National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for area centimeters cm

  1. Large-Area (over 50 cm 50 cm) Freestanding Films of Colloidal InP/ ZnS Quantum Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Large-Area (over 50 cm × 50 cm) Freestanding Films of Colloidal InP/ ZnS Quantum Dots Evren of flexible, freestanding films of InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) using fatty acid ligands across very large areas avoiding the need for ligand exchange. When pumped by a blue LED, these Cd-free QD films allow for high

  2. Basic Units of Measurement Astronomers use metric units, and in particular the cgs (centimeter-gram-second) system.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    Basic Units of Measurement Astronomers use metric units, and in particular the cgs (centimeter-gram-second) system. 1 Distance The basic unit of distance is the centimeter (cm). There are 100 centimeters) or millimeters (10 mm per cm). There are 2.54 cm per inch, and 1.62 km per mile. Longer distances are measured

  3. Centimeter

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    monitoring period 5 avg. noise, 5 false alarm counts 5 false trigger counts 5 CALIBRATION DATA gain values 5 mhi'g(gain) ' - 5 center freque.ncy 5 group dday 5 midrarge gain 5...

  4. Centimeter

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby a contractorEnergy, science, and7451SciTech

  5. GeV electron beams from a centimeter-scale channel guided laser wakefield acceleratora...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    GeV electron beams from a centimeter-scale channel guided laser wakefield acceleratora... K on the generation of GeV-class electron beams using an intense femtosecond laser beam and a 3.3 cm long preformed from 10­40 TW were guided over more than 20 Rayleigh ranges and high quality electron beams with energy

  6. Single Sub-20 nm Wide, Centimeter-Long Nanofluidic Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Single Sub-20 nm Wide, Centimeter-Long Nanofluidic Channel Fabricated by Novel Nanoimprint Mold an imprint mold of a channel pattern and nanoimprint to duplicate such channel. The centimeter-long channel without additional size shrinking.17 Single channels have been fabricated by using edge patterning18 (note

  7. 70 cm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. 10 cm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. 10 cm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The 2011 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

  11. License Iso. CM35

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    License Iso. CM35 hUhUll4MhiM&POlltYll7 llolh-thRqalStract Alolan&le, vlrghla Attoatlonl w. & 0. EutahlDon Pursuant to the Atanic Energy Act of 1954 and Section 40.21 or the Code...

  12. r:lCM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  13. GeV ELECTRON BEAMS FROM A CENTIMETER-SCALE LASER-DRIVEN PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    GeV ELECTRON BEAMS FROM A CENTIMETER-SCALE LASER-DRIVEN PLASMA ACCELERATOR A. J. Gonsalves, K discharge waveguide [1, 2]. Electron beams were not observed without a plasma channel, indicating that self of the electron beam spectra, and the dependence of the reliability of pro- ducing electron beams as a function

  14. Construction of a polarization sensitive planar antenna for microwaves in the centimeter range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Construction of a polarization sensitive planar antenna for microwaves in the centimeter range the construction of the actual antenna circuit took place, a number of tests were performed to develop of various techniques. Following these tests, a prototype antenna circuit was constructed and measurements

  15. LHC optics commissioning at beta*40 cm and 60 cm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langner, Andy Sven; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Ana; Maclean, Ewen Hamish; Malina, Lukas; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Mönig, Saskia; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Skowronski, Piotr Krzysztof; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Wenninger, Jorg; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the beta* = 40 cm and = 60 cm optics commissioning for the LHC at 6.5TeV from MD blocks I and II.

  16. APPLICATION CM CARES PROJECT REQUEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    -learning program sponsored by the Department of Construction Management. The goal of CM Cares is to infuse

  17. Centimeter-deep tissue fluorescence microscopic imaging with high signal-to-noise ratio and picomole sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Bingbing; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Pei, Yanbo; DSouza, Francis; Nguyen, Kytai T; Hong, Yi; Tang, Liping; Yuan, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopic imaging in centimeter-deep tissue has been highly sought-after for many years because much interesting in vivo micro-information, such as microcirculation, tumor angiogenesis, and metastasis, may deeply locate in tissue. In this study, for the first time this goal has been achieved in 3-centimeter deep tissue with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and picomole sensitivity under radiation safety thresholds. These results are demonstrated not only in tissue-mimic phantoms but also in actual tissues, such as porcine muscle, ex vivo mouse liver, ex vivo spleen, and in vivo mouse tissue. These results are achieved based on three unique technologies: excellent near infrared ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF) contrast agents, a sensitive USF imaging system, and an effective correlation method. Multiplex USF fluorescence imaging is also achieved. It is useful to simultaneously image multiple targets and observe their interactions. This work opens the door for future studies of centimeter...

  18. CM300DLFinal.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransenBusinessInitialRadiological Surveys Core Status:

  19. GeV electron beams from a centimeter-scale laser-driven plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    GeV electron beams from cm-scale channel guided laser wake?the generation of GeV-class electron beams using an intenseranges and high-quality electron beams with energy up to 1

  20. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  1. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2009-09-01

    July 8, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  2. Design and engineering of low-cost centimeter-scale repeatable and accurate kinematic fixtures for nanomanufacturing equipment using magnetic preload and potting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watral, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a low-cost, centimeter-scale kinematic coupling fixture for use in nanomanufacturing equipment. The fixture uses magnetic circuit design techniques to optimize the magnetic preload required to achieve ...

  3. Physical and chemical characteristics of fluorinel/sodium calcine generated during 30 cm Pilot-Plant Run 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, K.N.; Kessinger, G.F.; Littleton, L.L.; Olson, A.L.

    1993-07-01

    The 30 centimeter (cm) pilot plant calciner Run 17, of March 9, 1987, was performed to study the calcination of fluroinel-sodium blended waste blended at the ratio 3.5:1 fluorinel to sodium, respectively. The product of the run was analyzed by a variety of analytical techniques that included X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to deduce physical and chemical characteristics. The analytical data, as well as data analyses and conclusions drawn from the data, are presented.

  4. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, John K

    2010-01-01

    in activation of 1,3-butadiene (C 4 H 6 ) and isoprene (C 5greater than that of 1,3-butadiene, but their PAs are quiteand Cm + with butadiene and isoprene a Cm O + 1,3-C 4 H 6 NR

  5. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, John K

    2010-01-01

    ±50 kJ mol -1 . Catalytic oxidation of CO by N 2 O mediated+ O C Scheme 2 – Catalytic oxidation of CO by N 2 O mediatedexhibit such catalytic behavior [14]. Oxidation of CmO + did

  6. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, John K

    2010-01-01

    in activation of 1,3-butadiene (C 4 H 6 ) and isoprene (C 5Cm) reacted with butadiene [11]. The reaction efficienciesAmO + are inert towards butadiene but the reactivity with

  7. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Sokendai), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Toyokazu [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8602 (Japan); Takahashi, Tomo, E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp, E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp, E-mail: toyokazu.sekiguchi@helsinki.fi, E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ?{sub ?}=?{sub ?}/T{sub ?} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ?{sub ?} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  8. Towards Next Generation TATB-based Explosives by Understanding Voids and Microstructure from 10 nm to 1 cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willey, T M; Overturf, G

    2009-03-26

    TATB-based explosives have been investigated on length scales spanning several orders of magnitude, from just under 10 nm to larger than 1 cm. This has been accomplished using a combination of ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), ultra-small angle neutron scattering (USANS), and x-ray computed tomography (XRCT). USAXS determines distributions the smallest structures including hot-spot voids from hundreds of nanometers to a few microns, USANS extends this range to about 10 microns, and two variants of XRCT cover sizes from microns to centimeters. Several examples are presented for LX-17, a triaminotrinitrobenzene based plastic bonded explosive using Kel-F 800. As an extension of previous USAXS results, in these proceedings, an alternate binder results in a more uniform microstructure for the PBX, useful towards design of next-generation TATB-based explosives. These data are an important step to understanding microstructural mechanisms that affect the mechanical properties of TATB-based explosives, and provide complete a comprehensive characterization of the structure of LX-17 from nanometers to centimeters that can be used as empirical input to computational models of detonation, and in determining the relationship between voids and microstructure to detonation properties.

  9. ARCHITECTURE OVERVIEW TIPSTER SE/CM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARCHITECTURE OVERVIEW TIPSTER SE/CM tipster@fipster.org THE TIPSTER ARCHITECTURE The TIPSTER Architecture is a software architecture for providing Document Detection (i.e. Document Retrieval and Message Routing) and Information Extraction functions to text handling applications. The high level architecture

  10. Outcomes of Node-Negative Breast Cancer 5 Centimeters and Larger Treated With and Without Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulart, Jennifer; Truong, Pauline; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline H.; Kennecke, Hagen; Nichol, Alan

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The role of adjuvant postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) remains controversial for the rare presentation of pT3pN0cM0 breast cancer. The present analysis examined locoregional recurrence (LRR) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) in pT2 = 5.0-cm and pT3 >5.0-cm tumors treated with mastectomy, stratified by PMRT use. Materials and Methods: Between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 2000, the British Columbia provincial database yielded 100 node-negative patients with tumors {>=}5 cm of 19,846 nonmetastatic breast cancer patients (0.5%). Of these 100 patients, 44 (44%) had received adjuvant PMRT. Results: The PMRT group contained significantly more pT3 >5-cm cases (p = 0.001) and margin-positive cases (p = .03). With a median follow-up of 10 years, the cumulative 10-year LRR rate was 2.3% (95% confidence interval, 0.2-10.5) in the PMRT group vs. 8.9% (95% confidence interval, 3.2-18.2) in the no-PMRT group (p = .2). Regarding LRR in the no-PMRT group, all patients had Grade 3 histologic features (LRR 17%, 5 of 29) and had not received hormonal therapy (LRR 15%, 5 of 34). The 10-year breast cancer-specific survival rate was 85.8% (95% confidence interval 71.0-93.4) in the PMRT group vs. 74.6% (95% confidence interval 59.9-84.5) in the no-PMRT group (p = .2). On multivariate analysis, adjusted for the prognostic and predictive variables, PMRT did not significantly improve the LRR or breast cancer-specific survival rates. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated a low LRR rate for node-negative breast cancer {>=}5 cm. Our results indicate that PMRT should be considered for Grade 3 histologic features and patients not undergoing hormonal therapy.

  11. CM200DL-Final.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. ARM - Campaign Instrument - tethersonde-cm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a notegovInstrumentstdma Comments? We would

  13. THE METALLICITY OF THE CM DRACONIS SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Ramsey, Lawrence W. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Feiden, Gregory A., E-mail: rct151@psu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    The CM Draconis system comprises two eclipsing mid-M dwarfs of nearly equal mass in a 1.27 day orbit. This well-studied eclipsing binary has often been used for benchmark tests of stellar models, since its components are among the lowest mass stars with well-measured masses and radii ({approx}< 1% relative precision). However, as with many other low-mass stars, non-magnetic models have been unable to match the observed radii and effective temperatures for CM Dra at the 5%-10% level. To date, the uncertain metallicity of the system has complicated comparison of theoretical isochrones with observations. In this Letter, we use data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to measure the metallicity of the system during primary and secondary eclipses, as well as out of eclipse, based on an empirical metallicity calibration in the H and K near-infrared (NIR) bands. We derive an [Fe/H] = -0.30 {+-} 0.12 that is consistent across all orbital phases. The determination of [Fe/H] for this system constrains a key dimension of parameter space when attempting to reconcile model isochrone predictions and observations.

  14. Fuel elements of research reactor CM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlov, A.V.; Morozov, A.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Ershov, S.A.

    2013-07-01

    In 1961 the CM research reactor was commissioned at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad, Russia), it was intended to carry on investigations and the production of transuranium nuclides. The reactor is of a tank type. Original fuel assembly contained plate fuels that were spaced with vanes and corrugated bands. Nickel was used as a cladding material, fuel meat was produced from UO{sub 2} + electrolytic nickel composition. Fuel plates have been replaced by self-spacing cross-shaped dispersion fuels clad in stainless steel. In 2005 the reactor was updated. The purpose of this updating was to increase the quantity of irradiation channels in the reactor core and to improve the neutron balance. The updating was implemented at the expense of 20 % reduction in the quantity of fuel elements in the core which released a space for extra channels and decreased the mass of structural materials in the core. The updated reactor is loaded with modified standard fuel elements with 20 % higher uranium masses. At the same time stainless steel in fuel assembly shrouds was substituted by zirconium alloy. Today in progress are investigations and work to promote the second stage of reactor updating that involve developments of cross-shaped fuel elements having low neutron absorption matrix materials. This article gives an historical account of the design and main technical changes that occurred for the CM reactor since its commissioning.

  15. Investigations on Important Properties of the 10 cm x 10 cm GEM Prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Kulasri, Kittipong; Ritthirong, Anawat

    2015-01-01

    The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector is one of promising particle and radiation detectors that has been improved greatly from previous gas detectors. The improvement includes better spatial resolutions, higher detection rate capabilities, and flexibilities in designs. In particular, the 10 cm x 10 cm GEM prototype is designed and provided by the Gas Detectors Development group (GDD) at CERN, Switzerland. With its simplicity in operations and designs, while still maintaining high qualities, the GEM prototype is suitable for both start-up and advanced researches. This article aims to report the investigations on some important properties of the 10 cm x 10 cm GEM detector using current measurement and signal counting. Results have shown that gains of the GEM prototype exponentially increase as voltage supplied to the detector increases, while the detector reaches full efficiency (plateau region) when the voltage is greater than 4100 V. In terms of signal sharing between X and Y strips of the readout, X str...

  16. A New Galactic 6cm Formaldehyde Maser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araya, E; Hofner, P; Kurtz, S; Linz, H; Olmi, L

    2006-01-01

    We report the detection of a new H2CO maser in the massive star forming region G23.71-0.20 (IRAS 18324-0820), i.e., the fifth region in the Galaxy where H2CO maser emission has been found. The new H2CO maser is located toward a compact HII region, and is coincident in velocity and position with 6.7 GHz methanol masers and with an IR source as revealed by Spitzer/IRAC GLIMPSE data. The coincidence with an IR source and 6.7 GHz methanol masers suggests that the maser is in close proximity to an embedded massive protostar. Thus, the detection of H2CO maser emission toward G23.71-0.20 supports the trend that H2CO 6cm masers trace molecular material very near young massive stellar objects.

  17. A New Galactic 6cm Formaldehyde Maser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Araya; P. Hofner; W. M. Goss; S. Kurtz; H. Linz; L. Olmi

    2006-04-17

    We report the detection of a new H2CO maser in the massive star forming region G23.71-0.20 (IRAS 18324-0820), i.e., the fifth region in the Galaxy where H2CO maser emission has been found. The new H2CO maser is located toward a compact HII region, and is coincident in velocity and position with 6.7 GHz methanol masers and with an IR source as revealed by Spitzer/IRAC GLIMPSE data. The coincidence with an IR source and 6.7 GHz methanol masers suggests that the maser is in close proximity to an embedded massive protostar. Thus, the detection of H2CO maser emission toward G23.71-0.20 supports the trend that H2CO 6cm masers trace molecular material very near young massive stellar objects.

  18. Investigations on Important Properties of the 10 cm x 10 cm GEM Prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiadtisak Saenboonruang; Piyakul Kumphiranon; Kittipong Kulasri; Anawat Ritthirong

    2015-10-27

    The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector is one of promising particle and radiation detectors that has been improved greatly from previous gas detectors. The improvement includes better spatial resolutions, higher detection rate capabilities, and flexibilities in designs. In particular, the 10 cm x 10 cm GEM prototype is designed and provided by the Gas Detectors Development group (GDD) at CERN, Switzerland. With its simplicity in operations and designs, while still maintaining high qualities, the GEM prototype is suitable for both start-up and advanced researches. This article aims to report the investigations on some important properties of the 10 cm x 10 cm GEM detector using current measurement and signal counting. Results have shown that gains of the GEM prototype exponentially increase as voltage supplied to the detector increases, while the detector reaches full efficiency (plateau region) when the voltage is greater than 4100 V. In terms of signal sharing between X and Y strips of the readout, X strips, which is on the top layer of the readout, collect ~57% of the total signal. For the uniformity test, the GEM prototype has slightly higher efficiencies at the center of the detector and decreases as positions are closer to edges.

  19. Nevada Test Site 2009 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Radioactive Waste

    2010-06-23

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2009 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NTS. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. All gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below the minimum detectable concentrations, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. Radon flux from waste covers is well below regulatory limits. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. The 87.6 millimeters (mm) (3.45 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2009 is 43 percent below the average of 152.4 mm (6.00 in.), and the 62.7 mm (2.47 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2009 is 49 percent below the average of 122.5 mm (4.82 in.). Soil-gas tritium monitoring at borehole GCD-05 continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 30 cm (1 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2009, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation or were vegetated, but water drained from the bare-soil Area 3 drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. Elevated tritium levels in plants and animals sampled from the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs show tritium uptake by the biota, but the low levels of other radionuclides do not indicate that there has been biota intrusion into the waste. All 2009 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  20. Nevada National Security Site 2013 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, D. B.

    2014-08-19

    Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) within the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2013 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2013; 2014a; 2014b). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are close to detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below Derived Concentration Standards for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. Leachate samples collected from the leachate collection system at the mixed low-level waste cell were below established contaminant regulatory limits. The 105.8 millimeters (mm) (4.17 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2013 is 30% below the average of 150.3 mm (5.92 in.), and the 117.5 mm (4.63 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2013 is 5% below the average of 123.6 mm (4.86 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2013, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3-times natural precipitation. All 2013 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  1. Nevada National Security Site 2012 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, David B.

    2013-09-10

    Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2012 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2012; 2013a; 2013b). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below Derived Concentration Standards for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. Leachate samples collected from the leachate collection system at the mixed low-level waste cell were below established contaminant regulatory limits. The 133.9 millimeters (mm) (5.27 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2012 is 12% below the average of 153.0 mm (6.02 in.), and the 137.6 mm (5.42 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2012 is 11% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2012, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2012 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  2. Nevada National Security Site 2010 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-06-01

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2010 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2010a; 2010b; 2011). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. All gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below the minimum detectable concentrations, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. The 246.9 millimeters (mm) (9.72 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2010 is 56 percent above the average of 158.7 mm (6.25 in.), and the 190.4 mm (7.50 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2010 is 50 percent above the average of 126.7 mm (4.99 in.). Soil-gas tritium monitoring at borehole GCD-05 continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 61 cm (2 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2010, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Water drained from both the bare-soil drainage lysimeter and the invader species drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2010 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  3. FIRST: Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (Data Catalogs from the Very Large Array (VLA) First Survey)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 27 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and cleaned using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). Data were collected from 1993 through 2002, with enhanced images produced up through 2011. The Data Catalogs have been cleaned and reissued over time, with the latest version coming out in March, 2014. They contain maps, images, and binary data. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

  4. CASE/CM Services Supporting InternetBased Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biuk-Aghai, Robert P.

    CASE/CM Services Supporting Internet­Based Software Engineering Robert P. Biuk­Aghai Faculty of geographically dis­ tributed software engineers cooperating and com­ municating over the Internet. In the future of Internet­based Computer­Aided Software Engineering (CASE) and Configuration Manage­ ment (CM) environments

  5. CM3/ESM3 Planning January 12, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in uncoupled mode) by December, 2007. This will allow 12 months for optimizing CM3/ESM3. Component model-resolved soil hydrology and explicit rivers. (d) SEA ICE: similar to CM2. Our estimates are that the above configuration, running with interactive atmospheric and oceanic chemi

  6. This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Qian; Han, Jung

    2015-12-08

    This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

  7. The 21-cm Signal from the Cosmological Epoch of Recombination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fialkov, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    The redshifted 21-cm emission by neutral hydrogen offers a unique tool for mapping structure formation in the early universe in three dimensions. Here we provide the first detailed calculation of the 21-cm emission signal during and after the epoch of hydrogen recombination in the redshift range of z ~ 500-1,100, corresponding to observed wavelengths of 100-230 meters. The 21-cm line deviates from thermal equilibrium with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) due to the excess Ly-alpha radiation from hydrogen and helium recombinations. The resulting 21-cm signal reaches a brightness temperature of a milli-Kelvin, orders of magnitude larger than previously estimated. Its detection by a future lunar or space-based observatory could improve dramatically the statistical constraints on the cosmological initial conditions compared to existing two-dimensional maps of the CMB anisotropies.

  8. New HI 21-cm absorbers at low and intermediate redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwaan, M A; Péroux, C; Murphy, M T; Bouché, N; Curran, S J; Biggs, A D

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a survey for intervening HI 21-cm absorbers at intermediate and low redshift (0180 K. A subset of our systems were also searched for OH absorption, but no detections were made.

  9. Raman Shift (cm-1 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Raman Shift (cm-1 ) 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 RamanIntensity(a.u.) 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 Water - Anisotropic 0.10x HBr - Anisotropic 0.10x HI - Anisotropic Raman Shift (cm-1 ) 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 RamanIntensity(a.u.) 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 Water - Isotropic 0.015x HCl - Isotropic 0.015x HBr - Isotropic 0.015x HI

  10. POLYSHIFT Communications Software for the Connection Machine System CM-200

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    George, William; Brickner, Ralph G.; Johnsson, S. Lennart

    1994-01-01

    We describe the use and implementation of a polyshift function PSHIFT for circular shifts and end-offs shifts. Polyshift is useful in many scientific codes using regular grids, such as finite difference codes in several dimensions, and multigrid codes, molecular dynamics computations, and in lattice gauge physics computations, such as quantum chromodynamics (QCD) calculations. Our implementation of the PSHIFT function on the Connection Machine systems CM-2 and CM-200 offers a speedup of up to a factor of 3–4 compared with CSHIFT when the local data motion within a node is small. The PSHIFT routine is included in the Connection Machine Scientificmore »Software Library (CMSSL).« less

  11. Lensing of 21-cm Fluctuations by Primordial Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Book; Marc Kamionkowski; Fabian Schmidt

    2011-12-02

    Weak-gravitational-lensing distortions to the intensity pattern of 21-cm radiation from the dark ages can be decomposed geometrically into curl and curl-free components. Lensing by primordial gravitational waves induces a curl component, while the contribution from lensing by density fluctuations is strongly suppressed. Angular fluctuations in the 21-cm background extend to very small angular scales, and measurements at different frequencies probe different shells in redshift space. There is thus a huge trove of information with which to reconstruct the curl component of the lensing field, allowing tensor-to-scalar ratios conceivably as small as r ~ 10^{-9} - far smaller than those currently accessible - to be probed.

  12. c : solute concentration in solution, mol or g solutes/ cm3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    ) strength, cm3 water/cm3 soil/h t : time, h x : depth, cm z : gravitational potential, cm : volumetric tables and the consequently increased energy costs for pumping, it is recognized that ground water

  13. ARM - Campaign Instrument - pyran-kandz-cm11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign

  14. Probing patchy reionization through ?-21 cm correlation statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meerburg, P. Daniel; Spergel, David N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Dvorkin, Cora, E-mail: meerburg@princeton.edu, E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: cdvorkin@ias.edu [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We consider the cross-correlation between free electrons and neutral hydrogen during the epoch of reionization (EoR). The free electrons are traced by the optical depth to reionization ?, while the neutral hydrogen can be observed through 21 cm photon emission. As expected, this correlation is sensitive to the detailed physics of reionization. Foremost, if reionization occurs through the merger of relatively large halos hosting an ionizing source, the free electrons and neutral hydrogen are anticorrelated for most of the reionization history. A positive contribution to the correlation can occur when the halos that can form an ionizing source are small. A measurement of this sign change in the cross-correlation could help disentangle the bias and the ionization history. We estimate the signal-to-noise ratio of the cross-correlation using the estimator for inhomogeneous reionization ?-hat {sub ?m} proposed by Dvorkin and Smith. We find that with upcoming radio interferometers and cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments, the cross-correlation is measurable going up to multipoles ? ? 1000. We also derive parameter constraints and conclude that, despite the foregrounds, the cross-correlation provides a complementary measurement of the EoR parameters to the 21 cm and CMB polarization autocorrelations expected to be observed in the coming decade.

  15. De-contamination of cosmological 21-cm maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liron Gleser; Adi Nusser; Andrew J. Benson

    2008-10-27

    We present a method for extracting the expected cosmological 21-cm signal from the epoch of reionization, taking into account contaminating radiations and random instrumental noise. The method is based on the maximum a-posteriori probability (MAP) formalism and employs the coherence of the contaminating radiation along the line-of-sight and the three-dimensional correlations of the cosmological signal. We test the method using a detailed and comprehensive modeling of the cosmological 21-cm signal and the contaminating radiation. The signal is obtained using a high resolution N-body simulation where the gas is assumed to trace the dark matter and is reionized by stellar radiation computed from semi-analytic galaxy formation recipes. We model contaminations to the cosmological signal from synchrotron and free-free galactic foregrounds and extragalactic sources including active galactic nuclei, radio haloes and relics, synchrotron and free-free emission from star forming galaxies, and free-free emission from dark matter haloes and the intergalactic medium. We provide tests of the reconstruction method for several rms values of instrumental noise from $\\sigma_{N}=1$ to 250 mK. For low instrumental noise, the recovered signal, along individual lines-of-sight, fits the true cosmological signal with a mean rms difference of $d_{rms}\\approx 1.7\\pm 0.6$ for $\\sigma_{N}=1$ mK, and $d_{rms}\\approx 4.2\\pm 0.4$ for $\\sigma_{N}=5$ mK. The one-dimensional power spectrum is nicely reconstructed for all values of $\\sigma_{N}$ considered here, while the reconstruction of the two-dimensional power spectrum and the Minkowski functionals is good only for noise levels of the order of few mK.

  16. A 1.3 cm Line Survey toward Orion KL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Y; Thorwirth, S; Spezzano, S; Menten, K M; Walmsley, C M; Wyrowski, F; Mao, R Q; Klein, B

    2015-01-01

    Orion KL has served as a benchmark for spectral line searches throughout the (sub)millimeter regime. The main goal is to systematically study spectral characteristics of Orion KL in the 1.3 cm band. We carried out a spectral line survey (17.9 GHz to 26.2 GHz) with the Effelsberg-100 m telescope towards Orion KL. We find 261 spectral lines, yielding an average line density of about 32 spectral features per GHz above 3$\\sigma$. The identified lines include 164 radio recombination lines (RRLs) and 97 molecular lines. A total of 23 molecular transitions from species known to exist in Orion KL are detected for the first time in the interstellar medium. Non-metastable 15NH3 transitions are detected in Orion KL for the first time. Based on the velocity information of detected lines and the ALMA images, the spatial origins of molecular emission are constrained and discussed. A narrow feature is found in SO2 ($8_{1,7}-7_{2,6}$), possibly suggesting the presence of a maser line. Column densities and fractional abundanc...

  17. CENTIMETER CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS OF THE NORTHERN HEAD OF THE HH 80/81/80N JET: REVISING THE ACTUAL DIMENSIONS OF A PARSEC-SCALE JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masque, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert; Girart, Josep M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Beltran, Maria T.

    2012-10-10

    We present 6 and 20 cm Jansky Very Large Array/Very Large Array observations of the northern head of the HH 80/81/80N jet, one of the largest collimated jet systems known so far, aimed to look for knots farther than HH 80N, the northern head of the jet. Aligned with the jet and 10' northeast of HH 80N, we found a radio source not reported before, with a negative spectral index similar to that of HH 80, HH 81, and HH 80N. The fit of a precessing jet model to the knots of the HH 80/81/80N jet, including the new source, shows that the position of this source is close to the jet path resulting from the modeling. If the new source belongs to the HH 80/81/80N jet, its derived size and dynamical age are 18.4 pc and >9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr, respectively. If the jet is symmetric, its southern lobe would expand beyond the cloud edge resulting in an asymmetric appearance of the jet. Based on the updated dynamical age, we speculate on the possibility that the HH 80/81/80N jet triggered the star formation observed in a dense core found ahead of HH 80N, which shows signposts of interaction with the jet. These results indicate that parsec-scale radio jets can play a role in the stability of dense clumps and the regulation of star formation in the molecular cloud.

  18. Material Disposal Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudgetMaterial Disposal Areas Material

  19. GUILLE-ESCURET, G. et HLADIK, C.M. (1990) --Products of the oil palm In : C.M. HLADIK, S. BAHUCHET et I. de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1990-01-01

    GUILLE-ESCURET, G. et HLADIK, C.M. (1990) -- Products of the oil palm In : C.M. HLADIK, S. BAHUCHET of production. Disnibution of the oil palm in Africa has been favoured by human activities. Schwartz(1) has African Republic, the most productive "wild" populations of oil palm are located on the sites of fonner

  20. Product Note Q, S, DEAE, CM Ceramic HyperD F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Product Note Q, S, DEAE, CM Ceramic HyperD® F Ion Exchange Sorbents · High dynamic binding capacity at high flow rates · Truly rigid, non-compressible sorbent · Salt tolerant CM Ceramic HyperD F sorbent, and CM Ceramic HyperD F ion exchangers are high capacity sorbents designed for efficient and scalable

  1. Heat Transfer -1 Consider a composite pipe of inner diameter 10 cm and outer diameter 10.6 cm subjected to an external

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a composite pipe of inner diameter 10 cm and outer diameter 10.6 cm subjected to an external constant uniform heat flux of 100,000 W/m2 . The composite material of the pipe has/mK in the axial direction. Both ends of the pipe are insulated from any heat loss. The pipe is cooled by water

  2. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications TheGashome /Areas Research Areas

  3. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 112: AREA 23 HAZARDOUS WASTE TRENCHES, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 2003 - SEPTEMBER 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit located in Area 23 of the NTS. This annual Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report provides the results of inspections and monitoring for CAU 112. This report includes a summary and analysis of the site inspections, repair and maintenance, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 112 for the current monitoring period, October 2003 through September 2004. Inspections of the CAU 112 RCRA unit were performed quarterly to identify any significant physical changes to the site that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit. The overall condition of the covers and facility was good, and no significant findings were observed. The annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted on August 23, 2004, and the results indicated that no cover subsidence4 has occurred at any of the markers. The elevations of the markers have been consistent for the past 11 years. The total precipitation for the current reporting period, october 2003 to September 2004, was 14.0 centimeters (cm) (5.5 inches [in]) (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, Special Operations and Research Division, 2004). This is slightly below the average rainfall of 14.7 cm (5.79 in) over the same period from 1972 to 2004. Post-closure monitoring verifies that the CAU 112 trench covers are performing properly and that no water is infiltrating into or out of the waste trenches. Sail moisture measurements are obtained in the soil directly beneath the trenches and compared to baseline conditions for the first year of post-closure monitoring, which began in october 1993. neutron logging was performed twice during this monitoring period along 30 neutron access tubes to obtain soil moisture data and detect any changes that may indicate moisture movement beneath each trench. Soil moisture results obtained to date indicate that the compliance criterion of less than 5% Residual Volumetric Moisture Content was met. Soil conditions remain dry and stable beneath the trenches, and the cover is functioning as designed within the compliance limits.

  4. TESTING AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NASA 5 CM BY 5 CM BI-SUPPORTED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS OPERATED IN BOTH FUEL CELL AND STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. C. O'Brien; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; X. Zhang; S. C. Farmer; T. L. Cable; J. A. Setlock

    2011-11-01

    A series of 5 cm by 5 cm bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 cm by 5 cm SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.

  5. High redshift signatures in the 21 cm forest due to cosmic string wakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroyuki Tashiro; Toyokazu Sekiguchi; Joseph Silk

    2013-10-15

    Cosmic strings induce minihalo formation in the early universe. The resultant minihalos cluster in string wakes and create a "21 cm forest" against the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum. Such a 21 cm forest can contribute to angular fluctuations of redshifted 21 cm signals integrated along the line of sight. We calculate the root-mean-square amplitude of the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings and show that these fluctuations can dominate signals from minihalos due to primordial density fluctuations at high redshift ($z \\gtrsim 10$), even if the string tension is below the current upper bound, $G \\mu Square Kilometre Array (SKA) can potentially detect the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings with $G \\mu \\approx 7.5 \\times 10^{-8}$ for the single frequency band case and $4.0 \\times 10^{-8}$ for the multi-frequency band case.

  6. High redshift signatures in the 21 cm forest due to cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Silk, Joseph E-mail: toyokazu.sekiguchi@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic strings induce minihalo formation in the early universe. The resultant minihalos cluster in string wakes and create a ''21 cm forest'' against the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum. Such a 21 cm forest can contribute to angular fluctuations of redshifted 21 cm signals integrated along the line of sight. We calculate the root-mean-square amplitude of the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings and show that these fluctuations can dominate signals from minihalos due to primordial density fluctuations at high redshift (z?>10), even if the string tension is below the current upper bound, G? < 1.5 × 10{sup ?7}. Our results also predict that the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) can potentially detect the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings with G? ? 7.5 × 10{sup ?8} for the single frequency band case and 4.0 × 10{sup ?8} for the multi-frequency band case.

  7. GeV electron beams from cm-scale channel guided laser wakefield accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    GeV electron beams from cm-scale channel guided laser wake?the generation of GeV-class electron beams using an intenseranges and high-quality electron beams with energy up to 1

  8. PAPER-64 CONSTRAINTS ON REIONIZATION: THE 21 cm POWER SPECTRUM AT z = 8.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zaki S.

    In this paper, we report new limits on 21 cm emission from cosmic reionization based on a 135 day observing campaign with a 64-element deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization ...

  9. Probing the epoch of reionization with redshifted 21 cm HI emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowman, Judd D. (Judd David)

    2007-01-01

    Emission and absorption features in the spectrum of the diffuse radio background below 200 MHz due to the 21 cm hyperfine transition line of neutral hydrogen gas in the high redshift intergalactic medium offer a new and ...

  10. Initial exploration of 21-cm cosmology with imaging and power spectra from the Murchison Widefield Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Christopher Leigh

    2012-01-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency radio array under construction in Western Australia with a primary goal of measuring the power spectrum of the 21-cm signal from neutral hydrogen during the Epoch ...

  11. Spin-orbit holds the heavyweight title for Pu and Am: Exchange regains it for Cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, K; der Laan, G v; Soderlind, P

    2008-01-10

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) The 5f electrons in Cm are near an LS coupling scheme. (2) This coupling scheme allows for a large spin polarization of the 5f electrons, which in turn stabilizes the Cm III crystal structure. (3) Results for Cm show us the recipe for magnetic stabilization of the crystal structure of metals: (A) The metal must be near the itinerant-localized transition where multiple crystal structures have close energies; (B) The metal is just on the magnetic side of the transition; and (C) There must be a magnetic moment large enough to overcome the energy difference between crystal structures, thus dictating the atomic geometry. (4) These results solidify our understanding of magnetically-stabilized metals, showing us where to look for engineered materials with magnetic applications.

  12. Mapping the Dynamics of Cold Gas around Sgr A* through 21 cm Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a circumnuclear stellar disk around Sgr A* and megamaser systems near other black holes indicates that dense neutral disks can be found in galactic nuclei. We show that depending on their inclination angle, optical depth, and spin temperature, these disks could be observed spectroscopically through 21 cm absorption. Related spectroscopic observations of Sgr A* can determine its HI disk parameters and the possible presence of gaps in the disk. Clumps of dense gas similar to the G2 could could also be detected in 21 cm absorption against the Sgr A* radio emission.

  13. UV pumping of hyperfine transitions in the light elements, with application to 21-cm hydrogen and 92-cm deuterium lines from the early universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonid Chuzhoy; Paul R. Shapiro

    2006-06-30

    We present new analytic calculations of the coupling between ultraviolet resonance photons and the population of the hyperfine states in the light elements (H, D, He3+) which include several previously neglected physical processes. Among these are the backreaction of resonant scattering on the pumping radiation, the scattering of Ly_beta photons and the effect of local departure from pure Hubble flow. The application of the new treatment to the redshifted hydrogen 21 and deuterium 92 cm lines from the high-redshift universe results in an amplitude correction of up to an order of magnitude. We further show that the standard assumption that ultraviolet pumping drives the spin temperature towards the kinetic temperature does not hold for deuterium, whose spin temperature is generally negative.

  14. Monte-Carlo simulations of polymer crystallization in dilute solution C.-M. Chena)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chi-Ming

    carbon atoms, and we also investigate chain folding of very long polymers. For monodisperse flexibleMonte-Carlo simulations of polymer crystallization in dilute solution C.-M. Chena) and Paul G Received 7 July 1997; accepted 8 December 1997 Polymer crystallization in dilute solution is studied

  15. C M Y CM MY CY CMY K Category: Geographic Information Systems/Oceanography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    C M Y CM MY CY CMY K Category: Geographic Information Systems/Oceanography The oceans of earth--71. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology is the engine at the heart of this digital revelation applications, a K­12 lesson plan, and other supplemental material. With a foreword by the National Geographic

  16. Fast Marching farthest point sampling Carsten Moenning (cm230@cl.cam.ac.uk)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodgson, Neil

    Fast Marching farthest point sampling Carsten Moenning (cm230@cl.cam.ac.uk) Neil A. Dodgson (nad@cl.cam.ac.uk) Introduction We introduce the Fast Marching farthest point sampling (FastFPS) approach for the progressive sampling of planar domains and curved manifolds in triangulated, point cloud or implicit form. We use Fast

  17. Chancellor's Memorandum CM-25 LSUHSC Policy on AIDS (HIV) and Hepatitis Virus (HBV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chancellor's Memorandum CM-25 ­ LSUHSC Policy on AIDS (HIV) and Hepatitis Virus (HBV) To: Vice Orleans Chancellor May 15, 2002 Individuals Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)/Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) It is a policy of LSUHSC to encourage preventive and early care

  18. Future Gemini Instrumentation F.C. Gillett and C.M. Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Gemini Instrumentation F.C. Gillett and C.M. Mountain Gemini 8m Telescopes Project, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson AZ 85719 Gemini Preprint # 35 #12; 2 Future Gemini Instrumentation ABSTRACT The following capabilities have been identified as high priority for future Gemini instrumentation. 1) A Natural

  19. Spectroscopy of formaldehyde in the 30140-30790cm^-1 range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motsch, Michael; Zeppenfeld, Martin; Schmitt, Michael; Meerts, W Leo; Pinkse, Pepijn W H; Rempe, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Room-temperature absorption spectroscopy of formaldehyde has been performed in the 30140-30790cm^-1 range. Using tunable ultraviolet continuous-wave laser light, individual rotational lines are well resolved in the Doppler-broadened spectrum. Making use of genetic algorithms, the main features of the spectrum are reproduced. Spectral data is made available as Supporting Information.

  20. Physics 343 Lecture # 2: Lab #1 & the HI 21cm line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    Physics 343 Lecture # 2: Lab #1 & the HI 21cm line #12; Lab and office hour schedules), 38 (sogg), 39 (pathan), 40 (qawasmi), 41 (ramekar) #12; Lab # 1: HI in earlytype galaxies You = detect (or place upper limit on) HI content of three earlytype (elliptical/lenticular) galaxies based

  1. Nuclear transparency in 90c.m. quasielastic A,,p,2p... reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Nelson

    Nuclear transparency in 90c.m. ° quasielastic A,,p,2p... reactions J. Aclander,7 J. Alster,7 G Synchrotron of BNL to measure the nuclear transparency of nuclei measured in the A p,2p quasielastic of the energy dependence of the nuclear transparency. In E850 the angular dependence of the nuclear transparency

  2. Abstract--Thirty-three skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) (53-73 cm fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    379 Abstract--Thirty-three skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) (53-73 cm fork length) were caught) Vertical movement patterns of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, California 92037-1508 Limited information on the vertical movements of skipjack tuna (Kat- suwonus pelamis

  3. Centrifugal Pump for a 20-m/s, 1-cm-Diameter Mercury Jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Centrifugal Pump for a 20-m/s, 1-cm-Diameter Mercury Jet Ernst de Haas, Kirk T. McDonald Joseph) centrifugal pump from R.S. Cor- coran, powered by a 20-hp, 480 V motor from Baldor. A photograph of this pump

  4. H I SHELLS AND SUPERSHELLS IN THE I-GALFA H I 21 cm LINE SURVEY. I. FAST-EXPANDING H I SHELLS ASSOCIATED WITH SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, G.; Koo, B.-C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Gibson, S. J.; Newton, J. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Kang, J.-H.; Lane, D. C.; Douglas, K. A. [Arecibo Observatory, HC 3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); Peek, J. E. G. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Korpela, E. J. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heiles, C., E-mail: koo@astro.snu.ac.kr [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We search for fast-expanding H I shells associated with Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) in the longitude range l ? 32° to 77° using 21 cm line data from the Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array (I-GALFA) H I survey. Among the 39 known Galactic SNRs in this region, we find such H I shells in 4 SNRs: W44, G54.4-0.3, W51C, and CTB 80. All four were previously identified in low-resolution surveys, and three of those (excluding G54.4-0.3) were previously studied with the Arecibo telescope. A remarkable new result, however, is the detection of H I emission at both very high positive and negative velocities in W44 from the receding and approaching parts of the H I expanding shell, respectively. This is the first detection of both sides of an expanding shell associated with an SNR in H I 21 cm emission. The high-resolution I-GALFA survey data also reveal a prominent expanding H I shell with high circular symmetry associated with G54.4-0.3. We explore the physical characteristics of four SNRs and discuss what differentiates them from other SNRs in the survey area. We conclude that these four SNRs are likely the remnants of core-collapse supernovae interacting with a relatively dense (?> 1 cm{sup –3}) ambient medium, and we discuss the visibility of SNRs in the H I 21 cm line.

  5. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  6. Nevada Test Site 2005 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Hudson, Cathy A. Wills

    2006-08-01

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2005 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (U.S. Department of Energy, 2005; Grossman, 2005; Bechtel Nevada, 2006). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure levels around the RWMSs are at or below background levels. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. There is no detectable man-made radioactivity by gamma spectroscopy, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits at the Area 3 RWMS. Measurements at the Area 5 RWMS show that radon flux from waste covers is no higher than natural radon flux from undisturbed soil in Area 5. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. Precipitation during 2005 totaled 219.1 millimeters (mm) (8.63 inches [in.]) at the Area 3 RWMS and 201.4 mm (7.93 in.) at the Area 5 RWMS. Soil-gas tritium monitoring continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Moisture from precipitation at Area 5 has percolated to the bottom of the bare-soil weighing lysimeter, but this same moisture has been removed from the vegetated weighing lysimeter by evapotranspiration. Vadose zone data from the operational waste pit covers show that precipitation from the fall of 2004 and the spring of 2005 infiltrated past the deepest sensors at 188 centimeters (6.2 feet) and remains in the pit cover. Precipitation did not infiltrate to the deepest sensor on the vegetated final cover at U-3ax/bl. Water drained from all Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received three times natural precipitation, but there was no drainage from the lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Biota monitoring data show that tritium is the primary radionuclide accessible to plants and animals. Other human-produced radionuclides in the tissues of plant and animal samples from both RWMSs were not found at concentrations higher than in biota samples collected at control locations. This suggests that sampled animals did not intrude into the waste and that waste did not move to where it is accessible to plants or animals.

  7. Abstract of the talk given at Luminy, June 18th, 2002: CM Periods and the anticyclotomic main conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hida, Haruzo

    and the anticyclotomic main conjecture Haruzo Hida1 Department of Mathematics, UCLA of the per* *iod 2ssi of the exponential function). The main conjecture in Iwasawa's theory pre- dicts to CM forms) and the anticyclotomic main conjecture for CM fields. If we could prove the integral CM

  8. 2Name ________________________________ Question 1: What is the usable area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the area of a satellite solar panel and estimate the total electrical power that can be generated. Students, the maximum panel area is 12,240 sq. cm, so (8100/12240)x100% = 66% of the panel is covered by solar cells shown below? Question 2: What electrical power can be generated by the panel? Question 3: If there are 8

  9. 7 -29 nm 29 -56 nm 56 -95 nm Particlenumberconcentration(#cm-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmén, Britt A.

    Freeway Stop-and-go ULSD n = 4 7 - 29 nm 29 - 56 nm 56 - 95 nm Pariclenumberconcentration,(#cm -3 ) 0 1e+5 2e+5 3e+5 4e+5 5e+5 Freeway Stop-and-go ULSD n = 4 Freeway Stop-and-go Particlenumberconcentration.4 miles ·Average speed: 30 mph · Fuel: ·Ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) ConclusionsConclusions ELPI

  10. Detecting the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect with high-redshift 21-cm surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Dai, Liang; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the possibility to detect the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect by cross-correlating 21-cm surveys at high redshifts with galaxies, in a way similar to the usual CMB-galaxy cross-correlation. The high-redshift 21-cm signal is dominated by CMB photons that travel freely without interacting with the intervening matter, and hence its late-time ISW signature should correlate extremely well with that of the CMB at its peak frequencies. Using the 21-cm temperature brightness instead of the CMB would thus be a further check of the detection of the ISW effect, measured by different instruments at different frequencies and suffering from different systematics. We also study the ISW effect on the photons that are scattered by HI clouds. We show that a detection of the unscattered photons is achievable with planned radio arrays, while one using scattered photons will require advanced radio interferometers, either an extended version of the planned Square Kilometre Array or futuristic experiments such as...

  11. 21 cm fluctuations from inhomogeneous X-ray heating before reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan R. Pritchard; Steven R. Furlanetto

    2007-01-17

    Many models of early structure formation predict a period of heating immediately preceding reionization, when X-rays raise the gas temperature above that of the cosmic microwave background. These X-rays are often assumed to heat the intergalactic medium (IGM) uniformly, but in reality they will heat the gas more strongly closer to the sources. We develop a framework for calculating fluctuations in the 21 cm brightness temperature that originate from this spatial variation in the heating rate. High-redshift sources are highly clustered, leading to significant gas temperature fluctuations (with fractional variations ~40%, peaking on k~0.1 Mpc^{-1} scales). This induces a distinctive peak-trough structure in the angle-averaged 21 cm power spectrum, which may be accessible to the proposed Square Kilometre Array. This signal reaches the ~10 mK level, and is stronger than that induced by Lyman alpha flux fluctuations. As well as probing the thermal evolution of the IGM before reionization, this 21 cm signal contains information about the spectra of the first X-ray sources. Finally, we consider disentangling temperature, density and Lyman alpha flux fluctuations as functions of redshift.

  12. Dark matter annihilation and its effect on CMB and Hydrogen 21 cm observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natarajan, Aravind

    2009-01-01

    If dark matter is made up of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, the annihilation of these particles in halos results in energy being released, some of which is absorbed by gas, causing partial ionization and heating. It is shown that early ionization results in a transfer of power to higher multipoles in the large angle CMB polarization power spectra. Future CMB experiments may be able to detect this effect in the case of certain light dark matter models. We also investigate the effect of gas heating on the expected H21 cm power spectrum. Heating by particle annihilation results in a decrease in the amplitude of the H21 cm power spectrum as the gas temperature $T$ becomes comparable to the CMB temperature $T_\\gamma$, and then an increase as $T > T_\\gamma$. The result is a minimum in the power spectrum at the redshift for which $T \\approx T_\\gamma$. Only certain models (low particle masses $\\sim$ 10 GeV, or favorable halo parameters) show this effect. Within these models, observations of the H21 cm power sp...

  13. Cosmic Reionization On Computers. Mean and Fluctuating Redshifted 21 cm Signal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaurov, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    We explore the mean and fluctuating redshifted 21 cm signal in numerical simulations of cosmic reionization from the Cosmic Reionization On Computers (CROC) project. We find that the mean signal varies between about $\\pm20\\rm{mK}$. Most significantly, we find that the negative pre-reionization dip at $z\\sim10-15$ only extends to $\\langle\\Delta T_B\\rangle\\sim-20\\rm{mK}$, in agreement with prior simulation results and in significant contrast to Pritchard & Loeb analytical model, requiring substantially higher sensitivity from global signal experiments that operate in this redshift range (EDGES-II, LEDA, SCI-HI, and DARE). We also explore the role of dense substructure (filaments and embedded galaxies) in the formation of 21 cm power spectrum. We find that by neglecting the semi-neutral substructure inside ionized bubbles, the power spectrum can be mis-estimated by 25-50\\% at scales $k\\sim 0.1-1h\\rm{Mpc}^{-1}$. This scale range is of a particular interest, because the upcoming 21 cm experiments (MWA, PAPER, ...

  14. The imprint of the cosmic supermassive black hole growth history on the 21 cm background radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Takamitsu L; Perna, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    The redshifted 21 cm transition line of hydrogen tracks the thermal evolution of the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) at "cosmic dawn," during the emergence of the first luminous astrophysical objects (~100 Myr after the Big Bang) but before these objects ionized the IGM (~400-800 Myr after the Big Bang). Because X-rays, in particular, are likely to be the chief energy courier for heating the IGM, measurements of the 21 cm signature can be used to infer knowledge about the first astrophysical X-ray sources. Using analytic arguments and a numerical population synthesis algorithm, we argue that the progenitors of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) should be the dominant source of hard astrophysical X-rays---and thus the primary driver of IGM heating and the 21 cm signature---at redshifts $z 20$. An absence of such a signature in the forthcoming observational data would imply that SMBH formation occurred later (e.g. via so-called direct collapse scenarios), that it was not a common occurrence in early galaxies ...

  15. Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomplun, Marc

    Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION Advancing Area Activation towards a General Model at Boston 100 Morrissey Boulevard Boston, MA 02125-3393 USA Phone: 617-287-6485 Fax: 617-287-6433 e. Without great effort, human observers clearly outperform every current artificial vision system in tasks

  16. H I 21 cm ABSORPTION AND UNIFIED SCHEMES OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2010-03-20

    In a recent study of z >= 0.1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we found that 21 cm absorption has never been detected in objects in which the ultraviolet luminosity exceeds L{sub UV} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}. In this paper, we further explore the implications that this has for the currently popular consensus that it is the orientation of the circumnuclear obscuring torus, invoked by unified schemes of AGNs, which determines whether absorption is present along our sight line. The fact that at L{sub UV} {approx}< 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}, both type-1 and type-2 objects exhibit a 50% probability of detection, suggests that this is not the case and that the bias against detection of H I absorption in type-1 objects is due purely to the inclusion of the L{sub UV} {approx}> 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1} sources. Similarly, the ultraviolet luminosities can also explain why the presence of 21 cm absorption shows a preference for radio galaxies over quasars and the higher detection rate in compact sources, such as compact steep spectrum or gigahertz peaked spectrum sources, may also be biased by the inclusion of high-luminosity sources. Being comprised of all 21 cm searched sources at z >= 0.1, this is a necessarily heterogeneous sample, the constituents of which have been observed by various instruments. By this same token, however, the dependence on the UV luminosity may be an all encompassing effect, superseding the unified schemes model, although there is the possibility that the exclusive 21 cm non-detections at high UV luminosities could be caused by a bias toward gas-poor ellipticals. Additionally, the high UV fluxes could be sufficiently exciting/ionizing the H I above 21 cm detection thresholds, although the extent to which this is related to the neutral gas deficit in ellipticals is currently unclear. Examining the moderate UV luminosity (L{sub UV} {approx}< 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}) sample further, from the profile widths and offsets from the systemic velocities, we find no discernible differences between the two AGN types. This may suggest that the bulk of the absorption generally occurs in the galactic disk, which must therefore be randomly orientated with respect to the circumnuclear torus. Furthermore, we see no difference in the reddening between the two AGN types, indicating, like the 21 cm absorption, that the orientation of the torus has little bearing on this. We also find a correlation between 21 cm line strength and the optical-near-infrared color, which suggests that the reddening is caused by dust located in the large-scale, H I absorbing disk which intervenes the sight line to the AGN.

  17. Utilization of Local Law Enforcement Aerial Resources in Consequence Management (CM) Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasiolek, Piotr T.; Malchow, Russell L.

    2013-03-12

    During the past decade the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was instrumental in enhancing the nation’s ability to detect and prevent a radiological or nuclear attack in the highest risk cities. Under the DHS Securing the Cities initiative, nearly 13,000 personnel in the New York City region have been trained in preventive radiological and nuclear detection operations, and nearly 8,500 pieces of radiological detection equipment have been funded. As part of the preventive radiological/nuclear detection (PRND) mission, several cities have received funding to purchase commercial aerial radiation detection systems. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Aerial Measuring System (AMS) program started providing Mobile Aerial Radiological Surveillance (MARS) training to such assets, resulting in over 150 HAZMAT teams’ officers and pilots from 10 law enforcement organizations and fire departments being trained in the aerial radiation detection. From the beginning, the MARS training course covered both the PRND and consequence management (CM) missions. Even if the law enforcement main focus is PRND, their aerial assets can be utilized in the collection of initial radiation data for post-event radiological CM response. Based on over 50 years of AMS operational experience and information collected during MARS training, this presentation will focus on the concepts of CM response using aerial assets as well as utilizing law enforcement/fire department aerial assets in CM. Also discussed will be the need for establishing closer relationships between local jurisdictions’ aerial radiation detection capabilities and state and local radiation control program directors, radiological health department managers, etc. During radiological events these individuals may become primary experts/advisers to Incident Commanders for radiological emergency response, especially in the early stages of a response. The knowledge of the existence, specific capabilities, and use of local aerial radiation detection systems would be critical in planning the response, even before federal assets arrive on the scene. The relationship between local and federal aerial assets and the potential role for the further use of the MARS training and expanded AMS Reachback capabilities in facilitating such interactions will be discussed.

  18. The 21cm power spectrum and the shapes of non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chongchitnan, Sirichai

    2013-03-01

    We consider how measurements of the 21cm radiation from the epoch of reionization (z = 8?12) can constrain the amplitudes of various 'shapes' of primordial non-Gaussianity. The limits on these shapes, each parametrized by the non-linear parameter f{sub NL}, can reveal whether the physics of inflation is more complex than the standard single-field, slow-roll scenario. In this work, we quantify the effects of the well-known local, equilateral, orthogonal and folded types of non-Gaussianities on the 21cm power spectrum, which is expected to be measured by upcoming radio arrays such as the Square-Kilometre Array (SKA). We also assess the prospects of the SKA in constraining these non-Gaussianities, and found constraints that are comparable with those from cosmic-microwave-background experiments such as Planck. We show that the limits on various f{sub NL} can be tightened to O(1) using a radio array with a futuristic but realistic set of specifications.

  19. Limits on Variations in Fundamental Constants from 21-cm and Ultraviolet Quasar Absorption Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Webb, J.K.; Flambaum, V.V.; Curran, S.J.; Murphy, M.T.

    2005-07-22

    Quasar absorption spectra at 21-cm and UV rest wavelengths are used to estimate the time variation of x{identical_to}{alpha}{sup 2}g{sub p}{mu}, where {alpha} is the fine structure constant, g{sub p} the proton g factor, and m{sub e}/m{sub p}{identical_to}{mu} the electron/proton mass ratio. Over a redshift range 0.24 < or approx. z{sub abs} < or approx. 2.04, <{delta}x/x>{sub total}{sup weighted}=(1.17{+-}1.01)x10{sup -5}. A linear fit gives x/x=(-1.43{+-}1.27)x10{sup -15} yr{sup -1}. Two previous results on varying {alpha} yield the strong limits {delta}{mu}/{mu}=(2.31{+-}1.03)x10{sup -5} and {delta}{mu}/{mu}=(1.29{+-}1.01)x10{sup -5}. Our sample, 8x larger than any previous, provides the first direct estimate of the intrinsic 21-cm and UV velocity differences {approx}6 km s{sup -1}.

  20. Constraints on the neutrino parameters by future cosmological 21cm line and precise CMB polarization observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshihiko Oyama; Kazunori Kohri; Masashi Hazumi

    2015-10-13

    Observations of the 21 cm line radiation coming from the epoch of reionization have a great capacity to study the cosmological growth of the Universe. Also, CMB polarization produced by gravitational lensing has a large amount of information about the growth of matter fluctuations at late time. In this paper, we investigate their sensitivities to the impact of neutrino property on the growth of density fluctuations, such as the total neutrino mass, the effective number of neutrino species (extra radiation), and the neutrino mass hierarchy. We will show that by combining a precise CMB polarization observations such as Simons Array with a 21 cm line observation such as Square kilometer Array (SKA) phase 1 and a baryon acoustic oscillation observation (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument:DESI) we can measure effects of non-zero neutrino mass on the growth of density fluctuation if the total neutrino mass is larger than 0.1eV. Additionally, the combinations can strongly improve errors of the bounds on the effective number of neutrino species sigma(N_nu) ~ 0.06-0.09 at 95 % C.L.. Finally, by using SKA phase 2, we can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at 95 % C.L. if the total neutrino mass is similar to or smaller than 0.1 eV.

  1. Constraints on the neutrino parameters by future cosmological 21cm line and precise CMB polarization observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyama, Yoshihiko; Hazumi, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the 21 cm line radiation coming from the epoch of reionization have a great capacity to study the cosmological growth of the Universe. Also, CMB polarization produced by gravitational lensing has a large amount of information about the growth of matter fluctuations at late time. In this paper, we investigate their sensitivities to the impact of neutrino property on the growth of density fluctuations, such as the total neutrino mass, the effective number of neutrino species (extra radiation), and the neutrino mass hierarchy. We will show that by combining a precise CMB polarization observations such as Simons Array with a 21 cm line observation such as Square kilometer Array (SKA) phase 1 and a baryon acoustic oscillation observation (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument:DESI) we can measure effects of non-zero neutrino mass on the growth of density fluctuation if the total neutrino mass is larger than 0.1eV. Additionally, the combinations can strongly improve errors of the bounds on the effect...

  2. Cosmological signatures of tilted isocurvature perturbations: reionization and 21cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Silk, Joseph E-mail: hiroyuki.tashiro@asu.edu E-mail: naoshi@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-03-01

    We investigate cosmological signatures of uncorrelated isocurvature perturbations whose power spectrum is blue-tilted with spectral index 2?cm line fluctuations due to neutral hydrogens in minihalos. Combination of measurements of the reionization optical depth and 21cm line fluctuations will provide complementary probes of a highly blue-tilted isocurvature power spectrum.

  3. IDS120j WITHOUT RESISTIVE MAGNETS ( 20 cm GAPS AND 15.8 g/cc W BEADS )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ;IDS120j: REPLACING RESISTIVE MAGNETS AND FILLING UPPER HALF OF Hg POOL WITH SHIELDING. GENERAL OVERVIEW (LEFT), POOL REGION DETAILS (RIGHT). [20 cm GAPS] SH#1 SH#1 SH#1A SH#2 SH#1A Hg POOL SH#4 SH#3 Hg POOL SH#1 2 cm THICK STST OUTER TUBE CRYO#1 CRYO#4CRYO#3 CRYO#2 2 cm THICK STST BEAM PIPE BEAM PIPE

  4. The 21 cm Signature of Shock Heated and Diffuse Cosmic String Wakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oscar F. Hernandez; Robert H. Brandenberger

    2012-07-31

    The analysis of the 21 cm signature of cosmic string wakes is extended in several ways. First we consider the constraints on $G\\mu$ from the absorption signal of shock heated wakes laid down much later than matter radiation equality. Secondly we analyze the signal of diffuse wake, that is those wakes in which there is a baryon overdensity but which have not shock heated. Finally we compare the size of these signals compared to the expected thermal noise per pixel which dominates over the background cosmic gas brightness temperature and find that the cosmic string signal will exceed the thermal noise of an individual pixel in the Square Kilometre Array for string tensions $G\\mu > 2.5 \\times 10^{-8}$.

  5. Single-shot hyperspectral coherent Raman planar imaging in the range 0–4200 cm

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2014-10-20

    We propose a technique for ultrabroadband planar coherent Raman spectroscopy that enables wideband chemically selective mapping of molecular partition functions in the gas-phase within a single-laser-shot. A spectral region spanning 0–4200 cm?¹ is excited simultaneously, in principle allowing for coherent planar imaging of most all fundamental Raman-active modes. This unique instantaneous and spatially correlated assessment enables multiplexed studies of transient dynamical systems in a two-dimensional (2D) field. Here, we demonstrate single-laser-shot high temperature diagnostics of H?, with spatially resolved 2D measurement of transitions of both the pure-rotational H? S-branch and the vibrational H? Q-branch, analyzing the temperature contour of amore »reacting fuel-species as it evolves at a flame-front.« less

  6. The 21 cm signature of shock heated and diffuse cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernández, Oscar F.; Brandenberger, Robert H. E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2012-07-01

    The analysis of the 21 cm signature of cosmic string wakes is extended in several ways. First we consider the constraints on G? from the absorption signal of shock heated wakes laid down much later than matter radiation equality. Secondly we analyze the signal of diffuse wake, that is those wakes in which there is a baryon overdensity but which have not shock heated. Finally we compare the size of these signals to the expected thermal noise per pixel which dominates over the background cosmic gas brightness temperature and find that the cosmic string signal will exceed the thermal noise of an individual pixel in the Square Kilometre Array for string tensions G? > 2.5 × 10{sup ?8}.

  7. Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codron, Francis

    Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5 J relevant to the climate system, it may be referred to as an Earth System Model. However, the IPSL-CM5 model climate and Earth System Models, both developed in France and contributing to the 5th coupled model

  8. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Quigley, Gerard P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm.sup.2 emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm.sup.2 at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing.

  9. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

    1996-12-17

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

  10. 21 cm signal from cosmic dawn: Imprints of spin temperature fluctuations and peculiar velocities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghara, Raghunath; Datta, Kanan K

    2014-01-01

    Observations of fluctuations in the 21 cm brightness temperature $\\delta T_b$ from reionization promise to provide information on the physical processes during that epoch. We present a formalism for generating the distribution of $\\delta T_b$ using dark matter $N$-body simulations and an one-dimensional radiative transfer code. The spectral energy distribution of the radiation sources is assumed to consist of a stellar-like and a mini-quasar like component. Our analysis is able to take into account the fluctuations in the spin temperature $T_S$ of neutral hydrogen arising from inhomogeneous X-ray heating and Ly$\\alpha$ coupling during cosmic dawn. We find that the power spectrum at large scales ($k \\sim 0.1$ Mpc$^{-1}$), when plotted as a function of redshift, shows three peaks. The middle peak has the largest amplitude and occurs when $\\sim 10\\%$ of the gas (by volume) is heated above the CMB temperature, irrespective of the X-ray source properties. The power spectrum when plotted against $k$ shows a "bump"-...

  11. TWO LOCAL VOLUME DWARF GALAXIES DISCOVERED IN 21 cm EMISSION: PISCES A AND B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E.; Stern, Daniel E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu E-mail: mputman@astro.columbia.edu

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of two dwarf galaxies, Pisces A and B, from a blind 21 cm H I search. These were the only two galaxies found via optical imaging and spectroscopy of 22 H I clouds identified in the GALFA-H I survey as dwarf galaxy candidates. They have properties consistent with being in the Local Volume (<10 Mpc), and one has resolved stellar populations such that it may be on the outer edge of the Local Group (?1 Mpc from M31). While the distance uncertainty makes interpretation ambiguous, these may be among the faintest star-forming galaxies known. Additionally, rough estimates comparing these galaxies to ?CDM dark matter simulations suggest consistency in number density, implying that the dark matter halos likely to host these galaxies are primarily H I-rich. The galaxies may thus be indicative of a large population of dwarfs at the limit of detectability that are comparable to the faint satellites of the Local Group. Because they are outside the influence of a large dark matter halo to alter their evolution, these galaxies can provide critical anchors to dwarf galaxy formation models.

  12. Simulating the 21-cm signal from reionisation including non-linear ionisations and inhomogeneous recombinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan, Sultan; Finlator, Kristian; Santos, Mario G

    2015-01-01

    We explore the impact of incorporating physically motivated ionisation and recombination rates on the history and topology of cosmic reionisation, by incorporating inputs from small-volume hydrodynamic simulations into a semi-numerical code, SimFast21, that evolves reionisation on large scales. We employ radiative hydrodynamic simulations to parameterize the ionisation rate Rion and recombination rate Rrec as functions of halo mass, overdensity and redshift. We find that Rion is super-linearly dependent on halo mass (Rion ~ Mh^1.41), in contrast to previous assumptions. We implement these scalings into SimFast21 to identify the ionized regions. We tune our models to be consistent with recent observations of the optical depth, ionizing emissivity, and neutral fraction by the end of reionisation. We require an average photon escape fraction fesc=0.04 within ~ 0.5 cMpc cells, independent of halo mass or redshift, to simultaneously match these data. We present predictions for the 21cm power spectrum, and show tha...

  13. 21-cm signal from cosmic dawn - II: Imprints of the light-cone effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghara, Raghunath; Choudhury, T Roy

    2015-01-01

    Details of various unknown physical processes during the cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization can be extracted from observations of the redshifted 21-cm signal. These observations, however, will be affected by the evolution of the signal along the line-of-sight which is known as the "light-cone effect". We model this effect by post-processing a dark matter $N-$body simulation with a 1-D radiative transfer code. We find that the effect is much stronger and dramatic in presence of inhomogeneous heating and Ly$\\alpha$ coupling compared to the case where these processes are not accounted for. One finds increase (decrease) in the coeval spherically averaged power spectrum up to a factor of 3 (0.6) at large scales ($k \\sim 0.05\\, \\rm Mpc^{-1}$), though these numbers are highly dependent on the source model. Consequently, the peak and trough-like features seen in the evolution of the large-scale power spectrum can be smoothed out to a large extent if the width of the frequency bands used in the experiment is la...

  14. Size and spacial distribution of micropores in SBA-15 using CM-SANS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, Rachel A; Walsh, Brenna R; Fry, Jason A; Ghampson, Tyrone; Centikol, Ozgul; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Kaiser, Helmut; Pynn, Roger; Frederick, Brian G

    2011-01-01

    Diffraction intensity analysis of small-angle neutron scattering measurements of dry SBA-15 have been combined with nonlocal density functional theory (NLDFT) analysis of nitrogen desorption isotherms to characterize the micropore, secondary mesopore, and primary mesopore structure. The radial dependence of the scattering length density, which is sensitive to isolated surface hydroxyls, can only be modeled if the NLDFT pore size distribution is distributed relatively uniformly throughout the silica framework, not localized in a 'corona' around the primary mesopores. Contrast matching-small angle neutron scattering (CM-SANS) measurements, using water, decane, tributylamine, cyclohexane, and isooctane as direct probes of the size of micropores indicate that the smallest pores in SBA-15 have diameter between 5.7 and 6.2 {angstrom}. Correlation of the minimum pore size with the onset of the micropore size distribution provides direct evidence that the shape of the smallest micropores is cylinderlike, which is consistent with their being due to unraveling of the polymer template.

  15. Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit 51, CC in GIS; Cowen, David; Ferguson, Warren

    1990-01-01

    51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS1990 Page 1 Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas Computers inyour students. UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS Compiled with

  16. Joint Symposium of ICA Working Group on CEWaCM and JBGIS Gi4DM Cartography and Geoinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    Joint Symposium of ICA Working Group on CEWaCM and JBGIS Gi4DM Cartography and Geoinformatics://c4c.geogr.muni.cz #12;CARTOGRAPHY AND GEOINFORMATICS FOR EARLY WARNING AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

  17. Coupling of a regional atmospheric model (RegCM3) and a regional oceanic model (FVCOM) over the maritime continent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun

    Climatological high resolution coupled climate model simulations for the maritime continent have been carried out using the regional climate model (RegCM) version 3 and the finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) ...

  18. It's always darkest before the cosmic dawn : early results from novel tools and telescopes for 21 cm cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Joshua Shane

    2015-01-01

    21 cm cosmology, the statistical observation of the high redshift universe using the hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen, has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of cosmology and the astrophysical processes ...

  19. Nevada National Security Site 2011 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-07-31

    Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2011 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. During the last 2 weeks of March 2011, gamma spectroscopy results for air particles showed measurable activities of iodine-131 (131I), cesium-134 (134Cs), and cesium-137 (137Cs). These results are attributed to the release of fission products from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi power plant in Japan. The remaining gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below minimum detectable concentrations. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. The 86.3 millimeters (mm) (3.40 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2011 is 44% below the average of 154.1 mm (6.07 in.), and the 64.8 mm (2.55 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2011 is 47% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 RWMS operational waste covers was not done during 2011 due to construction of the final evapotranspiration cover at these monitoring locations. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 122 centimeters (4 feet) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2011, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 feet) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Ten percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2011 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  20. Examination of Organic Carryover from 2-cm Contactors to Support the Modular CSSX Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, Charles A.; Norato, Michael A.; Walker; D. Douglas; Pierce, Robert A.; Eubanks, Ronnye A.; Clark, James D.; Smith, Wilson M. Jr.; Crump, Stephen L.; Nelson, D. Zane; Fink, Samuel D.; Peters, Thomas B.; May, Cecil G.; Herman, David T.; Bolton, Henry L.

    2005-04-29

    A bank of four 2-cm centrifugal contactors was operated in countercurrent fashion to help address questions about organic carryover for the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). The contactors, having weirs sized for strip operation, were used to examine carryover for both strip effluent (SE) and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). Since only one bank of contactors was available in the short time frame of this work, the organic phase and only one aqueous phase were present in the flow loops at a time. Personnel maintained flowsheet-typical organic phase to aqueous phase (O:A) flow ratios when varying flow rates. Solvent from two different batches were tested with strip solution. In addition, potential mitigations of pH adjustment and coalescing media were examined. The experiment found that organic carryover after decanting averaged 220 ppm by mass with a range of 74 to 417 ppm of Isopar{reg_sign} L for strip effluent (SE)/organic solvent contacts. These values are based on measured modifier. Values were bounded by a value of 95 ppm based upon Isopar{reg_sign} L values as reported. The higher modifier-based numbers are considered more reliable at this time. Carryover of Isopar{reg_sign} L in DSS simulant averaged 77 ppm by mass with a range of 70 to 88 ppm of Isopar{reg_sign} L based on modifier content. The carryover was bounded by a value of 19 ppm based upon Isopar{reg_sign} L values as reported. More work is needed to resolve the discrepancy between modifier and Isopar{reg_sign} L values. The work did not detect organic droplets greater than 18 microns in SE. Strip output contained droplets down to 0.5 micron in size. Droplets in DSS were almost monodisperse by comparison, having a size range 4.7 +/- 1.6 micron in one test and 5.2 +/- 0.8 micron in the second demonstration. Optical microscopy provided qualitative results confirming the integrity of droplet size measurements in this work. Acidic or basic adjustments of aqueous strip solution from pH 3 to 1 and from pH 3 to 11 were not effective in clarifying the aqueous dispersions of organic droplets. Use of a 0.7-micron rated glass fiber filter of 3/4 mm thickness under gravity flow provided significant reduction in organic content and increased clarity. A 2 inch element stack of ''Teflon{reg_sign} Fiber Interceptor-Pak{trademark}'' media from ACS Separations, Inc. was not effective in clarifying DSS simulant.

  1. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and roads The spatial location and boundaries for each Site shown on the Site Monitoring Area maps originate from activities conducted under the Compliance Order on Consent with...

  2. Research Highlights Sorted by Research Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday Production of SOA in UrbanArctic Haze:IceResearch Area

  3. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience 28 (2010) 259270 259 DOI 10.3233/RNN-2010-0488

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark

    2010-01-01

    ; kHz: kilohertz; LED: light emitting diode; cd: candela; m: meter; cm: centimeter; ms: millisecond; d

  4. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Ordovician shale quartzite MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest...

  5. Neutron Science Research Areas | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home | Science & Discovery | Neutron Science | Research Areas SHARE Research Areas Neutron scattering research at ORNL covers four broad research areas: biology and soft...

  6. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatridge, Michael J.

    2010-06-28

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  7. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatridge, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    referred to as B p , B evo , and B 0 respectively. Theramped to a …eld strength B evo B p , where the spins arefor a period of time t evo . Finally, the …eld is again

  8. C.M. Waluda P.G. Rodhouse G.P. Podesta P.N. Trathan G.J. Pierce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Graham

    -Verlag 2001 Abstract Interannual variability in the mesoscale ocean- ography of the inferred hatching area variability in the mesoscale oceanic circulation in the inferred hatching area was examined in terms of (1

  9. Strategic Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhoton Source Parameters StorageHeatStrategic Focus

  10. Sweet Surface Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production 1:Physics Lab AprilSustainabilityS ISweet

  11. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3 Outlook forSimulationsSite Map TUNLMaps

  12. Geographic Area Month

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Fuels by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for...

  13. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  14. Fire patterns in central semiarid Argentina M.A. Fischer a,*, C.M. Di Bella a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Fire patterns in central semiarid Argentina M.A. Fischer a,*, C.M. Di Bella a,b , E.G. Jobbágy b Cabañas S/N, Hurlingham (1686), Buenos Aires, Argentina b Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina c Grupo de Estudios Ambientales e IMASL, Universidad Nacional de San

  15. 45cm long compression-molded polymer-based optical bus Ray T. Chen and Suning Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    45cm long compression-molded polymer-based optical bus Ray T. Chen and Suning Tang Microelectronics of an optical bus using compression-molding technique. The linear dimension of such a waveguide is well beyond to determine the optimal dimension of the molding tool design for single- and multimode waveguides. A molded

  16. 1IWF/AW GRAZ LOFAR Carpathian Mountain (CM) stationLSS Workshop, Paris 1718 Jan. 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    1IWF/ÖAW GRAZ LOFAR Carpathian Mountain (CM) stationLSS Workshop, Paris 1718 Jan. 2008 Roger Investigations, Kosivska Poliana, Ukraine #12;2IWF/ÖAW GRAZ Ukrainian Carpathian mountainsLSS Workshop, Paris 1718 Jan. 2008 .Rakhiv #12;3IWF/ÖAW GRAZ Ukrainian Carpathian mountainsLSS Workshop, Paris 1718 Jan

  17. NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: 109, 341-349 (1991) Fission Cross-Section Measurements of 247Cm,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    1991-01-01

    -- NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: 109, 341-349 (1991) Fission Cross-Section Measurements of 247Cm Polytechnic Institute, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics Gaerttner Linac Laboratory Alamos, New Mexico 87451 Received September 21, 1990 Accepted June 4, 1991 Abstract- The fission cross

  18. COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM February 2006/Vol. 49, No. 2 41 CM's study of the offshoring of software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM February 2006/Vol. 49, No. 2 41 A CM's study of the offshoring types of jobs to offshoring, but it can also be harmed through unwise policies about federal investment in education and research in restricting foreign stu- dents. Even if a nation as a whole gains from offshoring

  19. COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM August 2005/Vol. 48, No. 8 29 CM, IEEE/CS, and USENIX organize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM August 2005/Vol. 48, No. 8 29 A CM, IEEE/CS, and USENIX organize. This col- umn discusses what I learned about the advantages of using ACM. My introduction to the topic came- ence attendees in the ele- vator recognized me as ACM's President, so I became an instant and captive

  20. CM165A-01 ACM-TRANSACTION September 15, 2003 16:34 Efficient Multiply-with-Carry Random Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goresky, Mark

    P1: GDP CM165A-01 ACM-TRANSACTION September 15, 2003 16:34 Efficient Multiply-with-Carry Random. Copyrights for components of this work owned by others than ACM must be honored. Abstracting with credit be requested from Publications Dept., ACM, Inc., 1515 Broadway, New York, NY 10036 USA, fax: +1 (212) 869

  1. COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM October 2004/Vol. 47, No. 10 19 CM provides a large number of online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM October 2004/Vol. 47, No. 10 19 A CM provides a large number of online something you'd like to read and don't recall your ACM login and password, just follow the friendly links on portal.acm.org to establish a new account. An email verification will then be sent to you to activate

  2. Hard-molded 51 cm long waveguide array with a 150 GHz bandwidth for board-level optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wei

    Hard-molded 51 cm long waveguide array with a 150 GHz bandwidth for board-level optical fabricated by silicon hard-molding technology. To reduce the silicon sidewall roughness, a wet-producible, and high-quality optical layers. We previously demonstrated a soft-molded waveguide layer with 45° coupling

  3. Energy of the quasi-free electron in supercritical argon near the critical point C.M. Evans1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Energy of the quasi-free electron in supercritical argon near the critical point C.M. Evans1 to the interaction between argon and the quasi-free electron arising from field ionization of the dopant. The energy by the ionic core, V0(P) is the quasi-free electron energy in the perturbing medium, and P is the perturber

  4. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  5. THE IMPACT OF THE SUPERSONIC BARYON-DARK MATTER VELOCITY DIFFERENCE ON THE z {approx} 20 21 cm BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McQuinn, Matthew; O'Leary, Ryan M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    Recently, Tseliakhovich and Hirata showed that during the cosmic Dark Ages the baryons were typically moving supersonically with respect to the dark matter with a spatially variable Mach number. Such supersonic motion may source shocks that inhomogeneously heat the universe. This motion may also suppress star formation in the first halos. Even a small amount of coupling of the 21 cm signal to this motion has the potential to vastly enhance the 21 cm brightness temperature fluctuations at 15 {approx}< z {approx}< 40, as well as to imprint distinctive acoustic oscillations in this signal. We present estimates for the size of this coupling, which we calibrate with a suite of cosmological simulations of the high-redshift universe using the GADGET and Enzo codes. Our simulations, discussed in detail in a companion paper, are initialized to self-consistently account for gas pressure and the dark matter-baryon relative velocity, v {sub bc} (in contrast to prior simulations). We find that the supersonic velocity difference dramatically suppresses structure formation on 10-100 comoving kpc scales, it sources shocks throughout the universe, and it impacts the accretion of gas onto the first star-forming minihalos (even for halo masses as large as 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }). However, prior to reheating by astrophysical sources, we find that the v {sub bc}-sourced temperature fluctuations can contribute only as much as Almost-Equal-To 10% of the fluctuations in the 21 cm signal. We do find that v {sub bc} in certain scenarios could source an O(1) component in the power spectrum of the 21 cm background on observable scales via the X-ray (but not ultraviolet) backgrounds produced once the first stars formed. In a scenario in which {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub Sun} minihalos reheated the universe via their X-ray backgrounds, we find that the pre-reionization 21 cm signal would be larger than previously anticipated and exhibit more significant acoustic features. Such features would be a direct probe of the first stars and black holes. In addition, we show that structure formation shocks are unable to heat the universe sufficiently to erase a strong 21 cm absorption trough at z {approx} 20 that is found in most models of the sky-averaged 21 cm intensity.

  6. IDS120h: PROTON P0-P14 TRAJECTORY FOOTPRINT AT z = -37.5, -10, 0, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 550 cm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SOLENOID FURTHER AWAY FROM Hg POOL GAP, JET AND PROTON BEAM 3 #12;IDS120h: PROTON 3D TRAJECTORY FROM Z = -300 cm USING P12 OPTIMIZED INITIAL POINT WITH POOL WALLS AT x = +/-40 cm, POOL GAP WALLS AT x = +/-6.077835, -0.028829, 0.996549) 4 FOR POOL WALLS AT x = +/- 40 cm PROTONS STOPPED BY THE z = 550 cm POOL WALL

  7. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  8. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  9. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  10. A laser frequency comb that enables radial velocity measurements with a precision of 1 cm s$^{-1}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chih-Hao Li; Andrew J. Benedick; Peter Fendel; Alexander G. Glenday; Franz X. Kaertner; David F. Phillips; Dimitar Sasselov; Andrew Szentgyorgyi; Ronald L. Walsworth

    2008-04-07

    Searches for extrasolar planets using the periodic Doppler shift of stellar spectral lines have recently achieved a precision of 60 cm/s (ref 1), which is sufficient to find a 5-Earth-mass planet in a Mercury-like orbit around a Sun-like star. To find a 1-Earth-mass planet in an Earthlike orbit, a precision of 5 cm/s is necessary. The combination of a laser frequency comb with a Fabry-Perot filtering cavity has been suggested as a promising approach to achieve such Doppler shift resolution via improved spectrograph wavelength calibration, with recent encouraging results. Here we report the fabrication of such a filtered laser comb with up to 40- GHz (1-A) line spacing, generated from a 1- GHz repetition-rate source, without compromising long-term stability, reproducibility or spectral resolution. This wide-line-spacing comb, or `astro-comb', is well matched to the resolving power of high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs. The astro-comb should allow a precision as high as 1 cm/s in astronomical radial velocity measurements.

  11. Combined Ethanol Injection Therapy and Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy in Percutaneous Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Larger than 4 cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vallone, Paolo; Catalano, Orlando [National Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology (Italy)], E-mail: orlandcat@tin.it; Izzo, Francesco [National Cancer Institute, Department of Surgical Oncology 'D' (Italy); Siani, Alfredo [National Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology (Italy)

    2006-08-15

    Background. Optimal treatment of large-sized hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still debated, because percutaneous ablation therapies alone do not always achieve complete necrosis. Objective. To report our experience in the treatment of patients with HCC larger than 4 cm in diameter by combined percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency thermal ablation. Methods. In a 5-year period there were 40 consecutive patients meeting the inclusion criteria (24 men and 16 women; age range 41-72 years, mean 58 years). These subjects had a single HCC larger than 4 cm. Twelve subjects also had one or two additional nodules smaller than 4 cm (mean 1.2 nodules per patient). Patients were submitted to one to three sessions consisting of ethanol injection at two opposite tumor poles (mean 12 ml) and then of radiofrequency application through one or two electrodes placed at the tumor center (mean treatment duration 30 min). Results. Complete necrosis was obtained in all cases with one to three sessions (mean 1.3 sessions per patient). All patients experienced pain and fever but one only subject had a major complication requiring treatment (abscess development and fistulization). Overall follow-up was 7-69 months. Two patients showed local recurrence and 9 developed new etherotopic HCC nodules. Seven subjects died during follow-up while 33 were free from recurrence 8-69 months after treatment. Conclusion. A combination of ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation is effective in the treatment of large HCC.

  12. The cross correlation between the 21-cm radiation and the CMB lensing field: a new cosmological signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vallinotto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations through the 21-cm intensity mapping technique at redshift z {<=} 4 has the potential to tightly constrain the evolution of dark energy. Crucial to this experimental effort is the determination of the biasing relation connecting fluctuations in the density of neutral hydrogen (HI) with the ones of the underlying dark matter field. In this work I show how the HI bias relevant to these 21-cm intensity mapping experiments can successfully be measured by cross-correlating their signal with the lensing signal obtained from CMB observations. In particular I show that combining CMB lensing maps from Planck with 21-cm field measurements carried out with an instrument similar to the Cylindrical Radio Telescope, this cross-correlation signal can be detected with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of more than 5. Breaking down the signal arising from different redshift bins of thickness {Delta}z = 0.1, this signal leads to constraining the large scale neutral hydrogen bias and its evolution to 4{sigma} level.

  13. First measurement of HI 21cm emission from a GRB host galaxy indicates a post-merger system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arabsalmani, Maryam; Zwaan, Martin; Kanekar, Nissim; Micha?owski, Micha? J

    2015-01-01

    We report the detection and mapping of atomic hydrogen in HI 21cm emission from ESO 184-G82, the host galaxy of the gamma ray burst 980425. This is the first instance where HI in emission has been detected from a galaxy hosting a gamma ray burst. ESO 184-G82 is an isolated galaxy and contains a Wolf-Rayet region close to the location of the gamma ray burst and the associated supernova, SN 1998bw. This is one of the most luminous HII regions identified in the local Universe, with a very high inferred density of star formation. The HI 21cm observations reveal a high HI mass for the galaxy, twice as large as the stellar mass. The spatial and velocity distribution of the HI 21cm emission reveals a disturbed rotating gas disk, which suggests that the galaxy has undergone a recent minor merger that disrupted its rotation. We find that the Wolf-Rayet region and the gamma ray burst are both located in the highest HI column density region of the galaxy. We speculate that the merger event has resulted in shock compress...

  14. Implementation and evaluation of online gas-phase chemistry within a regional climate model (RegCM-CHEM4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shalaby, A. K.; Zakey, A. S.; Tawfik, A. B.; Solmon, F.; Giorgi, Filippo; Stordal, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Steiner, A. L.

    2012-05-22

    The RegCM-CHEM4 is a new online climate-chemistry model based on the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model (RegCM4). Tropospheric gas-phase chemistry is integrated into the climate model using the condensed version of the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-Z; Zaveri and Peters, 1999) with a fast solver based on radical balances. We evaluate the model over Continental Europe for two different time scales: (1) an event-based analysis of the ozone episode associated with the heat wave of August 2003 and (2) a climatological analysis of a sixyear simulation (2000-2005). For the episode analysis, model simulations show good agreement with European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) observations of hourly ozone over different regions in Europe and capture ozone concentrations during and after the August 2003 heat wave event. For long-term climate simulations, the model captures the seasonal cycle of ozone concentrations with some over prediction of ozone concentrations in non-heat wave summers. Overall, the ozone and ozone precursor evaluation shows the feasibility of using RegCM-CHEM4 for decadal-length simulations of chemistry-climate interactions.

  15. Utah_cm_smith

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cindy and Mack Smith Site - Utah Wind Anemometer Loan Program Latitude: N. 37 deg. 44.034' Longitude: W. 109 deg. 17.28' Elevation: 6762' Placed in service: November 21, 2002...

  16. License Iso. CM35

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and MyersHr. Anthony V. Andolina:I 1 '\

  17. Eolian sabkha sandstones in the Nugget Sandstone (Jurassic), Vernal area, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenk, C.J.; Peterson, F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-06-01

    The Jurassic Nugget Sandstone in the Vernal, Utah, area is characterized by thick (up to 25 m) sets of cross-stratified eolian dune sandstone separated by either erosional planar bounding surfaces or thin (mostly < 3 m) sandstones interpreted as sabkha sandstones. Structures in Nugget sabkha sandstones are predominantly wavy or irregular bedding and thin, remnant sets of dune cross-strata consisting of eolian ripple and avalanche strata. The types of sedimentary structures and erosional features in Nugget sabkha sandstones indicate a close relationship between sand deposition and erosion and fluctuations in the local water table. Thin, remnant eolian dune sets are common in Nugget sabkha sandstones. The remnant sets form when dunes migrating across a sabkha are partially wetted as the water table rises slightly (on a scale of tens of centimeters); the lower part of the dune with wetted sand remains on the sabkha as the rest of the dune continues to migrate. Typically, ripple strata of the dune apron and the toes of avalanche strata are preserved in dune remnants. The avalanche strata, being slightly coarser grained, are preferentially deflated, leaving microtopography. This topography is commonly filled in with ripple strata that form as dry sand again blows across the sabkha. Stacked sets of remnant dunes separated by erosional surfaces illustrate the control of sand deposition on eolian sabkhas by the local water table.

  18. Program Areas | National Security | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Program Areas SHARE Program Areas image Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a robust...

  19. 2002 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. E. Townsend

    2003-06-01

    Environmental, subsidence, and meteorological monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)(refer to Figure 1). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater,meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada (BN) reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorological data indicate that 2002 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 26 mm (1.0 in) at the Area 3 RWMS and 38 mm (1.5 in) at the Area 5 RWMS. Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 2002 rainfall infiltrated less than 30 cm (1 ft) before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium monitoring data indicate slow subsurface migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were lower than in previous years. Special investigations conducted in 2002 included: a comparison between waste cover water contents measured by neutron probe and coring; and a comparison of four methods for measuring radon concentrations in air. All 2002 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility Performance Assessments (PAs).

  20. Limitations on area compression of beams from pierce guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakovlev, V.P.; Nezhevenko, O.A. [Omega-P Inc., 202008 Yale Station, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-2008 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    An important limitation for rf sources such as klystrons and magnicons, designed for 10{close_quote}s of MW power outputs at cm-wavelengths, is the transverse electron beam size. Cathode current density limits require high beam area compressions to obtain small transverse beam areas for fixed currents. This paper discusses the limitations to high beam area compression, namely geometrical aberrations and thermal spread in transverse velocities. Compensation can oftentimes be introduced for aberrations, but thermal velocity spread presents a fundamental limitation. Examples where subtle compensation strategies were employed are discussed for three guns with 100 MW beam power, and area compressions greater than 2000:1. Two of these guns have already been built. A clear determination of effective cathode temperature has yet to be found experimentally, but possible means to measure it are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. 100 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentataboutScalablePhysicist: Christian Bauer 101000 Area

  2. 300 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News Below are newsBelle-IIProcesses -1300 Area

  3. 700 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News Below are4B Drawings 4B618-10 and700 Area

  4. Tank Farm Area Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:Take Action APPENDIX-11CoverArea

  5. Tank Farm Area Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:Take Action APPENDIX-11CoverArea

  6. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Collingwood CFB Borden 0 10 20 Kilometers Area = 521,900 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Population

  7. Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at INL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy G. Garn; David H. Meikrantz; Nick R. Mann; Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

    2008-09-01

    Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5 cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at the INL Troy G. Garn, Dave H. Meikrantz, Nick R. Mann, Jack D. Law, Terry A. Todd Idaho National Laboratory Commercially available, Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACC) are currently being evaluated for processing dissolved nuclear fuel solutions to selectively partition integrated elements using solvent extraction technologies. These evaluations include hydraulic and clean-in-place (CIP) testing of a commercially available 12.5 cm unit. Data from these evaluations is used to support design of future nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. Hydraulic testing provides contactor throughput performance data on two-phase systems for a wide range of operating conditions. Hydraulic testing results on a simple two-phase oil and water system followed by a 30 % Tributyl phosphate in N-dodecane / nitric acid pair are reported. Maximum total throughputs for this size contactor ranged from 20 to 32 liters per minute without significant other phase carryover. A relatively new contactor design enhancement providing Clean-in-Place capability for ACCs was also investigated. Spray nozzles installed into the central rotor shaft allow the rotor internals to be cleaned, offline. Testing of the solids capture of a diatomaceous earth/water slurry feed followed by CIP testing was performed. Solids capture efficiencies of >95% were observed for all tests and short cold water cleaning pulses proved successful at removing solids from the rotor.

  8. Arrangements for the Building and Use of a 150 cm Cloud Chamber in Co-operation Between CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (ETH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1960-01-01

    Arrangements for the Building and Use of a 150 cm Cloud Chamber in Co-operation Between CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (ETH)

  9. Arrangements for the Building and Use of a 150 cm Cloud Chamber in Co-operation between CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (ETH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    European Organization for Nuclear Research

    1960-01-01

    Arrangements for the Building and Use of a 150 cm Cloud Chamber in Co-operation between CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (ETH)

  10. M. Bertolini et al. (2012) "ChowHeegner Points on CM Elliptic Curves," International Mathematics Research Notices, rns237, 49 pages.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Kartik

    2012-01-01

    Research Notices, rns237, 49 pages. doi:10.1093/imrn/rns237 Chow­Heegner Points on CM Elliptic Curves

  11. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculations and data comparisons for MIST (Multi-Loop Integral System Test) small-break loss-of-coolant accidents with scaled 10 cm/sup 2/ and 50 cm/sup 2/ breaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, J.L.; Siebe, D.A.; Boyack, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the Integral System Test (IST) program initiated in June 1983 for the purpose of providing integral system test data on specific issues/phenomena relevant to post-small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs), loss of feedwater and other transients in Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) plant designs. The Multi-Loop Integral System Test (MIST) facility is the largest single component in the IST program. MIST is a 2 x 4 (2 hot legs and steam generators, 4 cold legs and reactor-coolant pumps) representation of lowered-loop reactor systems of the B and W design. It is a full-height, full-pressure facility with 1/817 power and volume scaling. Two other experimental facilities are included in the IST program: test loops at the University of Maryland, College Park, and at Stanford Research Institute. The objective of the IST tests is to generate high-quality experimental data to be used for assessing thermal-hydraulic safety computer codes. Efforts are underway at Los Alamos to assess TRAC-PF1/MOD1 against data from each of the IST facilities. Calculations and data comparisons for TRAC-PF1/MOD1 assessment have been completed for two transients run in the MIST facility. These are the MIST nominal test. Test 3109AA, a scaled 10 cm/sup 2/ SBLOCA and Test 320201, a scaled 50 cm/sup 2/ SBLOCA. Only MIST assessment results are presented in this paper.

  12. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  13. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-07

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  14. THE CM-, MM-, AND SUB-MM-WAVE SPECTRUM OF ALLYL ISOCYANIDE AND RADIOASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATIONS IN ORION KL AND THE SgrB2 LINE SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haykal, I.; Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.; Motyienko, R. A.; Écija, P.; Cocinero, E. J.; Basterretxea, F.; Fernández, J. A.; Castaño, F.; Guillemin, J. C.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-11-10

    Organic isocyanides have an interesting astrochemistry and some of these molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, rotational spectral data for this class of compounds are still scarce. We provide laboratory spectra of the four-carbon allyl isocyanide covering the full microwave region, thus allowing a potential astrophysical identification in the ISM. We assigned the rotational spectrum of the two cis (synperiplanar) and gauche (anticlinal) conformations of allyl isocyanide in the centimeter-wave region (4-18 GHz), resolved its {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) hyperfine structure, and extended the measurements into the millimeter and submillimeter-wave (150-900 GHz) ranges for the title compound. Rotational constants for all the monosubstituted {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopologues are additionally provided. Laboratory observations are supplemented with initial radioastronomical observations. Following analysis of an extensive dataset (>11000 rotational transitions), accurate ground-state molecular parameters are reported for the cis and gauche conformations of the molecule, including rotational constants, NQC parameters, and centrifugal distortion terms up to octic contributions. Molecular parameters have also been obtained for the two first excited states of the cis conformation, with a dataset of more than 3300 lines. The isotopic data allowed determining substitution and effective structures for the title compound. We did not detect allyl isocyanide either in the IRAM 30 m line survey of Orion KL or in the PRIMOS survey toward SgrB2. Nevertheless, we provided an upper limit to its column density in Orion KL.

  15. Astronomical Images from the Very Large Array (VLA) FIRST Survey Images from the STScI Archive (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters was a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid. The binary data are available in detailed source catalogs, but the full images themselves, developed through special techniques, are also available for public access. Note that the images are fairly large, typically 1150x1550 pixels. Access to the images is simple through the search interface; the images are also available via anonymous ftp at ftp://archive.stsci.edu/pub/vla_first/data. Another convenient way to obtain images is through the FIRST Cutout Server, which allows an image section to be extracted from the coadded image database at a user-specified position. The cutout server is also linked to the FIRST Search Engine, so that the catalog can be searched for sources of interest and then images can be obtained for those objects. All images taken through 2011 are available through the cutout server at http://third.ucllnl.org/cgi-bin/firstcutout.

  16. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 2:50pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department...

  17. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe???Se??? thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm²

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yue; Li, Qiang; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, Toshinori

    2015-01-01

    We performed magneto-optical (MO) measurements on FeTe???Se??? thin films grown on LaAlO? (LAO) and Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single-crystalline substrates. These thin films show superconducting transition temperature Tc ~19 K, 4 K higher than the bulk sample. Typical roof-top patterns can be observed in the MO images of thin films grown on LAO and YSZ, from which a large and homogeneous critical current density Jc ~ 3 - 4 x 10? A/cm² at 5 K was obtained. Magnetic flux penetration measurement reveals that the current is almost isotropically distributed in the two thin films. Compared with bulk crystals, FeTe???Se??? thin film demonstrates not only higher Tc, but also much larger Jc, which is attractive for applications.

  18. The simultaneous spectrum of Sgr A* from 20cm to 1mm and the nature of the mm-excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heino Falcke; W. M. Goss; Hiroshi Matsuo; Peter Teuben; Jun-Hui Zhao; Robert Zylka

    1998-01-12

    We report results from a multiwavelength campaign to measure the simultaneous spectrum of the super-massive black hole candidate Sgr A* in the Galactic Center from cm to mm-wavelengths using the VLA, BIMA, the Nobeyama 45m, and the IRAM 30m telescopes. The observations confirm that the previously detected mm-excess is an intrinsic feature of the spectrum of Sgr A*. The excess can be interpreted as due to the presence of an ultra-compact component of relativistic plasma with a size of a few Schwarzschild radii near the black hole. If so, Sgr A* might offer the unique possibility to image the putative black hole against the background of this component with future mm-VLBI experiments.

  19. Experimental investigation of a 1 kA/cm{sup 2} sheet beam plasma cathode electron gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Niraj Narayan Pal, Udit; Prajesh, Rahul; Prakash, Ram; Kumar Pal, Dharmendra

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, a cold cathode based sheet-beam plasma cathode electron gun is reported with achieved sheet-beam current density ?1 kA/cm{sup 2} from pseudospark based argon plasma for pulse length of ?200 ns in a single shot experiment. For the qualitative assessment of the sheet-beam, an arrangement of three isolated metallic-sheets is proposed. The actual shape and size of the sheet-electron-beam are obtained through a non-conventional method by proposing a dielectric charging technique and scanning electron microscope based imaging. As distinct from the earlier developed sheet beam sources, the generated sheet-beam has been propagated more than 190 mm distance in a drift space region maintaining sheet structure without assistance of any external magnetic field.

  20. Simulating the 21cm forest detectable with LOFAR and SKA in the spectra of high-z GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciardi, B; Abdalla, F B; Asad, K; Bernardi, G; Bolton, J S; Brentjens, M; de Bruyn, A G; Chapman, E; Daiboo, S; Fernandez, E R; Ghosh, A; Graziani, L; Harker, G J A; Iliev, I T; Jelic, V; Jensen, H; Kazemi, S; Koopmans, L V E; Martinez, O; Maselli, A; Mellema, G; Offringa, A R; Pandey, V N; Schaye, J; Thomas, R; Vedantham, H; Yatawatta, S; Zaroubi, S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of detecting 21cm absorption features in the afterglow spectra of high redshift long Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). This is done employing simulations of cosmic reionization, together with the instrumental characteristics of the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR). We find that absorption features could be marginally (with a S/N larger than a few) detected by LOFAR at z>7 if the GRB originated from PopIII stars, while the detection would be easier if the noise were reduced by one order of magnitude, i.e. similar to what is expected for the first phase of the Square Kilometer Array (SKA1-low). On the other hand, more standard GRBs are too dim to be detected even with ten times the sensitivity of SKA1-low, and only in the most optimistic case can a S/N larger than a few be reached at z>9.

  1. Interpreting the Global 21-cm Signal from High Redshifts. II. Parameter Estimation for Models of Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirocha, Jordan; Burns, Jack O

    2015-01-01

    Following our previous work, which related generic features in the sky-averaged (global) 21-cm signal to properties of the intergalactic medium, we now investigate the prospects for constraining a simple galaxy formation model with current and near-future experiments. Markov-Chain Monte Carlo fits to our synthetic dataset, which includes a realistic galactic foreground, a plausible model for the signal, and noise consistent with 100 hours of integration by an ideal instrument, suggest that a simple four-parameter model that links the production rate of Lyman-$\\alpha$, Lyman-continuum, and X-ray photons to the growth rate of dark matter halos can be well-constrained (to $\\sim 0.1$ dex in each dimension) so long as all three spectral features expected to occur between $40 \\lesssim \

  2. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe???Se??? thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm²

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Yue; Li, Qiang; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, Toshinori

    2014-12-03

    We performed magneto-optical (MO) measurements on FeTe???Se??? thin films grown on LaAlO? (LAO) and Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single-crystalline substrates. These thin films show superconducting transition temperature Tc ~19 K, 4 K higher than the bulk sample. Typical roof-top patterns can be observed in the MO images of thin films grown on LAO and YSZ, from which a large and homogeneous critical current density Jc ~ 3 - 4 x 10? A/cm² at 5 K was obtained. In this study, magnetic flux penetration measurement reveals that the current is almost isotropically distributed in the two thin films. Compared with bulk crystals,more »FeTe???Se??? thin film demonstrates not only higher Tc, but also much larger Jc, which is attractive for applications.« less

  3. PROBING THE DARK AGES AT z ? 20: THE SCI-HI 21 cm ALL-SKY SPECTRUM EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voytek, Tabitha C.; Natarajan, Aravind; Peterson, Jeffrey B. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Jáuregui García, José Miguel; López-Cruz, Omar, E-mail: tcv@andrew.cmu.edu [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Optica y Electrónica (INAOE), Coordinación de Astrofísica, Luis Enrique Erro No. 1 Sta. Ma. Tonantzintla, Puebla, 72840 Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-02-10

    We present first results from the SCI-HI experiment, which we used to measure the all-sky-averaged 21 cm brightness temperature in the redshift range 14.8 < z < 22.7. The instrument consists of a single broadband sub-wavelength size antenna and a sampling system for real-time data processing and recording. Preliminary observations were completed in 2013 June at Isla Guadalupe, a Mexican biosphere reserve located in the Pacific Ocean. The data was cleaned to excise channels contaminated by radio frequency interference, and the system response was calibrated by comparing the measured brightness temperature to the Global Sky Model of the Galaxy and by independent measurement of Johnson noise from a calibration terminator. We present our results, discuss the cosmological implications, and describe plans for future work.

  4. Sub-cm Resolution Distributed Fiber Optic Hydrogen Sensing with Nano-Engineered TiO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, Zsolt; Yan, Aidong; Lin, Yuankun; Chen, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The 3D nano-structuring on the 2) to be reduced and matched with the cladding of optical fiber(n~1.46) for low-loss integration. A high temperature capable hydrogen sensor composed of D-shaped optical fiber with palladium nanoparticles infused nanoporous (~5nm) TiO2 film is demonstrated. The behavior of the developed sensor was characterized by examining the wavelength of an incorporated Fiber Bragg Grating and by observing the transmission losses at temperatures up to 700C. In addition, with frequency domain reflectometry the distributed sensing potential of the developed sensor for hydrogen concentrations of up to 10% is examined. The results show the possibility of detecting chemical gradients with sub-cm resolution at very high temperatures(>500C).

  5. Spectral content of buried Ag foils at 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntington, C. M. Maddox, B. R.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S.; Remington, B. A.

    2014-11-15

    Sources of 5–12 keV thermal He? x-rays are readily generated by laser irradiation of mid-Z foils at intensities >10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, and are widely used as probes for inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density experiments. Higher energy 17–50 keV x-ray sources are efficiently produced from “cold” K? emission using short pulse, petawatt lasers at intensities >10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} [H.-S. Park, B. R. Maddox et al., “High-resolution 17–75 keV backlighters for high energy density experiments,” Phys. Plasmas 15(7), 072705 (2008); B. R. Maddox, H. S. Park, B. A. Remington et al., “Absolute measurements of x-ray backlighter sources at energies above 10 keV,” Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 056709 (2011)]. However, when long pulse (>1 ns) lasers are used with Z > 30 elements, the spectrum contains contributions from both K shell transitions and from ionized atomic states. Here we show that by sandwiching a silver foil between layers of high-density carbon, the ratio of K?:He? in the x-ray spectrum is significant increased over directly illuminated Ag foils, with narrower lines from K-shell transitions. Additionally, the emission volume is more localized for the sandwiched target, producing a more planar x-ray sheet. This technique may be useful for generating probes requiring spectral purity and a limited spatial extent, for example, in incoherent x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

  6. Particulate Media Richard Dee, Chairman Perpendicular quantized magnetic disks with 45 Gbits on a 4 4 cm2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    using nanoimprint lithography NIL and electroplating. The total disk area, limited by the NIL mold, is 4 and electroplating, and their char- acterization using an atomic force microscope AFM , a magnetic force microscope consists of four major steps: substrate prepara- tion, patterning, electroplating, and chemical mechanical

  7. SepTeMBeR 2011 | Vol. 54 | no. 9 | CommUniCations of the aCm 69 Constraint-satisfaction problems arise in diverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    SepTeMBeR 2011 | Vol. 54 | no. 9 | CommUniCations of the aCm 69 Constraint-satisfaction problems techniques. #12;70 CommUniCations of the aCm | SepTeMBeR 2011 | Vol. 54 | no. 9 contributed articles

  8. F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractors have cleaned up the F Reactor Area, the first reactor area at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state to be fully remediated.

  9. Source area and rupture parameters of the 31 December 1881 Mw = 7.9 Car Nicobar earthquake estimated from tsunamis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Source area and rupture parameters of the 31 December 1881 Mw = 7.9 Car Nicobar earthquake on the India/Andaman plate boundary resulting in 10­60 cm of uplift of the island of Car Nicobar. The rupture., and R. Bilham, Source area and rupture parameters of the 31 December 1881 Mw = 7.9 Car Nicobar

  10. Monroe Urbanized Area MTP 2035 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2010-10-31

    /plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Monroe Urbanized Area MTP 2035 The 2035 Metropolitan Transportation Plan for the Monroe Urbanized Area Developed for The Monroe Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization and The Louisiana Department... of Transportation and Development Developed by In association with Neel-Schaffer, Inc. **DRAFT** Adopted Date Here This document was prepared in cooperation with: The Monroe Urbanized Area MPO Technical Advisory Committee and The Louisiana...

  11. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    used in area like smart buildings, street light controls andbuilding. This section focuses on HAN design to address two smart

  12. Plasma and Ion Sources in Large Area Coatings: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Andre

    2005-02-28

    Efficient deposition of high-quality coatings often requires controlled application of excited or ionized particles. These particles are either condensing (film-forming) or assisting by providing energy and momentum to the film growth process, resulting in densification, sputtering/etching, modification of stress, roughness, texture, etc. In this review, the technical means are surveyed enabling large area application of ions and plasmas, with ion energies ranging from a few eV to a few keV. Both semiconductortype large area (single wafer or batch processing with {approx} 1000 cm{sup 2}) and in-line web and glass-coating-type large area (> 10{sup 7} m{sup 2} annually) are considered. Characteristics and differences between plasma and ion sources are explained. The latter include gridded and gridless sources. Many examples are given, including sources based on DC, RF, and microwave discharges, some with special geometries like hollow cathodes and E x B configurations.

  13. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    RidgeRd. SimcoeSt. Hwy.7&12 RegRd.57 0 4 8 Kilometers Area = 51,980 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICSdatamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY Drivers Vehicles Trips/day 2011 2006 1996 1986 datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT

  14. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    .7 4.1 5.8 27.9 TRIPS MADE TO TTS AREA 4,070,800 22.8% 51% 22% 6% 21% 61% 13% 12% 2% 8% 4% 7.1 3.3 7datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 5 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY AREA City of Orillia Durham Region City

  15. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

    1991-07-16

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

  16. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chin-Chi (Oak Ridge, TN); Gorbatkin, Steven M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Berry, Lee A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

  17. tight environment high radiation area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , no active electronics · transmit image through flexible fiber bundle Optical Diagnostics 01-13-2006 1 #12 electronics · transmit image through flexible fiber bundle One set of optics per viewport 11 #12; to infinity Length: 1-meter Hawkeye flexible borescope 5 #12;cm scale borescope retroreflected illumination 6

  18. How to Directly Image a Habitable Planet Around Alpha Centauri with a ~30-45cm Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belikov, Ruslan; Thomas, Sandrine; Males, Jared; Lozi, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Several mission concepts are being studied to directly image planets around nearby stars. It is commonly thought that directly imaging a potentially habitable exoplanet around a Sun-like star requires space telescopes with apertures of at least 1m. A notable exception to this is Alpha Centauri (A and B), which is an extreme outlier among FGKM stars in terms of apparent habitable zone size: the habitable zones are ~3x wider in apparent size than around any other FGKM star. This enables a ~30-45cm visible light space telescope equipped with a modern high performance coronagraph or starshade to resolve the habitable zone at high contrast and directly image any potentially habitable planet that may exist in the system. We presents a brief analysis of the astrophysical and technical challenges involved with direct imaging of Alpha Centauri with a small telescope and describe two new technologies that address some of the key technical challenges. In particular, the raw contrast requirements for such an instrument c...

  19. Near-term measurements with 21 cm intensity mapping: Neutral hydrogen fraction and BAO at z<2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masui, Kiyoshi Wesley; McDonald, Patrick; Pen, Ue-Li

    2010-05-15

    It is shown that 21 cm intensity mapping could be used in the near term to make cosmologically useful measurements. Large scale structure could be detected using existing radio telescopes, or using prototypes for dedicated redshift survey telescopes. This would provide a measure of the mean neutral hydrogen density, using redshift space distortions to break the degeneracy with the linear bias. We find that with only 200 hours of observing time on the Green Bank Telescope, the neutral hydrogen density could be measured to 25% precision at redshift 0.54

  20. Spatially Extended 21 cm Signal from Strongly Clustered UV and X-Ray Sources in the Early Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Norman, Michael L; Alvarez, Marcelo A; Wise, John H

    2014-01-01

    We present our prediction for the local 21 cm differential brightness temperature ($\\delta T_{b}$) from a set of strongly clustered sources of Population III (Pop III) and II (Pop II) objects in the early Universe, by a numerical simulation of their formation and radiative feedback. These objects are located inside a highly biased environment, which is a rare, high-density peak ("Rarepeak") extending to $\\sim7$ comoving Mpc. We study the impact of ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray photons on the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the resulting $\\delta T_{b}$, when Pop III stars are assumed to emit X-ray photons by forming X-ray binaries after their death. We parameterize the rest-frame spectral energy density (SED) of X-ray photons, which regulates X-ray photon-trapping, IGM-heating, secondary Lyman-alpha pumping and the resulting morphology of $\\delta T_{b}$. A combination of emission ($\\delta T_{b}>0$) and absorption ($\\delta T_{b}<0$) regions appears in varying amplitudes and angular scales. The boost of the signa...

  1. Fisher matrix predictions for detecting the cosmological 21 cm signal with the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharadwaj, Somnath; Ali, Sk Saiyad

    2015-01-01

    We have used the Fisher matrix formalism to quantify the prospects of detecting the z = 3.35 redshifted 21-cm HI power spectrum with the upcoming radio-imterferometric array OWFA. OWFA's frequency and baseline coverage spans comoving Fourier modes (k) in the range 0.018 to 2.7 [1/Mpc]. The OWFA HI signal, however, is predominantly from the range k below 0.2 [1/Mpc]. The larger modes, though abundant, do not contribute much to the HI signal. In this work we have focused on combining the entire signal to achieve a detection. We find that a 5-sigma detection of A_{HI} is possible with ~ 150 hr of observations, here A^2 _{HI} is the amplitude of the HI power spectrum. We have also carried out a joint analysis for A_{HI} and the redshift space distortion parameter. Our study shows that OWFA is very sensitive to the amplitude of the HI power spectrum. However, the anisotropic distribution of the k modes does not make it very suitable for measuring the redshift space distortion parameter.

  2. Proposed Laser-driven, Dielectric Microstructure Few-cm Long Undulator for Attosecond Coherent X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plettner, T; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2011-09-16

    This article presents the concept of an all-dielectric laser-driven undulator for the generation of coherent X-rays. The proposed laser-driven undulator is expected to produce internal deflection forces equivalent to a several-Tesla magnetic field acting on a speed-of-light particle. The key idea for this laser-driven undulator is its ability to provide phase synchronicity between the deflection force and the electron beam for a distance that is much greater than the laser wavelength. The potential advantage of this undulator is illustrated with a possible design example that assumes a small laser accelerator which delivers a 2 GeV, 1 pC, 1 kHz electron bunch train to a 10 cm long, 1/2 mm period laser-driven undulator. Such an undulator could produce coherent X-ray pulses with {approx}10{sup 9} photons of 64 keV energy. The numerical modeling for the expected X-ray pulse shape was performed with GENESIS, which predicts X-ray pulse durations in the few-attosecond range. Possible applications for nonlinear electromagnetic effects from these X-ray pulses are briefly discussed.

  3. Geothermal resource area 9: Nye County. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource area 9 encompasses all of Nye County, Nevada. Within this area there are many different known geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/ to over 265/sup 0/ F. Fifteen of the more major sites have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the resource sites discussed in this Area Development Plan were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities, and comparing those with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 15 geothermal sites considered in this Area Development Plan are summarized.

  4. Beam Test of a Large Area nonn Silicon Strip Detector with Fast Binary Readout Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beam Test of a Large Area n­on­n Silicon Strip Detector with Fast Binary Readout Electronics Y modules was irradiated with protons to a fluence of 1.2 × 10 14 p/cm 2 . A beam test was carried out in the edge regions were analyzed using the beam test data. High efficiency both for the non

  5. Graphene Transistors Fabricated via Transfer-Printing In Device Active-Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graphene Transistors Fabricated via Transfer-Printing In Device Active-Areas on Large Wafer Xiaogan graphene islands from a graphite and then uses transfer printing to place the islands from the stamp from the printed graphene. The transistors show a hole and electron mobility of 3735 and 795 cm2/V

  6. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    % 7% 6.5 5.5 6.5 68.5 30,100 10% 5% 51% 34% 73% 17% 1% * 3% 7% 7.0 7.2 10.0 * ANCASTER AREA CITYdatamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 85 ANCASTER AREA CITY OF HAMILTON Mohawk Rd. Main St. Carluke Rd. Governors Rd. Garner

  7. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    ,213,000 38% 13% 35% 14% 60% 14% 16% 1% 7% 2% 5.7 4.1 6.6 30.0 TRIPS MADE TO TTS AREA 3,168,200 23.5% 51% 22datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 5 GREATER TORONTO HAMILTON AREA Durham Region Peel Region City of Hamilton City

  8. FURTHER MODELING OF LIQUID WATER ON CM PARENT BODIES. B. A. Cohen , Department of Planetary Sciences, 1629 E. University Blvd., The University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Barbara Anne

    FURTHER MODELING OF LIQUID WATER ON CM PARENT BODIES. B. A. Cohen 1 and R. F. Coker 2 , Department in a warmer neb- ula, the time of accretion can be delayed even further to ~5 Ma. Peak temperatures. In every

  9. SSAASSSAP and SSASMP profiles were projected over a 1 cm vertical grid and difference between them was evaluated in terms of RMSD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SSAASSSAP and SSASMP profiles were projected over a 1 cm vertical grid and difference between them was evaluated in terms of RMSD: Minimizing SSA makes it possible to obtain new values for parameters relating

  10. 069 MCNITORINGTHE GROWTH OF SEODNDARYPRECIPITATES UPON METALSORPTICN CM CLAY MINERALS AND ALUMINUM OXIDES USING X-RAY ABSORPTICN FINE STRUCIURE (XAFS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    069 MCNITORINGTHE GROWTH OF SEODNDARYPRECIPITATES UPON METALSORPTICN CM CLAY MINERALS AND ALUMINUM and oxide minerals is typically fast initially, then the rates gradually diminish. In the literature on surfaces of clay minerals and aluminum oxides. #12;

  11. To obtain representative temperatures, sensors were made with a length of 35 cm. The stainless steel needles have a diameter of 3 mm. Inside are five

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    To obtain representative temperatures, sensors were made with a length of 35 cm. The stainless steel needles have a diameter of 3 mm. Inside are five Platinum Pt-100 sensors, that are cascaded

  12. Kodiak Area Management Reports, 19242010 Kodiak Area Management Reports, 19242010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    367 Kodiak Area Management Reports, 1924­2010 APPENDIX 4 Kodiak Area Management Reports, 1924­2010 1924: Fred R. Lucas. Report of Kodiak-Afognak Fish- eries District to August 31, 1924. U.S. Bureau of Fisheries, Afognak, AK (5 September 1924). 8 p. 1924: Fred R. Lucas. Report of Kodiak-Afognak Dis- trict

  13. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    and implementation of smart home energy management systemsStandard Technologies for Smart Home Area Networks EnablingInteroperability framework for smart home systems”, Consumer

  14. Starry Night The above picture is starry night by Vincent Van Gogh. The picture actual painting is 73.7 cm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    of map distance. How big will the map be? 2) If you are to build a model house out of the 1 cm blocks at a ratio of 1 m:1 cm. If the base of the house is 20 meters by 30 meters, how many blocks do you need a 220 lb person weigh on the moon? 4) Homework: Choose an object (animal, plane, ship, landmark

  15. Area Lodging: Knoxville | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagnetic SpinsSolicitations &Knoxville Area

  16. Area Lodging: Oak Ridge | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagnetic SpinsSolicitations &Knoxville AreaOak

  17. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 51 TOWN OF RICHMOND HILL REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF YORK LeslieSt. Stouffville Rd. King 6 Kilometers Area = 10,180 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Population Age Daily

  18. Area Health Education Center of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Area Health Education Center of Eastern Washington Washington State University Extension's Area Health Education Center of Eastern Washington works with university and community allies to promote health for underserved and at-risk populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions

  19. Before Mapping After Mapping Area Power Area Delay Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    32 Exam- ples Before Mapping After Mapping Area Power Area Delay Power 5xp1 0.93 0.98 0.86 0.82 0 1.01 1.01 1.02 1.07 0.99 duke2 1.01 1.01 0.99 1.13 0.97 e64 1.00 0.51 0.83 1.16 0.50 ex5 0.99 0.89 0.99 0.92 0.96 1.05 0.90 Table 2: Area, delay and power statistics for power script (normalized

  20. AREA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO...

  1. AreaMapWeb copy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal8823 Revision 02August 1,Are there Gains ORNL

  2. Focus Areas | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »FirstCurrent Science Create a FlyingFocus

  3. Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout UsRegionalScientificRenewablesPeriod: EIAReport

  4. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    21] ZigBee Alliance. "ZigBee Smart Energy V2.0”, 2011 [22]Secure remote access to Smart Energy Home area Networks”,Density HEMS SEP Smart Energy Profile HV Home Energy

  5. Progress Update: M Area Closure

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    A progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The celebration of the first area cleanup completion with the help of the Recovery Act.

  6. Security Area Vouching and Piggybacking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-05

    Establishes requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Security Area practice of "vouching" or "piggybacking" access by personnel. DOE N 251.40, dated 5-3-01, extends this directive until 12-31-01.

  7. Variable area fuel cell cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

  8. Multi-area network analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Liang

    2005-02-17

    -1 MULTI-AREA NETWORK ANALYSIS A Dissertation by LIANG ZHAO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY... December 2004 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering MULTI-AREA NETWORK ANALYSIS A Dissertation by LIANG ZHAO Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  9. Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Research Areas Research Areas Properties of Materials under Extreme Conditions and Hydrodynamics During open solicitations research...

  10. Investigation of broadening and shift of vapour absorption lines of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O in the frequency range 7184 – 7186 cm{sup -1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadezhdinskii, A I; Pereslavtseva, A A; Ponurovskii, Ya Ya [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-31

    We present the results of investigation of water vapour absorption spectra in the 7184 – 7186 cm{sup -1} range that is of particular interest from the viewpoint of possible application of the data obtained for monitoring water vapour in the Earth's stratosphere. The doublet of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O near ? = 7185.596 cm{sup -1} is analysed. The coefficients of broadening and shift of water vapour lines are found in the selected range in mixtures with buffer gases and compared to those obtained by other authors. (laser spectroscopy)

  11. Multisensor Geophysical Fusion for Improved Sub-surface Imaging at Historic Camptown Cemetery, Brenham, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meehan, Tate

    2013-09-30

    Meters – measurement of area cm Centimeters – measurement of distance kHz Kilohertz, 1000 hertz – measurement of frequency MHz Megahertz, 106 hertz GHz Gigahertz, 109 hertz Tesla The standardized unit for magnetic field Tx Transmitter.... The magnetic anomaly can be approximately modeled by subtracting the main field magnetism from the total measured field. These anomalies are subtle, regional differences of magnetic field measured in nanoTeslas. Instrumentation The Geometrics G-858...

  12. pubs.acs.org/cmPublished on Web 07/01/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Chem. Mater. 2009, 21, 30333035 3033

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Reflecting emerging energy challenges, catalysis,2 hydrogen and methane storage,3 and chemical separations4 of appropriate size and composition to capture CO2 from mixtures with methane. Based on condensation of cheappubs.acs.org/cmPublished on Web 07/01/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Chem. Mater. 2009, 21

  13. r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/cm101568z |Chem. Mater. XXXX, XXX, 000000 COMMUNICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    " for the preparation of PtAu alloy NPs20 but also facilitates the uniform loading of PtAu NPs on graphene. MoreAu/CB were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Figure 1a displays the as-prepared graphene­000 COMMUNICATION pubs.acs.org/cm Graphene Decorated with PtAu Alloy Nanoparticles: Facile Synthesis and Promising

  14. Published: January 11, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 1079 dx.doi.org/10.1021/cm101568z |Chem. Mater. 2011, 23, 10791081

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    " for the preparation of PtAu alloy NPs20 but also facilitates the uniform loading of PtAu NPs on graphene. MoreAu/CB were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Figure 1a displays the as-prepared graphene |Chem. Mater. 2011, 23, 1079­1081 COMMUNICATION pubs.acs.org/cm Graphene Decorated with PtAu Alloy

  15. pubs.acs.org/cmPublished on Web 06/22/2010r 2010 American Chemical Society Chem. Mater. 2010, 22, 41534157 4153

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cases, optical properties. We have recently reported the preparation of graphene oxide paper,4 also for the preparation of func- tionalized graphene oxide papers. Alternatively, as- sembled graphene oxide paper could, 4153­4157 4153 DOI:10.1021/cm100454g Systematic Post-assembly Modification of Graphene Oxide Paper

  16. UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1) Host institution: University of Oxford Cartwright Project description: Recovery of natural gas from mudstone (shale) formations has triggered

  17. CO2-broadened water in the pure rotation and m2 fundamental regions L.R. Brown a,*, C.M. Humphrey b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamache, Robert R.

    . Keywords: Carbon dioxide broadened water; Theoretical calculations; Measurements; Half-widths; Pressure abundant species is carbon dioxide, but the two atmo- spheres are at very different pressures transitions of (000)­(000) between 200 and 900 cmÀ1 in order to facilitate atmospheric remote sensing of Mars

  18. GLOBAL EMISSIONS INVENTORIES OF ACID-RELATED COMPOUNDS T.E. GRAEDEL t , C.M. BENKOVITZ 2, W.C. KEENE 3, D.S. LEE 4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL EMISSIONS INVENTORIES OF ACID-RELATED COMPOUNDS T.E. GRAEDEL t , C.M. BENKOVITZ 2, W, and future rely in part on inventories of emissions constructed on appropriate spatial and temporal scales and the regulatory and policy communities. The production of global emissions inventories is the task of the GlobalEmissions

  19. A FOURTH H I 21 cm ABSORPTION SYSTEM IN THE SIGHT LINE OF MG J0414+0534: A RECORD FOR INTERVENING ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanna, A.; Webb, J. K.; Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.; Bignell, C.

    2013-08-01

    We report the detection of a strong H I 21 cm absorption system at z = 0.5344, as well as a candidate system at z = 0.3389, in the sight line toward the z = 2.64 quasar MG J0414+0534. This, in addition to the absorption at the host redshift and the other two intervening absorbers, takes the total to four (possibly five). The previous maximum number of 21 cm absorbers detected along a single sight line is two and so we suspect that this number of gas-rich absorbers is in some way related to the very red color of the background source. Despite this, no molecular gas (through OH absorption) has yet been detected at any of the 21 cm redshifts, although, from the population of 21 cm absorbers as a whole, there is evidence for a weak correlation between the atomic line strength and the optical-near-infrared color. In either case, the fact that so many gas-rich galaxies (likely to be damped Ly{alpha} absorption systems) have been found along a single sight line toward a highly obscured source may have far-reaching implications for the population of faint galaxies not detected in optical surveys, a possibility which could be addressed through future wide-field absorption line surveys with the Square Kilometer Array.

  20. DRUMSTICK TREE WATER RELATIONS Moravec, C.M., Bradford, K.J. and Laca, E.A. (2008), Seed Sci. & Technol., 36, 311-324

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradford, Kent

    2008-01-01

    311 DRUMSTICK TREE WATER RELATIONS Moravec, C.M., Bradford, K.J. and Laca, E.A. (2008), Seed Sci. & Technol., 36, 311-324 Water relations of drumstick tree seed (Moringa oleifera): imbibition, desiccation created a need for information about the water relationships of its seeds. Thus, we studied the imbibition

  1. Multi-Agent Itinerary Planning for Sensor Networks(Invited Paper) 1Min Chen, 2 Sergio Gonzlez, 3 Yan Zhang, 2Victor C.M. Leung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    Yan Zhang, 2Victor C.M. Leung 1 School of Comp Sci & Eng, Seoul National University, Korea (ubcminchen@gmail.com) 2 Dept. of Elect & Comp Eng, Univ. of British Columbia, V6T 1Z4, Canada (sergiog on designing various single agent based itinerary planning (SIP) algorithms by considering energy

  2. pubs.acs.org/cm Published on Web 08/26/2009 r 2009 American Chemical Society 4090 Chem. Mater. 2009, 21, 40904092

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 21, 4090­4092 DOI:10.1021/cm9016134 Solar Cells from a Solution Processable Pentacene with Improved-oxidation of the pentacene donor.16 This situation is exacerbated by the fact that nearly all organic solar cells necessi, 13-di(2-thienyl)pentacene have encouraged us to investi- gate its performance in solar cells

  3. Aerogels: stiff foams composed of up to 99.8% air Silica aerogel is the world's lowest-density solid: 1 mg/cm3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    #12;Aerogels: stiff foams composed of up to 99.8% air Silica aerogel is the world's lowest-density solid: 1 mg/cm3 Aerogels hold 15 different records for material properties, including best insulator 2.38 g piece of aerogel supports a 2.5 kg brick. #12;#12;#12;l = m × n unit vector in orbital space

  4. pubs.acs.org/cmPublished on Web 12/08/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Chem. Mater. 2010, 22, 579584 579

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    .37%. As one of the major renewable energy sources, solar energy has the potential to become an essential compo- nent of future global energy production. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs),1 represent one of the most, 579­584 579 DOI:10.1021/cm903164k Dye-Sensitized TiO2 Nanotube Solar Cells with Markedly Enhanced

  5. H-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  6. University of Virginia Housing Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    University of Virginia Housing Areas Copeley Hill Faulkner Copeley III & IV Piedmont Hereford Gardens Lile-Maupin House 2372 Tuttle - Dunnington House 2373 Shannon House 2374 Gibbons House 2375 IvyGardensWay Tree House Drive Grady Avenue University Court Farrish Circle W estview Road Engineer'sWay Gildersleve

  7. 200 area TEDF sample schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.

    1995-03-22

    This document summarizes the sampling criteria associated with the 200 Area Treatment Effluent Facility (TEDF) that are needed to comply with the requirements of the Washington State Discharge Permit No. WA ST 4502 and good engineering practices at the generator streams that feed into TEDF. In addition, this document Identifies the responsible parties for both sampling and data transference.

  8. EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

  9. Stimulated Emission from As-grown GaN Hexagons by Selective Area Growth Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stimulated Emission from As-grown GaN Hexagons by Selective Area Growth Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy Engineering and the Photonics Center, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary's St., Boston, MA 02215-2421, USA R hydride vapor phase epitaxy. We found the threshold for bulk stimulated emission to be 3.4 MW cm2

  10. Direct measurement of {sup 12}C+{sup 4}He?{sup 16}O+? total cross section at E{sub cm}=1.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Sagara, K.; Fujita, K.; Kodama, D.; Narikiyo, Y.; Hamamoto, K.; Ban, T.; Tao, N.; Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University (Japan)

    2014-05-02

    A fusion reaction of {sup 12}C+{sup 4}He?{sup 16}O+? is one of the main reactions in He-burning of stars and important for nucleosynthesis. The fusion cross section at stellar energy of E{sub cm}=0.3 MeV has not been determined precisely yet in spite of efforts for about 40 years. We plan to measure directly the total fusion cross section down to 0.7 MeV at Kyushu University Tandem accelerator Laboratory and to estimate the cross section at 0.3MeV by extrapolation. We have already measured the cross sections at 2.4 MeV and 1.5 MeV. The measurement at E{sub cm}=1.2 MeV is in progress.

  11. COMPLETE IONIZATION OF THE NEUTRAL GAS: WHY THERE ARE SO FEW DETECTIONS OF 21 cm HYDROGEN IN HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO GALAXIES AND QUASARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2012-11-10

    From the first published z {approx}> 3 survey of 21 cm absorption within the hosts of radio galaxies and quasars, Curran et al. found an apparent dearth of cool neutral gas at high redshift. From a detailed analysis of the photometry, each object is found to have a {lambda} = 1216 A continuum luminosity in excess of L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}, a critical value above which 21 cm has never been detected at any redshift. At these wavelengths, and below, hydrogen is excited above the ground state so that it cannot absorb in 21 cm. In order to apply the equation of photoionization equilibrium, we demonstrate that this critical value also applies to the ionizing ({lambda} {<=} 912 A) radiation. We use this to show, for a variety of gas density distributions, that upon placing a quasar within a galaxy of gas, there is always an ultraviolet luminosity above which all of the large-scale atomic gas is ionized. While in this state, the hydrogen cannot be detected or engage in star formation. Applying the mean ionizing photon rate of all of the sources searched, we find, using canonical values for the gas density and recombination rate coefficient, that the observed critical luminosity gives a scale length (3 kpc) similar that of the neutral hydrogen (H I) in the Milky Way, a large spiral galaxy. Thus, this simple yet physically motivated model can explain the critical luminosity (L {sub 912} {approx} L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}), above which neutral gas is not detected. This indicates that the non-detection of 21 cm absorption is not due to the sensitivity limits of current radio telescopes, but rather that the lines of sight to the quasars, and probably the bulk of the host galaxies, are devoid of neutral gas.

  12. SPECTRES DE RFLEXION ET CONSTANTES OPTIQUES DE LA PROUSTITE (Ag3AsS3) ENTRE 14 ET 600 cm-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    L-95 SPECTRES DE R�FLEXION ET CONSTANTES OPTIQUES DE LA PROUSTITE (Ag3AsS3) ENTRE 14 ET 600 cm-1, accepte le 6 janvier 1977) Résumé. 2014 Les constantes optiques de la proustite (Ag3AsS3), à 300 K et à 80 Optical constants of proustite (Ag3AsS3) are determined from 18 to 700 03BCm by Kra- mers-Kronig analysis

  13. horizontal de 60 cm de long, avec une tension de 100 200 volts et du papier Whatman No 3MM de 5 cul de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    source, déposée à une extrémité, migrer environ jusqu'aux 2/3 de la longueur du papier. 147 Pm additionné même pour toutes les fractions de,1 /2 cm correspondant à la zone Sm - Pm - Nd. La raie de 121 ke carbone absorbant les p-, est (3 :1: 0,5)10-1 /P- de 14'Pm. C. Conclusion : Origine du rayonnement de 121

  14. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

  15. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

    1986-01-01

    Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

  16. Innovation investment area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

  17. Estimating Temperature Distributions In Geothermal Areas Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Areas Using A Neuronet Approach Abstract A method is proposed for predicting the distribution of temperatures in geothermal areas using the neuronet approach and, in particular,...

  18. LED Outdoor Area Lighting Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outdoor Area Lighting LED technology is rapidly becoming competitive with high-intensity discharge light sources for outdoor area lighting. This document reviews the major design...

  19. Outdoor Area Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for outdoor areas. Outdoor Area Lighting (June 2008) More Documents & Publications Philadelphia International Airport Apron Lighting: LED System Performance in a Trial...

  20. Fabrication of large area Si cylindric drift detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, W.; Kraner, H.W.; Li, Z.; Rehak, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hess, F. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Physics

    1993-04-01

    Advanced Si drift detector, a large area cylindrical drift detector (CDD), processing steps, with the exception of the ion implantation, were carried out in the BNL class 100 cleanroom. The double-side planer process technique was developed for the fabrication of CDD. Important improvements of the double-side planer process in this fabrication are the introduction of Al implantation protection mask and the remaining of a 1000 Angstroms oxide layer in the p-window during the implantation. Another important design of the CDD is the structure called ``river,`` which ,allows the current generated on Si-SiO{sub 2} interface to ``flow`` into the guard anode, and thus can minimize the leakage current at the signed anode. The test result showed that most of the signal anodes have the leakage current about 0.3 nA/cm{sup 2} for the best detector.

  1. CM Bioenergia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick, Maine:IAEAT JumpCEECHOEnvirogas LtdCLVCM

  2. Carlsbad Area Office strategic plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This edition of the Carlsbad Area Office Strategic Plan captures the U.S. Department of Energy`s new focus, and supercedes the edition issued previously in 1995. This revision reflects a revised strategy designed to demonstrate compliance with environmental regulations earlier than the previous course of action; and a focus on the selected combination of scientific investigations, engineered alternatives, and waste acceptance criteria for supporting the compliance applications. An overview of operations and historical aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico is presented.

  3. Texas Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborgTecsisArea Jump to:

  4. Geothermal Areas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special PagesGeotermica JumpAreas Jump

  5. Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

    1985-11-29

    This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)

  6. 300 Area signal cable study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whattam, J.W.

    1994-09-15

    This report was prepared to discuss the alternatives available for removing the 300 Area overhead signal cable system. This system, installed in 1969, has been used for various monitoring and communication signaling needs throughout the 300 Area. Over the years this cabling system has deteriorated, has been continually reconfigured, and has been poorly documented to the point of nonreliability. The first step was to look at the systems utilizing the overhead signal cable that are still required for operation. Of the ten systems that once operated via the signal cable, only five are still required; the civil defense evacuation alarms, the public address (PA) system, the criticality alarms, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Facilities Management Control System (FMCS), and the 384 annunciator panel. Of these five, the criticality alarms and the FMCS have been dealt with under other proposals. Therefore, this study focused on the alternatives available for the remaining three systems (evacuation alarms, PA system, and 384 panel) plus the accountability aid phones. Once the systems to be discussed were determined, then three alternatives for providing the signaling pathway were examined for each system: (1) re-wire using underground communication ducts, (2) use the Integrated Voice/Data Telecommunications System (IVDTS) already installed and operated by US West, and (3) use radio control. Each alternative was developed with an estimated cost, advantages, and disadvantages. Finally, a recommendation was provided for the best alternative for each system.

  7. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one NaI scintillator and the other foil on the other NaI detector and the activities measured simultaneously. The activation of a particular foil was compared to that of the normalization foil by dividing the count rate for each foil by that of the normalization foil. To correct for the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors, the normalization foil was counted in Detector 1 simultaneously with the foil at position x in Detector 2, and then the normalization foil was counted simultaneously in Detector 2 with the foil from position x in Counter 1. The activity of the foil from position x was divided by the activity of the normalization foil counted simultaneously. This resulted in obtaining two values of the ratio that were then averaged. This procedure essentially removed the effect of the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors. Differing efficiencies of 10% resulted in errors in the ratios measured to less than 1%. The background counting rates obatined with the foils used for the measurements on the NaI detectors before their irradiation measurement were subtracted from all count rates. The results of the cadmium ratio measurements are given in Table 1.3-1 and Figure 1.3-1. “No correction has been made for self shielding in the foils” (Reference 3).

  8. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2014-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one NaI scintillator and the other foil on the other NaI detector and the activities measured simultaneously. The activation of a particular foil was compared to that of the normalization foil by dividing the count rate for each foil by that of the normalization foil. To correct for the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors, the normalization foil was counted in Detector 1 simultaneously with the foil at position x in Detector 2, and then the normalization foil was counted simultaneously in Detector 2 with the foil from position x in Counter 1. The activity of the foil from position x was divided by the activity of the normalization foil counted simultaneously. This resulted in obtaining two values of the ratio that were then averaged. This procedure essentially removed the effect of the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors. Differing efficiencies of 10% resulted in errors in the ratios measured to less than 1%. The background counting rates obatined with the foils used for the measurements on the NaI detectors before their irradiation measurement were subtracted from all count rates. The results of the cadmium ratio measurements are given in Table 1.3-1 and Figure 1.3-1. “No correction has been made for self shielding in the foils” (Reference 3).

  9. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-05-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950’s efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles”. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.” The first two experiments in the series were evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-001) and HEU-COMP-FAST-002 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-002). The first experiment had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The third set of experiments in the series, performed in mid-1963, which is studied in this evaluation, used beryllium reflectors. The beryllium reflected system was the preferred reactor configuration for this application because of the small thickness of the reflector. The two core configurations had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice and arranged in 7-tube clusters. The experiments have been determined to represent acceptable benchmark experiments. Information for this evaluation was compiled from published reports on all three parts of the experimental series (Reference 1-5) and the experimental logbook as well as from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

  10. Building the Foundation for U.S. Astronomy at m/cm Wavelengths in 2010 and Beyond A meeting held 3-4 August 2006 Tucson, AZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was aided by reference to the set of key science areas identified for the Square Kilometre Array as a long-term timing array for the detection of the nano-Hertz gravity waves, which result from cosmic

  11. Sealed head access area enclosure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Govi, Aldo R. (Greensburg, PA)

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder power reactor is provided with a sealed head access area enclosure disposed above the reactor vessel head consisting of a plurality of prefabricated structural panels including a center panel removably sealed into position with inflatable seals, and outer panels sealed into position with semipermanent sealant joints. The sealant joints are located in the joint between the edge of the panels and the reactor containment structure and include from bottom to top an inverted U-shaped strip, a lower layer of a room temperature vulcanizing material, a separator strip defining a test space therewithin, and an upper layer of a room temperature vulcanizing material. The test space is tapped by a normally plugged passage extending to the top of the enclosure for testing the seal or introducing a buffer gas thereinto.

  12. Large Area Vacuum Deposited Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-04-30

    It's easy to make the myriad of types of large area and decorative coatings for granted. We probably don't even think about most of them; the low-e and heat mirror coatings on our windows and car windows, the mirrors in displays, antireflection coatings on windows and displays, protective coatings on aircraft windows, heater coatings on windshields and aircraft windows, solar reflectors, thin film solar cells, telescope mirrors, Hubble mirrors, transparent conductive coatings, and the list goes on. All these products require large deposition systems and chambers. Also, don't forget that large batches of small substrates or parts are coated in large chambers. In order to be cost effective hundreds of ophthalmic lenses, automobile reflectors, display screens, lamp reflectors, cell phone windows, laser reflectors, DWDM filters, are coated in batches.

  13. The Spin-Kinetic Temperature Coupling and the Heating Rate due to Lyman Alpha Scattering before Reionization: Predictions for 21cm Emission and Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuelei Chen; Jordi Miralda-Escude

    2003-07-25

    We investigate the interaction of Lyman alpha photons produced by the first stars in the universe with the intergalactic medium (IGM) prior to reionization. The background Lyman alpha spectral profile is obtained by solving a Fokker-Planck equation. Accurate values of the heating and scattering rates, and the spin-kinetic temperature coupling coefficient, are presented. We show that the heating rate induced by the Lyman alpha scatterings is much lower than found previously, and is basically negligible. The dominant heating source is most likely the X-rays from the first ionizing sources, which are able to penetrate into the atomic medium. The scattering of Lyman alpha photons couples the hydrogen spin temperature to the kinetic temperature. If the first ionizing sources in the universe did not emit significant X-rays, the spin temperature would be rapidly brought down to the very low gas kinetic temperature, and a 21cm absorption signal against the CMB larger than 100 mK would be predicted. However, we argue that sufficient X-rays are likely to have been emitted by the first stellar population, implying that the gas kinetic temperature should rapidly increase, turning a reduced and brief absorption signal into emission, with a smaller amplitude of about 10 mK. The detection of the 21cm absorption and emission feature would be a hallmark in unravelling the history of the ``dark age'' before reionization.

  14. Evolution of the surface area of a snow layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanot, L.; Domine, F.

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric trace gases can partition between the atmosphere and the snow surface. Because snow has a large surface-to-volume ratio, an important interaction potential between ice and atmospheric trace gases exists. Quantifying this partitioning requires the knowledge of the surface area (SA) of snow. Eleven samples were taken from a 50 cm thick snow fall at Col de Porte, near Grenoble (French Alps) between January 20 and February 4, 1998. Fresh snow and 3, 8, and 15-day-old snow were sampled at three different depths. Surface hoar, formed after the fall, was also sampled. Air and surface snow temperature, snow density, and snow fall rate were measured. Snow temperature always remained below freezing. Snow SA was measured using methane adsorption at 77.15 K. Values ranged from 2.25 m{sup 2}/g for fresh snow to 0.25 m{sup 2}/g for surface hoar and surface snow after 15 days. These values are much too high to be explained by the macroscopic aspect of snow crystals, and microstructures such as small rime droplets must have been present. Large decrease in SA with time were observed. The first meter of snowpack had a total surface area of about 50,000 m{sup 2} per m{sup 2} of ground. Reduction in SA will lead to the emission of adsorbed species by the snowpack, with possible considerable increase in atmospheric concentrations.

  15. Game Preserves and Closed Areas (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Game preserves and closed areas exist within the state of Montana for the protection of all the game animals and birds. Construction and development is limited in these areas. Currently, only three...

  16. MARINE PROTECTED AREAS Fisheries Science and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    1 MARINE PROTECTED AREAS Fisheries Science and Management Rita OLIVEIRA MONTEIRO Cover photo of a mpa (coast and underwater) MARINE PROTECTED AREAS OBJECTIVES FOR TODAY: · definitions · historical · habitat degradation · invasive species · harmful algal blooms · marine epidemics · mass mortalities

  17. Center symmetry and area laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas D. Cohen

    2014-07-15

    SU($N_c$) gauge theories containing matter fields may be invariant under transformations of some subgroup of the $\\mathbb{Z}_{N_c}$ center; the maximum such subgroup is $\\mathbb{Z}_{p}$, with $p$ depending on $N_c$ and the representations of the various matter fields in the theory. Confining SU($N_c$) gauge theories in either 3+1 or 2+1 space-time dimensions and with matter fields in any representation have string tensions for representation $R$ given by $\\sigma_R =\\sigma_f \\, \\, \\frac{p_R (p-p_R) \\, \\, g\\left (p_R (p-p_R) \\right )}{(p-1) \\, \\, g(p -1 )} $ with $p_R={n_R \\, \\rm mod}(p)$, where $\\sigma_f $ is the string tension for the fundamental representation, $g$ is a positive finite function and $n_R$ is the n-ality of $R$. This implies that a necessary condition for a theory in this class to have an area law is invariance of the theory under a nontrivial subgroup of the center. Significantly, these results depend on $p$ regardless of the value of $N_c$.

  18. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Italy (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  19. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  20. Considering LEDs for Street and Area Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View Jim Brodrick's keynote video from the September 2009 IES Street and Area Lighting Conference in Philadelphia.

  1. New Academic Subject Area Information Sheet To be completed for new Academic Subject Areas only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    New Academic Subject Area Information Sheet To be completed for new Academic Subject Areas only New Academic Subject Area:____________________ (Maximum 4 Letters eg: INFO; except for ELFSC: Maximum of 6

  2. Part-of-Speech tagging Dividing area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    Part-of-Speech tagging Dividing area -Grids by 1 degree lat & lng Evaluation area weight Date Area (lat, lng) snow 9/1/2012 38~39, -78~-77 sunset 13/1/2012 47~48,-123~-122 Grammy 12/2/2012 34

  3. Lake Charles Urbanized Area MTP 2034 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake Charles Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-08-04

    CONSTRAINED AND UNCONSTRAINED PLAN PROJECTS . C-1 ? Lake Charles Urbanized Area MTP 2034 ? Page v Alliance Transportation Group, Inc. Adopted August 4, 2009 Table of Tables Table 2-1 Stakeholders Present... ......................................................................................................... 3-1 ? Lake Charles Urbanized Area MTP 2034 ? Page iii Alliance Transportation Group, Inc. Adopted August 4, 2009 LAKE CHARLES URBANIZED AREA TRAVEL DEMAND MODEL .............................................................. 3-2 SOCIOECONOMIC...

  4. SWOPE PARK INDUSTRIAL AREA Kansas City, Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SWOPE PARK INDUSTRIAL AREA Kansas City, Missouri MODIFICATION REQUEST Modification to support this request. PROJECT PURPOSE Swope Park Industrial Area is located in the south-central portion safe ingress/egress during flooding. The Swope Park Industrial Area has limited access, one

  5. Parameter Tuning and Calibration of RegCM3 with MIT-Emanuel Cumulus Parameterization Scheme over CORDEX East Asian Domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Liwei; Qian, Yun; Zhou, Tianjun; Yang, Ben

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we calibrated the performance of regional climate model RegCM3 with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)-Emanuel cumulus parameterization scheme over CORDEX East Asia domain by tuning the selected seven parameters through multiple very fast simulated annealing (MVFSA) sampling method. The seven parameters were selected based on previous studies, which customized the RegCM3 with MIT-Emanuel scheme through three different ways by using the sensitivity experiments. The responses of model results to the seven parameters were investigated. Since the monthly total rainfall is constrained, the simulated spatial pattern of rainfall and the probability density function (PDF) distribution of daily rainfall rates are significantly improved in the optimal simulation. Sensitivity analysis suggest that the parameter “relative humidity criteria” (RH), which has not been considered in the default simulation, has the largest effect on the model results. The responses of total rainfall over different regions to RH were examined. Positive responses of total rainfall to RH are found over northern equatorial western Pacific, which are contributed by the positive responses of explicit rainfall. Followed by an increase of RH, the increases of the low-level convergence and the associated increases in cloud water favor the increase of the explicit rainfall. The identified optimal parameters constrained by the total rainfall have positive effects on the low-level circulation and the surface air temperature. Furthermore, the optimized parameters based on the extreme case are suitable for a normal case and the model’s new version with mixed convection scheme.

  6. K-shell emission trends from 60 to 130cm/s stainless steel implosions D. J. Ampleford, C. A. Jennings, B. Jones, S. B. Hansen, M. E. Cuneo, C. A. Coverdale, M. C. Jones, T. M.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K-shell emission trends from 60 to 130cm/s stainless steel implosions D. J. Ampleford, C. A/ls stainless steel implosions D. J. Ampleford,1,a) C. A. Jennings,1 B. Jones,1 S. B. Hansen,1 M. E. Cuneo,1 C, implosion velocities up to 110­130 cm/ls in imploding stainless steel wire arrays. These velocities

  7. Transfer Area Mechanical Handling Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Dianda

    2004-06-23

    This calculation is intended to support the License Application (LA) submittal of December 2004, in accordance with the directive given by DOE correspondence received on the 27th of January 2004 entitled: ''Authorization for Bechtel SAX Company L.L. C. to Include a Bare Fuel Handling Facility and Increased Aging Capacity in the License Application, Contract Number DE-AC28-01R W12101'' (Arthur, W.J., I11 2004). This correspondence was appended by further Correspondence received on the 19th of February 2004 entitled: ''Technical Direction to Bechtel SAIC Company L.L. C. for Surface Facility Improvements, Contract Number DE-AC28-OIRW12101; TDL No. 04-024'' (BSC 2004a). These documents give the authorization for a Fuel Handling Facility to be included in the baseline. The purpose of this calculation is to establish preliminary bounding equipment envelopes and weights for the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) transfer areas equipment. This calculation provides preliminary information only to support development of facility layouts and preliminary load calculations. The limitations of this preliminary calculation lie within the assumptions of section 5 , as this calculation is part of an evolutionary design process. It is intended that this calculation is superseded as the design advances to reflect information necessary to support License Application. The design choices outlined within this calculation represent a demonstration of feasibility and may or may not be included in the completed design. This calculation provides preliminary weight, dimensional envelope, and equipment position in building for the purposes of defining interface variables. This calculation identifies and sizes major equipment and assemblies that dictate overall equipment dimensions and facility interfaces. Sizing of components is based on the selection of commercially available products, where applicable. This is not a specific recommendation for the future use of these components or their related manufacturer. A component produced by one manufacturer certainly varies dimensionally from a similar product produced by a different manufacturer. The internal envelope dimensions are dependent on the selection of the individual components. The external envelope dimensions, as well as, key interface dimensions are established within this calculation and are to be treated as bounding dimensions.

  8. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIFUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Caldwell, T.; Pak, D; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.

    2011-09-27

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. Conclusions from this work include the following. The CSSX process is capable of reducing {sup 137}Cs in high level radioactive waste by a factor of more than 40,000 using five extraction, two scrub, and five strip stages. Tests demonstrated extraction and strip section stage efficiencies of greater than 93% for the Tank 49H waste test and greater than 88% for the simulant waste test. During a test with HLW, researchers processed 39 liters of Tank 49H solution and the waste raffinate had an average decontamination factor (DF) of 6.78E+04, with a maximum of 1.08E+05. A simulant waste solution ({approx}34.5 liters) with an initial Cs concentration of 83.1 mg/L was processed and had an average DF greater than 5.9E+03, with a maximum DF of greater than 6.6E+03. The difference may be attributable to differences in contactor stage efficiencies. Test results showed the solvent can be stripped of cesium and recycled for {approx}25 solvent turnovers without the occurrence of any measurable solvent degradation or negative effects from minor components. Based on the performance of the 12-stage 2-cm apparatus with the Tank 49H HLW, the projected DF for MCU with seven extraction, two scrub, and seven strip stages operating at a nominal efficiency of 90% is {approx}388,000. At 95% stage efficiency, the DF in MCU would be {approx}3.2 million. Carryover of organic solvent in aqueous streams (and aqueous in organic streams) was less than 0.1% when processing Tank 49H HLW. The entrained solvent concentration measured in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) was as much as {approx}140 mg/L, although that value may be overstated by as much as 50% due to modifier solubility in the DSS. The entrained solvent concentration was measured in the strip effluent (SE) and the results are pending. A steady-state concentration factor (CF) of 15.9 was achieved with Tank 49H HLW. Cesium distribution ratios [D(Cs)] were measured with non-radioactive Tank 49H waste simulant and actual Tank 49H waste. Below is a comparison of D(Cs) values of ESS and 2-cm tests. Batch Extraction-Strip-Scrub (ESS) tests yielded D(Cs) values for extraction of {approx}81-88 for tests with Tank 49H waste and waste simulant. The results from the 2-cm contactor tests were in agreement with values of 58-92 for the Tank 49H HLW test and 54-83 for the simulant waste test. These values are consistent with the reference D(Cs) for extraction of {approx}60. In tests with Tank 49H waste and waste simulant, batch ESS tests measured D(Cs) values for the two scrub stages as {approx}3.5-5.0 for the first scrub stage and {approx}1.0-3.0 for the second scrub stage. In the Tank 49H test, the D(Cs) values for the 2-cm test were far from the ESS values. A D(Cs) value of 161 was measured for the first scrub stage and 10.8 for the second scrub stage. The data suggest that the scrub stage is not operating as effectively as intended. For the simulant test, a D(Cs) value of 1.9 was measured for the first scrub stage; the sample from the second scrub stage was compromised. Measurements of the pH of all stage samples for the Tank 49H test showed that the pH for extraction and scrub stages was 14 and the pH for the strip stages was {approx}7. It is expected that the pH of the second scrub stage would be {approx}12-13. Batch ESS tests measured D(Cs) values for the strip stages to be {approx}0.002-0.010. A high value in Strip No.3 of a test with simulant solution has been attributed to issues associated with the limits of detection for the

  9. From Centimeter to Millimeter Wavelengths: A High Angular Resolution Study of 3C273

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Krichbaum; A. Witzel; J. A. Zensus

    2001-03-27

    We monitored 3C273 with VLBI at 15-86 GHz since 1990. We discuss component trajectories, opacity effects at the jet base, a rotating and perhaps precessing jet, and outburst-ejection relations from Gamma-ray to radio bands.

  10. Structure of W3(OH) from Very High Spectral Resolution Observations of 5 Centimeter OH Masers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish; Loránt O. Sjouwerman

    2007-06-22

    Recent studies of methanol and ground-state OH masers at very high spectral resolution have shed new light on small-scale maser processes. The nearby source W3(OH), which contains numerous bright masers in several different transitions, provides an excellent laboratory for high spectral resolution techniques. We present a model of W3(OH) based on EVN observations of the rotationally-excited 6030 and 6035 MHz OH masers taken at 0.024 km/s spectral resolution. The 6.0 GHz masers are becoming brighter with time and show evidence for tangential proper motions. We confirm the existence of a region of magnetic field oriented toward the observer to the southeast and find another such region to the northeast in W3(OH), near the champagne flow. The 6.0 GHz masers trace the inner edge of a counterclockwise rotating torus feature. Masers at 6030 MHz are usually a factor of a few weaker than at 6035 MHz but trace the same material. Velocity gradients of nearby Zeeman components are much more closely correlated than in the ground state, likely due to the smaller spatial separation between Zeeman components. Hydroxyl maser peaks at very long baseline interferometric resolution appear to have structure on scales both smaller than that resolvable as well as on larger scales.

  11. Observations of the 6 Centimeter Lines of OH in Evolved (OH/IR) Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish; Laura K. Zschaechner; Loránt O. Sjouwerman; Ylva M. Pihlström; Mark J. Claussen

    2006-10-24

    Recent observational and theoretical advances have called into question traditional OH maser pumping models in evolved (OH/IR) stars. The detection of excited-state OH lines would provide additional constraints to discriminate amongst these theoretical models. In this Letter, we report on VLA observations of the 4750 MHz and 4765 MHz lines of OH toward 45 sources, mostly evolved stars. We detect 4765 MHz emission in the star forming regions Mon R2 and LDN 1084, but we do not detect excited-state emission in any evolved stars. The flux density and velocity of the 4765 MHz detection in Mon R2 suggests that a new flaring event has begun.

  12. Correction of Magnetization Sextupole and Decapole in a 5 Centimeter Bore SSC Dipole Using Passive Superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Idea of Passive Superconductor Correction," presented aton the Fermilab Passive Superconductor Test," ICFA Workshop,methods of passive superconductor correction will reduce

  13. Modeling and implementation of solder-activated joints for single actuator, centimeter-scale robotic mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telleria, Maria J

    2010-01-01

    This thesis explains when, and why, solder-based phase change materials (PCMs) are best-suited as a means to modify a robotic mechanism's kinematic and elastomechanic behavior. The preceding refers to mechanisms that possess ...

  14. Public participation in a DOE national program: The mixed waste focus area`s approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The authors describe the Mixed Waste Focus Area`s approach to involving interested Tribal and public members in the mixed waste technology development process. Evidence is provided to support the thesis that the Focus Area`s systems engineering process, which provides visible and documented requirements and decision criteria, facilitates effective Tribal and public participation. Also described is a status of Tribal and public involvement at three levels of Focus Area activities.

  15. Constraints on the neutrino parameters by future cosmological 21cm line and precise CMB polarization observations (PhD thesis, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI))

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyama, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the 21 cm line radiation coming from the epoch of reionization have a great capacity to study the cosmological growth of the Universe. Also, CMB polarization produced by gravitational lensing has a large amount of information about the growth of matter fluctuations at late time. In this thesis, we investigate their sensitivities to the impact of neutrino property on the growth of density fluctuations, such as the total neutrino mass, the neutrino mass hierarchy, the effective number of neutrino species (extra radiation), and the lepton asymmetry of our Universe. We will show that by combining the precise CMB polarization observations with Square Kilometer Array (SKA) we can measure the impact of non-zero neutrino mass on the growth of density fluctuation, and determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at 2 sigma level if the total neutrino mass is smaller than 0.1 eV. Additionally, we will show that by using these combinations we can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthes...

  16. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIGUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Pak, D.; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.; Caldwell, T.

    2011-11-29

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive is used to improve stripping performance and to mitigate the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008.

  17. An Automated Method for the Detection and Extraction of HI Self-Absorption in High-Resolution 21cm Line Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven J. Gibson; A. Russell Taylor; Lloyd A. Higgs; Christopher M. Brunt; Peter E. Dewdney

    2005-03-05

    We describe algorithms that detect 21cm line HI self-absorption (HISA) in large data sets and extract it for analysis. Our search method identifies HISA as spatially and spectrally confined dark HI features that appear as negative residuals after removing larger-scale emission components with a modified CLEAN algorithm. Adjacent HISA volume-pixels (voxels) are grouped into features in (l,b,v) space, and the HI brightness of voxels outside the 3-D feature boundaries is smoothly interpolated to estimate the absorption amplitude and the unabsorbed HI emission brightness. The reliability and completeness of our HISA detection scheme have been tested extensively with model data. We detect most features over a wide range of sizes, linewidths, amplitudes, and background levels, with poor detection only where the absorption brightness temperature amplitude is weak, the absorption scale approaches that of the correlated noise, or the background level is too faint for HISA to be distinguished reliably from emission gaps. False detection rates are very low in all parts of the parameter space except at sizes and amplitudes approaching those of noise fluctuations. Absorption measurement biases introduced by the method are generally small and appear to arise from cases of incomplete HISA detection. This paper is the third in a series examining HISA at high angular resolution. A companion paper (Paper II) uses our HISA search and extraction method to investigate the cold atomic gas distribution in the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey.

  18. Focus Areas 1 and 4 Deliverables

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 - Requirements Flow Down and Focus Area 4 - Graded Approach to Quality Assurance Graded Approach Model and Expectation Page 1 of 18 Office of Environmental Management And Energy...

  19. Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard - DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear facilities. DOE-STD-1150-2013, Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard Type: Invoked Technical Standards Status: Current Approved Date: Dec 02, 2013...

  20. 300 Area Process Trenches Groundwater Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Jonathan W.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2001-08-13

    This document is a proposed groundwater monitoring plan for the 300 Area process trenches to comply with RCRA final status, corrective action groundwater monitoring.

  1. Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    radiation-dominated HED dynamo, and radiation-dominated reconnection. Nonlinear Optics of Plasmas and Laser-Plasma Interactions Specific areas of interest include, but are...

  2. Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At...

  3. Safety Software Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72-2011, Safety Software Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard by Diane Johnson This SSQA FAQS identifies the minimum technical competency requirements for DOE...

  4. Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wannamaker...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area, Nevada- Structural Controls, Hydrothermal Alteration and Deep Fluid Sources Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMagne...

  5. DFAS Wide-Area Workflow Issues

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the DFAS wide-area workflow issues and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  6. Area 2: Use Of Engineered Nanoparticle-Stabilized CO 2 Foams To Improve

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal8823 Revision 02August 1,Are there Gains fromArea

  7. Molecular eigenstate spectroscopy: Application to the intramolecular dynamics of some polyatomic molecules in the 3000 to 7000 cm{sup {minus}1} region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, D.S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) appears to be a universal property of polyatomic molecules in energy regions where the vibrational density of states is greater than about 5 to 30 states per cm{sup {minus}1}. Interest in IVR stems from its central importance to the spectroscopy, photochemistry, and reaction kinetics of these molecules. A bright state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which may be a C-H stretching vibration, carries the oscillator strength from the ground state. This bright state may mix with bath rotational-vibrational levels to form a clump of molecular eigenstates, each of which carries a portion of the oscillator strength from the ground state. In this work the authors explicitly resolve transitions to each of these molecular eigenstates. Detailed information about the nature of IVR is contained in the frequencies and intensities of the observed discrete transitions. The primary goal of this research is to probe the coupling mechanisms by which IVR takes place. The most fundamental distinction to be made is between anharmonic coupling which is independent of molecular rotation and rotationally-mediated coupling. The authors are also interested in the rate at which IVR takes place. Measurements are strictly in the frequency domain but information is obtained about the decay of the zero order state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which could be prepared in a hypothetical experiment as a coherent excitation of the clump of molecular eigenstates. As the coherent superposition dephases, the energy would flow from the initially prepared mode into nearby overtones and combinations of lower frequency vibrational modes. The decay of the initially prepared mode is related to a pure sequence infrared absorption spectrum by a Fourier transform.

  8. Faculty & Staff Areas of Specialization ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Faculty & Staff Areas of Specialization 2010-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING #12;Faculty & Staff Areas of Engineering 3304 Patrick F. Taylor Hall Baton Rouge, LA 70803 225/578-5706 225/578-8388 Fax mlavall@lsu.edu www.eng.lsu.edu COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 1 Table of Contents College of Engineering Administration

  9. College of Science CLINICAL SCIENCE AREA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 College of Science CLINICAL SCIENCE AREA MANUAL DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY VIRIGINIA TECH AY2015 Training 24 B. Clinical Science Area Committee 25 C. Graduate Student Representatives 25 D. Advisor 26 E for Continuation on to the Preliminary Examination 49 F. Plan of Study: Doctoral Degree 51 G. The Preliminary

  10. Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin and Range Geothermal Region Medical Hot Springs Geothermal Area Idaho Batholith Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Cascades Melozi Hot Springs Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal...

  11. Tanks Focus Area annual report FY2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation effort with tanks containing hazardous and radioactive waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials. With some 90 million gallons of waste in the form of solid, sludge, liquid, and gas stored in 287 tanks across the DOE complex, containing approximately 650 million curies, radioactive waste storage tank remediation is the nation's highest cleanup priority. Differing waste types and unique technical issues require specialized science and technology to achieve tank cleanup in an environmentally acceptable manner. Some of the waste has been stored for over 50 years in tanks that have exceeded their design lives. The challenge is to characterize and maintain these contents in a safe condition and continue to remediate and close each tank to minimize the risks of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. In 1994, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) created a group of integrated, multiorganizational teams focusing on specific areas of the EM cleanup mission. These teams have evolved into five focus areas managed within EM's Office of Science and Technology (OST): Tanks Focus Area (TFA); Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area; Nuclear Materials Focus Area; Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area; and Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area.

  12. Area products for black hole horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Area products for multi-horizon black holes often have intriguing properties, and are often independent of the mass of the black hole (depending only on various charges, angular momenta, and moduli). Such products are often formulated in terms of the areas of inner (Cauchy) horizons and event horizons, and often include the effects of unphysical "virtual'" horizons. For the Schwarzschild-de Sitter [Kottler] black hole in (3+1) dimensions it is shown by explicit exact calculation that the product of event horizon area and cosmological horizon area is not mass independent. (Including the effect of the third "virtual" horizon does not improve the situation.) Similarly, in the Reissner-Nordstrom-anti-de Sitter black hole in (3+1) dimensions the product of inner (Cauchy) horizon area and event horizon area is calculated (perturbatively), and is shown to be not mass independent. That is, the mass-independence of the product of physical horizon areas is not generic. In the generic situation, whenever the quasi-local...

  13. 200 North Aggregate Area source AAMS report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the 200 North Aggregate Area in the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. This scoping level study provides the basis for initiating Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS) under RCRA. This report also integrates select RCRA treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past practice investigations.

  14. Radiological Modeling for Determination of Derived Concentration Levels of an Area with Uranium Residual Material - 13533

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Sanchez, Danyl [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)] [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    As a result of a pilot project developed at the old Spanish 'Junta de Energia Nuclear' to extract uranium from ores, tailings materials were generated. Most of these residual materials were sent back to different uranium mines, but a small amount of it was mixed with conventional building materials and deposited near the old plant until the surrounding ground was flattened. The affected land is included in an area under institutional control and used as recreational area. At the time of processing, uranium isotopes were separated but other radionuclides of the uranium decay series as Th-230, Ra-226 and daughters remain in the residue. Recently, the analyses of samples taken at different ground's depths confirmed their presence. This paper presents the methodology used to calculate the derived concentration level to ensure that the reference dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 used as radiological criteria. In this study, a radiological impact assessment was performed modeling the area as recreational scenario. The modelization study was carried out with the code RESRAD considering as exposure pathways, external irradiation, inadvertent ingestion of soil, inhalation of resuspended particles, and inhalation of radon (Rn-222). As result was concluded that, if the concentration of Ra-226 in the first 15 cm of soil is lower than, 0.34 Bq g{sup -1}, the dose would not exceed the reference dose. Applying this value as a derived concentration level and comparing with the results of measurements on the ground, some areas with a concentration of activity slightly higher than latter were found. In these zones the remediation proposal has been to cover with a layer of 15 cm of clean material. This action represents a reduction of 85% of the dose and ensures compliance with the reference dose. (authors)

  15. Central Plateau Inner Area Cleanup Principles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network Shaping ofStaff HighlightCentral

  16. 100-F/IU Area ROD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPO Retirees withEnergy Special4 Mickey

  17. Area Information | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagnetic SpinsSolicitations &

  18. Beryllium Facilities & Areas - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBeryllium and Chronic Beryllium DiseaseFAQs About

  19. Efficient Wide Area Data Transfer Protocols

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES Science NetworkMediator Effects of ProtonationEfficient Wide

  20. Fire victim helped by area programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices » IncentivesStocks 7,171Fire

  1. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Science Thrust Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask2 J.N.openNeutronUser Resources The

  2. Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAboutNuclearPrincipalResearch AffiliateNational Laser

  3. Research Subject Areas for IGPPS Proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday Production of SOA inResearch Portfolio MapResearchResearch

  4. PPPL Area Map | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams forOrhanTheoretical Methods for2016 Science asPPPL

  5. SULI Areas of Research | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The2/01/12 PageInformation DoE PagesW1SULI

  6. Knoxville Area Transit: Propane Hybrid Electric Trolleys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-04-01

    A 2-page fact sheet summarizing the evaluation done by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity on the Knoxville Area Transit's use of propane hybrid electric trolleys.

  7. Sacramento Area Voltage Support Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    transmission projects in the general area, would not generate significant amounts of air pollution emissions. ES.7 IMPACTS The Proposed Action would consist of 31.6 miles of...

  8. Industrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    selected in Biomedical, Civil and Environmental, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering are thoseIndustrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering understands our students may work as Industrial Engineers in other engineering

  9. Chinese immigrant entrepreneurs in New England area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Joe Xiongwei

    2008-01-01

    More and more Chinese immigrants came to the U.S. to start a whole new life. Some of them became entrepreneurs. This study focused on Chinese new immigrant entrepreneurs in New England area, and analyzed what factors have ...

  10. Redefining Housing Market Areas in Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muir, Christopher Iain

    2009-01-01

    This research aims to address some of the limitations inherent in the methods currently used for identification of Housing Market Areas (HMAs) in Scotland. Firstly the conventionally defined geography of HMAs for the four ...

  11. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  12. Regulating new construction in historic areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sellers-Garcia, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    This study is an examination of how the restrictiveness of different design regulations impacts the process of new construction in historic areas. The North End, South End, and Back Bay neighborhoods of Boston were identified ...

  13. Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy from buildings. Ventilation, however, comes with a significant energy cost. Currently, heating, cooling and ventilating commercial buildings represents 29 percent of their total onsite energy use

  14. Family Care La Mesa Village Housing Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Family Care La Mesa Village Housing Area Child Care Development Center 2 La Mesa Way Bldg. 439 831 Recommendation 1 The Monterey Taxi Cab Company will provide Taxi Service from Herrmann Hall to your residence

  15. Using mammographic density to predict breast cancer risk: dense area or percent dense area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Jennifer; Ding, Jane; Warren, Ruth M L; Duffy, Stephen; Hopper, John L

    2010-11-18

    and dense area were strongly associated with breast cancer risk; however, inclusion of dense area in a PDA-adjusted model improved the pre- diction of breast cancer risk, but not vice versa. This suggests that, in terms of a single parameter, dense area... dense area alone. Conclusions: As a single parameter, dense area provides more information than PDA on breast cancer risk. Introduction A number of prospective, nested case control studies have shown that, for women of the same age, those with greater...

  16. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIvERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIv% 22% 21% 11% 1% 19% 51% 18% 12% 2.9 1.9 2.2 2.2 7.1 TRIPS MADE BY RESIDENTS OF TOWNSHIP OF KING 9

  17. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIvERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIv,800 20.6% 43% 18% 26% 13% 67% 14% 5% 3% 8% 3% 5.7 3.4 3.9 51.8 329,100 28% 9% 45% 18% 69% 19% 4% 2% 5% 1

  18. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIvERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIv% 26% 24% 26% 15% 3% 30% 51% 13% 3% 3.2 1.7 2.2 1.9 6.8 TRIPS MADE BY RESIDENTS OF TOWNSHIP OF BROCK

  19. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIvERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIv,000 72% 13% 15% 15% 33% 20% 23% 9% 4% 30% 51% 12% 3% 2.8 1.6 2.0 1.8 6.5 TRIPS MADE BY RESIDENTS OF TOWN

  20. Area and Volume Problems 1. Given the formula for the area of a square, derive the formula for the area of a rectangle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    Area and Volume Problems 1. Given the formula for the area of a square, derive the formula for the area of a rectangle of dimensions a and b. 2. Given the formula for the area of a rectangle, derive the formula for the area of a parallelogram of base b and height h. 3. Use calculus to derive the formula

  1. Development of Large Area Gas Electron Multiplier Detector and Its Application to a Digital Hadron Calorimeter for Future Collider Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andrew

    2014-09-25

    The UTA High Energy Physics Group conducted generic detector development based on large area, very thin and high sensitivity gas detector using gas electron multiplier (GEM) technology. This is in preparation for a use as a sensitive medium for sampling calorimeters in future collider experiments at the Energy Frontier as well as part of the tracking detector in Intensity Frontier experiments. We also have been monitoring the long term behavior of one of the prototype detectors (30cmx30cm) read out by the SLAC-developed 13-bit KPiX analog chip over three years and have made presentations of results at various APS meetings. While the important next step was the development of large area (1m x 1m) GEM planes, we also have looked into opportunities of applying this technology to precision tracking detectors to significantly improve the performance of the Range Stack detector for CP violation experiments and to provide an amplification layer for the liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber in the LBNE experiment. We have jointly developed 33cmx100cm large GEM foils with the CERN gas detector development group to construct 33cm x100cm unit chambers. Three of these unit chambers will be put together to form a 1m x 1m detector plane. Following characterization of one 33cmx100cm unit chamber prototype, a total of five 1m x 1m planes will be constructed and inserted into an existing 1m3 RPC DHCAL stack to test the performance of the new GEM DHCAL in particle beams. The large area GEM detector we planned to develop in this proposal not only gives an important option to DHCAL for future collider experiments but also the potential to expand its use to Intensity Frontier and Cosmic Frontier experiments as high efficiency, high amplification anode planes for liquid Argon time projection chambers. Finally, thanks to its sensitivity to X-rays and other neutral radiations and its light-weight characteristics, the large area GEM has a great potential for the use in medical imaging and homeland security, as well as satellite based astronomy experiments.

  2. Wetland survey of selected areas in the K-24 Site Area of responsibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel, B.A.; Awl, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    In accordance with DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements, wetland surveys were conducted in selected areas within the K-25 Area of Responsibility during the summer of 1994. These areas are Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, the K-770 OU, Duct Island Peninsula, the Powerhouse area, and the K-25 South Corner. Previously surveyed areas included in this report are the main plant area of the K-25 Site, the K-901 OU, the AVLIS site, and the K-25 South Site. Wetland determinations were based on the USACE methodology. Forty-four separate wetland areas, ranging in size from 0.13 to 4.23 ha, were identified. Wetlands were identified in all of the areas surveyed with the exception of the interior of the Duct Island Peninsula and the main plant area of the K-25 Site. Wetlands perform functions such as floodflow alteration, sediment stabilization, sediment and toxicant retention, nutrient transformation, production export, and support of aquatic species and wildlife diversity and abundance. The forested, scrub-shrub, and emergent wetlands identified in the K-25 area perform some or all of these functions to varying degrees.

  3. Entanglement area law from specific heat capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernando G. S. L. Brandao; Marcus Cramer

    2015-08-20

    We study the scaling of entanglement in low-energy states of quantum many-body models on lattices of arbitrary dimensions. We allow for unbounded Hamiltonians such that systems with bosonic degrees of freedom are included. We show that if at low enough temperatures the specific heat capacity of the model decays exponentially with inverse temperature, the entanglement in every low-energy state satisfies an area law (with a logarithmic correction). This behaviour of the heat capacity is typically observed in gapped systems. Assuming merely that the low-temperature specific heat decays polynomially with temperature, we find a subvolume scaling of entanglement. Our results give experimentally verifiable conditions for area laws, show that they are a generic property of low-energy states of matter, and, to the best of our knowledge, constitute the first proof of an area law for unbounded Hamiltonians beyond those that are integrable.

  4. Property:DevelopmentArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOfficesCollaboratorsDevelopmentArea Jump to:

  5. Large-area Silicon-Film{trademark} panels and solar cells. Final technical report, July 1995--March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rand, J.A.; Bai, Y.; Barnett, A.M.; Culik, J.S.; Ford, D.H.; Hall, R.B.; Kendall, C.L.

    1998-09-01

    This report will detail substantial improvements in each of the task areas. A number of new products were developed, including a 130 kW array built using a new panel design. Improvements in laboratory-scale solar cell processing resulted in a confirmed efficiency of 16.6%. A new Silicon-Film{trademark} production sheet machine was built which increased throughput by 70%. Three solar cell fabrication processes were converted from low throughout batch processes to high throughput, continuous, belt processes. These new processes are capable of processing sheet over 31 cm in width. Finally, a new Silicon-Film{trademark} sheet machine was built that demonstrated a sheet width of 38 cm. This tool enabled AstroPower to demonstrate a wide range of solar cell sizes, many of which have generated considerable market interest.

  6. Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-03

    The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

  7. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRELL, R D

    2002-07-16

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  8. Versatile secondary beam for the meson area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, T.

    1982-03-01

    A new secondary beam design is outlined for the Meson M6 Beamline that combines versatility with economy. The beamline described will transport charged particles of either sign to 800 GeV/c and bring the beam to a focus in one of three potential experimental areas. The plan makes maximal use of existing civil construction.

  9. Quiet, Nonconsumptive Recreation Reduces Protected Area Effectiveness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    in community composition from native to nonnative species. Demand for recreation and nature-based tourism use the world's protected areas for the recreation, education, and tourism opportu- nities public access (IUCN Categories Ib-VI; IUCN 1994), and key reserve networks, including national park sys

  10. Business Continuity Planning Administrative Support Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    of facilities or utilities · Deliberate acts of disruption Business continuity planning process is an ongoingBusiness Continuity Planning for Administrative Support Areas 1 #12;What is Business Continuity Planning? Planning for an adverse, major or catastrophic event that would cause a disruption to our mission

  11. AREA OVERVIEW----Agent & Data Mining Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Longbing

    AREA OVERVIEW---- Agent & Data Mining Interaction (ADMI) Longbing Cao Faculty of Information in a Multiple Agent Environment", EWSL91, 1991 Agent-based data mining & knowledge discovery by Davies, W., 1994 Research topics Agent driven data mining Data mining driven agents & multi- agent systems Mutual issues

  12. Orc Notation Structured Wide-Area Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Jayadev

    Orc Notation Structured Wide-Area Programming Jayadev Misra Department of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu April 12, 2010 Rennes, France #12;Orc Notation hierarchical structure. #12;Orc Notation Orc · Goal: Internet scripting language. · Next: Component integration

  13. ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

  14. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark R. Cole

    2013-12-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

  15. Understanding ecological variation across species: area-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Ian

    and mass- based assimilation rate or nitrogen (N) content can equally be Table 1 The two main arguments put: Photosynthesis is naturally an area-based process. When it is expressed on a mass basis, the dominant axis and associated traits) and biochemistry (e.g. nitrogen (N)) affect leaf carbon exchange processes

  16. 100-B area technical baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, R.W.

    1994-09-01

    This document supports the environmental remediation effort of the 100-B Area by providing remediation planners with key data that characterize the 100-B and 100-C Reactor sites. It provides operational histories of the 100-B and 100-C Reactors and each of their associated liquid and solid waste sites.

  17. Understanding Road Usage Patterns in Urban Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decreases the roads' level of service, while at the same time increasing both fuel consump- tion5Understanding Road Usage Patterns in Urban Areas Pu Wang1,2 , Timothy Hunter4 , Alexandre M. Bayen4 patterns in urban road usage. We find that the major usage of each road segment can be traced to its own

  18. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keim, E.

    1997-04-01

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

  19. West Central North East Area of Tucson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    a, b) in urbanized areas. The Tucson Hummingbird Project (THP) is a citizen-science, reconciliation for migrating ones. Citizen Science and OutreachCitizen Science and Outreach The latter was achieved with citizen scientists via large-scale outreach to the local community. Projects such as the THP can

  20. 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the RCBRA Fall 2005 Data Compilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Queen

    2006-05-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a brief description of the sampling approaches, a description of the samples collected, and the results for the Fall 2005 sampling event. This report presents the methods and results of the work to support the 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment.

  1. Geophysical Mapping of Lost Historical Sites: Brenham, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Charles

    2014-09-17

    of distance cm Centimeters – measurement of distance m 2 Squared Meters – measurement of area kHz Kilohertz, 1000 hertz – measurement of frequency MHz Megahertz, 10 6 hertz GHz Gigahertz, 10 9 hertz nT nanoTeslas... battery pack and is responsible for recording and storing of all data. Typically measurements of the geomagnetic field range from 45,000 to 50,000 nanoTeslas (nT), the G-858 magnetometer is able to measure the magnetic field with a precision of 0.1 n...

  2. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM New Jersey Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

    2013-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development and evaluation of the delineations for the New Jersey (NJ) WEA. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the New Jersey WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL identified a selection of leasing areas and proposed delineation boundaries within the established NJ WEA. The primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

  3. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Parker, Z.; Fields, M.; Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Draxl, C.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development of three delineated leasing area options for the Massachusetts (MA) WEA and the technical evaluation of these leasing areas. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the MA WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL worked with BOEM to identify an appropriate number of leasing areas and proposed three delineation alternatives within the MA WEA based on the boundaries announced in May 2012. A primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

  4. Nevada Test 1999 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 radioactive waste management sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yvonne Townsend

    2000-05-01

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels, whereas radon concentrations are not above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the alluvial aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorology data indicate that 1999 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 3.9 inches at the Area 3 RWMS (61 percent of average) and 3.8 inches at the Area 5 RWMS (75 percent of average). Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 1999 rainfall infiltrated less than one foot before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium data indicate very slow migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were insignificant. All 1999 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing as expected at isolating buried waste.

  5. Hydrogeologic analyses in support of the conceptual model for the LANL Area G LLRW performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vold, E.L.; Birdsell, K.; Rogers, D.; Springer, E.; Krier, D.; Turin, H.J.

    1996-04-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level radioactive waste disposal facility at Area G is currently completing a draft of the site Performance Assessment. Results from previous field studies have estimated a range in recharge rate up to 1 cm/yr. Recent estimates of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity for each stratigraphic layer under a unit gradient assumption show a wide range in recharge rate of 10{sup {minus}4} to 1 cm/yr depending upon location. Numerical computations show that a single net infiltration rate at the mesa surface does not match the moisture profile in each stratigraphic layer simultaneously, suggesting local source or sink terms possibly due to surface connected porous regions. The best fit to field data at deeper stratigraphic layers occurs for a net infiltration of about 0.1 cm/yr. A recent detailed analysis evaluated liquid phase vertical moisture flux, based on moisture profiles in several boreholes and van Genuchten fits to the hydraulic properties for each of the stratigraphic units. Results show a near surface infiltration region averages 8m deep, below which is a dry, low moisture content, and low flux region, where liquid phase recharge averages to zero. Analysis shows this low flux region is dominated by vapor movement. Field data from tritium diffusion studies, from pressure fluctuation attenuation studies, and from comparisons of in-situ and core sample permeabilities indicate that the vapor diffusion is enhanced above that expected in the matrix and is presumably due to enhanced flow through the fractures. Below this dry region within the mesa is a moisture spike which analyses show corresponds to a moisture source. The likely physical explanation is seasonal transient infiltration through surface-connected fractures. This anomalous region is being investigated in current field studies, because it is critical in understanding the moisture flux which continues to deeper regions through the unsaturated zone.

  6. Kirkland gets license in hot Philippines area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkland, A.S.

    1992-08-03

    This paper reports that Kirkland As, Oslo, has received a geophysical survey and exploration contract (GSEC) in a sizzling exploration and development theater off the Philippines. The license covers about 6,000 sq miles of undisputed waters, with depths mostly less than 300 ft, and lies in the Reed Bank area off Northwest Palawan Island, where several major oil and gas strikes have been made recently. Kirkland has 1 year in which to carry out its seismic work commitment. The terms of the GSEC then give an option to drill one well in a 6 month period. Once the results have been analyzed, the company can either drill another well or enter into a service contract for the license. Kirkland has a 65% share in the license, with the remainder split between Philippine companies Philodrill Corp., Beguet Mining Corp. subsidiary Petrofields, and Seafront Resources Corp. The Philippines is one of Kirkland's main areas of activity, the Kirkland Commercial Manager Ralph Baxter.

  7. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Reimer; P. F. Michelson; R. A. Cameron; S. W. Digel; D. J. Thompson; K. S. Wood

    2006-11-21

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-band blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  8. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  9. Maxwell's equal area law for Lovelock Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    We present the construction of Maxwell's equal area law for the Guass-Bonnet AdS black holes in $d=5,6$ and third order Lovelock AdS black holes in $d=7,8$. The equal area law can be used to find the number and location of the points of intersection in the plots of Gibbs free energy, so that we can get the thermodynamically preferred solution which corresponds to the first order phase transition. We have the radius of the small and larger black holes in the phase transition which share the same Gibbs free energy. The latent heat can also be calculated. For the third order Lovelock AdS black holes in $d=8$, the first order phase transition can be found in $T_t

  10. Maxwell's equal area law for Lovelock Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao Xu; Zhen-Ming Xu

    2015-10-22

    We present the construction of Maxwell's equal area law for the Guass-Bonnet AdS black holes in $d=5,6$ and third order Lovelock AdS black holes in $d=7,8$. The equal area law can be used to find the number and location of the points of intersection in the plots of Gibbs free energy, so that we can get the thermodynamically preferred solution which corresponds to the first order phase transition. We have the radius of the small and larger black holes in the phase transition which share the same Gibbs free energy. The latent heat can also be calculated. For the third order Lovelock AdS black holes in $d=8$, the first order phase transition can be found in $T_t

  11. Measurement of emission fluxes from Technical Area 54, Area G and L. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eklund, B.

    1995-03-15

    The emission flux (mass/time-area) of tritiated water from TA-54 was measured to support the characterization of radioactive air emissions from waste sites for the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program and for the Area G Performance Assessment. Measurements were made at over 180 locations during the summers of 1993 and 1994, including randomly selected locations across Area G, three suspected areas of contamination at Area G, and the property surrounding TA-54. The emission fluxes of radon were measured at six locations and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 30 locations. Monitoring was performed at each location over a several-hour period using the U.S. EPA flux chamber approach. Separate samples for tritiated water, radon, and VOCs were collected and analyzed in off-site laboratories. The measured tritiated water emission fluxes varied over several orders of magnitude, from background levels of about 3 pCi/m{sup 2}-min to 9.69 x 10{sup 6} pCi/m{sup 2}-min near a disposal shaft. Low levels of tritiated water were found to have migrated into Pajarito Canyon, directly south of Area G. The tritium flux data were used to generate an estimated annual emission rate of 14 Curies/yr for all of Area G, with the majority of this activity being emitted from relatively small areas adjacent to several disposal shafts. The estimated total annual release is less than 1% of the total tritium release from all LANL in 1992 and results in a negligible off-site dose. Based on the limited data available, the average emission flux of radon from Area G is estimated to be 8.1 pCi/m{sup 2}-min. The measured emission fluxes of VOCs were < 100 {mu}g/m{sup 2}-min, which is small compared with fluxes typically measured at hazardous waste landfills. The air quality impacts of these releases were evaluated in a separate report.

  12. The Needles Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |InformationThe Needles Geothermal Area (Redirected from

  13. Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergyTrailTrosky, Minnesota:Truckhaven Geothermal Area

  14. Pulse Areas in Multi-Soliton Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth Groves; B. D. Clader; J. H. Eberly

    2008-11-12

    The prospect of self-consistent propagation of more than two pulses contemporaneously through multi-resonant media raises open questions: whether soliton solutions exist, and whether a useful generalization of two-level pulse Area can be found. We answer these questions positively for the case of four pulses interacting in combined V and Lambda fashion with an idealized pair of atomic D-lines.

  15. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

  16. Functional Area Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CRADS provided on this page are provided as examples of functional area Objectives and Criteria used to evaluate how requirements are meet. They are only examples and should not be utilized as is. In accordance with DOE Standard 3006-2010, CRADs should be developed by team members to reflect the specifics of the proposed review (i.e., breadth and depth) as defined in the approved Plan of Action.

  17. Hawthorne Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynnMassachusetts:Ohio:WebsiteInformationHawthorne Geothermal Area

  18. Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP)DisplacementTudorOpenApplication

  19. Little Melozitna Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: Energy ResourcesGrove,Little Melozitna Geothermal Area

  20. Redfield Campus Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield Campus Geothermal Area (Redirected from

  1. Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area (Gardner, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

  2. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area PowerAdministratio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Desert Southwest Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area...

  3. Hanford Site Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment (PA) Current Status Hanford Site Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment (PA) Current Status Marcel Bergeron Washignton River...

  4. Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 2003 - 2003...

  5. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1998 - 2002...

  6. Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date 1998 - 2002...

  7. Ground Magnetics At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Colwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Colwell, Et Al., 2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date 2011 - 2011...

  8. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1996 - 1996...

  9. Clean Cities: Alamo Area Clean Cities (San Antonio) coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alamo Area Clean Cities (San Antonio) Coalition The Alamo Area Clean Cities (San Antonio) coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other...

  10. Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study...

  11. The Sacramento Area Water Forum: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connick, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    CCOMWP). April 8, 1993. Sacramento Area Water Plan ForumProcess (Draft). Sacramento, California. Emphasis inWorking Paper 2006-06 The Sacramento Area Water Forum: A

  12. Energy Innovation Hub Report Shows Philadelphia-area Building...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Innovation Hub Report Shows Philadelphia-area Building Retrofits Could Support 23,500 Jobs Energy Innovation Hub Report Shows Philadelphia-area Building Retrofits Could Support...

  13. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Associates, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Truckhaven Area Exploration...

  14. Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The...

  15. Clean Cities: Greater Lansing Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calnin has worked with the Clean Cities initiative since 2007, having supported the Detroit Area coalition as well as the Greater Lansing Area coalition. With a background that...

  16. Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The Customer Perspective, June 2003 Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The Customer Perspective,...

  17. Clean Cities: Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities Coalition The Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and...

  18. Area della Ricerca CNR Area della Ricerca del Cnr di Pisa Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa, ITALY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Area della Ricerca CNR Area della Ricerca del Cnr di Pisa Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa, ITALY'aula 27 dell'Area della Ricerca del CNR di Pisa. Tutti gli interessati sono invitati a partecipare Antonio

  19. Deformation and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    plant. The maximum subsidence rate in the peak of the anomaly is approximately 3.5 cm yr (super -1) , and the average volumetric rate of subsidence is of the order of 106 m3 yr -1...

  20. Zxodes scapularis (Acari:Ixodidae) Deer Tick Mesoscale Populations in Natural Areas: Effects of Deer, Area,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    Zxodes scapularis (Acari:Ixodidae) Deer Tick Mesoscale Populations in Natural Areas: Effects al. 1990al) and macroscales (eastern United States [Daniels et al. 19931).We examined the mesoscale

  1. Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

    2013-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

  2. 3D Simulations for the Elliptic Jet W. Bo (Aug 12, 2009)3D Simulations for the Elliptic Jet W. Bo (Aug 12, 2009) Parameters: Length = 8cm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    3D Simulations for the Elliptic Jet W. Bo (Aug 12, 2009)3D Simulations for the Elliptic Jet W. Bo (Aug 12, 2009) Parameters: Length = 8cm Elli i j M j di 0 8 Mi di 0 3 Elliptic jet: Major radius = 0 is used. The peak pressure is 14,000 bar. 1 #12;2D Simulations for the Elliptic Jet2D Simulations

  3. 100-N Area underground storage tank closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, C.A.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the removal/characterization actions concerning underground storage tanks (UST) at the 100-N Area. Included are 105-N-LFT, 182-N-1-DT, 182-N-2-DT, 182-N-3-DT, 100-N-SS-27, and 100-N-SS-28. The text of this report gives a summary of remedial activities. In addition, correspondence relating to UST closures can be found in Appendix B. Appendix C contains copies of Unusual Occurrence Reports, and validated sampling data results comprise Appendix D.

  4. Expanding the Area of Gravitational Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    2002-11-12

    I describe how gravitational entropy is intimately connected with the concept of gravitational heat, expressed as the difference between the total and free energies of a given gravitational system. From this perspective one can compute these thermodyanmic quantities in settings that go considerably beyond Bekenstein's original insight that the area of a black hole event horizon can be identified with thermodynamic entropy. The settings include the outsides of cosmological horizons and spacetimes with NUT charge. However the interpretation of gravitational entropy in these broader contexts remains to be understood.

  5. Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-12-04

    A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

  6. REMOTE AREA RADIATION MONITORING (RARM) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NELSON RL

    2008-07-18

    The Remote Area Radiation Monitoring (RARM) system will be used to provide real-time radiation monitoring information to the operations personnel during tank retrieval and transfer operations. The primary focus of the system is to detect potential anomalous (waste leaks) or transient radiological conditions. This system will provide mobile, real-time radiological monitoring, data logging, and status at pre-selected strategic points along the waste transfer route during tank retrieval operations. The system will provide early detection and response capabilities for the Retrieval and Closure Operations organization and Radiological Control personnel.

  7. Outdoor Area Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary Areas of the countryofPROGRAM |TechnologyDepartment ofOurAThis

  8. Hot Pot Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey:Hopkinsville, Kentucky:OpenHot Pot Geothermal Area

  9. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: EnergyGreat Basin Geothermal Area Jump to:

  10. Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen Geothermal Area

  11. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP)DisplacementTudorOpenApplicationDixie Valley

  12. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP)DisplacementTudorOpenApplicationDixie

  13. Mori Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformation MontanaOhio:Hill, California: EnergyMori Geothermal Area

  14. Krafla Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrderInformationKizildereTexas:Solar IncKrafla Geothermal Area

  15. Ngawha Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNew Hampshire: Energy Resources JumpNgawha Geothermal Area Jump to:

  16. Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,Energy Information Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

  17. Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,Energy Information Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,Obsidian

  18. Surrond Area Resturants | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing You theLessons Learned |8,Super BowlEXC-14-0002Surrond Area

  19. Property:GeothermalArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETE Inc d bGeothermalArea Jump to: navigation,

  20. Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpAFlex Fuels EnergyToolFort Bliss Geothermal Area

  1. Routt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEast JumpInformation SanjunyanRoutt Geothermal Area

  2. Southern CA Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfin JumpOpen EnergySoutheastern ElectricCA Area Jump to:

  3. Trimont Area Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown ofTransportToolkitTrenton,Kentucky)Trimont Area

  4. Aqua Quieta Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to:AngolaEnergyAqua Quieta Geothermal Area Jump to:

  5. Area Science Park | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S JumpArchuleta County, Colorado:Ardentown,Area Science Park

  6. Cove Fort Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)|Alabama: Energy Resources JumpCove Fort Geothermal Area

  7. Kilo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItronKanoshKetchikan Public UtilitiesKilo Geothermal Area

  8. Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search

  9. Berkshire East Ski Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher Homes JumpCreekEast Ski Area Jump to:

  10. Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,Information PromotingProperty Edit withAreaGeology

  11. Tank Farm Area Cleanup Decision-Making

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:Take Action APPENDIX-11CoverArea

  12. Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Albert, A.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /ICE, Bellaterra /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Artep Inc. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /ASDC, Frascati /ASDC, Frascati /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /DAPNIA, Saclay /Alabama U., Huntsville; /more authors..

    2012-09-14

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% confidence level upper limits range from about 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 5 GeV to about 5 x 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation final state. For the first time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section ({approx}3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

  13. NIH POLICY MANUAL 3015 -Admittance of Minors to Hazardous Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    NIH POLICY MANUAL 3015 - Admittance of Minors to Hazardous Areas Issuing Office: OD/OM/ORS/DOHS 301 on admittance of minors to hazardous work areas that may contain inherently or potentially hazardous chemicals. Definitions: 1. Hazardous Area ­ Any area that poses an actual or potential risk of illness or injury

  14. The Smoke Control Area (Authorised Fuels) Regulations 1963 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Keith

    1963-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1963 No. 1275 CLEAN AIR The Smoke Control Areas (Authorised Fuels) Regulations 1963

  15. Electronic state spectroscopy of diiodomethane (CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}): Experimental and computational studies in the 30?000–95?000 cm{sup ?1} region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, Anuvab; Jagatap, B. N.; Singh, Param Jeet; Shastri, Aparna

    2014-05-21

    The electronic absorption spectrum of diiodomethane in the 30?000–95?000 cm{sup ?1} region is investigated using synchrotron radiation; the spectrum in the 50?000–66?500 cm{sup ?1} region is reported for the first time. The absorption bands in the 30?000–50?000 cm{sup ?1} region are attributed to valence transitions, while the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrum (50?000–95?000 cm{sup ?1}) is dominated by several Rydberg series converging to the first four ionization potentials of CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} at 9.46, 9.76, 10.21, and 10.56 eV corresponding to the removal of an electron from the outermost 3b{sub 2}, 2b{sub 1}, 1a{sub 2}, and 4a{sub 1} non-bonding orbitals, respectively. Rydberg series of ns, np, and nd type converging to each of the four ionization potentials are assigned based on a quantum defect analysis. Time dependent density functional theory calculations of excited states support the analysis and help in interpretation of the Rydberg and valence nature of observed transitions. Density functional theory calculations of the neutral and ionic ground state geometries and vibrational frequencies are used to assign the observed vibronic structure. Vibronic features accompanying the Rydberg series are mainly due to excitation of the C-I symmetric stretch (?{sub 3}) and CH{sub 2} wag (?{sub 8}) modes, with smaller contributions from the C-H symmetric stretch (?{sub 1}). UV absorption bands are assigned to low lying valence states 1{sup 1}B{sub 2}, 1{sup 1}B{sub 1}, 2{sup 1}A{sub 1}, 3{sup 1}A{sub 1}, 2{sup 1}B{sub 1}, and 2{sup 1}B{sub 2} and the unusually high underlying intensity in parts of the VUV spectrum is attributed to valence states with high oscillator strength. This is the first report of a comprehensive Rydberg series and vibronic analysis of the VUV absorption spectrum of CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} in the 50?000–85?000 cm{sup ?1} region. The VUV absorption spectrum of CD{sub 2}I{sub 2} which serves to verify and consolidate spectral assignments is also reported here for the first time.

  16. High surface area, high permeability carbon monoliths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Processing Dept.

    1994-12-31

    The goal of this work is to prepare carbon monoliths having precisely tailored pore size distribution. Prior studies have demonstrated that poly(acrylonitrile) can be processed into a precursor having tailored macropore structure. Since the macropores were preserved during pyrolysis, this synthetic process provided a route to porous carbon having macropores with size =0.1 to 10{mu}m. No micropores of size <2 nm could be detected in the carbon, however, by nitrogen adsorption. In the present work, the authors have processed a different polymer, poly(vinylidene chloride) into a macroporous precursor, Pyrolysis produced carbon monoliths having macropores derived from the polymer precursor as well as extensive microporosity produced during the pyrolysis of the polymer. One of these carbons had BET surface area of 1,050 m{sup 2}/g and about 1.2 cc/g total pore volume, with about 1/3 of the total pore volume in micropores and the remainder in 1{mu}m macropores. No mesopores in the intermediate size range could be detected by nitrogen adsorption. Carbon materials having high surface area as well as micron size pores have potential applications as electrodes for double layer supercapacitors containing liquid electrolyte, or as efficient media for performing chemical separations.

  17. Turbine airfoil with controlled area cooling arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liang, George

    2010-04-27

    A gas turbine airfoil (10) includes a serpentine cooling path (32) with a plurality of channels (34,42,44) fluidly interconnected by a plurality of turns (38,40) for cooling the airfoil wall material. A splitter component (50) is positioned within at least one of the channels to bifurcate the channel into a pressure-side channel (46) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the pressure side (24) and a suction-side channel (48) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the suction side (26) longitudinally downstream of an intermediate height (52). The cross-sectional area of the pressure-side channel (46) and suction-side channel (48) are thereby controlled in spite of an increasing cross-sectional area of the airfoil along its longitudinal length, ensuring a sufficiently high mach number to provide a desired degree of cooling throughout the entire length of the airfoil.

  18. Casimir effect in dielectrics: Surface area contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmen Molina-Paris; Matt Visser

    1997-07-08

    In this paper we take a deeper look at the technically elementary but physically robust viewpoint in which the Casimir energy in dielectric media is interpreted as the change in the total zero point energy of the electromagnetic vacuum summed over all states. Extending results presented in previous papers [hep-th/9609195; hep-th/9702007] we approximate the sum over states by an integral over the density of states including finite volume corrections. For an arbitrarily-shaped finite dielectric, the first finite-volume correction to the density of states is shown to be proportional to the surface area of the dielectric interface and is explicitly evaluated as a function of the permeability and permitivity. Since these calculations are founded in an elementary and straightforward way on the underlying physics of the Casimir effect they serve as an important consistency check on field-theoretic calculations. As a concrete example we discuss Schwinger's suggestion that the Casimir effect might be the underlying physical basis behind sonoluminescence}. The recent controversy concerning the relative importance of volume and surface contributions is discussed. For sufficiently large bubbles the volume effect is always dominant. Furthermore we can explicitly calculate the surface area contribution as a function of refractive index.

  19. NCS area of applicability determination for AVLIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, C.; Koopman, R.P.

    1999-07-01

    The authors present a method for examining congruence between the processes that make up an AVLIS enrichment plant and the benchmark critical experiments that are used to establish the bias and validate the codes used for nuclear criticality safety (NCS) calculations of those processes. A measure of the validity of the process of selecting critical experiments that are similar in nature to processes found in the plant is presented. The probability of fission depends primarily on neutron energy and the interaction cross sections of the materials in the process. The physics of fission has led one to consider the energy of neutrons causing fission to be the fundamental parameter for examining the area of applicability. Benchmark experiments are chosen to cover the material compositions, geometric arrangements, neutron energy spectra, and other parameters such as material heterogeneity, neutron leakage or reflection, interaction, and absorption in special materials. These parameters influence the process by affecting the number of neutrons available to cause fission at any given energy. The neutron energy distribution is established primarily as a result of the energy-dependent cross sections for the materials that are present. Thus, the energy of neutrons causing fission is the fundamental parameter needed for examining the effects of other parameters within the area of applicability.

  20. Quantum money and scalable 21-cm cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutomirski, Andrew (Andrew Michael)

    2011-01-01

    This thesis covers two unrelated topics. The first part of my thesis is about quantum money, a cryptographic protocol in which a mint can generate a quantum state that no one can copy. In public-key quantum money, anyone ...

  1. Overcoming the Challenges of 21cm Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pober, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    application of delay/delay rate (DDR) filters was applied (I use delay/delay-rate (DDR) filters to extract estimates ofbaseline individually in DDR space. This is done to ensure

  2. Workshop on Transients C.M. Greenfield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tokamak plasmas with the characteristics desired for a fusion power plant can be robustly produced Virtual workshop to gather community input Community (submits 2-page white papers and give short

  3. CM-1-H Wholesale Power Rate Schedule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Availability:This rate schedule shall be available to the South Mississippi Electric Power Association, Municipal Energy Agency of Mississippi, and Mississippi Delta Energy Agency (hereinafter...

  4. Tecogen CM-75 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)ModelTalbottsInformation

  5. ARM - Campaign Instrument - cm-cryo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, AugustgovInstrumentsap-surfgovInstrumentscitation Comments?cryo

  6. ARM - Campaign Instrument - cm-sonde

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, AugustgovInstrumentsap-surfgovInstrumentscitation Comments?cryosonde

  7. ARM - Campaign Instrument - kandz-cm21

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday,air Comments? WegovInstrumentsirt-air Comments? We would Comments? We

  8. summer_nid_cr_cm_2003.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves AdjustmentsDecade Year-0 Year-1A.1.20051,Gut

  9. summer_nid_cr_cm_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves AdjustmentsDecade Year-0

  10. summer_nid_cr_cm_2005.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves AdjustmentsDecade Year-0d Form EIA-411 for 2005

  11. summer_nid_cr_cm_2006.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves AdjustmentsDecade Year-0d Form EIA-411 for

  12. PROPOSED PLAN FOR THE ST. LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , Compensation, and Liability Act CFR Code of Federal Regulations cm centimeter CMM Continental Mining & Milling effective dose equivalent Th thorium U uranium UMTRCA Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act USACE

  13. 2014 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan- Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Vault-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2014 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Vault-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas Describes DOE Headquarters procedures for establishing, maintaining, and deactivating Limited Areas and Vault-Type Rooms and protecting the classified information handled within those Areas.

  14. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Maryland Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

    2013-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of the delineation proposed by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) for the Maryland (MD) WEA and two alternative delineations. The objectives of the NREL evaluation were to assess MEA's proposed delineation of the MD WEA, perform independent analysis, and recommend how the MD WEA should be delineated.

  15. Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

  16. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    In support of its vision for technological excellence, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) has identified three strategic goals. The three goals of the SCFA are: Contain and/or stabilize contamination sources that pose an imminent threat to surface and ground waters; Delineate DNAPL contamination in the subsurface and remediate DNAPL-contaminated soils and ground water; and Remove a full range of metal and radionuclide contamination in soils and ground water. To meet the challenges of remediating subsurface contaminants in soils and ground water, SCFA funded more than 40 technologies in fiscal year 1997. These technologies are grouped according to the following product lines: Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids; Metals and Radionuclides; Source Term Containment; and Source Term Remediation. This report briefly describes the SCFA 1997 technologies and showcases a few key technologies in each product line.

  17. Home Area Networks and the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, Samuel L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Hadley, Mark D.

    2011-04-01

    With the wide array of home area network (HAN) options being presented as solutions to smart grid challenges for the home, it is time to compare and contrast their strengths and weaknesses. This white paper examines leading and emerging HAN technologies. The emergence of the smart grid is bringing more networking players into the field. The need for low consistent bandwidth usage differs enough from the traditional information technology world to open the door to new technologies. The predominant players currently consist of a blend of the old and new. Within the wired world Ethernet and HomePlug Green PHY are leading the way with an advantage to HomePlug because it doesn't require installing new wires. In the wireless the realm there are many more competitors but WiFi and ZigBee seem to have the most momentum.

  18. Packing efficiency and accessible surface area of crumpled graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cranford, Steven Wayne

    Graphene holds promise as an ultracapacitor due to its high specific surface area and intrinsic capacitance. To exploit both, a maximum surface area must be accessible while the two-dimensional (2D) graphene is deformed ...

  19. AN ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY STUDY OF THE KILAUEA VOLCANO AREA, HAWAII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY STUDY OF THE KILAUEA VOLCANO AREA, HAWAII STUDY OF THE KILAUEA VOLCANO AREA, HAWAII M.A. Scholl, S.E. Ingebritsen, C.J. Janik, and J.P. Kauahikaua

  20. GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Til, C. J. Van

    2012-01-01

    1976, "Blowout o f a Geothermal Well", California Geology,in Rocks from Two Geothermal Areas'' , -- P1 anetary ScienceMonitoring Ground Movement in Geothermal Areas", Hydraul ic

  1. Gas Flux Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the geothermal area. Ultimately for potential development of EGS. Notes A CO2 soil gas flux survey was conducted in areas recognized as geothermal upflow zones within the...

  2. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  3. Selectivity and development of the visual word form area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Li-Wei

    2013-01-01

    An area of left occipitotemporal cortex commonly referred to as the visual word form area (VWFA), has consistently been shown to activate during the processing of written language. However, the exact nature of the region's ...

  4. A comparative analysis of area navigation systems for general aviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodge, Steven Malcolm

    1973-01-01

    Within the next decade area navigation is to become the primary method of air navigation within the United States. There are numerous radio navigation systems that offer the capabilities of area navigation to general ...

  5. ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF A WIDE AREA RELEASE OF ANTHRAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF A WIDE AREA RELEASE OF ANTHRAX May 2009 Prepared Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security Economic Impacts of a Wide Area Release of Anthrax KS .................................................................................................................................................. 1 Categories of Economic Impacts

  6. Casimir effect in dielectrics Surface area contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molina-Paris, C; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Visser, Matt

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we take a deeper look at the technically elementary but physically robust viewpoint in which the Casimir energy in dielectric media is interpreted as the change in the total zero point energy of the electromagnetic vacuum summed over all states. Extending results presented in previous papers [hep-th/9609195; hep-th/9702007] we approximate the sum over states by an integral over the density of states including finite volume corrections. For an arbitrarily-shaped finite dielectric, the first finite-volume correction to the density of states is shown to be proportional to the surface area of the dielectric interface and is explicitly evaluated as a function of the permeability and permitivity. Since these calculations are founded in an elementary and straightforward way on the underlying physics of the Casimir effect they serve as an important consistency check on field-theoretic calculations. As a concrete example we discuss Schwinger's suggestion that the Casimir effect might be the underlying ph...

  7. Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Source Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    We present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100~MeV--300~GeV range. Based on the first four years of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the 2FGL catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources above 4 sigma significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 232 sources are considered as identifie...

  8. Airbrushed Nickel Nanoparticles for Large-Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarac, Mehmet; ANDERSON, BRYAN; Pearce, Ryan; Railsback, Justin; Oni, Adedapo; White, Ryan M.; Hensley, Dale K; Lebeau, James M; Melechko, Anatoli; Tracy, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) were grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using Ni nanoparticle (NP) catalysts that were deposited by airbrushing onto Si, Al, Cu, and Ti substrates. Airbrushing is a simple method for depositing catalyst NPs over large areas that is compatible with roll-to-roll processing. The distribution and morphology of VACNFs are affected by the airbrushing parameters and the composition of the metal foil. Highly concentrated Ni NPs in heptane give more uniform distributions than pentane and hexanes, resulting in more uniform coverage of VACNFs. For VACNF growth on metal foils, Si micropowder was added as a precursor for Si-enriched coatings formed in situ on the VACNFs that impart mechanical rigidity. Interactions between the catalyst NPs and the metal substrates impart control over the VACNF morphology. Growth of carbon nanostructures on Cu is particularly noteworthy because the miscibility of Ni with Cu poses challenges for VACNF growth, and carbon nanostructures anchored to Cu substrates are desired as anode materials for Li-ion batteries and for thermal interface materials.

  9. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM); Henins, Ivars (Los Alamos, NM); Babayan, Steve E. (Huntington Beach, CA); Hicks, Robert F. (Los Angeles, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  10. Evaluation of Cadmium Ratio and Foil Activation Measurements for a Beryllium-Reflected Assembly of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Triangular Pitch)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2014-11-04

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were completed from 1962 to 1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of un-moderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UOIdaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States) fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. The graphite reflectors were then changed to beryllium reflectors. For the beryllium reflected assemblies, the fuel was in 1.506-cm-triangular and 7-tube clusters leading to two critical configurations. Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements, performed on the 1.506-cm-array critical configuration, have been evaluated and are described in this paper.

  11. Evaluation of Cadmium Ratio and Foil Activation Measurements for a Beryllium-Reflected Assembly of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Triangular Pitch)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marshall, Margaret A.

    2014-11-04

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were completed from 1962 to 1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of un-moderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UOIdaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States) fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. The graphite reflectors were then changed to beryllium reflectors. For the beryllium reflected assemblies, the fuel wasmore »in 1.506-cm-triangular and 7-tube clusters leading to two critical configurations. Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements, performed on the 1.506-cm-array critical configuration, have been evaluated and are described in this paper.« less

  12. Evaluation of Cadmium Ratio and Foil Activation Measurements for a Beryllium-Reflected Assembly of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Triangular Pitch)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-04

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were completed from 1962 to 1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of un-moderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UOIdaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States) fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. The graphite reflectors were then changed to beryllium reflectors. For the beryllium reflected assemblies, the fuel was in 1.506-cm-triangular and 7-tube clusters leading to two critical configurations. Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements, performed on the 1.506-cm-array critical configuration, have been evaluated and are described in this paper.

  13. The Sacramento Area Water Forum: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connick, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    quality, reservoir operations, ground water, water reclamation, water needs of jurisdictions outside the Sacramento area, and water management

  14. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Farhar, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  15. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Rafferty, 1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  16. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Witcher, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  17. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Sammel, 1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  18. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Lienau, 1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  19. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Callender, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  20. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Grant, 1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  2. Preserving Area Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks by using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    a studied phenomenon. Sensor nodes are deployed over hostile or remote environments to monitor a target area

  3. Aeromagnetic Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aeromagnetic Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  4. Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  5. Geographic Information System At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Getman, 2014) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

  6. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Smith, 1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  7. Exploratory Boreholes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Parr...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploratory Boreholes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Parr & Percival, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory...

  8. Identification of 300 Area Contaminants of Potential Concern for Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.W. Ovink

    2010-04-05

    This report documents the process used to identify source area contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) in support of the 300 Area remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan. This report also establishes the exclusion criteria applicable for 300 Area use and the analytical methods needed to analyze the COPCs.

  9. Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs) All Hazardous waste generated to be chemically hazardous and shall be kept in a Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA). The safety coordinator will keep a list of all SAA's in the division and must be notified before an accumulation area

  10. Drawing Area-Proportional Venn-3 Diagrams with Convex Polygons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Drawing Area-Proportional Venn-3 Diagrams with Convex Polygons Peter Rodgers1 , Jean Flower2 , Gem Modelling Group, University of Brighton, UK {g.e.stapleton,john.howse}@brighton.ac.uk Abstract. Area-proportional intersections have a specified numerical value. In these diagrams, the areas of the re- gions are in proportion

  11. High Surface Area Stainless Steel Brushes as Cathodes in Microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Surface Area Stainless Steel Brushes as Cathodes in Microbial Electrolysis Cells D O U G L show here that high surface area stainless steel brush cathodes produce hydrogen at rates. Using a stainless steel brush cathode with a specific surface area of 810 m2 /m3 , hydrogen was produced

  12. IMPLEMENTING MARINE PROTECTED AREAS POLICY: LESSONS FROM CANADA AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i IMPLEMENTING MARINE PROTECTED AREAS POLICY: LESSONS FROM CANADA AND AUSTRALIA by Jodi Stark B: Implementing Marine Protected Areas Policy: Lessons From Canada And Australia Report No. 369 Examining oceans management, and include strategies for establishing a system of marine protected areas (MPAs

  13. Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area, amorphous-silicon-based submodules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delahoy, A.E.; Tonon, T.; Macneil, J. (Chronar Corp., Princeton, NJ (USA))

    1991-06-01

    The primary objective of this subcontract is to develop the technology for same bandgap, amorphous silicon tandem junction photovoltaic modules having an area of at least 900 cm{sup 2} with the goal of achieving an aperture area efficiency of 9%. A further objective is to demonstrate modules that retain 95% of their under standard light soaking conditions. Our approach to the attainment of these objective is based on the following distinctive technologies: (a) in-house deposition of SiO{sub 2}/SnO{sub 2}:F onto soda lime glass by APCVD to provide a textured, transparent electrode, (b) single chamber r.f. flow discharge deposition of the a-Si:H layers onto vertical substrates contained with high package density in a box carrier'' to which the discharge is confined (c) sputter deposition of highly reflecting, ZnO-based back contacts, and (d) laser scribing of the a-Si:H and electrodes with real-time scribe tracking to minimize area loss. Continued development of single junction amorphous silicon was aggressively pursued as proving ground for various optical enhancement schemes, new p-layers, and i-layers quality. We have rigorously demonstrated that the introduction of a transitional i-layer does not impair stability and that the initial gain in performance is retained. We have demonstrated a small improvement in cell stability through a post-fabrication treatment consisting of multiple, intense light flashes followed by sufficient annealing. Finally, several experiments have indicated that long term stability can be improved by overcoating the SnO{sub 2} with ZnO. 25 refs., 17 figs.

  14. Waste Area Grouping 2 Remedial Investigation Phase 1 Seep Task data report: Contaminant source area assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, D.S.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the findings of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2, Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Seep Task efforts during 1993 and 1994 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented here follow results form the first year of sampling, 1992, which are contained in the Phase 1 RI report for WAG 2 (DOE 1995a). The WAG 2 Seep Task efforts focused on contaminants in seeps, tributaries, and main streams within the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed. This report is designed primarily as a reference for contaminants and a resource for guiding remedial decisions. Additional in-depth assessments of the Seep Task data may provide clearer understandings of contaminant transport from the different source areas in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 consists of WOC and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake, the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, and the associated flood plains and subsurface environment. The WOC watershed encompasses ORNL and associated WAGs. WAG 2 acts as an integrator for contaminant releases from the contaminated sites at ORNL and as the conduit transporting contaminants to the Clinch River. The main objectives of the Seep Task were to identify and characterize seeps, tributaries and source areas that are responsible for the contaminant releases to the main streams in WAG 2 and to quantify their input to the total contaminant release from the watershed at White Oak Dam (WOD). Efforts focused on {sup 90}Sr, {sup 3}H, and {sup 137}Cs because these contaminants pose the greatest potential human health risk from water ingestion at WOD. Bimonthly sampling was conducted throughout the WOC watershed beginning in March 1993 and ending in August 1994. Samples were also collected for metals, anions, alkalinity, organics, and other radionuclides.

  15. Sediment Properties: E-Area Completion Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.; Bagwell, L.; Amidon, M.; Dixon, K.

    2011-04-29

    To accommodate a future need for additional waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site, the Solid Waste Management Division (SWMD) designated nine additional plots for development (Kasraii 2007; SRS 2010); these plots are collectively known as the E Area Completion Project (ECP). Subsurface samples were collected from ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 (Figure 1) for chemical and physical property analyses to support Performance Assessment (PA) and Special Analyses (SA) modeling. This document summarizes the sampling and analysis scheme and the resultant data, and provides interpretations of the data particularly in reference to existing soil property data. Analytical data in this document include: gamma log, cone penetrometer log, grain size (sieve and hydrometer), water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity (falling head permeameter), porosity, dry bulk density, total organic carbon, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence data. SRNL provided technical and safety oversight for the fieldwork, which included completion of eight soil borings, four geophysical logs, and the collection of 522 feet of core and 33 Shelby tubes from ECP plots 6, 7, 8, and 9. Boart Longyear provided sonic drilling and logging services. Two soil borings were completed at each location. The first set of boreholes extended into (but did not fully penetrate) the Warley Hill Formation. These boreholes were continuously cored, then geophysically (gamma ray) logged. The recovered core was split, photographed, and described; one half of the core was archived at SRS's Core Lab facilities, and the remaining half was consumed as necessary for testing at SRS and off-site labs. Core descriptions and geophysical data were used to calculate target elevations for Shelby tube samples, which were obtained from the second set of boreholes. Shelby tubes were shipped to MACTEC Engineering and Consulting Inc. (MACTEC) in Atlanta for physical property testing. SRNL deployed their Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) cone penetrometer test (CPT) truck at ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 to collect inferred lithology data for the vadose zone. Results from this study are used to make recommendations for future modeling efforts involving the ECP plots. The conceptual model of the ECP hydrogeology differs from the conceptual model of the current ELLWF disposal area in that for the ECP plots, the topography (ground surface) is generally lower in elevation; The Upland and top of Tobacco Road lithostratigraphic units are missing (eroded); The water table occurs lower in elevation (i.e., it occurs in lower stratigraphic units); and the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) often occurs within the vadose zone (rather than in the saturated zone). Due to the difference in the hydrogeology between the current ELLWF location and the ECP plots, different vadose zone properties are recommended for the ECP plots versus the properties recommended by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current disposal units. Results from this study do not invalidate or conflict with the current PA's use of the Upper and Lower Vadose Zone properties as described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current ELLWF disposal units. The following modeling recommendations are made for future modeling of the ECP plots where vadose zone properties are required: (1) If a single vadose zone property is preferred, the properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the Upper Vadose Zone encompass the general physical properties of the combined sands and clays in the ECP vadose zone sediments despite the differences in hydrostratigraphic units. (2) If a dual zone system is preferred, a combination of the Lower Zone properties and the Clay properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) are appropriate for modeling the physical properties of the ECP vadose zone. The Clay properties would be assigned to the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) and any other significant clay layers, while the Lower Zone properties would be assigned for the remainder of the vadose zone. No immediate updates or changes are recommended for

  16. Mixed waste focus area alternative technologies workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borduin, L.C.; Palmer, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.A.

    1995-05-24

    This report documents the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA)-sponsored Alternative Technology Workshop held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from January 24--27, 1995. The primary workshop goal was identifying potential applications for emerging technologies within the Options Analysis Team (OAT) ``wise`` configuration. Consistent with the scope of the OAT analysis, the review was limited to the Mixed Low-Level Waste (MLLW) fraction of DOE`s mixed waste inventory. The Los Alamos team prepared workshop materials (databases and compilations) to be used as bases for participant review and recommendations. These materials derived from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) data base (May 1994), the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) data base, and the OAT treatment facility configuration of December 7, 1994. In reviewing workshop results, the reader should note several caveats regarding data limitations. Link-up of the MWIR and DSTP data bases, while representing the most comprehensive array of mixed waste information available at the time of the workshop, requires additional data to completely characterize all waste streams. A number of changes in waste identification (new and redefined streams) occurred during the interval from compilation of the data base to compilation of the DSTP data base with the end result that precise identification of radiological and contaminant characteristics was not possible for these streams. To a degree, these shortcomings compromise the workshop results; however, the preponderance of waste data was linked adequately, and therefore, these analyses should provide useful insight into potential applications of alternative technologies to DOE MLLW treatment facilities.

  17. Alternatives to incineration. Technical area status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwinkendorf, W.E.; McFee, J.; Devarakonda, M.; Nenninger, L.L.; Fadullon, F.S.; Donaldson, T.L.; Dickerson, K.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the DOE`s Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) (superseded by the Mixed Waste Focus Area) initiated an evaluation of alternatives to incineration to identify technologies capable of treating DOE organically contaminated mixed wastes and which may be more easily permitted. These technologies have the potential of alleviating stakeholder concerns by decreasing off-gas volurties and the associated emissions of particulates, volatilized metals and radionuclides, PICs, NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and recombination products (dioxins and furans). Ideally, the alternate technology would be easily permitted, relatively omnivorous and effective in treating a variety of wastes with varying constituents, require minimal pretreatment or characterization, and be easy to implement. In addition, it would produce secondary waste stream volumes significantly smaller than the original waste stream, and would minimize the environmental health and safety effects on workers and the public. The purpose of this report is to provide an up-to-date (as of early 1995) compendium of iternative technologies for designers of mixed waste treatment facilities, and to identify Iternate technologies that may merit funding for further development. Various categories of non-thermal and thermal technologies have been evaluated and are summarized in Table ES-1. Brief descriptions of these technologies are provided in Section 1.7 of the Introduction. This report provides a detailed description of approximately 30 alternative technologies in these categories. Included in the report are descriptions of each technology; applicable input waste streams and the characteristics of the secondary, or output, waste streams; the current status of each technology relative to its availability for implementation; performance data; and costs. This information was gleaned from the open literature, governments reports, and discussions with principal investigators and developers.

  18. Wide Area Security Region Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Lu, Shuai; Guo, Xinxin; Gronquist, James; Du, Pengwei; Nguyen, Tony B.; Burns, J. W.

    2010-03-31

    This report develops innovative and efficient methodologies and practical procedures to determine the wide-area security region of a power system, which take into consideration all types of system constraints including thermal, voltage, voltage stability, transient and potentially oscillatory stability limits in the system. The approach expands the idea of transmission system nomograms to a multidimensional case, involving multiple system limits and parameters such as transmission path constraints, zonal generation or load, etc., considered concurrently. The security region boundary is represented using its piecewise approximation with the help of linear inequalities (so called hyperplanes) in a multi-dimensional space, consisting of system parameters that are critical for security analyses. The goal of this approximation is to find a minimum set of hyperplanes that describe the boundary with a given accuracy. Methodologies are also developed to use the security hyperplanes, pre-calculated offline, to determine system security margins in real-time system operations, to identify weak elements in the system, and to calculate key contributing factors and sensitivities to determine the best system controls in real time and to assist in developing remedial actions and transmission system enhancements offline . A prototype program that automates the simulation procedures used to build the set of security hyperplanes has also been developed. The program makes it convenient to update the set of security hyperplanes necessitated by changes in system configurations. A prototype operational tool that uses the security hyperplanes to assess security margins and to calculate optimal control directions in real time has been built to demonstrate the project success. Numerical simulations have been conducted using the full-size Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) system model, and they clearly demonstrated the feasibility and the effectiveness of the developed technology. Recommendations for the future work have also been formulated.

  19. Modeling and implementation of solder-activated joints for single-actuator, centimeter-scale robotic mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telleria, Maria J.

    We explain when, and why, solder-based phase change materials (PCMs) are best-suited as a means to modify a robotic mechanism's kinematic and elastomechanic behavior. The preceding refers to mechanisms that possess joints ...

  20. Preliminary characterization of the 100 area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biang, C.; Biang, R.; Patel, P.

    1994-06-01

    This characterization report is based on the results of sampling and an initial environmental assessment of the 100 Area of Argonne National Laboratory. It addresses the current status, projected data requirements, and recommended actions for five study areas within the 100 Area: the Lime Sludge Pond, the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond, the Coal Yard, the East Area Burn Pit, and the Eastern Perimeter Area. Two of these areas are solid waste management units under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (the Lime Sludge Pond and the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond); however, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has determined that no further action is necessary for the Lime Sludge Pond. Operational records for some of the activities were not available, and one study area (the East Area Burn Pit) could not be precisely located. Recommendations for further investigation include sample collection to obtain the following information: (1) mineralogy of major minerals and clays within the soils and underlying aquifer, (2) pH of the soils, (3) total clay fraction of the soils, (4) cation exchange capacity of the soils and aquifer materials, and (5) exchangeable cations of the soils and aquifer material. Various other actions are recommended for the 100 Area, including an electromagnetic survey, sampling of several study areas to determine the extent of contamination and potential migration pathways, and sampling to determine the presence of any radionuclides. For some of the study areas, additional actions are contingent on the results of the initial recommendations.