribution function f(N_HI,X) spanning four orders of magnitude in column density, 10^19 (T_s/100 K)(1/f) cm^-2 < N_HI < 10^23 (T_s/100 K)(1/f) cm^-2, that is consistent with previous redshifted optical damped Ly alpha surveys and the aggregate HI 21 cm emission in the local universe. The detection rate is in agreement with extant observations. This pilot survey suggests that an absorption line sear...

Darling, Jeremy; Haynes, Martha P; Giovanelli, Riccardo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)

Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

1985-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

252

Modulation of over 10{sup 14}?cm{sup ?2} electrons in SrTiO{sub 3}/GdTiO{sub 3} heterostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate charge modulation of over 10{sup 14}?cm{sup ?2} electrons in a two-dimensional electron gas formed in SrTiO{sub 3}/GdTiO{sub 3} inverted heterostructure field-effect transistors. Increased charge modulation was achieved by reducing the effect of interfacial region capacitances through thick SrTiO{sub 3} cap layers. Transport and device characteristics of the heterostructure field-effect transistors were found to match a long channel field effect transistor model. SrTiO{sub 3} impurity doped metal–semiconductor field effect transistors were also demonstrated with excellent pinch-off and current density exceeding prior reports. The work reported here provides a path towards oxide-based electronics with extreme charge modulation exceeding 10{sup 14}?cm{sup ?2}.

Boucherit, M.; Shoron, O.; Polchinski, C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Jackson, C. A.; Cain, T. A.; Buffon, M. L. C.; Stemmer, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Rajan, S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

253

Direct measurement of {sup 12}C+{sup 4}He?{sup 16}O+? total cross section at E{sub cm}=1.2 MeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fusion reaction of {sup 12}C+{sup 4}He?{sup 16}O+? is one of the main reactions in He-burning of stars and important for nucleosynthesis. The fusion cross section at stellar energy of E{sub cm}=0.3 MeV has not been determined precisely yet in spite of efforts for about 40 years. We plan to measure directly the total fusion cross section down to 0.7 MeV at Kyushu University Tandem accelerator Laboratory and to estimate the cross section at 0.3MeV by extrapolation. We have already measured the cross sections at 2.4 MeV and 1.5 MeV. The measurement at E{sub cm}=1.2 MeV is in progress.

Yamaguchi, H.; Sagara, K.; Fujita, K.; Kodama, D.; Narikiyo, Y.; Hamamoto, K.; Ban, T.; Tao, N.; Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University (Japan)

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

254

MANOMTRE A PISTON LIBRE POUR LA MESURE ABSOLUE DES HAUTES PRESSIONS JUSQU'A 10000 kg cm2 ET DISPOSITIFS SECONDAIRES ASSOCIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

57 MANOM�TRE A PISTON LIBRE POUR LA MESURE ABSOLUE DES HAUTES PRESSIONS JUSQU'A 10000 kg cm2 ET manomètre absolu de laboratoire, à piston libre, a été réalisé avec deux équipages interchangeables d'entraînement du piston permettant soit un mouvement d'oscillation, soit un mou- vement de rotation continue du

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

255

Synchrotron-based far infrared study of the rotation-vibration-inversion spectrum of silacyclobutane below 500 cm{sup ?1}: The ?{sub 29} and ?{sub 30} bands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fourier transform spectra of the four-membered heterocycle silacyclobutane (c-C{sub 3}H{sub 8}Si) were recorded in the far infrared region from 100 to 500 cm{sup ?1} with a maximum resolution of 0.000959 cm{sup ?1} using synchrotron radiation from the Canadian Light Source. The two fundamental bands observed in this region correspond to motions best described as the out-of-plane modes related to ring puckering (?{sub 30}) at ?158 cm{sup ?1} and SiH{sub 2} rocking (?{sub 29}) at ?410 cm{sup ?1}. Both bands exhibit complex, dense spectral patterns that arise from ring inversion tunneling of the puckered SCB ring through a planar (C{sub 2v}) intermediate configuration. Analysis of these patterns revealed rotation-vibration transitions between states of the same inversion symmetry as well as rotation-vibration-inversion transitions that connect states of different inversion symmetry. Infrared ground state combination differences from 1871 pairs of P and R branch transitions were used to accurately determine the spectroscopic parameters for the tunneling-doubled ground state based on a broad range of quantum levels. With the ground state energy levels well-determined, 8255 infrared transitions were assigned and analyzed to derive the band centers, rotational and centrifugal distortion constants for the inversion split ?{sub 29} and ?{sub 30} vibrational states. Comparison with the band centers predicted via DFT (B3LYP) and MP2 calculations [6-311++G(2d,2p)] suggests that anharmonic corrections found via perturbation theory typically agree within 2% when compared with the observed spectrum of SCB.

Chen, Ziqiu; Wijngaarden, Jennifer van, E-mail: vanwijng@cc.umanitoba.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

HST polarization map of the ultraviolet emission from the outer jet in M87 and a comparison with the 2cm radio emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first high resolution polarization map of the ultraviolet emission from the outer jet in M87. The data were obtained by the Faint Object Camera (FOC) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The polarization map has a resolution of 0.2 arcsec and was derived using data from three linearly polarized images combined with the best available calibration data. The ultraviolet emission is highly polarized (~40\\%) with the magnetic vector aligned roughly with the jet axis, except in the region of the brightest knot (Knot A) where the position angle changes abruptly and the magnetic vector becomes perpendicular to the jet axis. A similar behaviour is seen in the 2cm VLA radio polarization map. By aligning the FOC and VLA data, we present ultraviolet--2cm spectral index, depolarization and rotation measure maps. We identify a region of high depolarization adjacent to Knot A. This is the first direct observational evidence that indicates the presence of a cloud or filament of dense thermal material which is mixed with the synchrotron emitting plasma of the jet. The interaction of the jet with this cloud is likely to be responsible for the sudden increase in the brightness of the jet at Knot A due to an induced shock. We suggest that the dark line seen in the 2cm radio data between Knot A and Knot C could be the shadow or magnetotail of the depolarizing cloud in the jet.

R. C. Thomson; D. R. T. Robinson; N. R. Tanvir; C. D. Mackay; A. Boksenberg

1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

New Limits on 21cm EoR From PAPER-32 Consistent with an X-Ray Heated IGM at z=7.7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new constraints on the 21cm Epoch of Reionization (EoR) power spectrum derived from 3 months of observing with a 32-antenna, dual-polarization deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. In this paper, we demonstrate the efficacy of the delay-spectrum approach to avoiding foregrounds, achieving over 8 orders of magnitude of foreground suppression (in mK^2). Combining this approach with a procedure for removing off-diagonal covariances arising from instrumental systematics, we achieve a best 2-sigma upper limit of 52 mK^2 for k=0.11 h Mpc^-1 at z=7.7. This limit falls within an order of magnitude of the brighter predictions of the expected 21cm EoR signal level. Using the upper limits set by these measurements, we generate new constraints on the brightness temperature of 21cm emission in neutral regions for various reionization models. We show that for several ionization models, heating of the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) is...

Parsons, Aaron R; Aguirre, James E; Ali, Zaki S; Bradley, Richard F; Carilli, Chris L; DeBoer, David R; Dexter, Matthew R; Gugliucci, Nicole E; Jacobs, Daniel C; Klima, Pat; MacMahon, David H E; Manley, Jason R; Moore, David F; Pober, Jonathan C; Stefan, Irina I; Walbrugh, William P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

acs_CM_cm-2011-012395 1..8  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Suree S. Brown, Jamie Adcock, Richard T. Mayes, Bingkun Guo, Xiao-Guang Sun,* , Shannon M. Mahurin, Gabriel M. Veith,* , and Sheng Dai* ,, ...

259

Improved large-area, two-terminal InP/Ga{sub 0.47}In{sub 0.53}As tandem solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the development of high-efficiency, large-area, two-terminal InP/Ga{sub 0.47}In{sub 0.53}As tandem solar cells is reported. Five tandem cells with total areas of {approximately}4 cm{sup 2}, with 1-sun AM0 efficiencies ranging from 19.4% to 21.1%, were prepared for the STRV-1 satellite solar cell flight experiment. Additionally, an {approximately}1 cm{sup 2} tandem cell with a 1-sun AM0 efficiency of 22.2% has been confirmed. Possible further improvements and performance potential are discussed.

Wanlass, M.W.; Ward, J.S.; Emery, K.A.; Duda, A.; Coutts, T.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Ashland Area Support Substation Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power Light Company's (PP L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP L's Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW's) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nev HB-Line, located on the fifth and sixth levels of Building 221-H, is designed to replace the aging existing HB-Line production facility. The nev HB-Line consists of three separate facilities: the Scrap Recovery Facility, the Neptunium Oxide Facility, and the Plutonium Oxide Facility. There are three separate safety analyses for the nev HB-Line, one for each of the three facilities. These are issued as supplements to the 200-Area Safety Analysis (DPSTSA-200-10). These supplements are numbered as Sup 2A, Scrap Recovery Facility, Sup 2B, Neptunium Oxide Facility, Sup 2C, Plutonium Oxide Facility. The subject of this safety analysis, the, Plutonium Oxide Facility, will convert nitrate solutions of {sup 238}Pu to plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) powder. All these new facilities incorporate improvements in: (1) engineered barriers to contain contamination, (2) barriers to minimize personnel exposure to airborne contamination, (3) shielding and remote operations to decrease radiation exposure, and (4) equipment and ventilation design to provide flexibility and improved process performance.

Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Allen, P.M.; Gouge, A.P.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

cm4035159 1..10  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in nanometer-scale carbon pores have been investigated using small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering and fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. C 4 mim + Tf 2 N...

263

Plutonium focus area. Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) in October 1995. The PFA {open_quotes}...provides for peer and technical reviews of research and development in plutonium stabilization activities...{close_quotes} In addition, the PFA identifies and develops relevant research and technology. The purpose of this document is to focus attention on the requirements used to develop research and technology for stabilization, storage, and preparation for disposition of nuclear materials. The PFA Technology Summary presents the approach the PFA uses to identify, recommend, and review research. It lists research requirements, research being conducted, and gaps where research is needed. It also summarizes research performed by the PFA in the traditional research summary format. This document encourages researchers and commercial enterprises to do business with PFA by submitting research proposals or {open_quotes}white papers.{close_quotes} In addition, it suggests ways to increase the likelihood that PFA will recommend proposed research to the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG) of DOE.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one NaI scintillator and the other foil on the other NaI detector and the activities measured simultaneously. The activation of a particular foil was compared to that of the normalization foil by dividing the count rate for each foil by that of the normalization foil. To correct for the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors, the normalization foil was counted in Detector 1 simultaneously with the foil at position x in Detector 2, and then the normalization foil was counted simultaneously in Detector 2 with the foil from position x in Counter 1. The activity of the foil from position x was divided by the activity of the normalization foil counted simultaneously. This resulted in obtaining two values of the ratio that were then averaged. This procedure essentially removed the effect of the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors. Differing efficiencies of 10% resulted in errors in the ratios measured to less than 1%. The background counting rates obatined with the foils used for the measurements on the NaI detectors before their irradiation measurement were subtracted from all count rates. The results of the cadmium ratio measurements are given in Table 1.3-1 and Figure 1.3-1. “No correction has been made for self shielding in the foils” (Reference 3).

Margaret A. Marshall

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one NaI scintillator and the other foil on the other NaI detector and the activities measured simultaneously. The activation of a particular foil was compared to that of the normalization foil by dividing the count rate for each foil by that of the normalization foil. To correct for the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors, the normalization foil was counted in Detector 1 simultaneously with the foil at position x in Detector 2, and then the normalization foil was counted simultaneously in Detector 2 with the foil from position x in Counter 1. The activity of the foil from position x was divided by the activity of the normalization foil counted simultaneously. This resulted in obtaining two values of the ratio that were then averaged. This procedure essentially removed the effect of the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors. Differing efficiencies of 10% resulted in errors in the ratios measured to less than 1%. The background counting rates obatined with the foils used for the measurements on the NaI detectors before their irradiation measurement were subtracted from all count rates. The results of the cadmium ratio measurements are given in Table 1.3-1 and Figure 1.3-1. “No correction has been made for self shielding in the foils” (Reference 3).

Margaret A. Marshall

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Observation of high-j quasiparticle states in {sup 249}Cm by in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy using heavy-ion transfer reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured de-excitation {gamma} rays in {sup 249}Cm populated by one-neutron stripping reactions with a {sup 248}Cm target and 162-MeV {sup 16}O, 162-MeV {sup 18}O, and 120-MeV {sup 13}C beams. {gamma} rays in {sup 249}Cm were identified by measuring kinetic energies of outgoing particles using Si {delta}E-E detectors. It was demonstrated that high-j orbitals were selectively populated in the ({sup 16}O, {sup 15}O) reaction having a large negative Q value. We have observed eight quasiparticle states above the deformed shell gap of N=152. The 1/2{sup +}[620], 1/2{sup -}[750], and 7/2{sup +}[613] bands were extended up to 19/2{sup +}, 19/2{sup -}, and 13/2{sup +} states, respectively. We have established the 9/2 9/2{sup +}[615] state at 526 keV, the 9/2 9/2{sup +}[604] state with a short life of T{sub 1/2}<<2 ps at 1030 keV, and the 11/2 11/2{sup -}[725] state with T{sub 1/2}=19(1) ns at 375 keV. Furthermore, the 17/2 1/2{sup +}[880] state, having a large component of the k{sub 17/2} spherical single-particle state, has been identified at 1505 keV. We discuss the properties of those quasiparticle states in the framework of a deformed shell model.

Ishii, T. [Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Makii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Toyoshima, A. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Matsuda, M. [Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Makishima, A. [Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan); Shigematsu, S.; Kohno, T. [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kaneko, J.; Ogawa, M. [Department of Radiological Sciences, Komazawa University, Setagaya, Tokyo 154-8525 (Japan); Shizuma, T. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Toume, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); College of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Hossain, I. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Critical Areas of State Concern (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation designates the Chesapeake Bay, other Atlantic Coastal Bays, and their tributaries and adjacent lands as critical areas of state concern. It is state policy to protect these areas...

268

Local Area Networks - Applications to Energy Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOCAL AREA NETWORKS - APPLICATIONS TO MERCY MANAGmNT Advanced BRUCE M. BAKKEN Software bfanager Micro Syatems Corporation Milwaukee, WI ABSTRACT One of the newest advances in computer technology is the Local Area Network. Its many...

Bakken, B. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Electricity Suppliers' Service Area Assignments (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To promote efficiency and avoid waste and duplication, rural and unincorporated areas of Indiana are divided into geographic areas, to be assigned to an electricity provider that will have the sole...

270

Game Preserves and Closed Areas (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Game preserves and closed areas exist within the state of Montana for the protection of all the game animals and birds. Construction and development is limited in these areas. Currently, only three...

271

Large area, high spatial resolution tracker for new generation of high luminosity experiments in Hall A at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2014 the CEBAF electron accelerator at Jefferson Lab (JLab) will deliver a longitudinally polarized (up to 85%), high intensity (up to 100 ?A) beam with maximum energy of 12 GeV, twice the present value. To exploit the new opportunities that the energy upgrade will offer, a new spectrometer (Super BigBite - SBS) is under development, featuring very forward angle, large acceptance and ability to operate in high luminosity environment. The tracking system of SBS will consist of large area (40×150 cm2 and 50×200 cm2), high spatial resolution (better than 100 ?m) chambers based on the GEM technology and 2 small (10×20 cm) Silicon Strip Detector planes. The design of the GEM chambers and its sub-components such as the readout electronics is resented here.

Bellini, V; Castelluccio, D; Colilli, S; Cisbani, E; De Leo, R; Fratoni, R; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Guiliani, F; Guisa, A; Gricia, M; Lucentini, M; Meddi, F; Minutoli, S; Musico, P; Noto, F; De Oliveira, R; Santavenere, F; Sutera, M C

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

CRITICAL CONFIGURATION FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950’s efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles”. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.” The first two experiments in the series were evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-001) and HEU-COMP-FAST-002 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-002). The first experiment had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The third set of experiments in the series, performed in mid-1963, which is studied in this evaluation, used beryllium reflectors. The beryllium reflected system was the preferred reactor configuration for this application because of the small thickness of the reflector. The two core configurations had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice and arranged in 7-tube clusters. The experiments have been determined to represent acceptable benchmark experiments. Information for this evaluation was compiled from published reports on all three parts of the experimental series (Reference 1-5) and the experimental logbook as well as from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

Margaret A. Marshall

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - February 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stochastic Optimization for Power System Configuration with Renewable Energy in Remote Areas Ludwig Kuznia, Bo Zeng, Grisselle Centeno, Zhixin Miao.

274

Considering LEDs for Street and Area Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

View Jim Brodrick's keynote video from the September 2009 IES Street and Area Lighting Conference in Philadelphia.

275

Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

276

D-Area Preliminary Hazards Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive review of hazards associated with the D-Area was performed to identify postulated event scenarios.

Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Paik, I.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, , ()

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Original article Photosynthesis, leaf area and productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Photosynthesis, leaf area and productivity of 5 poplar clones during; The stem volume and biomass (stem + branches) production, net photosynthesis of mature leaves and leaf area found in volume production, woody biomass production, total leaf area and net photosynthesis. Above

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

278

Introduction Marine protected areas (MPA's) are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

67(1) 1 Introduction Marine protected areas (MPA's) are an important tool for managing fisheries protected area is "any area of the marine environ- ment that has been reserved by Federal, State, tribal, territorial, or local laws or regulations to provide lasting protection for part or all of the natural

279

THE 2012 KINDER HOUSTON AREA SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADJUSTED. #12;WHAT IS THE BIGGEST PROBLEM IN THE HOUSTON AREA TODAY? (1982-2012) 51 47 25 1510 36 71 27 10THE 2012 KINDER HOUSTON AREA SURVEY: Perspectives on a City inTransition STEPHEN L. KLINEBERG The GHP-Kinder Institute Luncheon and Release of the Findings, 24 April 2012 #12;KINDER HOUSTON AREA

280

Local control of area-preserving maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method of control of chaos in area-preserving maps. This method gives an explicit expression of a control term which is added to a given area-preserving map. The resulting controlled map which is a small and suitable modification of the original map, is again area-preserving and has an invariant curve whose equation is explicitly known.

Cristel Chandre; Michel Vittot; Guido Ciraolo

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

West Central North East Area of Tucson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 West Central North East Area of Tucson #Individuals Anna Broad-billed Costa Rufous Black-chinned 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 West Central North East Area of Tucson not be conflicting, and urban areas may actually provide valuable surrogates for degraded habitats. Our knowledge

Hall, Sharon J.

282

The effect of non-Gaussianity on error predictions for the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) 21-cm power spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The EoR 21-cm signal is expected to become increasingly non-Gaussian as reionization proceeds. We have used semi-numerical simulations to study how this affects the error predictions for the EoR 21-cm power spectrum. We expect $SNR=\\sqrt{N_k}$ for a Gaussian random field where $N_k$ is the number of Fourier modes in each $k$ bin. We find that the effect of non-Gaussianity on the $SNR$ does not depend on $k$. Non-Gaussianity is important at high $SNR$ where it imposes an upper limit $[SNR]_l$. It is not possible to achieve $SNR > [SNR]_l$ even if $N_k$ is increased. The value of $[SNR]_l$ falls as reionization proceeds, dropping from $\\sim 500$ at $\\bar{x}_{{\\rm HI}} = 0.8-0.9$ to $\\sim 10$ at $\\bar{x}_{{\\rm HI}} = 0.15$. For $SNR \\ll [SNR]_l$ we find $SNR = \\sqrt{N_k}/A$ with $A \\sim 1.5 - 2.5$, roughly consistent with the Gaussian prediction. We present a fitting formula for the $SNR$ as a function of $N_k$, with two parameters $A$ and $[SNR]_l$ that have to be determined using simulations. Our results are r...

Mondal, Rajesh; Majumdar, Suman; Bera, Apurba; Acharyya, Ayan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate Change Projections on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States.I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at PNNL contributing to the water sector study of the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous U.S. to climate change in 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095--as projected by the HadCM2 general circulation model--was modeled with HUMUS (Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S.). HUMUS consists of a GIS that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the hydrology model Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the 2101 8-digit USGS hydrologic unit areas (HUA). Results are aggregated to the 4-digit and 2-digit (Major Water Resource Region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of temperature and precipitation for 1961-1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY)--sum of surface and subsurface runoff--increases from the baseline period over most of the U.S. in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm from baseline in the Pacific NW. Decreased WY is projected for the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins, driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation. The HadCM2 2095 scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in WY increases of 38%. WY increases are projected throughout the eastern U.S. WY also increases in the western U.S. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased WYs in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations to account for the potential impacts of the CO2-fertilization effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated CO2 but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Final Characterization Report for Corrective Action Unit 109: Area 2 U-2BU Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 109, Area 2 U-2bu Crater, is an inactive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Permit disposal unit located in Area 2 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The Corrective Action Unit has been characterized under the requirements of the Nevada Test Site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 265 (CFR, 1996). The site characterization was performed under the RCRA Part A Permit Characterization Plan for the U-2bu Subsidence Crater (DOE/NV, 1998c), as approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (Liebendorfer, 1998). The primary objective of the site characterization activities was to evaluate the presence, concentration, and extent of any Resource Conservation and Recovery Act contaminants in the crater. Surface soil samples were collected on April 22, 1998, and subsurface soil samples and geotechnical samples were collected from April 27-29, 1998. Soil samples were collected using a hand auger or a piston-type drive hammer to advance a 5-centimeter (2-inch) diameter steel sampling tool into the ground. The permit for the Nevada Test Site requires that Corrective Action Unit 109 be closed under 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265 Subpart G and 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 265.310 (CFR, 1996). Analysis of the data collected during the characterization effort indicates that lead was detected in Study Area 1 at 5.7 milligrams per liter, above the regulatory level in 40 Code of Federal Regulations 261.24 of 5.0 milligrams per liter. Except for the lead detection at a single location within the crater, the original Resource Conservation Recovery Act constituents of potential concern determined between the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office and the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection during the Data Quality Objectives process (DOE/NV, 1998b) were not found to be present at Corrective Action Unit 109 above regulatory levels of concern. The single lead detection that exceeded regulatory limits was discovered at a depth of 1.2 meters (4 feet) in Study Area 1. Total petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in Study Area 4 at two locations at concentrations of 130 and 190 milligrams per kilogram. These concentrations exceed the 100 milligram per kilogram action level established in Nevada Administrative Code 445A.2272 (NAC, 1996). The primary conceptual model identified during the Data Quality Objectives process appears to have been substantiated by the analytical results from site characterization; migration of contaminants of potential concern does not appear to be occurring, as none were detected in a significant percentage of the characterization samples. Based on the results of the characterization, clean closure by removal and disposal of impacted soil will be evaluated in the closure plan to address Study Area 1. An (a) through (k) analysis, as specified in Nevada Administrative Code 445A.227, should be used to evaluate total petroleum hydrocarbon contamination within Study Area 4. Study Areas 2, 3, and 5 should be clean closed without further assessment or remediation (see Figures 2-1 and 5-1 in the Characterization Report).

ITLV

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR GRAPHITE REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950’s efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles”. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.” The first experiment in the series was evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001. It had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, which is studied in this evaluation, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The experiment has been determined to represent an acceptable benchmark experiment. Information for this evaluation was compiled from published reports on all three parts of the experimental series (Reference 1-5) and the experimental logbook as well as from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

Margaret A. Marshall

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

X-Ray Radiation Measurements With Photodiodes In Plasmas Generated By 1017 W/Cm2 Intensity Krf Excimer Laser Pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments were carried out using a prepulse-free hybrid KrF excimer-dye laser system (700fs pulse duration, 248nm wavelength, 15mJ pulse energy). The intensity of the p-polarized, focused laser beam was 1.5{center_dot}1017 W/cm2. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and x-rays from solid state laser plasmas were generated in the laser-plasma interaction of subpicosecond laser pulses of nonrelativistic laser intensities. An x-ray sensitive FLM photodiode (ITE, Warsaw) was used to detect x-rays between 1-19 keV in front of the targets. The diode was filtered by a 4{mu}m Al foil. The dependence of the x-ray flux on laser intensity and the angular distribution of x-rays for aluminum and copper targets in the half space of the front side of the targets were investigated.

Racz, E.; Foeldes, I. B. [KFKI RMKI, EURATOM Association, P.O.Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ryc, L. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Hery 23, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Prompt neutron decay for very loosely coupled delayed critical 38.1-cm-diam uranium (93.2) metal cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A delayed critical very loosely coupled configuration of coaxial right circular 38.1-cm-diam, {approximately}7.62-cm-thick uranium (93.15 wt% {sup 235}U) metal cylinders was assembled in 1965 at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility to study interaction effects for unmoderated and unreflected uranium metal and described in 1996. Each of the two interacting cylinders was carefully adjusted by inverse kinetics rod drop (IKRD) measurements to have the same subcritical reactivity ({approximately} 85{cents}). For these reactivity determinations, each cylinder was alternately and separately assembled to delayed criticality with a small piece of polyethylene reflector present on the top surface. The system was raised to the appropriate power level by the use of a small additional reflector worth {approximately}10{cents} until delayed neutron precursors reached equilibrium. All reflectors were rapidly removed, and the subcriticality was obtained by IKRD interpretational algorithms. Several adjustments of the mass and configuration of each cylinder were required until the configuration of each cylinder had a subcritical reactivity of 85 {cents}. These adjustments were made by small variations in the mass of each of the cylinders so that the mass of the upper cylinder was 163.1 kg and that of the lower cylinder was 162.8 kg. Once each individual cylinder reactivity was adjusted to 85 {cents} subcritical, the distance between the flat surfaces of each of the two cylinders was adjusted to achieve delayed criticality. The delayed critical spacing between cylinders was 1.3 m. At this spacing for delayed criticality, the coupling reactivity exactly compensates for the subcriticality of the individual cylinders. Thus, the coupling reactivity is 85 {cents}, and using a delayed neutron fraction of 0.0066, the coupling reactivity in k units is 0.0056. This paper describes the prompt neutron decay constant measurements for this assembly.

Mihalczo, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Parameter Tuning and Calibration of RegCM3 with MIT-Emanuel Cumulus Parameterization Scheme over CORDEX East Asian Domain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we calibrated the performance of regional climate model RegCM3 with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)-Emanuel cumulus parameterization scheme over CORDEX East Asia domain by tuning the selected seven parameters through multiple very fast simulated annealing (MVFSA) sampling method. The seven parameters were selected based on previous studies, which customized the RegCM3 with MIT-Emanuel scheme through three different ways by using the sensitivity experiments. The responses of model results to the seven parameters were investigated. Since the monthly total rainfall is constrained, the simulated spatial pattern of rainfall and the probability density function (PDF) distribution of daily rainfall rates are significantly improved in the optimal simulation. Sensitivity analysis suggest that the parameter “relative humidity criteria” (RH), which has not been considered in the default simulation, has the largest effect on the model results. The responses of total rainfall over different regions to RH were examined. Positive responses of total rainfall to RH are found over northern equatorial western Pacific, which are contributed by the positive responses of explicit rainfall. Followed by an increase of RH, the increases of the low-level convergence and the associated increases in cloud water favor the increase of the explicit rainfall. The identified optimal parameters constrained by the total rainfall have positive effects on the low-level circulation and the surface air temperature. Furthermore, the optimized parameters based on the extreme case are suitable for a normal case and the model’s new version with mixed convection scheme.

Zou, Liwei; Qian, Yun; Zhou, Tianjun; Yang, Ben

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Ohio Community Reinvestment Area (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ohio Community Reinvestment Area program is an economic development tool administered by municipal and county government that provides real property tax exemptions for property owners who...

290

Radiation-dominated area metric cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide further crucial support for a refined, area metric structure of spacetime. Based on the solution of conceptual issues, such as the consistent coupling of fermions and the covariant identification of radiation fields on area metric backgrounds, we show that the radiation-dominated epoch of area metric cosmology is equivalent to that epoch in standard Einstein cosmology. This ensures, in particular, successful nucleosynthesis. This surprising result complements the previously derived prediction of a small late-time acceleration of an area metric universe.

Frederic P. Schuller; Mattias N. R. Wohlfarth

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Taupo, North Island, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

292

White Etch Areas: Metallurgical Characterization and Atomistic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Atomistic Modeling Presented by R. Scott Hyde of Timken Company at the 2014 Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar Timken Hyde White Etch Areas ANL Presentation Oct 2014...

293

Management of Specific Flood Plain Areas (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Floodplain management orders by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources as well as approved local ordinances designate an area as a regulated floodplain. These regulations establish minimum...

294

Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area, Indonesia (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At International Geothermal...

295

Redevelopment of Areas Needing Redevelopment Generally (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Redevelopment commissions are responsible for developing plans and managing tools used to address conditions of blight (redevelopment areas) and underutilized land of economic significance ...

296

DFAS Wide-Area Workflow Issues  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the DFAS wide-area workflow issues and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

297

Solar Power for Deployment in Populated Areas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The thesis presents background on solar thermal energy and addresses the structural challenges associated with the deployment of concentrating solar power fields in urban areas.… (more)

Hicks, Nathan Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

pubs.acs.org/cm Published on Web 10/05/2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society 5964 Chem. Mater. 2010, 22, 59645972  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT ), Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany, and ^ Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904 surface area of 5323 m2 g-1 . Their clean energy applications, especially in H2, CH4, and CO2 storage

Bluemel, Janet

299

DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIFUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. Conclusions from this work include the following. The CSSX process is capable of reducing {sup 137}Cs in high level radioactive waste by a factor of more than 40,000 using five extraction, two scrub, and five strip stages. Tests demonstrated extraction and strip section stage efficiencies of greater than 93% for the Tank 49H waste test and greater than 88% for the simulant waste test. During a test with HLW, researchers processed 39 liters of Tank 49H solution and the waste raffinate had an average decontamination factor (DF) of 6.78E+04, with a maximum of 1.08E+05. A simulant waste solution ({approx}34.5 liters) with an initial Cs concentration of 83.1 mg/L was processed and had an average DF greater than 5.9E+03, with a maximum DF of greater than 6.6E+03. The difference may be attributable to differences in contactor stage efficiencies. Test results showed the solvent can be stripped of cesium and recycled for {approx}25 solvent turnovers without the occurrence of any measurable solvent degradation or negative effects from minor components. Based on the performance of the 12-stage 2-cm apparatus with the Tank 49H HLW, the projected DF for MCU with seven extraction, two scrub, and seven strip stages operating at a nominal efficiency of 90% is {approx}388,000. At 95% stage efficiency, the DF in MCU would be {approx}3.2 million. Carryover of organic solvent in aqueous streams (and aqueous in organic streams) was less than 0.1% when processing Tank 49H HLW. The entrained solvent concentration measured in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) was as much as {approx}140 mg/L, although that value may be overstated by as much as 50% due to modifier solubility in the DSS. The entrained solvent concentration was measured in the strip effluent (SE) and the results are pending. A steady-state concentration factor (CF) of 15.9 was achieved with Tank 49H HLW. Cesium distribution ratios [D(Cs)] were measured with non-radioactive Tank 49H waste simulant and actual Tank 49H waste. Below is a comparison of D(Cs) values of ESS and 2-cm tests. Batch Extraction-Strip-Scrub (ESS) tests yielded D(Cs) values for extraction of {approx}81-88 for tests with Tank 49H waste and waste simulant. The results from the 2-cm contactor tests were in agreement with values of 58-92 for the Tank 49H HLW test and 54-83 for the simulant waste test. These values are consistent with the reference D(Cs) for extraction of {approx}60. In tests with Tank 49H waste and waste simulant, batch ESS tests measured D(Cs) values for the two scrub stages as {approx}3.5-5.0 for the first scrub stage and {approx}1.0-3.0 for the second scrub stage. In the Tank 49H test, the D(Cs) values for the 2-cm test were far from the ESS values. A D(Cs) value of 161 was measured for the first scrub stage and 10.8 for the second scrub stage. The data suggest that the scrub stage is not operating as effectively as intended. For the simulant test, a D(Cs) value of 1.9 was measured for the first scrub stage; the sample from the second scrub stage was compromised. Measurements of the pH of all stage samples for the Tank 49H test showed that the pH for extraction and scrub stages was 14 and the pH for the strip stages was {approx}7. It is expected that the pH of the second scrub stage would be {approx}12-13. Batch ESS tests measured D(Cs) values for the strip stages to be {approx}0.002-0.010. A high value in Strip No.3 of a test with simulant solution has been attributed to issues associated with the limits of detection for the

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Caldwell, T.; Pak, D; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

300

Faculty & Staff Areas of Specialization ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Engineering Engagement for Student Success (ENG2 ) . . . . .9 Division of Engineering Services Services WARREN R. HULL Manager, Engineering Communication Studio MIMI LAVALLE Director of CommunicationsFaculty & Staff Areas of Specialization 2010-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING #12;Faculty & Staff Areas

Harms, Kyle E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Industrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering understands our students may work as Industrial Engineers in other engineering industries, and to help prepare them for these careers, the ISE Areas of Interest was formulated. The courses

Berdichevsky, Victor

302

Pine Ridge Area Community Wildfire Protection Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pine Ridge Area Community Wildfire Protection Plan Update 2013 West Ash Fire: Wednesday August 29 the boundary of the original plan to include all the area within the Upper Niobrara White Natural Resource, 2012 #12;Facilitated by: Nebraska Forest Service In cooperation with: Region 23 Fire Protection

Farritor, Shane

303

Postdoctoral Scholar position Area: Mathematics Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the City of Calgary's vibrant energy and diversity. The university is home to scholars in 14 facultiesPostdoctoral Scholar position Area: Mathematics Education Duration: 18 months Start date: January 1, invites applications for a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the area of mathematics education. This competition

de Leon, Alex R.

304

ARRA Proposed Award: Retrofit Bay Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARRA Proposed Award: Retrofit Bay Area Counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco per year Prime contractor: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) Sub contractors: Alameda County Waste Management Authority (StopWaste.org) County of Contra Costa County of Marin City

305

7, 66876718, 2007 Mexico City area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussions Emissions from forest fires near Mexico City R. Yokelson1 , S. Urbanski2 , E. Atlas3 , D. Toohey4ACPD 7, 6687­6718, 2007 Mexico City area mountain fires R. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract to: R. Yokelson (bob.yokelson@umontana.edu) 6687 #12;ACPD 7, 6687­6718, 2007 Mexico City area

Boyer, Edmond

306

Alamo Area Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KFH GROUP, INC. ALAMO AREA REGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN Developed for: The Alamo Area Council of Governments and the San Antonio-Bexar County Metropolitan Planning Organization By: KFH Group..............................................................................................................................4 SUMMARY OF TRAVEL PATTERNS IN THE ALAMO REGION...............................................9 COORDINATION AND SERVICE ALTERNATIVES .................................................................16 COORDINATED TRANSPORTATION: PLANNED...

Alamo Area Council of Governments

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION FINAL Prepared by: Brookhaven FOR U.S. Department of Energy March 2009 #12;i OU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA..................................................................................................................4 4.0 Building 96 ­ Operational Background

308

Nutrient Management Examination Competency Areas Individual Specialists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reference materials are included on the Nutrient Management Resource CD distributed at the Nutrientv.01.2014 Nutrient Management Examination Competency Areas Individual Specialists The competency areas in this listing were developed according to the requirements of Pennsylvania's Nutrient Management

Guiltinan, Mark

309

Correction of Magnetization Sextupole and Decapole in a 5 Centimeter Bore SSC Dipole Using Passive Superconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Idea of Passive Superconductor Correction," presented aton the Fermilab Passive Superconductor Test," ICFA Workshop,methods of passive superconductor correction will reduce

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Observations of ring structure in a sunspot associated source at 6 centimeter wavelength  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the detection of a new kind of sunspot associated source in which the emission comes predominantly from a ring structure with size between that of the umbra and the penumbra. The absence of emission from the center of the spot is interpreted in terms of the orientation of the magnetic field and the presence of low temperature material above the umbra.

Alissandrakis, C.E.; Kundu, M.R.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Structure of W3(OH) from Very High Spectral Resolution Observations of 5 Centimeter OH Masers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent studies of methanol and ground-state OH masers at very high spectral resolution have shed new light on small-scale maser processes. The nearby source W3(OH), which contains numerous bright masers in several different transitions, provides an excellent laboratory for high spectral resolution techniques. We present a model of W3(OH) based on EVN observations of the rotationally-excited 6030 and 6035 MHz OH masers taken at 0.024 km/s spectral resolution. The 6.0 GHz masers are becoming brighter with time and show evidence for tangential proper motions. We confirm the existence of a region of magnetic field oriented toward the observer to the southeast and find another such region to the northeast in W3(OH), near the champagne flow. The 6.0 GHz masers trace the inner edge of a counterclockwise rotating torus feature. Masers at 6030 MHz are usually a factor of a few weaker than at 6035 MHz but trace the same material. Velocity gradients of nearby Zeeman components are much more closely correlated than in the ground state, likely due to the smaller spatial separation between Zeeman components. Hydroxyl maser peaks at very long baseline interferometric resolution appear to have structure on scales both smaller than that resolvable as well as on larger scales.

Vincent L. Fish; Loránt O. Sjouwerman

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

312

Observations of the 6 Centimeter Lines of OH in Evolved (OH/IR) Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observational and theoretical advances have called into question traditional OH maser pumping models in evolved (OH/IR) stars. The detection of excited-state OH lines would provide additional constraints to discriminate amongst these theoretical models. In this Letter, we report on VLA observations of the 4750 MHz and 4765 MHz lines of OH toward 45 sources, mostly evolved stars. We detect 4765 MHz emission in the star forming regions Mon R2 and LDN 1084, but we do not detect excited-state emission in any evolved stars. The flux density and velocity of the 4765 MHz detection in Mon R2 suggests that a new flaring event has begun.

Vincent L. Fish; Laura K. Zschaechner; Loránt O. Sjouwerman; Ylva M. Pihlström; Mark J. Claussen

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

313

Modeling and implementation of solder-activated joints for single actuator, centimeter-scale robotic mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explains when, and why, solder-based phase change materials (PCMs) are best-suited as a means to modify a robotic mechanism's kinematic and elastomechanic behavior. The preceding refers to mechanisms that possess ...

Telleria, Maria J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Cryogenic scanning Hall-probe microscope with centimeter scan range and submicron resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with 200 nm positioning resolution by coupling stepper motors to high-resolution drivers and reducing gears in coated conductors--high-Tc superconducting tapes--is demonstrated via model systems. We image an entire also use motor-driven microme- ters but couple them to improved electronics and reducing gears

Moler, Kathryn A.

315

Synthesis of the isotopes of elements 118 and 116 in the {sup 249}Cf and {sup 245}Cm+{sup 48}Ca fusion reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decay properties of {sup 290}116 and {sup 291}116, and the dependence of their production cross sections on the excitation energies of the compound nucleus, {sup 293}116, have been measured in the {sup 245}Cm ({sup 48}Ca, xn){sup 293-x}116 reaction. These isotopes of element 116 are the decay daughters of element 118 isotopes, which are produced via the {sup 249}Cf+{sup 48}Ca reaction. We performed the element 118 experiment at two projectile energies, corresponding to {sup 297}118 compound nucleus excitation energies of E*=29.2{+-}2.5 and 34.4{+-}2.3 MeV. During an irradiation with a total beam dose of 4.1x10{sup 19} {sup 48}Ca projectiles, three similar decay chains consisting of two or three consecutive {alpha} decays and terminated by a spontaneous fission (SF) with high total kinetic energy of about 230 MeV were observed. The three decay chains originated from the even-even isotope {sup 294}118 (E{sub {alpha}}=11.65{+-}0.06 MeV, T{sub {alpha}}=0.89{sub -0.31}{sup +1.07} ms) produced in the 3n-evaporation channel of the {sup 249}Cf+{sup 48}Ca reaction with a maximum cross section of 0.5{sub -0.3}{sup +1.6} pb.

Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Lobanov, Yu. V.; Abdullin, F. Sh.; Polyakov, A. N.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Tsyganov, Yu. S.; Voinov, A. A.; Gulbekian, G. G.; Bogomolov, S. L.; Gikal, B. N.; Mezentsev, A. N.; Iliev, S.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Subotic, K.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Vostokin, G. K.; Itkis, M. G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] (and others)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIGUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive is used to improve stripping performance and to mitigate the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Pak, D.; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.; Caldwell, T.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

3000 Area Phase 1 environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to sell the 3000 Area to prospective buyers. Environmental Services was requested by the WHC Economic Transition group to assess potential environmental liabilities in the area. Historical review of the area indicated that the site was the location of ``Camp Hanford`` in 1951 and has been used for a variety of purposes since then. The activities in the area have changed over the years. A number of Buildings from the area have been demolished and at least 15 underground storage tanks (USTs) have been removed. Part of the 3000 Area was identified as Operable Unit 1100-EM-3 in the Tri-Party Agreement and was cleaned up by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The cleanup included removal of contaminated soil and USTS. WHC and ICF KH had also performed sampling and analysis at some locations in the 3000 Area prior to USACE`s work on the Operable Unit 1100-EM-3. They removed a number of USTs and performed remediation.

Ranade, D.G.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Radiological Modeling for Determination of Derived Concentration Levels of an Area with Uranium Residual Material - 13533  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of a pilot project developed at the old Spanish 'Junta de Energia Nuclear' to extract uranium from ores, tailings materials were generated. Most of these residual materials were sent back to different uranium mines, but a small amount of it was mixed with conventional building materials and deposited near the old plant until the surrounding ground was flattened. The affected land is included in an area under institutional control and used as recreational area. At the time of processing, uranium isotopes were separated but other radionuclides of the uranium decay series as Th-230, Ra-226 and daughters remain in the residue. Recently, the analyses of samples taken at different ground's depths confirmed their presence. This paper presents the methodology used to calculate the derived concentration level to ensure that the reference dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 used as radiological criteria. In this study, a radiological impact assessment was performed modeling the area as recreational scenario. The modelization study was carried out with the code RESRAD considering as exposure pathways, external irradiation, inadvertent ingestion of soil, inhalation of resuspended particles, and inhalation of radon (Rn-222). As result was concluded that, if the concentration of Ra-226 in the first 15 cm of soil is lower than, 0.34 Bq g{sup -1}, the dose would not exceed the reference dose. Applying this value as a derived concentration level and comparing with the results of measurements on the ground, some areas with a concentration of activity slightly higher than latter were found. In these zones the remediation proposal has been to cover with a layer of 15 cm of clean material. This action represents a reduction of 85% of the dose and ensures compliance with the reference dose. (authors)

Perez-Sanchez, Danyl [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)] [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

200 North Aggregate Area source AAMS report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the 200 North Aggregate Area in the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. This scoping level study provides the basis for initiating Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS) under RCRA. This report also integrates select RCRA treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past practice investigations.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Trial Demonstration of Area Lighting Retrofit  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

LED Area Lighting Retrofit: Yuma Border Patrol Along the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona, the GATEWAY program conducted a trial demonstration in which the incumbent quartz metal halide area lighting was replaced with LED at three pole locations. The LED system was found to equal or better the incumbent system in terms of both illuminance and uniformity, and an advanced optical system and lower pole height improved the illuminance uniformity, reduced stray light, and increased projected energy and maintenance cost savings. This high luminous flux and high temperature application is not unique and similar applications can benefit from the findings of this installation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

About Kings Area Rural Transit The Kings County Area Public Transit Agency operates the Kings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case Study About Kings Area Rural Transit The Kings County Area Public Transit Agency operates's Central Valley. In the middle is Kings County, home to diverse communities of rural workers. The county the Kings Area Rural Transit (KART) vanpool program in California's San Joaquin Valley. Part of KART

Greenberg, Albert

322

Regulating new construction in historic areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is an examination of how the restrictiveness of different design regulations impacts the process of new construction in historic areas. The North End, South End, and Back Bay neighborhoods of Boston were identified ...

Sellers-Garcia, Oliver

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Critical Areas Act of 1973 (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act applies to certain areas of the state with important historic, cultural, or esthetic values, or natural systems with functions of greater than local significance. Plans for a given...

324

Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In order to prevent waste and to avoid the drilling of unnecessary wells and to encourage the development of coal seam natural gas producing areas in Louisiana, the commissioner of conservation is...

325

Fast Adaptive Silhouette Area based Template Matching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast Adaptive Silhouette Area based Template Matching Daniel Mohr and Gabriel Zachmann If (Technical Informatics and Computer Systems) Prof. Dr. Gabriel Zachmann (Computer Graphics) Prof. Dr Template Matching Daniel Mohr and Gabriel Zachmann Clausthal University of Technology, Department

Zachmann, Gabriel

326

300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

BERNESKI, L.D.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

Knoxville Area Transit: Propane Hybrid Electric Trolleys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2-page fact sheet summarizing the evaluation done by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity on the Knoxville Area Transit's use of propane hybrid electric trolleys.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

K-shell emission trends from 60 to 130cm/s stainless steel implosions D. J. Ampleford, C. A. Jennings, B. Jones, S. B. Hansen, M. E. Cuneo, C. A. Coverdale, M. C. Jones, T. M.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K-shell emission trends from 60 to 130cm/s stainless steel implosions D. J. Ampleford, C. A to IP: 132.76.61.23 On: Tue, 22 Oct 2013 07:09:31 #12;K-shell emission trends from 60 to 130 cm temperatures of $5 keV. These plasma conditions have resulted in significant increases in the K-shell radiated

329

Molecular eigenstate spectroscopy: Application to the intramolecular dynamics of some polyatomic molecules in the 3000 to 7000 cm{sup {minus}1} region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) appears to be a universal property of polyatomic molecules in energy regions where the vibrational density of states is greater than about 5 to 30 states per cm{sup {minus}1}. Interest in IVR stems from its central importance to the spectroscopy, photochemistry, and reaction kinetics of these molecules. A bright state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which may be a C-H stretching vibration, carries the oscillator strength from the ground state. This bright state may mix with bath rotational-vibrational levels to form a clump of molecular eigenstates, each of which carries a portion of the oscillator strength from the ground state. In this work the authors explicitly resolve transitions to each of these molecular eigenstates. Detailed information about the nature of IVR is contained in the frequencies and intensities of the observed discrete transitions. The primary goal of this research is to probe the coupling mechanisms by which IVR takes place. The most fundamental distinction to be made is between anharmonic coupling which is independent of molecular rotation and rotationally-mediated coupling. The authors are also interested in the rate at which IVR takes place. Measurements are strictly in the frequency domain but information is obtained about the decay of the zero order state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which could be prepared in a hypothetical experiment as a coherent excitation of the clump of molecular eigenstates. As the coherent superposition dephases, the energy would flow from the initially prepared mode into nearby overtones and combinations of lower frequency vibrational modes. The decay of the initially prepared mode is related to a pure sequence infrared absorption spectrum by a Fourier transform.

Perry, D.S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

High speed photometry of faint Cataclysmic Variables: II. RS Car, V365 Car,] V436 Car, AP Cru, RR Cha, BI Ori, CM Phe and V522 Sgr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short time scale photometric properties of eight faint Cataclysmic Variable (CV) stars are presented. Nova Carinae 1895 (RS Car) has a photometric modulation at 1.977 h which could be either an orbital or a superhump period. Nova Carinae 1948 (V365 Car) shows flickering, but any orbital modulation has a period in excess of 6 h. The nova-like variable and X-ray source V436 Car has an orbital modulation at P(orb) = 4.207 h, no detectable period near 2.67 h (which had previously given it a possible intermediate polar classification), and Dwarf Nova Oscillations (DNOs) at ~40 s. Nova Crucis 1936 (AP Cru) has a double humped ellipsoidal modulation at P(orb) = 5.12 h and a stable modulation at 1837 s characteristic of an intermediate polar. Nova Chamaeleontis 1953 (RR Cha) is an ecliping system with P(orb) = 3.362 h, but at times shows negative superhumps at 3.271 h and positive superhumps at 3.466 h. In addition it has a stable period at 1950 s, characteristic of an intermediate polar. BI Ori is a dwarf nova which we observed at quiescence and outburst without detecting any orbital modulation. CM Phe is a nova-like variable for which we confirm Hoard, Wachter & Kim-Quijano's (2001) value of P(orb) = 6.454 h. We have identified the remnant of Nova Saggitarii 1931 (V522 Sgr) with a flickering source ~2.2 mag fainter than the previously proposed candidate (which we find to be non-variable).

Patrick A. Woudt; Brian Warner

2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

331

Critical Configuration and Physics Mesaurements for Graphite Reflected Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.27-CM Pitch)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950's efforts were made to study 'power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles'. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in FY 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program's effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments served as a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated 253 stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. 'The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.' The experiment studied within this evaluation was the first of the series and had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Information for this evaluation was compiled from Reference 1 and 2, reports on subsequent experiments in the series, and the experimental logbook as well as from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

Margaret A. Marshall

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed from 1962–1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967.a The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, relative fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector” (see Reference 1). The experiment studied in this evaluation was the second of the series and had the fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular pitch. One critical configuration was found (see Reference 3). Once the critical configuration had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U,bc and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configuration are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4, and 1.7, respectively.

Margaret A. Marshall

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Aging Studies of Large Area Proportional Chambers under High-Rate Irradiation with $CF_4$-based Mixtures (PART 1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental conditions at the HERA-B experiment impose very strong requirements for gaseous detectors. The charged particle fluxes through the HERA-B tracking system, varying with the radial distance $R$ from the beam line, are about $2 \\times 10^{7}/R^{2}$ particles per second, and comparable to those that will be encountered by LHC experiments. The severe radiation environment of the HERA-B experiment leads to a maximum charge deposit on a wire, within the muon detector, of 200 mC/cm per year. We report recent results of aging studies performed by irradiating proportional wire chambers filled with $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (74:20:6), $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (67:30:3), $Ar/CF_4/CO_2$ (65:30:5), $Ar/CF_4$ (70:30), $CF_4/CH_4$ (90:10), $CF_4/CH_4$ (80:20) mixtures in a three different experimental setups. The size of the irradiation zone varied in the tests from 1 cm up to 500 cm. Our experience shows that the aging rate depends not only on the total collected charge, but, in addition, on the mode of operation and area of irradiation. The possible application of these results to the construction of a large area gaseous detectors for operation in high rate environments is presented.

M. Danilov; Yu. Gilitsky; T. Kvaratschellia; L. Laptin; I. Tichomirov; M. Titov; Yu. Zaitsev

2001-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

334

Aging Studies of Large Area Proportional Chambers under High-Rate Irradiation with $CF_4$-based Mixtures (Part 2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental conditions at the HERA-B experiment impose very strong requirements for gaseous detectors. The charged particle fluxes through the HERA-B tracking system, varying with the radial distance R from the beam line, are about $2 \\times 10^{7}/R^{2}$ particles per second, and comparable to those that will be encountered by LHC experiments. The severe radiation environment of the HERA-B experiment leads to a maximum charge deposit on a wire, within the muon detector, of 200 mC/cm per year. We report recent results of aging studies performed by irradiating proportional wire chambers filled with $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (74:20:6), $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (67:30:3), $Ar/CF_4/CO_2$ (65:30:5), $Ar/CF_4$ (70:30), $CF_4/CH_4$ (90:10), $CF_4/CH_4$ (80:20) mixtures in a three different experimental setups. The size of the irradiation zone varied in the tests from 1 cm up to 500 cm. Our experience shows that the aging rate depends not only on the total collected charge, but, in addition, on the mode of operation and area of irradiation. The possible application of these results to the construction of a large area gaseous detectors for operation in high rate environments is presented.

M. Danilov; Yu. Gilitsky; T. Kvaratschellia; L. Laptin; I. Tichomirov; M. Titov; Yu. Zaitsev

2001-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

335

Metropolitan area network support at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in wide area network service offerings, coupled with comparable developments in local area network technology have enabled many research sites to keep their offsite network bandwidth ahead of demand. For most sites, the more difficult and costly aspect of increasing wide area network capacity is the local loop, which connects the facility LAN to the wide area service provider(s). Fermilab, in coordination with neighboring Argonne National Laboratory, has chosen to provide its own local loop access through leasing of dark fiber to nearby network exchange points, and procuring dense wave division multiplexing (DWDM) equipment to provide data channels across those fibers. Installing and managing such optical network infrastructure has broadened the Laboratory's network support responsibilities to include operating network equipment that is located off-site, and is technically much different than classic LAN network equipment. Effectively, the Laboratory has assumed the role of a local service provider. This paper will cover Fermilab's experiences with deploying and supporting a Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) infrastructure to satisfy its offsite networking needs. The benefits and drawbacks of providing and supporting such a service will be discussed.

DeMar, Phil; Andrews, Chuck; Bobyshev, Andrey; Crawford, Matt; Colon, Orlando; Fry, Steve; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Lamore, Donna; Petravick, Don; /Fermilab

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

CARRELL, R.D.

2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

USACE Small Business Area of Responsibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACE Page 1 USACE Small Business Area of Responsibility OFC CODE STREET CITY ST ZIP TELEPHONE D S N-761-4609 Deputy to PARCs , Office of Small Business Prog, HQ U.S. Army Corps of CESB 60 Forsyth Street RM10M15

US Army Corps of Engineers

338

Geophysical investigations of certain Montana geothermal areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selected hot springs areas of Montana have been investigated by a variety of geophysical techniques. Resistivity, gravity, seismic, and magnetic methods have been applied during investigations near the hot springs. Because the geology is extremely varied at the locations of the investigations, several geophysical techniques have usually been applied at each site.

Wideman, C.J. (Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, Butte); Dye, L.; Halvorson, J.; McRae, M.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

Mark R. Cole

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Evolution of the Size and Functional Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution of the Size and Functional Areas of the Human Brain P. Thomas Schoenemann Department-6570/06/1021-0379$20.00 Key Words neuroanatomy, encephalization, behavior, adaptation, selection Abstract The human brain to understand basic principles of brain evolution that appear to operate across broad classes of organisms

Schoenemann, P. Thomas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Orc Notation Structured Wide-Area Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Orc Notation Structured Wide-Area Programming Jayadev Misra Department of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu April 12, 2010 Rennes, France #12;Orc Notation hierarchical structure. #12;Orc Notation Orc · Goal: Internet scripting language. · Next: Component integration

Misra, Jayadev

342

Structured Wide-Area Programming: Orc Calculus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structured Wide-Area Programming: Orc Calculus Jayadev Misra Department of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu #12;Concurrency · ubiquitous. · difficult interactions. · Support hierarchical structure. #12;Orc · Initial Goal: Internet scripting language. · Next

Misra, Jayadev

343

Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

Keim, E. [Siemens/KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

ARLINGTON/DEFOREST AREA CATERING INFORMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARLINGTON/DEFOREST AREA CATERING INFORMATION Rude's Family Catering DeForest, WI 608-846-5959 (Debbie) Roadside Grill DeForest, WI 608-846-1874 (Pete) Piggly Wiggly Poynette, WI 608-635-2647 (Heidi INFORMATION Holiday Inn Express 7184 Morrisonville Rd. DeForest, WI 53532 608-846-8686 toll free 800-HOLIDAY

Balser, Teri C.

345

n. Area Dipartimento Proponente Titolo Finanziamento  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breuil (Monte Circeo) e di altri siti del Lazio meridionale, quale possibile area rifugio nel Pleistocene'enteropatogeno Shigella flexneri. 5.000,00 si 13 A Dip. Biologia e biotecnologie BIAGIONI Stefano Biochemical biotecnologie CACCHIONE Stefano Functional characterization of Drosophila telomeres 5.000,00 17 A Dip. Biologia

Guidoni, Leonardo

346

Renewal of Brooklyn's GowanusCanalArea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewal of Brooklyn's GowanusCanalArea #12;#12;#12;54 TheJournalofIJrbanTechnology/Spnng1995 is active in all aspectsof the harbor sedimentwork. The Gowanus Canal project will benefit fiom this work economicallyacceptable methodsofdisposingofthesediment. unlikely that the dredged materials fiom the Gowanus Canal can

Brookhaven National Laboratory

347

ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

348

California Energy Balance ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Energy Balance Database ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ environmental January 2012 The Issue Comprehensive and reliable energy statistics are essential for good policy analysis and for future projections of energy supply and demand. In 2005, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

349

300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 300 Area Process Trenches, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. For the purposes of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Westinghouse Hanford Company is identified as ``co-operator.`` The 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan (Revision 0) consists of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Form 3 and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application, Form 3 submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and six appendices. The 300 Area Process Trenches received dangerous waste discharges from research and development laboratories in the 300 Area and from fuels fabrication processes. This waste consisted of state-only toxic (WT02), corrosive (D002), chromium (D007), spent halogenated solvents (F001, F002, and F003), and spent nonhalogented solvent (F005). Accurate records are unavailable concerning the amount of dangerous waste discharged to the trenches. The estimated annual quantity of waste (item IV.B) reflects the total quantity of both regulated and nonregulated waste water that was discharged to the unit.

Luke, S.N.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Campus Area Housing RENTAL RESOURCE GUIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, faculty, staff, communi- ty members, and area property owners and management companies. For more they live, have access to the academic and personal support programs and services offered by UW owned properties that participate in PHC. PHC property owners and managers provide enhanced services

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

351

Turkish Trailblazer: Boosting Rural Areas through Business  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Çokgezen Reviewed by · Aline Kraemer Sector · Consumer Products Enterprise Class · Large Domestic Company her company and the economic and social welfare of rural areas of Turkey. To achieve success, Ms production units in impoverished parts of Turkey in six years. Hey Textile's investment has improved

Sheldon, Nathan D.

352

RESEARCH INTERESTS My research has four major areas of emphasis presently. The first area is the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the documentation of radiation dispersion in rural and urban areas subsequent to release from a nuclear accident to refine models for predicting fallout patterns subsequent to nuclear dispersive weapons (dirty bombs and outside of the body. Radiation dosimetry is a central tenet of my third area of research, the biological

Chesser, Ronald Keith

353

100 Area and 300 Area Component of the RCBRA Fall 2005 Data Compilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a brief description of the sampling approaches, a description of the samples collected, and the results for the Fall 2005 sampling event. This report presents the methods and results of the work to support the 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment.

J.M. Queen

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Structure of Dark Molecular Gas in the Galaxy - I: A Pilot Survey for 18-cm OH Emission Towards $l \\approx 105^{\\deg}, b \\approx +1^{\\deg}$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first results from a survey for 1665, 1667, and 1720 MHz OH emission over a small region of the Outer Galaxy centered at $l \\approx 105.0\\deg , b \\approx +1.0\\deg$ . This sparse, high-sensitivity survey ($\\Delta Ta \\approx \\Delta Tmb \\approx 3.0 - 3.5$ mK rms in 0.55 km/s channels), was carried out as a pilot project with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT, FWHM $\\approx 7.6'$) on a 3 X 9 grid at $0.5\\deg$ spacing. The pointings chosen correspond with those of the existing $^{12}$CO(1-0) CfA survey of the Galaxy (FWHM $\\approx 8.4'$). With 2-hr integrations, 1667 MHz OH emission was detected with the GBT at $\\gtrsim 21$ of the 27 survey positions ($\\geq 78\\%$ ), confirming the ubiquity of molecular gas in the ISM as traced by this spectral line. With few exceptions, the main OH lines at 1665 and 1667 MHz appear in the ratio of 5:9 characteristic of LTE at our sensitivity levels. No OH absorption features are recorded in the area of the present survey, in agreement with the low levels of continuum bac...

Allen, Ronald J; Engelke, Philip D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

centimeter, of a Titanium layer, for Carbon monoxide, at room temperature is: S = 9 liters sec.cm2 therefore DANE VACUUM SYSTEM The use of Titanium Sublimation Pumps (TSP) V. Chimenti The vacuum chamber 20000 9 = 2200 square centimeters must be seen by the evaporator(s). Titanium reacts with CO giving

Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

356

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM New Jersey Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development and evaluation of the delineations for the New Jersey (NJ) WEA. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the New Jersey WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL identified a selection of leasing areas and proposed delineation boundaries within the established NJ WEA. The primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP). Appendix F, remediation analysis with Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for wide-area chemical hazards.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) commissioned an assessment of the Consequence Management (CM) plans in place on military bases for response to a chemical attack. The effectiveness of the CM plans for recovering from chemical incidents was modeled using a multiple Decision Support Tools (DSTs). First, a scenario was developed based on an aerial dispersion of a chemical agent over a wide-area of land. The extent of contamination was modeled with the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) tool. Subsequently, the Analyzer for Wide Area Restoration Effectiveness (AWARE) tool was used to estimate the cost and time demands for remediation based on input of contamination maps, sampling and decontamination resources, strategies, rates and costs. The sampling strategies incorporated in the calculation were designed using the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) tool. Based on a gaps assessment and the DST remediation analysis, an Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP) was developed.

Hassig, Nancy L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Pulsipher, Brent A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Electrohydrodynamically driven large-area liquid ion sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A large-area liquid ion source comprises means for generating, over a large area of the surface of a liquid, an electric field of a strength sufficient to induce emission of ions from a large area of said liquid. Large areas in this context are those distinct from emitting areas in unidimensional emitters.

Pregenzer, Arian L. (Corrales, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Using fat and muscle measurements from different areas of the carcass in the prediction of yield of pork four lean cuts and primals as affected by cutting method and trim level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-in and boneless FLC progressively trimmed to .64,.32, and 0 cm, BLSFLC, and FFLFLC. Twelfth rib fat depth 3/4 measure (TW5) and M. longissimus area (TW7) accounted for 81% of the variation in RFLC. Twelfth rib fat and muscle depth 1/2 distance measures (TW3 and TW...

Harris, Shawn Dale

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Laser conditioning study of KDP on the optical sciences laser using large area beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considerable attention has been paid over the years to the problem of growing high purity KDP and KD*P to meet threshold requirements on succeeding generations of inertial confinement fusion lasers at LLNL. While damage thresholds for these materials have increased over time, the current National Ignition Facility (NIF) maximum fluence requirement (redline) for KD*P frequency triplers of 14.3 J/cm{sup 2} at 351 nm, 3 ns has not been reached without laser (pre)conditioning. It is reasonable to assume that, despite the rapid increase in damage thresholds for rapidly grown crystals, -a program of large scale conditioning of the 192 NIF triplers will be required. Small area ramp (R/1) tests on single sites indicate that KDP damage thresholds can be raised on average up to 1.5X the unconditioned values. Unpublished LLNL 3{omega} raster conditioning studies on KDP, however, have not conclusively shown that off-line conditioning is feasible for KD*P. Consequently, investigating the feasibility of on-line conditioning of NIF triplers at 3{omega} has become a high priority for the KDP damage group at LLNL. To investigate the feasibility of on-line conditioning we performed a series of experiments using the Optical Sciences Laser (OSL) on numerous samples of conventional and rapid growth KDP and KD*P. The experiment entailed exposing sites on each sample to a range of ramped shot (N/l) sequences starting at average fluences of -2 J/cm{sup 2} (in a 7 mm ``top hat`` beam @ 351 nm, 3 ns) up to peak fluences of approximately 13 J/cm{sup 2}. Test results indicated that the most effective conditioning procedure entailed a 7-8 shot ramp starting at 2 J/cm{sup 2} and ending at 12-13 J/cm{sup 2}. The pinpoint onset fluence for the 8/1 tests was 1.4 times that of the unconditioned site. Damage evolution appears to be exponential as a function of increasing fluence. When damage occurs after conditioning however, pinpoint density evolution exhibits a greater slope than less conditioned sites. The overall reduction in the total pinpoint number can be as high as 30OX. Despite laser conditioning , the pinpoint onset for the samples considered is below the NIF redline fluence of 14.3 J/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the exponential pinpoint evolution curves indicate that damage levels at NIF redline fluences will be on the order of 10{sup 4} pinpoints/mm{sup 2}. This suggests that there will be significant damage in NIP triplers, however, substantial damage has not been observed in the large Beamlet tripler (conventionally grown KD*P) under similar exposure conditions. By applying the OSL damage evolution curves to model NIF THG output spatial profiles it is possible to show damage in NIF triplers will be slight, consisting of isolated clusters with a few pinpoints at high fluence portions of the beam. This prediction has been verified by scatter mapping the 37 cm Beamlet tripler crystal. These results will be discussed in a future memo. These results indicate the feasibility of on-line conditioning for the NIF laser.

Runkel, M.; DeYoreo, J.; Sell, W.; Milam, D.

1997-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Kirkland gets license in hot Philippines area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that Kirkland As, Oslo, has received a geophysical survey and exploration contract (GSEC) in a sizzling exploration and development theater off the Philippines. The license covers about 6,000 sq miles of undisputed waters, with depths mostly less than 300 ft, and lies in the Reed Bank area off Northwest Palawan Island, where several major oil and gas strikes have been made recently. Kirkland has 1 year in which to carry out its seismic work commitment. The terms of the GSEC then give an option to drill one well in a 6 month period. Once the results have been analyzed, the company can either drill another well or enter into a service contract for the license. Kirkland has a 65% share in the license, with the remainder split between Philippine companies Philodrill Corp., Beguet Mining Corp. subsidiary Petrofields, and Seafront Resources Corp. The Philippines is one of Kirkland's main areas of activity, the Kirkland Commercial Manager Ralph Baxter.

Kirkland, A.S.

1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

362

Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development of three delineated leasing area options for the Massachusetts (MA) WEA and the technical evaluation of these leasing areas. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the MA WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL worked with BOEM to identify an appropriate number of leasing areas and proposed three delineation alternatives within the MA WEA based on the boundaries announced in May 2012. A primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

Musial, W.; Parker, Z.; Fields, M.; Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Draxl, C.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

WRAP process area development control work plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work plan defines the manner in which the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module I Process Area will be maintained under development control status. This status permits resolution of identified design discrepancies, control system changes, as-building of equipment, and perform modifications to increase process operability and maintainability as parallel efforts. This work plan maintains configuration control as these efforts are undertaken. This task will end with system testing and reissue of field verified design drawings.

Leist, K.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

365

Functional Area Criteria & Review Approach Documents  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

CRADS provided on this page are provided as examples of functional area Objectives and Criteria used to evaluate how requirements are meet. They are only examples and should not be utilized as is. In accordance with DOE Standard 3006-2010, CRADs should be developed by team members to reflect the specifics of the proposed review (i.e., breadth and depth) as defined in the approved Plan of Action.

366

Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Property:GeothermalArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilipspresentsGeothermalArea Jump to: navigation,

368

Southern CA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerTypePonsa,HomeIndiana:RhodeSoutheasternCA Area Jump to:

369

Ohaaki Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: Energy Resources JumpBuildingsOhaaki Geothermal Area

370

Olkaria Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: Energy ResourcesCoMaine: EnergyOlkaria Geothermal Area

371

Larderello Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey, Washington:Lakeville, MN) JumpLarderello Geothermal Area Jump to:

372

Los Azufres Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster AndLittletown,Longwei SiliconLos Azufres Geothermal Area

373

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJunoMedanosElectric Co LtdJacksonLake Geothermal Area

374

Mokai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbHMilo,Energy Information Modoc HighMokai Geothermal Area

375

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a townLoadingMastic,(Redirected from Maui Area) Jump

376

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a townLoadingMastic,(Redirected from Maui Area)

377

Banbury Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT BiomassArnprior,AurantiaBanbury Geothermal Area Jump to:

378

Reykjanes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia Blue Ridge AndREIIReykjanes Geothermal Area Jump to:

379

Pamukoren Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County,PPPSolar Jump to:Pamukoren Geothermal Area Jump to:

380

Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Janik, 1992). Hot spring gas samples were collected by submerging a 20-cm-diameter plastic funnel into the pool over the bubble stream. Fumarole gas samples were collected by...

382

Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Janik, 1992). Hot spring gas samples were collected by submerging a 20-cm-diameter plastic funnel into the pool over the bubble stream. Fumarole gas samples were collected by...

383

Trickle irrigation in the Trans-Pecos area of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) deep. Laterals were spaced 80 inches (2 m) and orifice spacing was every 12 inches (30 cm). Table 5 shows cantaloupe yields for their study. Differences were not detected as much when comparing surface and subsurface treatments. Yield was higher...

Doak, Louis E

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Wide-Area Thermal Processing of Light-Emitting Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon carbide based materials and devices have been successfully exploited for diverse electronic applications. However, they have not achieved the same success as Si technologies due to higher material cost and higher processing temperatures required for device development. Traditionally, SiC is not considered for optoelectronic applications because it has an indirect bandgap. However, AppliCote Associates, LLC has developed a laser-based doping process which enables light emission in SiC through the creation of embedded p-n junctions. AppliCote laser irradiation of silicon carbide allows two different interaction mechanisms: (1) Laser conversion or induced phase transformation which creates carbon rich regions that have conductive properties. These conductive regions are required for interconnection to the light emitting semiconducting region. (2) Laser doping which injects external dopant atoms into the substrate that introduces deep level transition states that emit light when electrically excited. The current collaboration with AppliCote has focused on the evaluation of ORNL's unique Pulse Thermal Processing (PTP) technique as a replacement for laser processing. Compared to laser processing, Pulse Thermal Processing can deliver similar energy intensities (20-50 kW/cm2) over a much larger area (up to 1,000 cm2) at a lower cost and much higher throughput. The main findings of our investigation; which are significant for the realization of SiC based optoelectronic devices, are as follows: (1) The PTP technique is effective in low thermal budget activation of dopants in SiC similar to the laser technique. The surface electrical conductivity of the SiC samples improved by about three orders of magnitude as a result of PTP processing which is significant for charge injection in the devices; (2) The surface composition of the SiC film can be modified by the PTP technique to create a carbon-rich surface (increased local C:Si ratio from 1:1 to 2.9:1). This is significant as higher thermal and electrical conductivities of the surface layer are critical for a successful development of integrated optoelectronic devices; and (3) PTP provides low thermal budget dopant activation with a controlled depth profile, which can be exploited for high performance device development with selective patterning of the substrate. This project has successfully demonstrated that a low thermal budget annealing technique, such as PTP, is critical to defining the path for low cost electronic devices integrated on glass or polymeric substrates. This project is complimentary to the goals of the Solid State Lighting Program within DOE. It involves new manufacturing techniques for light emitting materials that are potentially much lower cost and energy efficient than existing products. Significant opportunity exists for further exploration of AppliCote's material and device technology in combination with ORNL's PTP technique, modeling, and characterization capabilities.

Duty, C.; Quick, N. (AppliCote Associates, LLC) [AppliCote Associates, LLC

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area...

386

Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity...

387

Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

388

Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1998 -...

389

Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

390

Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern...

391

areas vulnerabilities impacts: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on residential electricity consumption for the nine San Francisco Bay Area counties 22 Seismic vulnerability analysis of moderate seismicity areas using in situ experimental...

392

Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Conservation, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal...

393

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date...

394

Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area...

395

Aerial Photography At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area...

396

Multispectral Imaging At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Columbus Salt Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful...

397

Ground Gravity Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski,...

398

Analytical Modeling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analytical Modeling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (White, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

399

Geothermal Literature Review At White Mountains Area (Goff &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At White Mountains Area...

400

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy & Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

402

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti, Et Al., 2013) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

403

Aeromagnetic Survey At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

literature review of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area. Notes Aeromagnetic intensity residual map compiled for Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area, providing...

404

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique...

405

Savannah River Site - D-Area Groundwater | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

- D-Area Groundwater Savannah River Site - D-Area Groundwater January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report...

406

THURSDAY: Deputy Secretary of Energy to Visit Western Area Power...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

THURSDAY: Deputy Secretary of Energy to Visit Western Area Power Administration Transmission Substation THURSDAY: Deputy Secretary of Energy to Visit Western Area Power...

407

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

408

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake City Hot Springs Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

409

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lake City Hot Springs Area ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity...

410

Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Lienau, 1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

411

Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith & Rex, 1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

412

Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Smith, 1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal...

413

Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Range Geothermal Region Big Windy Hot Springs Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal Region Bingham Caribou Geothermal Area Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Birdsville...

414

Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity...

415

area mercantour massif: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

image through flexible fiber bundle One set of optics per viewport 11 12; tight environment high radiation area non-serviceable area passive components...

416

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rural Areas of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries...

417

Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

418

Size dependent specific surface area of nanoporous film assembled...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Size dependent specific surface area of nanoporous film assembled by core-shell iron nanoclusters. Size dependent specific surface area of nanoporous film assembled by core-shell...

419

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal...

420

Large area electron beam pumped krypton fluoride laser amplifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nike is a recently completed multi-kilojoule krypton fluoride (KrF) laser that has been built to study the physics of direct drive inertial confinement fusion. This paper describes in detail both the pulsed power and optical performance of the largest amplifier in the Nike laser, the 60 cm amplifier. This is a double pass, double sided, electron beam-pumped system that amplifies the laser beam from an input of 50 J to an output of up to 5 kJ. It has an optical aperture of 60 cm {times} 60 cm and a gain length of 200 cm. The two electron beams are 60 cm high {times} 200 cm wide, have a voltage of 640 kV, a current of 540 kA, and a flat top power pulse duration of 250 ns. A 2 kG magnetic field is used to guide the beams and prevent self-pinching. Each electron beam is produced by its own Marx/pulse forming line system. The amplifier has been fully integrated into the Nike system and is used on a daily basis for laser-target experiments. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Sethian, J.D.; Obenschain, S.P.; Gerber, K.A.; Pawley, C.J.; Serlin, V.; Sullivan, C.A. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC 20375 (United States)] [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC 20375 (United States); Webster, W. [Research Support Instruments, 4325-B Forbes Boulevard, Lanham, Maryland 20706 (United States)] [Research Support Instruments, 4325-B Forbes Boulevard, Lanham, Maryland 20706 (United States); Deniz, A.V.; Lehecka, T. [Science Applications International Corporation, 1710 Goodridge Drive, McLean, Virginia 22102 (United States)] [Science Applications International Corporation, 1710 Goodridge Drive, McLean, Virginia 22102 (United States); McGeoch, M.W. [PLEX Corporation, 21 Addington Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 02146 (United States)] [PLEX Corporation, 21 Addington Road, Brookline, Massachusetts 02146 (United States); Altes, R.A.; Corcoran, P.A.; Smith, I.D. [Pulse Sciences, Incorporated, 600 McCormick Street, San Leandro, California 94577 (United States)] [Pulse Sciences, Incorporated, 600 McCormick Street, San Leandro, California 94577 (United States); Barr, O.C. [Pharos Technical Enterprises, 1603 Barcelona Street, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Pharos Technical Enterprises, 1603 Barcelona Street, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

About possibility to measure an electric dipole moment (EDM) of nuclei in the range $10^{-27} ÷10^{-32}$ $e \\cdot cm$ in experiments for search of time-reversal violating generation of magnetic and electric fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possibility to measure an electric dipole moment (EDM) of nuclei in the range $10^{-27} \\div 10^{-32}$ $e \\cdot cm$ in experiments for search of time-reversal violating generation of magnetic and electric fields is discussed.

Vladimir Baryshevsky

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

422

This issue's cover: A soil sample following crushing by a 6 cm diameter piston at 222 kN. This sample and its pristine counterpart were spiked with explosives and the explosives concentrations were monitored over  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This issue's cover: A soil sample following crushing by a 6 cm diameter piston at 222 k particles. Three soils were crushed with a piston to emulate detonation- induced fracturing. X. Our results suggest soil mineralogical and geochemical compositions were not changed during piston

Douglas, Thomas A.

423

Geothermal Resource Area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two county area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this area development plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the geothermal sites considered are summarized.

Robinson, S.; Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Geothermal resource area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two country area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 11 geothermal sites considered are summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Algorithm for the calculation of proximity area and area centroid within the carpal joint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's corresponding proximity distance and projected bone information to calculate proximity "area" and its centroid. The programs accuracy was tested creating input files from a know geometry and testing the output for different thresholds. Each wrist was analyzed...

Boyd, Nolan Lee

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% confidence level upper limits range from about 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 5 GeV to about 5 x 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation final state. For the first time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section ({approx}3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Albert, A.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /ICE, Bellaterra /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Artep Inc. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /ASDC, Frascati /ASDC, Frascati /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /DAPNIA, Saclay /Alabama U., Huntsville; /more authors..

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Aging Studies of Large Area Proportional Chambers under High-Rate Irradiation with $CF_4$-based Mixtures (PART 1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental conditions at the HERA-B experiment impose very strong requirements for gaseous detectors. The charged particle fluxes through the HERA-B tracking system, varying with the radial distance $R$ from the beam line, are about $2 \\times 10^{7}/R^{2}$ particles per second, and comparable to those that will be encountered by LHC experiments. The severe radiation environment of the HERA-B experiment leads to a maximum charge deposit on a wire, within the muon detector, of 200 mC/cm per year. We report recent results of aging studies performed by irradiating proportional wire chambers filled with $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (74:20:6), $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (67:30:3), $Ar/CF_4/CO_2$ (65:30:5), $Ar/CF_4$ (70:30), $CF_4/CH_4$ (90:10), $CF_4/CH_4$ (80:20) mixtures in a three different experimental setups. The size of the irradiation zone varied in the tests from 1 cm up to 500 cm. Our experience shows that the aging rate depends not only on the total collected charge, but, in addition, on the mode of operation and area of irradi...

Danilov, M; Kvaratskheliia, T; Laptin, L; Tichomirov, I; Titov, M L; Zaitsev, Yu; Gilitsky, Yu.; Zaitsev, Yu.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Aging Studies of Large Area Proportional Chambers under High-Rate Irradiation with $CF_4$-based Mixtures (Part 2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental conditions at the HERA-B experiment impose very strong requirements for gaseous detectors. The charged particle fluxes through the HERA-B tracking system, varying with the radial distance R from the beam line, are about $2 \\times 10^{7}/R^{2}$ particles per second, and comparable to those that will be encountered by LHC experiments. The severe radiation environment of the HERA-B experiment leads to a maximum charge deposit on a wire, within the muon detector, of 200 mC/cm per year. We report recent results of aging studies performed by irradiating proportional wire chambers filled with $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (74:20:6), $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (67:30:3), $Ar/CF_4/CO_2$ (65:30:5), $Ar/CF_4$ (70:30), $CF_4/CH_4$ (90:10), $CF_4/CH_4$ (80:20) mixtures in a three different experimental setups. The size of the irradiation zone varied in the tests from 1 cm up to 500 cm. Our experience shows that the aging rate depends not only on the total collected charge, but, in addition, on the mode of operation and area of irradiat...

Danilov, M; Kvaratskheliia, T; Laptin, L; Tichomirov, I; Titov, M L; Zaitsev, Yu; Gilitsky, Yu.; Zaitsev, Yu.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Electro-catalytically Active, High Surface Area Cathodes for Low Temperature SOFCs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research focused on developing low polarization (area specific resistance, ASR) cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). In order to accomplish this we focused on two aspects of cathode development: (1) development of novel materials; and (2) developing the relationships between microstructure and electrochemical performance. The materials investigated ranged from Ag-bismuth oxide composites (which had the lowest reported ASR at the beginning of this contract) to a series of pyrochlore structured ruthenates (Bi{sub 2-x}M{sub x}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}, where M = Sr, Ca, Ag; Pb{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 6.5}; and Y{sub 2-2x}Pr{sub 2x}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}), to composites of the pyrochlore ruthenates with bismuth oxide. To understand the role of microstructure on electrochemical performance, we optimized the Ag-bismuth oxide and the ruthenate-bismuth oxide composites in terms of both two-phase composition and particle size/microstructure. We further investigated the role of thickness and current collector on ASR. Finally, we investigated issues of stability and found the materials investigated did not form deleterious phases at the cathode/electrolyte interface. Further, we established the ability through particle size modification to limit microstructural decay, thus, enhancing stability. The resulting Ag-Bi{sub 0.8}Er{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.5} and Bi{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7{sup -}}Bi{sub 0.8}Er{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.5} composite cathodes had ASRs of 1.0 {Omega} cm{sup 2} and 0.73 {Omega}cm{sup 2} at 500 C and 0.048 {Omega}cm{sup 2} and 0.053 {Omega}cm{sup 2} at 650 C, respectively. These ASRs are truly impressive and makes them among the lowest IT-SOFC ASRs reported to date.

Eric D. Wachsman

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

432

REMOTE AREA RADIATION MONITORING (RARM) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote Area Radiation Monitoring (RARM) system will be used to provide real-time radiation monitoring information to the operations personnel during tank retrieval and transfer operations. The primary focus of the system is to detect potential anomalous (waste leaks) or transient radiological conditions. This system will provide mobile, real-time radiological monitoring, data logging, and status at pre-selected strategic points along the waste transfer route during tank retrieval operations. The system will provide early detection and response capabilities for the Retrieval and Closure Operations organization and Radiological Control personnel.

NELSON RL

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

433

Expanding the Area of Gravitational Entropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I describe how gravitational entropy is intimately connected with the concept of gravitational heat, expressed as the difference between the total and free energies of a given gravitational system. From this perspective one can compute these thermodyanmic quantities in settings that go considerably beyond Bekenstein's original insight that the area of a black hole event horizon can be identified with thermodynamic entropy. The settings include the outsides of cosmological horizons and spacetimes with NUT charge. However the interpretation of gravitational entropy in these broader contexts remains to be understood.

R. B. Mann

2002-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

434

100-N Area underground storage tank closures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the removal/characterization actions concerning underground storage tanks (UST) at the 100-N Area. Included are 105-N-LFT, 182-N-1-DT, 182-N-2-DT, 182-N-3-DT, 100-N-SS-27, and 100-N-SS-28. The text of this report gives a summary of remedial activities. In addition, correspondence relating to UST closures can be found in Appendix B. Appendix C contains copies of Unusual Occurrence Reports, and validated sampling data results comprise Appendix D.

Rowley, C.A.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Type of Farming Areas in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-L180 I'EXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMkNrI' FI'AI'ION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR - COLLEGE, STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS - JLLETIN NO. 427 MAY, 1931 1IVISION OF FARM AND RANCH ECONOMICS i COOPERATION WITH THE BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECO- NOMICS..., UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ype of Farming Areas in Texas AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President STATION STAF'Ft ADMINISTRATION : A. B CONNER M S Director R. E: KARPER: M: s:: Vice-Director CLARICE MIXSON...

Elliot, F. F. (Foster Floyd); Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred)

1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Pacific Northwest Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOski Energy LLC Place:Ferry County JumpPVDAQBiodieselArea

437

Klamath Falls Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6Kentwood,George CountyMexicoFacility |Geothermal Area Jump

438

Clean Cities: Chicago Area Clean Cities coalition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheckInnovation,ClassroomArkansasCentralChicago Area

439

Astor Pass Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo Feng Bio EnergyInstituteFunding JumpGeothermal Area Jump

440

Gumuskoy Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer County is a county inAl., ItGumuskoy Geothermal Area Jump to:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Hot Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi GtelHomer, Alaska:Horace, NorthHorvatic JumpOpenHot Lake Area)

442

Outdoor Area Lighting | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's Impact on Our National-Projects2008Outdoor Area Lighting

443

SULI Areas of Research | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORTSORNRecoverynaturalSTORM/PALMSULI Areas

444

Bouillante Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Area Solar Energy Association Jump to:BotetourtHumboldt2Geothermal

445

Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus AreaDataBusPFAN) | OpenInc JumpNew YorkNew pageJump to:

446

Cerro Prieto Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El CER esMidAmericanArea

447

Mcleod 88 Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalwayHydrothermalMcFarland is a cityMcleod 88 Geothermal Area

448

Shakes Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton AbbeyARaft River,Shakes Springs Geothermal Area

449

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardtonManagement,SmartestEnergy LtdSnyderGeothermal Area

450

100-F/IU Area ROD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-on halloweenReliable solar:2 OFsupports national securityArea

451

Silver Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation,Pvt LtdShrub Oak, NewSilicium deSilver Peak Area) Jump

452

Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open Energy InformationAirQualityPermitProcessAreaGeology

453

Manley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a town in Carroll County,Manitoba HydroGeothermal Area

454

Surrond Area Resturants | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the GridwiseSiteDepartmentChallengeCompliance with OrderSupportSurrond Area

455

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision has TypeGeothermal Area Jump to: navigation,

456

Jemez Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6 Climate Zone Subtype A.645565°,Jehin Co Ltd JumpOpenArea

457

Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text09-0018-CXBasinDeseret Generation &Area Jump

458

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverseEnergy. ItTroy,Truckhaven Area) Jump

459

Fang Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37.California: Energy Resources Jump4748456°,Fallon NavalFang Geothermal Area

460

Fenton Hill Hdr Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37.California: EnergyFeilden Clegg Bradley Studios Jump to:FenixArea Jump

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Fernley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37.California: EnergyFeilden Clegg Bradley StudiosFernFernley Geothermal Area

462

Jemez Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: EdenOverview Jump to:Jamestown,JeffersonGeothermal Area

463

Kilo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:Keystone Clean Air Jump to: navigation,Kilo Geothermal Area

464

Contributed Paper Protected-Area Boundaries as Filters of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contributed Paper Protected-Area Boundaries as Filters of Plant Invasions LLEWELLYN C. FOXCROFT of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa Abstract: Human land uses surrounding protected areas provide propagules for colonization of these areas by non-native species, and corridors between protected-area

Kratochvíl, Lukas

465

FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

None

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

High surface area, high permeability carbon monoliths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this work is to prepare carbon monoliths having precisely tailored pore size distribution. Prior studies have demonstrated that poly(acrylonitrile) can be processed into a precursor having tailored macropore structure. Since the macropores were preserved during pyrolysis, this synthetic process provided a route to porous carbon having macropores with size =0.1 to 10{mu}m. No micropores of size <2 nm could be detected in the carbon, however, by nitrogen adsorption. In the present work, the authors have processed a different polymer, poly(vinylidene chloride) into a macroporous precursor, Pyrolysis produced carbon monoliths having macropores derived from the polymer precursor as well as extensive microporosity produced during the pyrolysis of the polymer. One of these carbons had BET surface area of 1,050 m{sup 2}/g and about 1.2 cc/g total pore volume, with about 1/3 of the total pore volume in micropores and the remainder in 1{mu}m macropores. No mesopores in the intermediate size range could be detected by nitrogen adsorption. Carbon materials having high surface area as well as micron size pores have potential applications as electrodes for double layer supercapacitors containing liquid electrolyte, or as efficient media for performing chemical separations.

Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Processing Dept.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Turbine airfoil with controlled area cooling arrangement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine airfoil (10) includes a serpentine cooling path (32) with a plurality of channels (34,42,44) fluidly interconnected by a plurality of turns (38,40) for cooling the airfoil wall material. A splitter component (50) is positioned within at least one of the channels to bifurcate the channel into a pressure-side channel (46) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the pressure side (24) and a suction-side channel (48) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the suction side (26) longitudinally downstream of an intermediate height (52). The cross-sectional area of the pressure-side channel (46) and suction-side channel (48) are thereby controlled in spite of an increasing cross-sectional area of the airfoil along its longitudinal length, ensuring a sufficiently high mach number to provide a desired degree of cooling throughout the entire length of the airfoil.

Liang, George

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

468

A correlated K-distribution model of the heating rates for H[sub 2]O and a molecular mixture in the 0-2500 cm[sup [minus]1] wavelength region in the atmosphere between 0 and 60 km  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For this report a prototype infrared radiative transfer model using a correlated k-distribution technique to calculate the transmission between atmospheric levels has been used to calculate the radiative fluxes and heating rates for H[sub 2]O and a mixture of the major molecular absorbers in the atmosphere between 0 and 60 km. The mixture consists of H[sub 2]O, CO[sub 2], O[sub 3], CH[sub 4], and N[sub 2]O. The wave number range considered is 0-2500 cm[sup [minus]1]. The use of the k-distribution method allows 25 cm[sup [minus]1] wave number bins to produce fluxes and heating rates which are within ten percent of the results of detailed line by line calculations.

Grossman, A S; Grant, K E

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

469

Home Area Networks and the Smart Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the wide array of home area network (HAN) options being presented as solutions to smart grid challenges for the home, it is time to compare and contrast their strengths and weaknesses. This white paper examines leading and emerging HAN technologies. The emergence of the smart grid is bringing more networking players into the field. The need for low consistent bandwidth usage differs enough from the traditional information technology world to open the door to new technologies. The predominant players currently consist of a blend of the old and new. Within the wired world Ethernet and HomePlug Green PHY are leading the way with an advantage to HomePlug because it doesn't require installing new wires. In the wireless the realm there are many more competitors but WiFi and ZigBee seem to have the most momentum.

Clements, Samuel L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Hadley, Mark D.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

L AREA WASTEWATER STORAGE DRUM EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the determination of the cause of pressurization that led to bulging deformation of a 55 gallon wastewater drum stored in L-Area. Drum samples were sent to SRNL for evaluation. The interior surface of these samples revealed blistering and holes in the epoxy phenolic drum liner and corrosion of the carbon steel drum. It is suspected that osmotic pressure drove permeation of the water through the epoxy phenolic coating which was weakened from exposure to low pH water. The coating failed at locations throughout the drum interior. Subsequent corrosion of the carbon steel released hydrogen which pressurized the drum causing deformation of the drum lid. Additional samples from other wastewater drums on the same pallet were also evaluated and limited corrosion was visible on the interior surfaces. It is suspected that, with time, the corrosion would have advanced to cause pressurization of these sealed drums.

Vormelker, P; Cynthia Foreman, C; Zane Nelson, Z; David Hathcock, D; Dennis Vinson, D

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Ashland Area Support Substation Project : Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power & Light Company`s (PP&L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP&L`s Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP&L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW`s) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP&L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Maryland Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of the delineation proposed by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) for the Maryland (MD) WEA and two alternative delineations. The objectives of the NREL evaluation were to assess MEA's proposed delineation of the MD WEA, perform independent analysis, and recommend how the MD WEA should be delineated.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Surface features of the Stetson Bank area and a non-bank area of comparable depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of bathymetric survey tracks from cruise 74-G-10 of the R/V Gyre. 39 10. 12. 13. 14. 15. Fathogram I. Fathogram 2. Fathogram 3. Fathogram 4. Fathogram 5. Fathogram 6. Fathogram 7. Fathogram 8. 42 43 45 46 Bathymetric profiles of Stetson Bank... or secondary disturbances for all sediment cores. 93o 40 3 ~ 2o lo 12 ~ ~ ~ IO 5o NON-BANK AREA 28o20 7 ~ 8o 4 ~ ' ~ STETSON BANK 30 LOU. NIUIICAL III 10 94 00' 25 C3 STUDY, ( 1 && ' ? AREA / / I ( . r 1 1 Fig. 1 ? Location...

Dunphy, Janet Louise

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

PROPOSED PLAN FOR THE ST. LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Compensation, and Liability Act CFR Code of Federal Regulations cm centimeter CMM Continental Mining & Milling effective dose equivalent Th thorium U uranium UMTRCA Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act USACE

US Army Corps of Engineers

476

Vegetation communities associated with the 100-Area and 200-Area facilities on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, lies within the broad semi-arid shrub-steppe vegetation zone of the Columbia Basin. Thirteen different habitat types on the Hanford Site have been mapped in Habitat Types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and Plant Species of Concern (Downs et al. 1993). In a broad sense, this classification is correct. On a smaller scale, however, finer delineations are possible. This study was conducted to determine the plant communities and estimate vegetation cover in and directly adjacent to the 100 and 200 Areas, primarily in relation to waste sites, as part of a comprehensive ecological study for the Compensation Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) characterization of the 100 and 200 Areas. During the summer of 1993, field surveys were conducted and a map of vegetation communities in each area, including dominant species associations, was produced. The field surveys consisted of qualitative community delineations. The community delineations described were made by field reconnaissance and are qualitative in nature. The delineations were made by visually determining the dominant plant species or vegetation types and were based on the species most apparent at the time of inspection. Additionally, 38 transects were run in these plant communities to try to obtain a more accurate representation of the community. Because habitat disturbances from construction/operations activities continue to occur in these areas, users of this information should be cautious in applying these maps without a current ground survey. This work will complement large-scale habitat maps of the Hanford Site.

Stegen, J.A.

1994-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

477

Guidelines for ACUC Oversight of Satellite Facilities, Study Areas, Laboratories and other Animal Activity Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidelines for ACUC Oversight of Satellite Facilities, Study Areas, Laboratories and other Animal? · Are pharmaceuticals in-date? Are chemical-grade materials in use for compounds for which pharmaceutical preparations familiar with procedures for receipt and disposition of animals and transport containers? If applicable

Bandettini, Peter A.

478

Electronic state spectroscopy of diiodomethane (CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}): Experimental and computational studies in the 30?000–95?000 cm{sup ?1} region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic absorption spectrum of diiodomethane in the 30?000–95?000 cm{sup ?1} region is investigated using synchrotron radiation; the spectrum in the 50?000–66?500 cm{sup ?1} region is reported for the first time. The absorption bands in the 30?000–50?000 cm{sup ?1} region are attributed to valence transitions, while the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrum (50?000–95?000 cm{sup ?1}) is dominated by several Rydberg series converging to the first four ionization potentials of CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} at 9.46, 9.76, 10.21, and 10.56 eV corresponding to the removal of an electron from the outermost 3b{sub 2}, 2b{sub 1}, 1a{sub 2}, and 4a{sub 1} non-bonding orbitals, respectively. Rydberg series of ns, np, and nd type converging to each of the four ionization potentials are assigned based on a quantum defect analysis. Time dependent density functional theory calculations of excited states support the analysis and help in interpretation of the Rydberg and valence nature of observed transitions. Density functional theory calculations of the neutral and ionic ground state geometries and vibrational frequencies are used to assign the observed vibronic structure. Vibronic features accompanying the Rydberg series are mainly due to excitation of the C-I symmetric stretch (?{sub 3}) and CH{sub 2} wag (?{sub 8}) modes, with smaller contributions from the C-H symmetric stretch (?{sub 1}). UV absorption bands are assigned to low lying valence states 1{sup 1}B{sub 2}, 1{sup 1}B{sub 1}, 2{sup 1}A{sub 1}, 3{sup 1}A{sub 1}, 2{sup 1}B{sub 1}, and 2{sup 1}B{sub 2} and the unusually high underlying intensity in parts of the VUV spectrum is attributed to valence states with high oscillator strength. This is the first report of a comprehensive Rydberg series and vibronic analysis of the VUV absorption spectrum of CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} in the 50?000–85?000 cm{sup ?1} region. The VUV absorption spectrum of CD{sub 2}I{sub 2} which serves to verify and consolidate spectral assignments is also reported here for the first time.

Mandal, Anuvab; Jagatap, B. N., E-mail: bnj@barc.gov.in [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Singh, Param Jeet; Shastri, Aparna [Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

479

100 Area soil washing treatability test plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This test plan describes specifications, responsibilities, and general methodology for conducting a soil washing treatability study as applied to source unit contamination in the 100 Area. The objective ofthis treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The purpose of separating these fractions is to minimize the volume of soil requiring permanent disposal. It is anticipated that this treatability study will be performed in two phases of testing, a remedy screening phase and a remedy selection phase. The remedy screening phase consists of laboratory- and bench-scale studies performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest laboratories (PNL) under a work order issued by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). This phase will be used to provide qualitative evaluation of the potential effectiveness of the soil washing technology. The remedy selection phase, consists of pilot-scale testing performed under a separate service contract to be competitively bid under Westinghouse Hanford direction. The remedy selection phase will provide data to support evaluation of the soil washing technology in future feasibility studies for Interim Remedial Measures (IRMs) or final operable unit (OU) remedies. Performance data from these tests will indicate whether applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or cleanup goals can be met at the site(s) by application of soil washing. The remedy selection tests wig also allow estimation of costs associated with implementation to the accuracy required for the Feasibility Study.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Source Catalog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100~MeV--300~GeV range. Based on the first four years of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the 2FGL catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources above 4 sigma significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 232 sources are considered as identifie...

,

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area centimeters cm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM); Henins, Ivars (Los Alamos, NM); Babayan, Steve E. (Huntington Beach, CA); Hicks, Robert F. (Los Angeles, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

area consortium energy: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Solar Energy in Un-electrified Areas' in Namibia by Heidi Camesano, Terri 54 FINITE ENERGY CYLINDERS OF SMALL AREA H. HOFER 1, K. WYSOCKI 2, AND E. ZEHNDER 3 Mathematics...

483

Gas Flux Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the geothermal area. Ultimately for potential development of EGS. Notes A CO2 soil gas flux survey was conducted in areas recognized as geothermal upflow zones within the...

484

Incremental Updates to Scenes Illuminated by Area Light Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by a singular sharp boundary (umbra), but also have partially lit areas (penumbra). In this paper we present. The boundaries between lit and penumbra and between penumbra and umbra areas are called the extremal boundaries

Chrysanthou, Yiorgos

485

A comparative analysis of area navigation systems for general aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the next decade area navigation is to become the primary method of air navigation within the United States. There are numerous radio navigation systems that offer the capabilities of area navigation to general ...

Dodge, Steven Malcolm

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION anthropogenic climate change on residential electricity consumption for the nine San Francisco Bay Area counties with different meant temperatures on households' electricity consumption. The estimation uses a comprehensive

487

Packing efficiency and accessible surface area of crumpled graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene holds promise as an ultracapacitor due to its high specific surface area and intrinsic capacitance. To exploit both, a maximum surface area must be accessible while the two-dimensional (2D) graphene is deformed ...

Cranford, Steven Wayne

488

area index lai: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Derived Leaf Area Index over the High-Latitude Northern Hemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: Leaf Area Index (LAI) is a key parameter in the...

489

area part ii: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Derived Leaf Area Index over the High-Latitude Northern Hemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: Leaf Area Index (LAI) is a key parameter in the...

490

ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF A WIDE AREA RELEASE OF ANTHRAX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF A WIDE AREA RELEASE OF ANTHRAX May 2009 Prepared Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security Economic Impacts of a Wide Area Release of Anthrax KS .................................................................................................................................................. 1 Categories of Economic Impacts

491

Decomposition algorithms for multi-area power system analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This dissertation investigates decomposition algorithms for multi-area power system transfer capability analysis and economic dispatch analysis. All of the proposed algorithms assume that areas do not share their network operating and economic information among...

Min, Liang

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

492

Energy Innovation Hub Report Shows Philadelphia-area Building...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Hub Report Shows Philadelphia-area Building Retrofits Could Support 23,500 Jobs Energy Innovation Hub Report Shows Philadelphia-area Building Retrofits Could Support 23,500...

493

AREAS OF GROUND SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEO-FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

here, and the Raft River geothermal wells a r e located t oPROPERTIES OF RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL WELL CORES (from Stokerin the area of Geothermal wells rs a 9 square mile area with

Grimsrud, G. Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

area dnapl characterization: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

assumes to consider the images in terms of area with the same texture. In uncertain environment, it could be better to take an imprecise decision or to reject the area...

495

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1976, "Blowout o f a Geothermal Well", California Geology,in Rocks from Two Geothermal Areas'' , -- P1 anetary ScienceMonitoring Ground Movement in Geothermal Areas", Hydraul ic

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

cm303870x 1..6  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Baggetto, Leslie A. Adamczyk, Bingkun Guo, Suree S. Brown, Xiao-Guang Sun, Austin A. Albert, James R. Humble, Craig E. Barnes, Michael J. Bojdys,...

497

CM-1-H Wholesale Power Rate Schedule  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Availability:This rate schedule shall be available to the South Mississippi Electric Power Association, Municipal Energy Agency of Mississippi, and Mississippi Delta Energy Agency (hereinafter...

498

summer_nid_cr_cm_2003.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions473.6 W 54,849.062 210 50trillion Interconnectiont

499

summer_nid_cr_cm_2004.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions473.6 W 54,849.062 210 50trillion

500

summer_nid_cr_cm_2005.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions473.6 W 54,849.062 210 50trilliond Form EIA-411 for