National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for area centimeters cm

  1. 70 cm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cm 50 cm Run 1153 Event 13. August 6 th 2015 21:02

  2. 10 cm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 cm Run 1149 Event 158. August 6 th 2015 17:52

  3. 10 cm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 cm Run 1153 Event 10. August 6 th 2015 21:01

  4. r:lCM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    r:lCM ' ~. :. i ., ;!~jk,;;~,::; ,,,,, ~;.~:~:,,i!::;~;;:, ,., ,,,I Be uia ..I...... Rary~~.:,.....:... PFe&.w.tloP ..I........................ -........................................ ..: . fj$I. ,_::I- -j$ y. ..- .2?2!yy~ ,:. ;:... ..__._............ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .._...e..... . . ..I .._...__........._._... ~. qv ~...,. : .~..:

  5. CM Bioenergia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CM Bioenergia Jump to: navigation, search Name: CM Bioenergia Place: Sao Paulo, Brazil Product: CM Bioenergia is joint venture between Coimex Trading Company and Mitsui Corporation...

  6. License Iso. CM35

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    License Iso. CM35 hUhUll4MhiM&POlltYll7~ llolh-thRqalStract Alolan&le, vlrghla Attoatlonl w. & 0. EutahlDon Pursuant to the Atanic Energy Act of 1954 and Section 40.21 or the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 - Atomic Energy, Chapter 1, Part 40 - Control of Sauce Haterid, you are hereby licensed to receive possession of and title to three hundred uwi l lght the term of this liceaee for pounda of refined eource material during 880 in meueb and demlopmt aotiritim MDool.atd lfltb

  7. Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The 2011 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

  8. CM-1-H Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CM-1-H Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CM-1-H Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: MEAM, MDEA, and SMEPA System: CU This rate schedule shall be available to the South Mississippi ...

  9. CM300DLFinal.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To reserve a CM300 session, go to wwwncem.lbl.gov, click on "Microscope Scheduling", use proposal number and password to log in. You may only sign up for 2 sessions per month, ...

  10. ARM - Campaign Instrument - kandz-cm21

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Kipp and Zonen - CM21 (KANDZ-CM21) Instrument Categories...

  11. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2009-09-01

    July 8, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  12. Accelerating Into the Future: From 0 to GeV in a Few Centimeters (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Leemans, Wim [LOASIS Program, AFRD

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: By exciting electric fields in plasma-based waveguides, lasers accelerate electrons in a fraction of the distance conventional accelerators require. The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division's LOASIS program, headed by Wim Leemans, has used 40-trillion-watt laser pulses to deliver billion-electron-volt (1 GeV) electron beams within centimeters. Leemans looks ahead to BELLA, 10-GeV accelerating modules that could power a future linear collider.

  13. ARM - Campaign Instrument - cm-cryo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cryo Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Cryogenic Chilled Mirror Hygrometer (CM-CRYO)...

  14. ARM - Campaign Instrument - cm-sonde

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sonde Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Chilled Mirror Sonde (CM-SONDE) Instrument Categories...

  15. CM200DL-Final.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To reserve a CM200 session, go to wwwncem.lbl.gov, click on "Microscope Scheduling", use proposal number and password to log in. You may only sign up for one Core session at a ...

  16. ARM - Campaign Instrument - tethersonde-cm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentstethersonde-cm Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Tethersonde With Chilled Mirror (TETHERSONDE-CM) Instrument Categories Airborne Observations, Atmospheric Profiling Campaigns Fall 1997 Water Vapor IOP [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Water Vapor IOP [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 1996.09.10 - 1996.09.30 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements

  17. THE METALLICITY OF THE CM DRACONIS SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Ramsey, Lawrence W. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Feiden, Gregory A., E-mail: rct151@psu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    The CM Draconis system comprises two eclipsing mid-M dwarfs of nearly equal mass in a 1.27 day orbit. This well-studied eclipsing binary has often been used for benchmark tests of stellar models, since its components are among the lowest mass stars with well-measured masses and radii ({approx}< 1% relative precision). However, as with many other low-mass stars, non-magnetic models have been unable to match the observed radii and effective temperatures for CM Dra at the 5%-10% level. To date, the uncertain metallicity of the system has complicated comparison of theoretical isochrones with observations. In this Letter, we use data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to measure the metallicity of the system during primary and secondary eclipses, as well as out of eclipse, based on an empirical metallicity calibration in the H and K near-infrared (NIR) bands. We derive an [Fe/H] = -0.30 {+-} 0.12 that is consistent across all orbital phases. The determination of [Fe/H] for this system constrains a key dimension of parameter space when attempting to reconcile model isochrone predictions and observations.

  18. Fuel elements of research reactor CM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlov, A.V.; Morozov, A.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Ershov, S.A.

    2013-07-01

    In 1961 the CM research reactor was commissioned at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad, Russia), it was intended to carry on investigations and the production of transuranium nuclides. The reactor is of a tank type. Original fuel assembly contained plate fuels that were spaced with vanes and corrugated bands. Nickel was used as a cladding material, fuel meat was produced from UO{sub 2} + electrolytic nickel composition. Fuel plates have been replaced by self-spacing cross-shaped dispersion fuels clad in stainless steel. In 2005 the reactor was updated. The purpose of this updating was to increase the quantity of irradiation channels in the reactor core and to improve the neutron balance. The updating was implemented at the expense of 20 % reduction in the quantity of fuel elements in the core which released a space for extra channels and decreased the mass of structural materials in the core. The updated reactor is loaded with modified standard fuel elements with 20 % higher uranium masses. At the same time stainless steel in fuel assembly shrouds was substituted by zirconium alloy. Today in progress are investigations and work to promote the second stage of reactor updating that involve developments of cross-shaped fuel elements having low neutron absorption matrix materials. This article gives an historical account of the design and main technical changes that occurred for the CM reactor since its commissioning.

  19. Towards Next Generation TATB-based Explosives by Understanding Voids and Microstructure from 10 nm to 1 cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willey, T M; Overturf, G

    2009-03-26

    TATB-based explosives have been investigated on length scales spanning several orders of magnitude, from just under 10 nm to larger than 1 cm. This has been accomplished using a combination of ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), ultra-small angle neutron scattering (USANS), and x-ray computed tomography (XRCT). USAXS determines distributions the smallest structures including hot-spot voids from hundreds of nanometers to a few microns, USANS extends this range to about 10 microns, and two variants of XRCT cover sizes from microns to centimeters. Several examples are presented for LX-17, a triaminotrinitrobenzene based plastic bonded explosive using Kel-F 800. As an extension of previous USAXS results, in these proceedings, an alternate binder results in a more uniform microstructure for the PBX, useful towards design of next-generation TATB-based explosives. These data are an important step to understanding microstructural mechanisms that affect the mechanical properties of TATB-based explosives, and provide complete a comprehensive characterization of the structure of LX-17 from nanometers to centimeters that can be used as empirical input to computational models of detonation, and in determining the relationship between voids and microstructure to detonation properties.

  20. PROCESS OF PRODUCING Cm$sup 244$ AND Cm$sup 24$$sup 5$

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manning, W.M.; Studier, M.H.; Diamond, H.; Fields, P.R.

    1958-11-01

    A process is presented for producing Cm and Cm/sup 245/. The first step of the process consists in subjecting Pu/sup 2339/ to a high neutron flux and subsequently dissolving the irradiated material in HCl. The plutonium is then oxidized to at least the tetravalent state and the solution is contacted with an anion exchange resin, causing the plutonium values to be absorbed while the fission products and transplutonium elements remain in the effluent solution. The effluent solution is then contacted with a cation exchange resin causing the transplutonium, values to be absorbed while the fission products remain in solution. The cation exchange resin is then contacted with an aqueous citrate solution and tbe transplutonium elements are thereby differentially eluted in order of decreasing atomic weight, allowing collection of the desired fractions.

  1. Outcomes of Node-Negative Breast Cancer 5 Centimeters and Larger Treated With and Without Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulart, Jennifer; Truong, Pauline; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline H.; Kennecke, Hagen; Nichol, Alan

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The role of adjuvant postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) remains controversial for the rare presentation of pT3pN0cM0 breast cancer. The present analysis examined locoregional recurrence (LRR) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) in pT2 = 5.0-cm and pT3 >5.0-cm tumors treated with mastectomy, stratified by PMRT use. Materials and Methods: Between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 2000, the British Columbia provincial database yielded 100 node-negative patients with tumors {>=}5 cm of 19,846 nonmetastatic breast cancer patients (0.5%). Of these 100 patients, 44 (44%) had received adjuvant PMRT. Results: The PMRT group contained significantly more pT3 >5-cm cases (p = 0.001) and margin-positive cases (p = .03). With a median follow-up of 10 years, the cumulative 10-year LRR rate was 2.3% (95% confidence interval, 0.2-10.5) in the PMRT group vs. 8.9% (95% confidence interval, 3.2-18.2) in the no-PMRT group (p = .2). Regarding LRR in the no-PMRT group, all patients had Grade 3 histologic features (LRR 17%, 5 of 29) and had not received hormonal therapy (LRR 15%, 5 of 34). The 10-year breast cancer-specific survival rate was 85.8% (95% confidence interval 71.0-93.4) in the PMRT group vs. 74.6% (95% confidence interval 59.9-84.5) in the no-PMRT group (p = .2). On multivariate analysis, adjusted for the prognostic and predictive variables, PMRT did not significantly improve the LRR or breast cancer-specific survival rates. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated a low LRR rate for node-negative breast cancer {>=}5 cm. Our results indicate that PMRT should be considered for Grade 3 histologic features and patients not undergoing hormonal therapy.

  2. ARM - Campaign Instrument - pyran-kandz-cm11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kandz-cm11 Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Pyranometer-kipp&zonen-cm11 (PYRAN-KANDZ-CM11

  3. CU-CM-1-I Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CM-1-I Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CU-CM-1-I Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: MEAM, MDEA, and SMEPA System: CU This rate schedule shall be available to the South Mississippi Electric Power Association, Municipal Energy Agency of Mississippi, and Mississippi Delta Energy Agency. This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such

  4. ARM - Campaign Instrument - kandz-cm21-schenk-star

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -schenk-star Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Kipp and Zonen-CM21 Schenk Star (KANDZ-CM21-SCHENK-STAR) Instrument Categories Radiometric Campaigns

  5. ARM - Campaign Instrument - cm22-air-and-gnd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    air-and-gnd Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : CM-22 Radiometer - Airborne and Ground Based (CM22-AIR-AND-GND) Instrument Categories Radiometric Campaigns ARESE II IOP [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2000.02.01 - 2000.04.05 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available

  6. ARM - Campaign Instrument - cm22-pmod-vent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pmod-vent Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Kipp & Zonen CM22-PMOD Vent (CM22-PMOD-VENT) Instrument Categories Radiometric Campaigns Diffuse Shortwave IOP [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2001.09.24 - 2001.10.22 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available measurements,

  7. This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Qian; Han, Jung

    2015-12-08

    This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

  8. FIRST: Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (Data Catalogs from the Very Large Array (VLA) First Survey)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 27 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and cleaned using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). Data were collected from 1993 through 2002, with enhanced images produced up through 2011. The Data Catalogs have been cleaned and reissued over time, with the latest version coming out in March, 2014. They contain maps, images, and binary data. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

  9. Nevada Test Site 2009 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Radioactive Waste

    2010-06-23

    from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 30 cm (1 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2009, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation or were vegetated, but water drained from the bare-soil Area 3 drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. Elevated tritium levels in plants and animals sampled from the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs show tritium uptake by the biota, but the low levels of other radionuclides do not indicate that there has been biota intrusion into the waste. All 2009 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  10. POLYSHIFT Communications Software for the Connection Machine System CM-200

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    George, William; Brickner, Ralph G.; Johnsson, S. Lennart

    1994-01-01

    We describe the use and implementation of a polyshift function PSHIFT for circular shifts and end-offs shifts. Polyshift is useful in many scientific codes using regular grids, such as finite difference codes in several dimensions, and multigrid codes, molecular dynamics computations, and in lattice gauge physics computations, such as quantum chromodynamics (QCD) calculations. Our implementation of the PSHIFT function on the Connection Machine systems CM-2 and CM-200 offers a speedup of up to a factor of 3–4 compared with CSHIFT when the local data motion within a node is small. The PSHIFT routine is included in the Connection Machine Scientificmore » Software Library (CMSSL).« less

  11. Nevada National Security Site 2012 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, David B.

    2013-09-10

    downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2012, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2012 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  12. Nevada National Security Site 2013 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, D. B.

    2014-08-19

    downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2013, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3-times natural precipitation. All 2013 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  13. Nevada National Security Site 2010 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-06-01

    evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 61 cm (2 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2010, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Water drained from both the bare-soil drainage lysimeter and the invader species drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2010 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  14. Comprehensive Characterization of Voids and Microstructure in TATB-based Explosives from 10 nm to 1 cm: Effects of Temperature Cycling and Compressive Creep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willey, T M; Lauderbach, L; Gagliardi, F; Cunningham, B; Lorenz, K T; Lee, J I; van Buuren, T; Call, R; Landt, L; Overturf, G

    2010-02-26

    This paper outlines the characterization of voids and Microstructure in TATB-based Explosives over several orders of magnitude, from sizes on the order of 10 nm to about 1 cm. This is accomplished using ultra small angle x-ray scattering to investigate voids from a few nm to a few microns, ultra small angle neutron scattering for voids from 100 nm to 10 microns, and x-ray computed microtomography to investigate microstructure from a few microns to a few centimeters. The void distributions of LX-17 are outlined, and the microstructure of LX-17 is presented. Temperature cycling and compressive creep cause drastically different damage to the microstructure. Temperature cycling leads to a volume expansion (ratchet growth) in TATB-based explosives, and x-ray scattering techniques that are sensitive to sizes up to a few microns indicated changes to the void volume distribution that had previously accounted for most, but not all of the change in density. This paper presents the microstructural damage larger than a few microns caused by ratchet growth. Temperature cycling leads to void creation in the binder poor regions associated with the interior portion of formulated prills. Conversely, compressive creep causes characteristically different changes to microstructure; fissures form at binder-rich prill boundaries prior to mechanical failure.

  15. Area 6 Decontamination Pond Corrective Action Unit 92 Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report for the Period January 2000-December 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Traynor

    2001-03-01

    The Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Corrective Action Unit 92, was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP, 1995]) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (NDEP, 1996) on May 11, 1999. Historically the Decontamination Pond was used for the disposal of partially treated liquid effluent discharged from the Decontamination Facility (Building 6-05) and the Industrial Laundry (Building 6-07) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1996). The Decontamination Pond was constructed and became operational in 1979. Releases of RCRA-regulated hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents have not been discharged to the Decontamination Pond since 1988 (DOE/NV, 1996). The pipe connecting the Decontamination Pond and Decontamination Facility and Industrial Laundry were cut and sealed at the Decontamination Pad Oil/Water Separator in 1992. The Decontamination Pond was closed in place by installing a RCRA cover. Fencing was installed around the periphery to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring at the site consists of quarterly inspections of the RCRA cover and fencing, and a subsidence survey. Additional inspections are conducted if: Precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period, or An earthquake occurs with a magnitude exceeding 4.5 on the Richter scale within 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) of the closure.

  16. Sub-nanometer flattening of a 45-cm long, 45-actuator x-ray deformable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sub-nanometer flattening of a 45-cm long, 45-actuator x-ray deformable mirror Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sub-nanometer flattening of a 45-cm long, 45-actuator x-ray ...

  17. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying uniform 10–30 T fields to centimeter-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rovang, D. C. Lamppa, D. C.; Cuneo, M. E.; Owen, A. C.; McKenney, J.; Johnson, D. W.; Radovich, S.; Kaye, R. J.; McBride, R. D.; Alexander, C. S.; Awe, T. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Haill, T. A.; Jones, P. A.; Argo, J. W.; Dalton, D. G.; Robertson, G. K.; Waisman, E. M.; Sinars, D. B.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Sandia has successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10–30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1–3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2–7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnostic lines of sight to the target. We describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.

  18. CENTIMETER CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS OF THE NORTHERN HEAD OF THE HH 80/81/80N JET: REVISING THE ACTUAL DIMENSIONS OF A PARSEC-SCALE JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masque, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert; Girart, Josep M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Beltran, Maria T.

    2012-10-10

    We present 6 and 20 cm Jansky Very Large Array/Very Large Array observations of the northern head of the HH 80/81/80N jet, one of the largest collimated jet systems known so far, aimed to look for knots farther than HH 80N, the northern head of the jet. Aligned with the jet and 10' northeast of HH 80N, we found a radio source not reported before, with a negative spectral index similar to that of HH 80, HH 81, and HH 80N. The fit of a precessing jet model to the knots of the HH 80/81/80N jet, including the new source, shows that the position of this source is close to the jet path resulting from the modeling. If the new source belongs to the HH 80/81/80N jet, its derived size and dynamical age are 18.4 pc and >9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr, respectively. If the jet is symmetric, its southern lobe would expand beyond the cloud edge resulting in an asymmetric appearance of the jet. Based on the updated dynamical age, we speculate on the possibility that the HH 80/81/80N jet triggered the star formation observed in a dense core found ahead of HH 80N, which shows signposts of interaction with the jet. These results indicate that parsec-scale radio jets can play a role in the stability of dense clumps and the regulation of star formation in the molecular cloud.

  19. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - C.M. Russell High School...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    C.M. Russell High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  20. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON POND FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2006-03-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by the NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2005. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2005. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Five additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in) within a 24-hour period during 2005. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2005 are included in Appendix C.

  1. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Areas Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions ⇒ Navigate Section Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions Biosciences The Biosciences Area forges multidisciplinary teams to solve national challenges in energy, environment and health issues; and to advance the engineering of biological systems for sustainable manufacturing. Biosciences Area research is coordinated through three divisions and is enabled by Berkeley

  2. TESTING AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NASA 5 CM BY 5 CM BI-SUPPORTED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS OPERATED IN BOTH FUEL CELL AND STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. C. O'Brien; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; X. Zhang; S. C. Farmer; T. L. Cable; J. A. Setlock

    2011-11-01

    A series of 5 cm by 5 cm bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 cm by 5 cm SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.

  3. Modifications to the cosmic 21-cm background frequency spectrum by scattering via electrons in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooray, Asantha

    2006-05-15

    The cosmic 21-cm background frequency spectrum related to the spin-flip transition of neutral hydrogen present during and before the era of reionization is rich in features associated with physical processes that govern transitions between the two spin states. The intervening electrons in foreground galaxy clusters inversely Compton scatter the 21-cm background spectrum and modify it just as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum is modified by inverse-Compton scattering. Towards typical galaxy clusters at low redshifts, the resulting modification is a few tenths milli-Kelvin correction to the few tens milli-Kelvin temperature of 21-cm signal relative to that of the cosmic microwave background blackbody spectrum. The modifications are mostly associated with sharp changes in the cosmic 21-cm background spectrum such as due to the onset of a Lyman-{alpha} radiation field or heating of neutral gas. Though low-frequency radio interferometers that are now planned for 21-cm anisotropy measurements are insensitive to the mean 21-cm spectrum, differential observations of galaxy clusters with these interferometers can be utilized to indirectly establish global features in the 21-cm frequency spectrum. We discuss the feasibility to detect the spectrum modified by clusters and find that, for upcoming interferometers, while a detection towards an individual cluster is challenging, one can average signals over a number of clusters, selected based on the strength of the Sunyave-Zel'dovich effect at high radio frequencies involving CMB scattering alone, to establish the mean 21-cm spectrum.

  4. High redshift signatures in the 21 cm forest due to cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Silk, Joseph E-mail: toyokazu.sekiguchi@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic strings induce minihalo formation in the early universe. The resultant minihalos cluster in string wakes and create a ''21 cm forest'' against the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum. Such a 21 cm forest can contribute to angular fluctuations of redshifted 21 cm signals integrated along the line of sight. We calculate the root-mean-square amplitude of the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings and show that these fluctuations can dominate signals from minihalos due to primordial density fluctuations at high redshift (z?>10), even if the string tension is below the current upper bound, G? < 1.5 10{sup ?7}. Our results also predict that the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) can potentially detect the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings with G? ? 7.5 10{sup ?8} for the single frequency band case and 4.0 10{sup ?8} for the multi-frequency band case.

  5. Large area bulk superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  6. Bay Area

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8%2A en NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiological Surveys Over San Francisco, Pacifica, Berkeley, And Oakland, CA Areas http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesamsca

  7. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in diverse research areas such as cell biology, lithography, infrared microscopy, radiology, and x-ray tomography. Time-Resolved These techniques exploit the pulsed nature of...

  8. Spin-orbit holds the heavyweight title for Pu and Am: Exchange regains it for Cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, K; der Laan, G v; Soderlind, P

    2008-01-10

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) The 5f electrons in Cm are near an LS coupling scheme. (2) This coupling scheme allows for a large spin polarization of the 5f electrons, which in turn stabilizes the Cm III crystal structure. (3) Results for Cm show us the recipe for magnetic stabilization of the crystal structure of metals: (A) The metal must be near the itinerant-localized transition where multiple crystal structures have close energies; (B) The metal is just on the magnetic side of the transition; and (C) There must be a magnetic moment large enough to overcome the energy difference between crystal structures, thus dictating the atomic geometry. (4) These results solidify our understanding of magnetically-stabilized metals, showing us where to look for engineered materials with magnetic applications.

  9. Implementation of the singular-value decomposition on the Connection Machine CM-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, N.A.

    1991-04-11

    In modern digital signal processing, the singular value decomposition is increasingly recognized as an important mathematical tool. The true measure of usefulness of such a tool is very much dependent on the ability to compute it at supercomputer throughput rates. This report describes an implementation of the singular value decomposition (SVD) on the Connection Machine CM-2 using parallel Fortran. The algorithm is based on Hestenes's, which is a Jacobi iteration in which pairs of rows are rotated to become orthogonal. The Fortran implementation of this algorithm on a full CM-2 is comparable in execution speed to the Linpack implementation on a Convex C220 processor.

  10. Constraining the physical conditions in the jets of ?-ray flaring blazars using centimeter-band polarimetry and radiative transfer simulations. I. Data and models for 0420014, OJ 287, and 1156+295

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aller, M. F.; Hughes, P. A.; Aller, H. D.; Latimer, G. E.; Hovatta, T.

    2014-08-10

    To investigate parsec-scale jet flow conditions during GeV ?-ray flares detected by the Fermi Large Angle Telescope, we obtained centimeter-band total flux density and linear polarization monitoring observations from 2009.5 through 2012.5 with the 26 m Michigan radio telescope for a sample of core-dominated blazars. We use these data to constrain radiative transfer simulations incorporating propagating shocks oriented at an arbitrary angle to the flow direction in order to set limits on the jet flow and shock parameters during flares temporally associated with ?-ray flares in 0420014, OJ 287, and 1156+295; these active galactic nuclei exhibited the expected signature of shocks in the linear polarization data. Both the number of shocks comprising an individual radio outburst (3 and 4) and the range of the compression ratios of the individual shocks (0.5-0.8) are similar in all three sources; the shocks are found to be forward-moving with respect to the flow. While simulations incorporating transverse shocks provide good fits for 0420014 and 1156+295, oblique shocks are required for modeling the OJ 287 outburst, and an unusually low value of the low-energy cutoff of the radiating particles' energy distribution is also identified. Our derived viewing angles and shock speeds are consistent with independent Very Long Baseline Array results. While a random component dominates the jet magnetic field, as evidenced by the low fractional linear polarization, to reproduce the observed spectral character requires that a significant fraction of the magnetic field energy is in an ordered axial component. Both straight and low pitch angle helical field lines are viable scenarios.

  11. Cross-correlation studies between CMB temperature anisotropies and 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooray, Asantha

    2004-09-15

    During the transition from a neutral to a fully reionized universe, scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons via free electrons leads to a new anisotropy contribution to the temperature distribution. If the reionization process is inhomogeneous and patchy, the era of reionization is also visible via brightness temperature fluctuations in the redshifted 21 cm line emission from neutral hydrogen. Since regions containing electrons and neutral hydrogen are expected to trace the same underlying density field, the two are (anti)correlated and this is expected to be reflected in the anisotropy maps via a correlation between arcminute-scale CMB temperature and the 21 cm background. In terms of the angular cross-power spectrum, unfortunately, this correlation is insignificant due to a geometric cancellation associated with second-order CMB anisotropies. The same cross correlation between ionized and neutral regions, however, can be studied using a bispectrum involving large-scale velocity field of ionized regions from the Doppler effect, arcminute-scale CMB anisotropies during reionization, and the 21 cm background. While the geometric cancellation is partly avoided, the signal-to-noise ratio related to this bispectrum is reduced due to the large cosmic variance related to velocity fluctuations traced by the Doppler effect. Unless the velocity field during reionization can be independently established, it is unlikely that the correlation information related to the relative distribution of ionized electrons and regions containing neutral hydrogen can be obtained with a combined study involving CMB and 21 cm fluctuations.

  12. Cosmological and astrophysical parameter measurements with 21-cm anisotropies during the era of reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Mario G.; Cooray, Asantha

    2006-10-15

    We study the prospects for extracting cosmological and astrophysical parameters from the low radio frequency 21-cm background due to the spin-flip transition of neutral hydrogen during and prior to the reionization of the Universe. We make use of the angular power spectrum of 21-cm anisotropies, which exists due to inhomogeneities in the neutral hydrogen density field, the gas temperature field, the gas velocity field, and the spatial distribution of the Lyman-{alpha} intensity field associated with first luminous sources that emit UV photons. We extract parameters that describe both the underlying mass power spectrum and the global cosmology, as well as a set of simplified astrophysical parameters that connect fluctuations in the dark matter to those that govern 21-cm fluctuations. We also marginalize over a model for the foregrounds at low radio frequencies. In this general description, we find large degeneracies between cosmological parameters and the astrophysical parameters, though such degeneracies are reduced when strong assumptions are made with respect to the spin temperature relative to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature or when complicated sources of anisotropy in the brightness temperature are ignored. Some of the degeneracies between cosmological and astrophysical parameters are broken when 21-cm anisotropy measurements are combined with information from the CMB, such as the temperature and the polarization measurements with Planck. While the overall improvement on the cosmological parameter estimates is not significant when measurements from first-generation interferometers are combined with Planck, such a combination can measure astrophysical parameters such as the ionization fraction in several redshift bins with reasonable accuracy.

  13. OPENING THE 21 cm EPOCH OF REIONIZATION WINDOW: MEASUREMENTS OF FOREGROUND ISOLATION WITH PAPER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Ali, Zaki; Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F.; Bradley, Richard F.; Carilli, Chris L.; DeBoer, Dave; Dexter, Matthew; MacMahon, Dave; Gugliucci, Nicole E.; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Klima, Patricia J.; Manley, Jason; Walbrugh, William P.; Stefan, Irina I.

    2013-05-10

    We present new observations with the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization with the aim of measuring the properties of foreground emission for 21 cm epoch of reionization (EoR) experiments at 150 MHz. We focus on the footprint of the foregrounds in cosmological Fourier space to understand which modes of the 21 cm power spectrum will most likely be compromised by foreground emission. These observations confirm predictions that foregrounds can be isolated to a {sup w}edge{sup -}like region of two-dimensional (k , k{sub Parallel-To })-space, creating a window for cosmological studies at higher k{sub Parallel-To} values. We also find that the emission extends past the nominal edge of this wedge due to spectral structure in the foregrounds, with this feature most prominent on the shortest baselines. Finally, we filter the data to retain only this ''unsmooth'' emission and image its specific k{sub Parallel-To} modes. The resultant images show an excess of power at the lowest modes, but no emission can be clearly localized to any one region of the sky. This image is highly suggestive that the most problematic foregrounds for 21 cm EoR studies will not be easily identifiable bright sources, but rather an aggregate of fainter emission.

  14. MEASURING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS ON 21 cm INTENSITY FLUCTUATIONS AT MODERATE REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao Xiaochun

    2012-06-20

    After reionization, emission in the 21 cm hyperfine transition provides a direct probe of neutral hydrogen distributed in galaxies. Different from galaxy redshift surveys, observation of baryon acoustic oscillations in the cumulative 21 cm emission may offer an attractive method for constraining dark energy properties at moderate redshifts. Keys to this program are techniques to extract the faint cosmological signal from various contaminants, such as detector noise and continuum foregrounds. In this paper, we investigate the possible systematic and statistical errors in the acoustic scale estimates using ground-based radio interferometers. Based on the simulated 21 cm interferometric measurements, we analyze the performance of a Fourier-space, light-of-sight algorithm in subtracting foregrounds, and further study the observing strategy as a function of instrumental configurations. Measurement uncertainties are presented from a suite of simulations with a variety of parameters, in order to have an estimate of what behaviors will be accessible in the future generation of hydrogen surveys. We find that 10 separate interferometers, each of which contains {approx}300 dishes, observing an independent patch of the sky and producing an instantaneous field of view (FOV) of {approx}100 deg{sup 2}, can be used to make a significant detection of acoustic features over a period of a few years. Compared to optical surveys, the broad bandwidth, wide FOV, and multi-beam observation are all unprecedented capabilities of low-frequency radio experiments.

  15. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 112: AREA 23 HAZARDOUS WASTE TRENCHES, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 2003 - SEPTEMBER 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit located in Area 23 of the NTS. This annual Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report provides the results of inspections and monitoring for CAU 112. This report includes a summary and analysis of the site inspections, repair and maintenance, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 112 for the current monitoring period, October 2003 through September 2004. Inspections of the CAU 112 RCRA unit were performed quarterly to identify any significant physical changes to the site that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit. The overall condition of the covers and facility was good, and no significant findings were observed. The annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted on August 23, 2004, and the results indicated that no cover subsidence4 has occurred at any of the markers. The elevations of the markers have been consistent for the past 11 years. The total precipitation for the current reporting period, october 2003 to September 2004, was 14.0 centimeters (cm) (5.5 inches [in]) (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, Special Operations and Research Division, 2004). This is slightly below the average rainfall of 14.7 cm (5.79 in) over the same period from 1972 to 2004. Post-closure monitoring verifies that the CAU 112 trench covers are performing properly and that no water is infiltrating into or out of the waste trenches. Sail moisture measurements are obtained in the soil directly beneath the trenches and compared to baseline conditions for the first year of post-closure monitoring, which began in october 1993. neutron logging was performed twice during this monitoring period along 30 neutron access tubes to obtain soil moisture data and detect any changes that may indicate moisture movement

  16. H I 21 cm ABSORPTION AND UNIFIED SCHEMES OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2010-03-20

    In a recent study of z >= 0.1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we found that 21 cm absorption has never been detected in objects in which the ultraviolet luminosity exceeds L{sub UV} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}. In this paper, we further explore the implications that this has for the currently popular consensus that it is the orientation of the circumnuclear obscuring torus, invoked by unified schemes of AGNs, which determines whether absorption is present along our sight line. The fact that at L{sub UV} {approx}< 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}, both type-1 and type-2 objects exhibit a 50% probability of detection, suggests that this is not the case and that the bias against detection of H I absorption in type-1 objects is due purely to the inclusion of the L{sub UV} {approx}> 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1} sources. Similarly, the ultraviolet luminosities can also explain why the presence of 21 cm absorption shows a preference for radio galaxies over quasars and the higher detection rate in compact sources, such as compact steep spectrum or gigahertz peaked spectrum sources, may also be biased by the inclusion of high-luminosity sources. Being comprised of all 21 cm searched sources at z >= 0.1, this is a necessarily heterogeneous sample, the constituents of which have been observed by various instruments. By this same token, however, the dependence on the UV luminosity may be an all encompassing effect, superseding the unified schemes model, although there is the possibility that the exclusive 21 cm non-detections at high UV luminosities could be caused by a bias toward gas-poor ellipticals. Additionally, the high UV fluxes could be sufficiently exciting/ionizing the H I above 21 cm detection thresholds, although the extent to which this is related to the neutral gas deficit in ellipticals is currently unclear. Examining the moderate UV luminosity (L{sub UV} {approx}< 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}) sample further, from the profile widths and offsets from the systemic velocities

  17. Comparison of 10. 7 CM radio flux with SME solar Lyman alpha flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, C.A.; Tobiska, W.K.; Rottman, G.J. ); White, O.R.

    1990-04-01

    Measurements of the solar Lyman alpha flux that were made over a seven-and-one-half-year period between October 11, 1981 and April 13, 1989 have been compared with ground-based measurements of the solar 10.7 cm radio flux made over the same time period. There is a long-term correlation between these two measures of solar flux during the declining part of the solar cycle. During the solar minimum period, there is only a poor correlation between the two solar fluxes because the 10.7 cm radio flux reaches a minimum of 65 {times} 10{sup {minus}22} W m{sup {minus}2} Hz{sup {minus}1} and does not vary below this value while the Lyman alpha flux continues to decline and show long-term and short-term variations. During the early ascending phase of the new solar cycle, there is again a correlation between the two fluxes, although the constant of proportionality between the two is different from the constant during the declining phase of the previous solar cycle. Somewhat later, during the period November 25, 1988-April 13, 1989 a medium-term correlation exists and the proportionality of the two indices is once again similar to what it was during the declining phase of the previous solar cycle. A study of the correlation of the 10.7 cm flux with the Lyman alpha for a 999-day period during the declining phase showed that for the short-term (27-day) variation there is a correlation between the two fluxes but the proportionality between them varies from one solar rotation to the next.

  18. MC4424 Firing Set (for PRESS/CM) characterization and development report: Appendices, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinen, R.J.; Smith, P.A.

    1995-05-01

    This volume contains Appendices A through V for report number KCP-613-5608, which is classified as confidential restricted data. These appendices are unclassified and are published as a separate report so that they can be handled and filed without the controls applied to classified material. Please see KCP-613-5608 for a discussion of the development and characterization of the MC4424 Firing Set which is included in the PRESS/CM project and for comments on each of these appendices.

  19. Utilization of Local Law Enforcement Aerial Resources in Consequence Management (CM) Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasiolek, Piotr T.; Malchow, Russell L.

    2013-03-12

    During the past decade the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was instrumental in enhancing the nation’s ability to detect and prevent a radiological or nuclear attack in the highest risk cities. Under the DHS Securing the Cities initiative, nearly 13,000 personnel in the New York City region have been trained in preventive radiological and nuclear detection operations, and nearly 8,500 pieces of radiological detection equipment have been funded. As part of the preventive radiological/nuclear detection (PRND) mission, several cities have received funding to purchase commercial aerial radiation detection systems. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Aerial Measuring System (AMS) program started providing Mobile Aerial Radiological Surveillance (MARS) training to such assets, resulting in over 150 HAZMAT teams’ officers and pilots from 10 law enforcement organizations and fire departments being trained in the aerial radiation detection. From the beginning, the MARS training course covered both the PRND and consequence management (CM) missions. Even if the law enforcement main focus is PRND, their aerial assets can be utilized in the collection of initial radiation data for post-event radiological CM response. Based on over 50 years of AMS operational experience and information collected during MARS training, this presentation will focus on the concepts of CM response using aerial assets as well as utilizing law enforcement/fire department aerial assets in CM. Also discussed will be the need for establishing closer relationships between local jurisdictions’ aerial radiation detection capabilities and state and local radiation control program directors, radiological health department managers, etc. During radiological events these individuals may become primary experts/advisers to Incident Commanders for radiological emergency response, especially in the early stages of a response. The knowledge of the existence

  20. Cosmological signatures of tilted isocurvature perturbations: reionization and 21cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Silk, Joseph E-mail: hiroyuki.tashiro@asu.edu E-mail: naoshi@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-03-01

    We investigate cosmological signatures of uncorrelated isocurvature perturbations whose power spectrum is blue-tilted with spectral index 2?cm line fluctuations due to neutral hydrogens in minihalos. Combination of measurements of the reionization optical depth and 21cm line fluctuations will provide complementary probes of a highly blue-tilted isocurvature power spectrum.

  1. The 21cm power spectrum and the shapes of non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chongchitnan, Sirichai

    2013-03-01

    We consider how measurements of the 21cm radiation from the epoch of reionization (z = 8?12) can constrain the amplitudes of various 'shapes' of primordial non-Gaussianity. The limits on these shapes, each parametrized by the non-linear parameter f{sub NL}, can reveal whether the physics of inflation is more complex than the standard single-field, slow-roll scenario. In this work, we quantify the effects of the well-known local, equilateral, orthogonal and folded types of non-Gaussianities on the 21cm power spectrum, which is expected to be measured by upcoming radio arrays such as the Square-Kilometre Array (SKA). We also assess the prospects of the SKA in constraining these non-Gaussianities, and found constraints that are comparable with those from cosmic-microwave-background experiments such as Planck. We show that the limits on various f{sub NL} can be tightened to O(1) using a radio array with a futuristic but realistic set of specifications.

  2. Design of a 10**36 CM-2 S-1 Super-B Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Guiducci, S.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; Bertsche, Kirk J.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Bettoni, S.; Paoloni, E.; Marchiori, G.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2011-10-24

    Parameters have been studied for a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at the Upsilon 4S that would deliver a luminosity of 1 to 4 x 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s. This collider, called a Super-B Factory, would use a combination of linear collider and storage ring techniques. In this scheme an electron beam and a positron beam are stored in low-emittance damping rings similar to those designed for a Linear Collider (LC) or the next generation light source. A LC style interaction region is included in the ring to produce sub-millimeter vertical beta functions at the collision point. A large crossing angle (+/- 24 mrad) is used at the collision point to allow beam separation. A crab-waist scheme is used to reduce the hourglass effect and restore peak luminosity. Beam currents of 1.8 A at 4 x 7 GeV in 1251 bunches can produce a luminosity of 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s with upgrade possibilities. Such a collider would produce an integrated luminosity of about 10,000 fb{sup -1} (10 ab{sup -1}) in a running year (10{sup 7} sec) at the {gamma}(4S) resonance. Further possibilities include having longitudinally polarized e- at the IR and operating at the J/Psi and Psi beam energies.

  3. Limits on Variations in Fundamental Constants from 21-cm and Ultraviolet Quasar Absorption Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Webb, J.K.; Flambaum, V.V.; Curran, S.J.; Murphy, M.T.

    2005-07-22

    Quasar absorption spectra at 21-cm and UV rest wavelengths are used to estimate the time variation of x{identical_to}{alpha}{sup 2}g{sub p}{mu}, where {alpha} is the fine structure constant, g{sub p} the proton g factor, and m{sub e}/m{sub p}{identical_to}{mu} the electron/proton mass ratio. Over a redshift range 0.24 < or approx. z{sub abs} < or approx. 2.04, <{delta}x/x>{sub total}{sup weighted}=(1.17{+-}1.01)x10{sup -5}. A linear fit gives x/x=(-1.43{+-}1.27)x10{sup -15} yr{sup -1}. Two previous results on varying {alpha} yield the strong limits {delta}{mu}/{mu}=(2.31{+-}1.03)x10{sup -5} and {delta}{mu}/{mu}=(1.29{+-}1.01)x10{sup -5}. Our sample, 8x larger than any previous, provides the first direct estimate of the intrinsic 21-cm and UV velocity differences {approx}6 km s{sup -1}.

  4. Signatures of clumpy dark matter in the global 21 cm background signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cumberbatch, Daniel T.; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Silk, Joseph

    2010-11-15

    We examine the extent to which the self-annihilation of supersymmetric neutralino dark matter, as well as light dark matter, influences the rate of heating, ionization, and Lyman-{alpha} pumping of interstellar hydrogen and helium and the extent to which this is manifested in the 21 cm global background signal. We fully consider the enhancements to the annihilation rate from dark matter halos and substructures within them. We find that the influence of such structures can result in significant changes in the differential brightness temperature, {delta}T{sub b}. The changes at redshifts z<25 are likely to be undetectable due to the presence of the astrophysical signal; however, in the most favorable cases, deviations in {delta}T{sub b}, relative to its value in the absence of self-annihilating dark matter, of up to {approx_equal}20 mK at z=30 can occur. Thus we conclude that, in order to exclude these models, experiments measuring the global 21 cm signal, such as EDGES and CORE, will need to reduce the systematics at 50 MHz to below 20 mK.

  5. Influence of electron injection into 27 cm audio plasma cell on the plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haleem, N. A.; Ragheb, M. S.; Zakhary, S. G.; El Fiki, S. A.; Nouh, S. A.; El Disoki, T. M.

    2013-08-15

    In this article, the plasma is created in a Pyrex tube (L = 27 cm, ?= 4 cm) as a single cell, by a capacitive audio frequency (AF) discharge (f = 10100 kHz), at a definite pressure of ?0.2 Torr. A couple of tube linear and deviating arrangements show plasma characteristic conformity. The applied AF plasma and the injection of electrons into two gas mediums Ar and N{sub 2} revealed the increase of electron density at distinct tube regions by one order to attain 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}. The electrons temperature and density strengths are in contrast to each other. While their distributions differ along the plasma tube length, they show a decaying sinusoidal shape where their peaks position varies by the gas type. The electrons injection moderates electron temperature and expands their density. The later highest peak holds for the N{sub 2} gas, at electrons injection it changes to hold for the Ar. The sinusoidal decaying density behavior generates electric fields depending on the gas used and independent of tube geometry. The effect of the injected electrons performs a responsive impact on electrons density not attributed to the gas discharge. Analytical tools investigate the interaction of the plasma, the discharge current, and the gas used on the electrodes. It points to the emigration of atoms from each one but for greater majority they behave to a preferred direction. Meanwhile, only in the linear regime, small percentage of atoms still moves in reverse direction. Traces of gas atoms revealed on both electrodes due to sheath regions denote lack of their participation in the discharge current. In addition, atoms travel from one electrode to the other by overcoming the sheaths regions occurring transportation of particles agglomeration from one electrode to the other. The electrons injection has contributed to increase the plasma electron density peaks. These electrons populations have raised the generated electrostatic fields assisting the elemental ions emigration

  6. The 21 cm signature of shock heated and diffuse cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernndez, Oscar F.; Brandenberger, Robert H. E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2012-07-01

    The analysis of the 21 cm signature of cosmic string wakes is extended in several ways. First we consider the constraints on G? from the absorption signal of shock heated wakes laid down much later than matter radiation equality. Secondly we analyze the signal of diffuse wake, that is those wakes in which there is a baryon overdensity but which have not shock heated. Finally we compare the size of these signals to the expected thermal noise per pixel which dominates over the background cosmic gas brightness temperature and find that the cosmic string signal will exceed the thermal noise of an individual pixel in the Square Kilometre Array for string tensions G? > 2.5 10{sup ?8}.

  7. X-ray metrology and performance of a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Poyneer, Lisa A.; Brejnholt, Nicolai F.; Hill, Randall; Jackson, Jessie; Hagler, Lisle; Celestre, Richard; Feng, Jun

    2016-05-20

    We describe experiments with a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror (XDM) that have been conducted in End Station 2, Beamline 5.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source. A detailed description of the hardware implementation is provided. We explain our one-dimensional Fresnel propagation code that correctly handles grazing incidence and includes a model of the XDM. This code is used to simulate and verify experimental results. Initial long trace profiler metrology of the XDM at 7.5 keV is presented. The ability to measure a large (150-nm amplitude) height change on the XDM is demonstrated. The results agree well with the simulated experimentmore » at an error level of 1 μrad RMS. Lastly, direct imaging of the x-ray beam also shows the expected change in intensity profile at the detector.« less

  8. Size and spacial distribution of micropores in SBA-15 using CM-SANS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, Rachel A; Walsh, Brenna R; Fry, Jason A; Ghampson, Tyrone; Centikol, Ozgul; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Kaiser, Helmut; Pynn, Roger; Frederick, Brian G

    2011-01-01

    Diffraction intensity analysis of small-angle neutron scattering measurements of dry SBA-15 have been combined with nonlocal density functional theory (NLDFT) analysis of nitrogen desorption isotherms to characterize the micropore, secondary mesopore, and primary mesopore structure. The radial dependence of the scattering length density, which is sensitive to isolated surface hydroxyls, can only be modeled if the NLDFT pore size distribution is distributed relatively uniformly throughout the silica framework, not localized in a 'corona' around the primary mesopores. Contrast matching-small angle neutron scattering (CM-SANS) measurements, using water, decane, tributylamine, cyclohexane, and isooctane as direct probes of the size of micropores indicate that the smallest pores in SBA-15 have diameter between 5.7 and 6.2 {angstrom}. Correlation of the minimum pore size with the onset of the micropore size distribution provides direct evidence that the shape of the smallest micropores is cylinderlike, which is consistent with their being due to unraveling of the polymer template.

  9. TWO LOCAL VOLUME DWARF GALAXIES DISCOVERED IN 21cm EMISSION: PISCES A AND B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E.; Stern, Daniel E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu E-mail: mputman@astro.columbia.edu

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of two dwarf galaxies, Pisces A and B, from a blind 21cm H I search. These were the only two galaxies found via optical imaging and spectroscopy of 22 H I clouds identified in the GALFA-H I survey as dwarf galaxy candidates. They have properties consistent with being in the Local Volume (<10 Mpc), and one has resolved stellar populations such that it may be on the outer edge of the Local Group (?1 Mpc from M31). While the distance uncertainty makes interpretation ambiguous, these may be among the faintest star-forming galaxies known. Additionally, rough estimates comparing these galaxies to ?CDM dark matter simulations suggest consistency in number density, implying that the dark matter halos likely to host these galaxies are primarily H I-rich. The galaxies may thus be indicative of a large population of dwarfs at the limit of detectability that are comparable to the faint satellites of the Local Group. Because they are outside the influence of a large dark matter halo to alter their evolution, these galaxies can provide critical anchors to dwarf galaxy formation models.

  10. Structural and thermodynamic properties of the CmIII ion solvated by water and methanol

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kelley, Morgan P.; Yang, Ping; Clark, Sue B.; Clark, Aurora E.

    2016-04-27

    The geometric and electronic structures of the 9-coordinate Cm3+ ion solvated with both water and methanol are systematically investigated in the gas phase at each possible solvent-shell composition and configuration using density functional theory and second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are employed to assess the effects of second and third solvent shells on the gas-phase structure. The ion–solvent dissociation energy for methanol is greater than that of water, potentially because of increased charge donation to the ion made possible by the electron-rich methyl group. Further, the ion–solvent dissociation energy and the ion–solvent distance are shown tomore » be dependent on the solvent-shell composition. Furthermore, this has implications for solvent exchange, which is generally the rate-limiting step in complexation reactions utilized in the separation of curium from complex metal mixtures that derive from the advanced nuclear fuel cycle.« less

  11. Physics with linear colliders in the TeV CM energy region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulos, F.; Cook, V.; Hinchliffe, I.; Lane, K.; Pellet, D.; Perl, M.; Seiden, A.; Wiedemann, H.

    1982-07-01

    From a technical point of view a linear collider of high energy and luminosity cannot be operated economically at the present date. A series of R and D efforts in different areas are required to produce the necessary technology for an economically feasible linear collider. No fundamental limits, however, have been found as yet that would prevent us from reaching the goals outlined in this report. Most of the critical component will be tested in a real like situation once the SLC comes into operation. Beyond that much R and D is required in rf-power sources to reduce the power consumption and in high gradient accelerating structures to minimize the required real estate and linear construction costs.

  12. Nevada Test Site 2005 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Hudson, Cathy A. Wills

    2006-08-01

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2005 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (U.S. Department of Energy, 2005; Grossman, 2005; Bechtel Nevada, 2006). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure levels around the RWMSs are at or below background levels. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. There is no detectable man-made radioactivity by gamma spectroscopy, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits at the Area 3 RWMS. Measurements at the Area 5 RWMS show that radon flux from waste covers is no higher than natural radon flux from undisturbed soil in Area 5. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. Precipitation during 2005 totaled 219.1 millimeters (mm) (8.63 inches [in.]) at the Area 3 RWMS and 201.4 mm (7.93 in.) at the Area 5 RWMS. Soil-gas tritium monitoring continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Moisture from precipitation at Area 5 has percolated to the bottom of the bare-soil weighing lysimeter, but this same moisture has been removed from the vegetated weighing lysimeter by evapotranspiration. Vadose zone data from the operational waste pit covers show that precipitation from the fall of 2004 and the spring of 2005 infiltrated past the deepest sensors at 188 centimeters (6.2 feet) and remains in the pit cover

  13. Sweet Surface Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sweet Surface Area Sweet Surface Area Create a delicious root beer float and learn sophisticated science concepts at the same time. Sweet Surface Area Science is all around us, so ...

  14. 300 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 AreaFast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim ...

  15. 200 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 AreaFast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim ...

  16. 700 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 AreaFast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim ...

  17. AREA 5 RWMS CLOSURE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    153 CLOSURE STRATEGY NEVADA TEST SITE AREA 5 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT SITE Revision 0 ... Closure Strategy Nevada Test Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management ...

  18. Strategic Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strategic Focus Areas Lockheed Martin on behalf of Sandia National Laboratories will consider grant requests that best support the Corporation's strategic focus areas and reflect ...

  19. CM modeling report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vann, J.M., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-07

    This report compiles TWRS configuration management pre- implementation assessments, categorizes findings, and highlights programs identified for improvement.

  20. License Iso. CM35

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Reither this license nor my right under this licewe shall be uslgned or otherwise traneferred in violation of the pmvislont of the Atalc Finer&y Act oi 19%. ' Ibis licenae haJ..l ...

  1. Utah_cm_smith

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cindy and Mack Smith Site - Utah Wind Anemometer Loan Program Latitude: N. 37 deg. 44.034' Longitude: W. 109 deg. 17.28' Elevation: 6762' Placed in service: November 21, 2002...

  2. 100 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    00 Area About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility F Reactor H

  3. Implementation and evaluation of online gas-phase chemistry within a regional climate model (RegCM-CHEM4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shalaby, A. K.; Zakey, A. S.; Tawfik, A. B.; Solmon, F.; Giorgi, Filippo; Stordal, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Steiner, A. L.

    2012-05-22

    The RegCM-CHEM4 is a new online climate-chemistry model based on the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model (RegCM4). Tropospheric gas-phase chemistry is integrated into the climate model using the condensed version of the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-Z; Zaveri and Peters, 1999) with a fast solver based on radical balances. We evaluate the model over Continental Europe for two different time scales: (1) an event-based analysis of the ozone episode associated with the heat wave of August 2003 and (2) a climatological analysis of a sixyear simulation (2000-2005). For the episode analysis, model simulations show good agreement with European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) observations of hourly ozone over different regions in Europe and capture ozone concentrations during and after the August 2003 heat wave event. For long-term climate simulations, the model captures the seasonal cycle of ozone concentrations with some over prediction of ozone concentrations in non-heat wave summers. Overall, the ozone and ozone precursor evaluation shows the feasibility of using RegCM-CHEM4 for decadal-length simulations of chemistry-climate interactions.

  4. The cross correlation between the 21-cm radiation and the CMB lensing field: a new cosmological signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vallinotto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations through the 21-cm intensity mapping technique at redshift z {<=} 4 has the potential to tightly constrain the evolution of dark energy. Crucial to this experimental effort is the determination of the biasing relation connecting fluctuations in the density of neutral hydrogen (HI) with the ones of the underlying dark matter field. In this work I show how the HI bias relevant to these 21-cm intensity mapping experiments can successfully be measured by cross-correlating their signal with the lensing signal obtained from CMB observations. In particular I show that combining CMB lensing maps from Planck with 21-cm field measurements carried out with an instrument similar to the Cylindrical Radio Telescope, this cross-correlation signal can be detected with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of more than 5. Breaking down the signal arising from different redshift bins of thickness {Delta}z = 0.1, this signal leads to constraining the large scale neutral hydrogen bias and its evolution to 4{sigma} level.

  5. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

    1996-12-17

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

  6. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C.; Quigley, Gerard P.

    1996-01-01

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm.sup.2 emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm.sup.2 at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing.

  7. Technical Area 21

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Area 21 Technical Area 21 Technical Area 21 was the site of chemical research for refining plutonium and plutonium metal production from 1945 to 1978. August 1, 2013 Technical Area 21 in 2011 Technical Area 21 in 2011 Technical Area 21 (TA-21), also known as DP Site was the site of chemical research for refining plutonium and plutonium metal production from 1945 to 1978. Between 2008 and 2011, MDAs B, U, and V were excavated and removed. 24 buildings were demolished in 2010 and 2011

  8. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maps Individual Permit: Site Monitoring Area Maps Each Site Monitoring Area Map is updated whenever the map information is updated. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email What do these maps show? The Individual Permit for Storm Water site monitoring area maps display the following information: Surface hydrological features Locations of the Site(s) assigned to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring

  9. Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at INL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy G. Garn; David H. Meikrantz; Nick R. Mann; Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

    2008-09-01

    Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5 cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at the INL Troy G. Garn, Dave H. Meikrantz, Nick R. Mann, Jack D. Law, Terry A. Todd Idaho National Laboratory Commercially available, Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACC) are currently being evaluated for processing dissolved nuclear fuel solutions to selectively partition integrated elements using solvent extraction technologies. These evaluations include hydraulic and clean-in-place (CIP) testing of a commercially available 12.5 cm unit. Data from these evaluations is used to support design of future nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. Hydraulic testing provides contactor throughput performance data on two-phase systems for a wide range of operating conditions. Hydraulic testing results on a simple two-phase oil and water system followed by a 30 % Tributyl phosphate in N-dodecane / nitric acid pair are reported. Maximum total throughputs for this size contactor ranged from 20 to 32 liters per minute without significant other phase carryover. A relatively new contactor design enhancement providing Clean-in-Place capability for ACCs was also investigated. Spray nozzles installed into the central rotor shaft allow the rotor internals to be cleaned, offline. Testing of the solids capture of a diatomaceous earth/water slurry feed followed by CIP testing was performed. Solids capture efficiencies of >95% were observed for all tests and short cold water cleaning pulses proved successful at removing solids from the rotor.

  10. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isakova, Yu. Pushkarev, A.; Khailov, I.; Zhong, H.

    2015-07-15

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm{sup 2}, and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm{sup 2}), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  11. V-209:Cisco WAAS (Wide Area Application Services) Arbitrary Code Execution Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cisco Wide Area Application Services (WAAS) when configured as Central Manager (CM), contains a vulnerability that could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to execute arbitrary code on the affected system.

  12. LiDAR At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    aerial Li-DAR survey flown over the project areas, securing over 177,000 square kilometers of <30cm accuracy digital elevation data. LiDAR data were analyzed to characterize...

  13. RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report for CAU 91: Area 3 U-3fi Waste Unit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. F. Emer

    2001-02-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Unit, located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999 to October 2000 period. Inspections of the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. The objective of the neutron-logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-feet [ft]) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) or to detect changes that maybe indicative of subsidence within the disposal unit itself. Physical inspections of the closure were completed in March and September 2000 and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. The directional survey which is required to be completed every five years was run in the ER3-3 casing to determine if subsidence was occurring in the U-3fi emplacement borehole. Small changes were noted which are attributed to initial settling of the sand pack stemming. No evidence of subsidence within the emplacement borehole was observed. The subsidence survey for the October 1999 to October 2000 monitoring period indicated an increase in elevation of 0.244 centimeters (cm) (0.008 ft) compared to the previous year, July 1999. All changes in subsidence survey data taken to date are so small as to be at the survey instrument resolution level and it is not clear if they represent subsidence or measurement error. There is no clear evidence for any subsidence of the monument. Soil moisture monitoring results indicate dry stable conditions

  14. Experimental investigation of a 1 kA/cm{sup 2} sheet beam plasma cathode electron gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Niraj Narayan Pal, Udit; Prajesh, Rahul; Prakash, Ram; Kumar Pal, Dharmendra

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, a cold cathode based sheet-beam plasma cathode electron gun is reported with achieved sheet-beam current density ∼1 kA/cm{sup 2} from pseudospark based argon plasma for pulse length of ∼200 ns in a single shot experiment. For the qualitative assessment of the sheet-beam, an arrangement of three isolated metallic-sheets is proposed. The actual shape and size of the sheet-electron-beam are obtained through a non-conventional method by proposing a dielectric charging technique and scanning electron microscope based imaging. As distinct from the earlier developed sheet beam sources, the generated sheet-beam has been propagated more than 190 mm distance in a drift space region maintaining sheet structure without assistance of any external magnetic field.

  15. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe???Se??? thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yue; Li, Qiang; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, Toshinori

    2015-01-01

    We performed magneto-optical (MO) measurements on FeTe???Se??? thin films grown on LaAlO? (LAO) and Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single-crystalline substrates. These thin films show superconducting transition temperature Tc ~19 K, 4 K higher than the bulk sample. Typical roof-top patterns can be observed in the MO images of thin films grown on LAO and YSZ, from which a large and homogeneous critical current density Jc ~ 3 - 4 x 10? A/cm at 5 K was obtained. Magnetic flux penetration measurement reveals that the current is almost isotropically distributed in the two thin films. Compared with bulk crystals, FeTe???Se??? thin film demonstrates not only higher Tc, but also much larger Jc, which is attractive for applications.

  16. Inner Area Principles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inner Area Principles The Inner Area principles proposed by the Tri-Parties are a good beginning toward consideration of what kind of approach will be needed to remedy the problems of the Central Plateau. However, the Board feels that some principles have been overlooked in the preparation of these. [1] While it has been generally agreed that designated waste disposal facilities of the Inner Area (like ERDF and IDF) would not be candidates for remediation. What happened to the remedial approach

  17. Experimental Cross Sections for Reactions of Heavy Ions and 208Pb, 209Bi, 238U, and 248Cm Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patin, Joshua B.

    2002-05-24

    The study of the reactions between heavy ions and {sup 208}Pb, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 238}U, and {sup 248} Cm targets was performed to look at the differences between the cross sections of hot and cold fusion reactions. Experimental cross sections were compared with predictions from statistical computer codes to evaluate the effectiveness of the computer code in predicting production cross sections. Hot fusion reactions were studied with the MG system, catcher foil techniques and the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS). 3n- and 4n-exit channel production cross sections were obtained for the {sup 238}U({sup 18}O,xn){sup 256-x}Fm, {sup 238}U({sup 22}Ne,xn){sup 260-x}No, and {sup 248}Cm({sup 15}N,xn){sup 263-x}Lr reactions and are similar to previous experimental results. The experimental cross sections were accurately modeled by the predictions of the HIVAP code using the Reisdorf and Schaedel parameters and are consistent with the existing systematics of 4n exit channel reaction products. Cold fusion reactions were examined using the BGS. The {sup 208}Pb({sup 48}Ca,xn){sup 256-x}No, {sup 208}Pb({sup 50}Ti,xn){sup 258-x}Rf, {sup 208}Pb({sup 51}V,xn){sup 259-x}Db, {sup 209}Bi({sup 50}Ti,xn){sup 259-x}Db, and {sup 209}Bi({sup 51}V,xn){sup 260-x}Sg reactions were studied. The experimental production cross sections are in agreement with the results observed in previous experiments. It was necessary to slightly alter the Reisdorf and Schaedel parameters for use in the HIVAP code in order to more accurately model the experimental data. The cold fusion experimental results are in agreement with current 1n- and 2n-exit channel systematics.

  18. Spectral content of buried Ag foils at 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntington, C. M. Maddox, B. R.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S.; Remington, B. A.

    2014-11-15

    Sources of 5–12 keV thermal Heα x-rays are readily generated by laser irradiation of mid-Z foils at intensities >10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, and are widely used as probes for inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density experiments. Higher energy 17–50 keV x-ray sources are efficiently produced from “cold” Kα emission using short pulse, petawatt lasers at intensities >10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} [H.-S. Park, B. R. Maddox et al., “High-resolution 17–75 keV backlighters for high energy density experiments,” Phys. Plasmas 15(7), 072705 (2008); B. R. Maddox, H. S. Park, B. A. Remington et al., “Absolute measurements of x-ray backlighter sources at energies above 10 keV,” Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 056709 (2011)]. However, when long pulse (>1 ns) lasers are used with Z > 30 elements, the spectrum contains contributions from both K shell transitions and from ionized atomic states. Here we show that by sandwiching a silver foil between layers of high-density carbon, the ratio of Kα:Heα in the x-ray spectrum is significant increased over directly illuminated Ag foils, with narrower lines from K-shell transitions. Additionally, the emission volume is more localized for the sandwiched target, producing a more planar x-ray sheet. This technique may be useful for generating probes requiring spectral purity and a limited spatial extent, for example, in incoherent x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

  19. Imperial Valley Geothermal Area

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Imperial Valley Geothermal project consists of 10 generating plants in the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resource Area in Southern California's Imperial Valley. The combined capacity at Imperial...

  20. Western Area Power Administration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Area Power Administration Follow-up to Nov. 25, 2008 Transition ... Southwestern Power Administration CONSTRUCTION BUDGET ITEM DESCRIPTION FY 2009* MICROWAVE ...

  1. Nevada National Security Site 2011 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-07-31

    (2.55 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2011 is 47% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 RWMS operational waste covers was not done during 2011 due to construction of the final evapotranspiration cover at these monitoring locations. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 122 centimeters (4 feet) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2011, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 feet) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Ten percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2011 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  2. Astronomical Images from the Very Large Array (VLA) FIRST Survey Images from the STScI Archive (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters was a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid. The binary data are available in detailed source catalogs, but the full images themselves, developed through special techniques, are also available for public access. Note that the images are fairly large, typically 1150x1550 pixels. Access to the images is simple through the search interface; the images are also available via anonymous ftp at ftp://archive.stsci.edu/pub/vla_first/data. Another convenient way to obtain images is through the FIRST Cutout Server, which allows an image section to be extracted from the coadded image database at a user-specified position. The cutout server is also linked to the FIRST Search Engine, so that the catalog can be searched for sources of interest and then images can be obtained for those objects. All images taken through 2011 are available through the cutout server at http://third.ucllnl.org/cgi-bin/firstcutout.

  3. THE CM-, MM-, AND SUB-MM-WAVE SPECTRUM OF ALLYL ISOCYANIDE AND RADIOASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATIONS IN ORION KL AND THE SgrB2 LINE SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haykal, I.; Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.; Motyienko, R. A.; Écija, P.; Cocinero, E. J.; Basterretxea, F.; Fernández, J. A.; Castaño, F.; Guillemin, J. C.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-11-10

    Organic isocyanides have an interesting astrochemistry and some of these molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, rotational spectral data for this class of compounds are still scarce. We provide laboratory spectra of the four-carbon allyl isocyanide covering the full microwave region, thus allowing a potential astrophysical identification in the ISM. We assigned the rotational spectrum of the two cis (synperiplanar) and gauche (anticlinal) conformations of allyl isocyanide in the centimeter-wave region (4-18 GHz), resolved its {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) hyperfine structure, and extended the measurements into the millimeter and submillimeter-wave (150-900 GHz) ranges for the title compound. Rotational constants for all the monosubstituted {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopologues are additionally provided. Laboratory observations are supplemented with initial radioastronomical observations. Following analysis of an extensive dataset (>11000 rotational transitions), accurate ground-state molecular parameters are reported for the cis and gauche conformations of the molecule, including rotational constants, NQC parameters, and centrifugal distortion terms up to octic contributions. Molecular parameters have also been obtained for the two first excited states of the cis conformation, with a dataset of more than 3300 lines. The isotopic data allowed determining substitution and effective structures for the title compound. We did not detect allyl isocyanide either in the IRAM 30 m line survey of Orion KL or in the PRIMOS survey toward SgrB2. Nevertheless, we provided an upper limit to its column density in Orion KL.

  4. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aluto Langano Geothermal Area Aluto Langano Geothermal Area East African Rift System Ethiopian Rift Valley Major Normal Fault Basalt MW K Amatitlan Geothermal Area Amatitlan...

  5. Near-term measurements with 21 cm intensity mapping: Neutral hydrogen fraction and BAO at z<2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masui, Kiyoshi Wesley; McDonald, Patrick; Pen, Ue-Li

    2010-05-15

    It is shown that 21 cm intensity mapping could be used in the near term to make cosmologically useful measurements. Large scale structure could be detected using existing radio telescopes, or using prototypes for dedicated redshift survey telescopes. This would provide a measure of the mean neutral hydrogen density, using redshift space distortions to break the degeneracy with the linear bias. We find that with only 200 hours of observing time on the Green Bank Telescope, the neutral hydrogen density could be measured to 25% precision at redshift 0.54

  6. Proposed Laser-driven, Dielectric Microstructure Few-cm Long Undulator for Attosecond Coherent X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plettner, T; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2011-09-16

    This article presents the concept of an all-dielectric laser-driven undulator for the generation of coherent X-rays. The proposed laser-driven undulator is expected to produce internal deflection forces equivalent to a several-Tesla magnetic field acting on a speed-of-light particle. The key idea for this laser-driven undulator is its ability to provide phase synchronicity between the deflection force and the electron beam for a distance that is much greater than the laser wavelength. The potential advantage of this undulator is illustrated with a possible design example that assumes a small laser accelerator which delivers a 2 GeV, 1 pC, 1 kHz electron bunch train to a 10 cm long, 1/2 mm period laser-driven undulator. Such an undulator could produce coherent X-ray pulses with {approx}10{sup 9} photons of 64 keV energy. The numerical modeling for the expected X-ray pulse shape was performed with GENESIS, which predicts X-ray pulse durations in the few-attosecond range. Possible applications for nonlinear electromagnetic effects from these X-ray pulses are briefly discussed.

  7. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  8. Physics Thrust Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thrust Areas Physics Thrust Areas Physics Division serves the nation through its broad portfolio of fundamental and applied research. Quality basic science research: critical component of maintaining our capabilities in national security research To further understand the physical world, generate new or improved technology in experimental physics, and establish a physics foundation for current and future Los Alamos programs, Physics Division leverages its expertise and experimental capabilities

  9. Hanford 300 Area ROD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    300 Area ROD Briefing to the Hanford Advisory Board March 6, 2014 Larry Gadbois -- EPA Recap of the 300 Area ROD Primary new concept -- Uranium Sequestration: * Purpose: Accelerate restoration of groundwater uranium contamination. * Protect groundwater from downward leaching from the vadose zone (overlying soil). * Add phosphate to chemically bond with uranium into geologically stable autunite. Does not dissolve. * Dissolve phosphate in water, apply at ground surface, inject into the ground,

  10. Operational Area Monitoring Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan

  11. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin; Duggal, Anil Raj; Shiang, Joseph John; Nealon, William Francis; Bortscheller, Jacob Charles

    2008-03-25

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  12. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The spatial location and boundaries for each Site shown on the Site Monitoring Area maps ... P-SMA-2 DP-SMA-0.4 LA-SMA-2.3 LA-SMA-5.51 LA-SMA-6.38 P-SMA-2.15 DP-SMA-0.6 ...

  13. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  14. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  15. Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area D Desert Peak...

  16. Figure 1. Project Area, Focused Study Area, Potential Access...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Page 4 of 8 Figure 1. Project Area, Focused Study Area, Potential Access Agreement Land, and Land Not Suitable for Conveyance

  17. Figure 1. Project Area, Focused Study Area, Potential Access...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 4 of 8 Figure 1. Project Area, Focused Study Area, Potential Access Agreement Land, and Land Not Suitable for Conveyance...

  18. Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate-Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States. Part II. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2003-06-30

    This study used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from records for 1961-1990. The scenario runs for 2025-2034 and 2090-2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the NE. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn yields were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward yield trends under scenarios of climate change. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization.

  19. Bay Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Edit History Bay Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Bay Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Bay Area 1.2 Research and Development...

  20. Rockies Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rockies Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Rockies Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Rockies Area 1.2 Research and Development...

  1. Texas Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Texas Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Texas Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the...

  2. Eolian sabkha sandstones in the Nugget Sandstone (Jurassic), Vernal area, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenk, C.J.; Peterson, F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-06-01

    The Jurassic Nugget Sandstone in the Vernal, Utah, area is characterized by thick (up to 25 m) sets of cross-stratified eolian dune sandstone separated by either erosional planar bounding surfaces or thin (mostly < 3 m) sandstones interpreted as sabkha sandstones. Structures in Nugget sabkha sandstones are predominantly wavy or irregular bedding and thin, remnant sets of dune cross-strata consisting of eolian ripple and avalanche strata. The types of sedimentary structures and erosional features in Nugget sabkha sandstones indicate a close relationship between sand deposition and erosion and fluctuations in the local water table. Thin, remnant eolian dune sets are common in Nugget sabkha sandstones. The remnant sets form when dunes migrating across a sabkha are partially wetted as the water table rises slightly (on a scale of tens of centimeters); the lower part of the dune with wetted sand remains on the sabkha as the rest of the dune continues to migrate. Typically, ripple strata of the dune apron and the toes of avalanche strata are preserved in dune remnants. The avalanche strata, being slightly coarser grained, are preferentially deflated, leaving microtopography. This topography is commonly filled in with ripple strata that form as dry sand again blows across the sabkha. Stacked sets of remnant dunes separated by erosional surfaces illustrate the control of sand deposition on eolian sabkhas by the local water table.

  3. 2002 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. E. Townsend

    2003-06-01

    Environmental, subsidence, and meteorological monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)(refer to Figure 1). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater,meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada (BN) reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorological data indicate that 2002 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 26 mm (1.0 in) at the Area 3 RWMS and 38 mm (1.5 in) at the Area 5 RWMS. Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 2002 rainfall infiltrated less than 30 cm (1 ft) before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium monitoring data indicate slow subsurface migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were lower than in previous years. Special investigations conducted in 2002 included: a comparison between waste cover water contents measured by neutron probe and coring; and a comparison of four methods for measuring radon concentrations in air. All 2002 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility Performance Assessments (PAs).

  4. Limitations on area compression of beams from pierce guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakovlev, V.P.; Nezhevenko, O.A. [Omega-P Inc., 202008 Yale Station, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-2008 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    An important limitation for rf sources such as klystrons and magnicons, designed for 10{close_quote}s of MW power outputs at cm-wavelengths, is the transverse electron beam size. Cathode current density limits require high beam area compressions to obtain small transverse beam areas for fixed currents. This paper discusses the limitations to high beam area compression, namely geometrical aberrations and thermal spread in transverse velocities. Compensation can oftentimes be introduced for aberrations, but thermal velocity spread presents a fundamental limitation. Examples where subtle compensation strategies were employed are discussed for three guns with 100 MW beam power, and area compressions greater than 2000:1. Two of these guns have already been built. A clear determination of effective cathode temperature has yet to be found experimentally, but possible means to measure it are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-07

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  6. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  7. A FOURTH H I 21 cm ABSORPTION SYSTEM IN THE SIGHT LINE OF MG J0414+0534: A RECORD FOR INTERVENING ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanna, A.; Webb, J. K.; Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.; Bignell, C.

    2013-08-01

    We report the detection of a strong H I 21 cm absorption system at z = 0.5344, as well as a candidate system at z = 0.3389, in the sight line toward the z = 2.64 quasar MG J0414+0534. This, in addition to the absorption at the host redshift and the other two intervening absorbers, takes the total to four (possibly five). The previous maximum number of 21 cm absorbers detected along a single sight line is two and so we suspect that this number of gas-rich absorbers is in some way related to the very red color of the background source. Despite this, no molecular gas (through OH absorption) has yet been detected at any of the 21 cm redshifts, although, from the population of 21 cm absorbers as a whole, there is evidence for a weak correlation between the atomic line strength and the optical-near-infrared color. In either case, the fact that so many gas-rich galaxies (likely to be damped Ly{alpha} absorption systems) have been found along a single sight line toward a highly obscured source may have far-reaching implications for the population of faint galaxies not detected in optical surveys, a possibility which could be addressed through future wide-field absorption line surveys with the Square Kilometer Array.

  8. Accurate determination of Curium and Californium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) in 248Cm samples for transmutation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gourgiotis, A.; Isnard, H.; Aubert, M.; Dupont, E.; AlMahamid, I.; Cassette, P.; Panebianco, S.; Letourneau, A.; Chartier, F.; Tian, G.; Rao, L.; Lukens, W.

    2011-02-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments including the mini-INCA (INcineration of Actinides) project for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron fluxes, in view of proposing solutions to reduce the radiotoxicity of long-lived nuclear wastes. In this context, a Cm sample enriched in {sup 248}Cm ({approx}97 %) was irradiated in thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). This work describes a quadrupole ICP-MS (ICP-QMS) analytical procedure for precise and accurate isotopic composition determination of Cm before sample irradiation and of Cm and Cf after sample irradiation. The factors that affect the accuracy and reproducibility of isotopic ratio measurements by ICP-QMS, such as peak centre correction, detector dead time, mass bias, abundance sensitivity and hydrides formation, instrumental background, and memory blank were carefully evaluated and corrected. Uncertainties of the isotopic ratios, taking into account internal precision of isotope ratio measurements, peak tailing, and hydrides formations ranged from 0.3% to 1.3%. This uncertainties range is quite acceptable for the nuclear data to be used in transmutation studies.

  9. AREA RADIATION MONITOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

    1962-06-12

    S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

  10. SSL Demonstration: Area Lighting Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DEMONSTRATION: Area Lighting Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area, AZ A unique GATEWAY evaluation on a stretch of border between the U.S. and Mexico looks at how high-flux LED lighting ...

  11. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chin-Chi; Gorbatkin, Steven M.; Berry, Lee A.

    1991-01-01

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

  12. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

    1991-07-16

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

  13. F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractors have cleaned up the F Reactor Area, the first reactor area at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state to be fully remediated.

  14. Location of the spinal cerebellar ataxia 2 locus to a 1 cM interval on chromsome 12q23-24.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allotey, R.; Twells, R.; Orozco, G.

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria and dysdiadochokinesia. We have previously assigned the disease locus to chromosome 12q23-24.1 in a population from the Holguin province, Cuba, within a 31 cM interval flanked by the anonymous marker D12S53 and the phospholipase A2 gene (PLA2). Clinical as much as genealogical and geographical evidence indicate that the Cuban pedigrees are homogeneous and descend from a common ancestor. We now report fine genetic mapping of the disease locus with fourteen microsatellite loci known to span this region, which positions SCA2 in a 1 cM interval defined by the loci D12S84-AFM291xe9. Observation of a common haplotype segregating with the disease supports the existence of a founder effect in the Holguin pedigrees.

  15. Focus Areas | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Areas FA 1: Diversifying Supply FA 2: Developing Substitutes FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling FA 4: Crosscutting Research

  16. COMPLETE IONIZATION OF THE NEUTRAL GAS: WHY THERE ARE SO FEW DETECTIONS OF 21 cm HYDROGEN IN HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO GALAXIES AND QUASARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2012-11-10

    From the first published z {approx}> 3 survey of 21 cm absorption within the hosts of radio galaxies and quasars, Curran et al. found an apparent dearth of cool neutral gas at high redshift. From a detailed analysis of the photometry, each object is found to have a {lambda} = 1216 A continuum luminosity in excess of L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}, a critical value above which 21 cm has never been detected at any redshift. At these wavelengths, and below, hydrogen is excited above the ground state so that it cannot absorb in 21 cm. In order to apply the equation of photoionization equilibrium, we demonstrate that this critical value also applies to the ionizing ({lambda} {<=} 912 A) radiation. We use this to show, for a variety of gas density distributions, that upon placing a quasar within a galaxy of gas, there is always an ultraviolet luminosity above which all of the large-scale atomic gas is ionized. While in this state, the hydrogen cannot be detected or engage in star formation. Applying the mean ionizing photon rate of all of the sources searched, we find, using canonical values for the gas density and recombination rate coefficient, that the observed critical luminosity gives a scale length (3 kpc) similar that of the neutral hydrogen (H I) in the Milky Way, a large spiral galaxy. Thus, this simple yet physically motivated model can explain the critical luminosity (L {sub 912} {approx} L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}), above which neutral gas is not detected. This indicates that the non-detection of 21 cm absorption is not due to the sensitivity limits of current radio telescopes, but rather that the lines of sight to the quasars, and probably the bulk of the host galaxies, are devoid of neutral gas.

  17. Geothermal resource area 9: Nye County. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource area 9 encompasses all of Nye County, Nevada. Within this area there are many different known geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/ to over 265/sup 0/ F. Fifteen of the more major sites have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the resource sites discussed in this Area Development Plan were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities, and comparing those with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 15 geothermal sites considered in this Area Development Plan are summarized.

  18. Snow Depth and Density at End-of-Winter for NGEE Areas A, B, C and D, Barrow, Alaska, 2012-2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Anna Liljedahl; Cathy Wilson

    2016-02-02

    End-of-winter snow depth and average snow density from area A, B, C and D, which include 1000's of point depth measurement located between approximately 20 and 50 cm apart.

  19. SSL Demonstration: Area Lighting, Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area, AZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-28

    Along the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona, the GATEWAY program conducted a trial demonstration in which the incumbent quartz metal halide area lighting was replaced with LED at three pole locations at the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona. The retrofit was documented to better understand LED technology performance in high-temperature environments. This document is a summary brief of the Phase 1.0 and 1.1 reports previously published on this demonstration.

  20. Cove Fort Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cove Fort Geothermal Area (Redirected from Cove Fort Geothermal Area - Vapor) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Cove Fort Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area...

  1. Blue Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blue Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area...

  2. Stillwater Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stillwater Geothermal Area (Redirected from Stillwater Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Stillwater Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2...

  3. Chena Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chena Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Chena Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 2.1 Chena Area...

  4. Salton Sea Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salton Sea Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salton Sea Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Salton Sea Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2...

  5. Heber Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heber Geothermal Area (Redirected from Heber Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Heber Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  6. Desert Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Geothermal Area (Redirected from Desert Peak Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Desert Peak Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2...

  7. PPPL Area Map | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL Area Map View Larger Map

  8. Property:GeothermalArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area + Babadere Geothermal Project + Tuzla Geothermal Area + Bacman 1 GEPP + Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area + Bacman 2 GEPP + Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area + Bacman...

  9. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2014-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  10. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  11. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Beryllium Reflected Assemblies of U(93.15)O₂ Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch and 7-Tube Clusters)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Margaret A.; Bess, John D.; Briggs, J. Blair; Murphy, Michael F.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2015-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  12. Spectra of atomic sulfur {sup 1}D in transitions to autoionizing Rydberg states in the region of 75 800-89 500 cm{sup -1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, W.-C.; Chen, I-C.; Huang, T.-P.; Yuh, J.-Y.; Lee, Y.-Y.

    2008-10-07

    We recorded photoionization spectra of sulfur atoms in transitions from state {sup 1}D in the range of 75 800-89 500 cm{sup -1}. Dissociation of CS{sub 2} after photolysis at 193 nm produced these sulfur atoms in a singlet excited state; they were then ionized with synchrotron radiation (NSRRC, beamline U9CGM) at resolution of up to 3 cm{sup -1} and detected with a quadruple mass filter. Rydberg series 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}({sup 2}D{sub 3/2}{sup 0})nd[3/2] and 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}({sup 2}D{sub 5/2}{sup 0})ns[5/2] with n extending to 16 and 32, respectively, to limit {sup 2}D{sup 0} are assigned. New Rydberg series 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}({sup 2}D{sub 3/2}{sup 0})nd[1/2]{sub 1}, ({sup 2}D{sub 5/2}{sup 0})nd[5/2], and ({sup 2}D{sub 3/2}{sup 0})nd[5/2] with n from 5-9 for the former two series and 7-13 for the latter are assigned. A new Rydberg line at 85 335 cm{sup -1} is assigned to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}({sup 2}D{sub 3/2}{sup 0})6d {sup 1}P.

  13. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-05-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratorys Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s efforts were made to study power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the programs effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector. The first two experiments in the series were evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-001) and HEU-COMP-FAST-002 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-002). The first experiment had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The third set of experiments in the series, performed in mid-1963, which is studied in this evaluation, used beryllium reflectors. The beryllium reflected system was the preferred reactor configuration for this application because of the small thickness of the reflector. The two core configurations had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm

  14. Why SRS Matters - F Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Steve; Tadlock, Bill; Beeler, Dewitt; Gardner, Curt

    2015-02-17

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features F Area's mission and operations.

  15. Tech Area II: A history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullrich, R.

    1998-07-01

    This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories` Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy`s compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission`s integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area`s primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on high-explosive components outside of the original Area II diamond-shaped parcel. Most of the buildings in the area are vacant and Sandia has no plans to use them. They are proposed for decontamination and demolition as funding becomes available.

  16. Why SRS Matters - L Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, Paul

    2015-01-28

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features L Area's mission and operations.

  17. Why SRS Matters - E Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Steve; Mooneyhan, Verne; Tempel, Kevin; Bullington, Michele

    2015-03-09

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features E Area's mission and operations.

  18. AREA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO...

  19. AREA

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the ...

  20. Vital area analysis using sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stack, D.W.; Francis, K.A.

    1980-05-01

    This report describes the use of the Set Equation Transformation System (SETS) for vital area analysis. Several concepts are introduced which enable the analyst to construct more efficient SETS user programs to perform vital area analysis. The advantages of performing the transformation of variables without first determining the minimal cut sets of the fault tree are discussed. A ''bottom-up'' approach to solving a fault tree is presented. The techniques described for vital area analysis are also suitable and efficient for many kinds of common cause analysis.

  1. Production of new superheavy Z=108-114 nuclei with {sup 238}U, {sup 244}Pu, and {sup 248,250}Cm targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng Zhaoqing; Jin Genming; Li Junqing

    2009-11-15

    Within the framework of the dinuclear system (DNS) model, production cross sections of new superheavy nuclei with charged numbers Z=108-114 are analyzed systematically. Possible combinations based on the actinide nuclides {sup 238}U, {sup 244}Pu, and {sup 248,250}Cm with the optimal excitation energies and evaporation channels are pointed out to synthesize new isotopes that lie between the nuclides produced in the cold fusion reactions and the {sup 48}Ca-induced fusion reactions experimentally, which are feasible to be constructed experimentally. It is found that the production cross sections of superheavy nuclei decrease drastically with the charged numbers of compound nuclei. Larger mass asymmetries of the entrance channels enhance the cross sections in 2n-5n channels.

  2. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm²

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Yue; Li, Qiang; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, Toshinori

    2014-12-03

    We performed magneto-optical (MO) measurements on FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films grown on LaAlO₃ (LAO) and Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single-crystalline substrates. These thin films show superconducting transition temperature Tc ~19 K, 4 K higher than the bulk sample. Typical roof-top patterns can be observed in the MO images of thin films grown on LAO and YSZ, from which a large and homogeneous critical current density Jc ~ 3 - 4 x 10⁶ A/cm² at 5 K was obtained. In this study, magnetic flux penetration measurement reveals that the current is almost isotropically distributed in the two thin films. Compared with bulk crystals,more » FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin film demonstrates not only higher Tc, but also much larger Jc, which is attractive for applications.« less

  3. Security Area Vouching and Piggybacking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-05

    Establishes requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Security Area practice of "vouching" or "piggybacking" access by personnel. DOE N 251.40, dated 5-3-01, extends this directive until 12-31-01.

  4. Manhattan Project: Tech Area Gallery

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    All of the photographs below are of the "Tech Area" at Los Alamos during or shortly after the wartime years. If you have a fast internet connection, you may wish to click here for ...

  5. Fire in a contaminated area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-28

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Fire in Contaminated Area. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  6. Progress Update: M Area Closure

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    A progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The celebration of the first area cleanup completion with the help of the Recovery Act.

  7. CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA ,FACILITY RECORDS 1970 UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY ... Prepared By Holmes & Narver. Inc. On-Continent Test Division P.O. Box 14340 Las Vegas, ...

  8. Manhattan Project: Tech Area Gallery

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    All of the photographs below are of the "Tech Area" at Los Alamos during or shortly after the wartime years. If this page is taking a long time to load, click here for a photo ...

  9. Focus Areas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Focus Areas Focus Areas Safety With this focus on cleanup completion and risk reducing results, safety still remains the utmost priority. EM will continue to maintain and demand the highest safety performance. All workers deserve to go home as healthy as they were when they came to the job in the morning. There is no schedule or milestone worth any injury to the work force. Project Management EM is increasing its concentration on project management to improve its overall performance toward

  10. Variable area fuel cell cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

  11. Carlsbad Area Office Executive Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 1998 Carlsbad Area Office Executive Summary The mission of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) is to protect human health and the environment by opening and operating the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste and by establishing an effective system for management of TRU waste from generation to disposal. It includes personnel assigned to CAO, WIPP site operations, transportation, and other activities associated with the National TRU Program (NTP). The

  12. Alum Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alum Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Alum Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and...

  13. Aurora Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aurora Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Aurora Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and...

  14. Berln Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Berln Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Berln Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and...

  15. Stillwater Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stillwater Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Stillwater Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  16. Krafla Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Krafla Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Krafla Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and...

  17. Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 2.1 Salt...

  18. Rye Patch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rye Patch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Rye Patch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory...

  19. Amedee Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Amedee Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Amedee Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and...

  20. Miravalles Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Miravalles Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Miravalles Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  1. Oita Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oita Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Oita Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and...

  2. Cove Fort Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cove Fort Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Cove Fort Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory...

  3. Geysers Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geysers Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geysers Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and...

  4. Larderello Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Larderello Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Larderello Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  5. Butte Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Butte Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Butte Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  6. Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  7. Research Subject Areas for IGPPS Proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Subject Areas Research Subject Areas for IGPPS Proposals High quality, cutting-edge science in the areas of astrophysics, space physics, solid planetary geoscience, and...

  8. Java - Dieng Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Java - Dieng Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Java - Dieng Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  9. Java - Kamojang Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Java - Kamojang Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Java - Kamojang Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  10. Java - Darajat Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Java - Darajat Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Java - Darajat Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  11. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Basin Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Great Basin Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  12. Sacramento Area Technology Alliance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sacramento Area Technology Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Sacramento Area Technology Alliance Name: Sacramento Area Technology Alliance Address: 5022 Bailey Loop Place:...

  13. Wild Rose Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wild Rose Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Wild Rose Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory...

  14. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 2.1 U.S. Department...

  15. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 2.1...

  16. Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mcgee Mountain Area) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT McGee Mountain Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http:...

  17. Geothermal resource area 11, Clark County area development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource Area 11 includes all of the land in Clark County, Nevada. Within this area are nine geothermal anomalies: Moapa Area, Las Vegas Valley, Black Canyon, Virgin River Narrows, Roger's Springs, Indian Springs, White Rock Springs, Brown's Spring, and Ash Creek Spring. All of the geothermal resources in Clark County have relatively low temperatures. The highest recorded temperature is 145{sup 0}F at Black Canyon. The temperatures of the other resources range from 70 to 90{sup 0}F. Because of the low temperature of the resources and, for the most part, the distance of the resources from any population base, the potential for the development of the resources are considered to be somewhat limited.

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIFUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Caldwell, T.; Pak, D; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.

    2011-09-27

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. Conclusions from this work include the following. The CSSX process is capable of reducing {sup 137}Cs in high level radioactive waste by a factor of more than 40,000 using five extraction, two scrub, and five strip stages. Tests demonstrated extraction and strip section stage efficiencies of greater than 93% for the Tank 49H waste test and greater than 88% for the simulant waste test. During a test with HLW, researchers processed 39 liters of Tank 49H solution and the waste raffinate had an average decontamination factor (DF) of 6.78E+04, with a maximum of 1.08E+05. A simulant waste solution ({approx}34.5 liters) with an initial Cs concentration of 83.1 mg/L was processed and had an average DF greater than 5.9E+03, with a maximum DF of greater than 6.6E+03. The difference may be attributable to differences in contactor stage efficiencies. Test results showed the solvent can be stripped of cesium and recycled for {approx}25 solvent turnovers without the occurrence of any measurable solvent degradation or negative effects from minor components. Based on the performance of the 12-stage 2-cm apparatus with the Tank 49H HLW, the projected DF for MCU with seven extraction, two scrub, and seven strip stages operating at a nominal efficiency of 90% is {approx}388,000. At 95% stage efficiency, the DF in MCU would be {approx}3.2 million. Carryover of organic solvent in aqueous streams (and aqueous in organic

  19. Los Humeros Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Chignautla, Puebla, Mexico Exploration Region: Transmexican Volcanic Belt GEA Development Phase:...

  20. H-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  1. AreaMapWeb copy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL ETTP CITY OF OAK RIDGE MAP AREA (below) 170 170 62 162 162 62 62 61 61 62 61 95 95 61 61 58 95 62 129 321 411 411 321 321 129 11W 11E 11 70 11 11 70 11 11 70 70 40 40 140 140 40 75 40 40 40 640 640 75 75 75 75 61 62 ALCOA MARYVILLE LENOIR CITY FARRAGUT LOUDON OLIVER SPRINGS OAK RIDGE KNOXVILLE AIRPORT McGhee Tyson Municipal Airport (Knoxville Airport) Route between Knoxville Airport, Downtown Knoxville, and Oak Ridge area Take left lane for I-40 West to Nashville, Chattanooga No. 376A Oak

  2. Large-area Silicon-Film{trademark} panels and solar cells. Phase 2 technical report, January 1996--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rand, J.A.; Barnett, A.M.; Checchi, J.C.; Culik, J.S.; Collins, S.R.; Ford, D.H.; Hall, R.B.; Jackson, E.L.; Kendall, C.L.

    1997-03-01

    The Silicon-Film{trademark} process is on an accelerated path to large-scale manufacturing. A key element in that development is optimizing the specific geometry of both the Silicon-Film{trademark} sheet and the resulting solar cell. That decision has been influenced by cost factors, engineering concerns, and marketing issues. The geometry investigation has focused first on sheet nominally 15 cm wide. This sheet generated solar cells with areas of 240 cm{sup 2} and 675 cm{sup 2}. Most recently, a new sheet fabrication machine was constructed that produces Silicon-Film{trademark} with a width in excess of 30 cm. Test results have indicated that there is no limit to the width of sheet generated by this process. The new wide material has led to prototype solar cells with areas of 300, 400, and 1,800 cm{sup 2}. Significant advances in solar-cell processing have been developed in support of fabricating large-area devices, including uniform emitter diffusion and anti-reflection coatings.

  3. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying 10-30 Tesla Fields to cm-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rovang, Dean C.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Owen, Albert; Mckenney, John; Johnson, Drew; Radovich, Shawn; Kaye, Ronald J.; McBride, Ryan D; Alexander, C. Scott; et al

    2014-12-04

    We have successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10–30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1–3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2–7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnosticmore » lines of sight to the target. We then describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.« less

  4. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying 10-30 Tesla Fields to cm-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rovang, Dean C.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Owen, Albert; Mckenney, John; Johnson, Drew; Radovich, Shawn; Kaye, Ronald J.; McBride, Ryan D; Alexander, C. Scott; Awe, Thomas James; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B; Haill, Thomas A.; Jones, Peter Andrew; Argo, Jeffrey W; Dalton, Devon; Robertson, Grafton Kincannon; Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Meissner, Joel; Milhous, Mark; Nguyen, Doan; Mielke, Chuck

    2014-12-04

    We have successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10–30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1–3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2–7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnostic lines of sight to the target. We then describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.

  5. Absolute and relative emission spectroscopy study of 3 cm wide planar radio frequency atmospheric pressure bio-plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Xiaolong; Nikiforov, Anton Yu Leys, Christophe; Ionita, Eusebiu-Rosini; Dinescu, Gheorghe

    2015-08-03

    The dynamics of low power atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge generated in Ar gas in long gap of 3 cm is investigated. This plasma source is characterized and analyzed for possible large scale biomedical applications where low gas temperature and potential-less effluent are required. The discharge forms a homogenous glow-like afterglow in ambient air at input power of 30 W with low gas temperature of 330 K, which is desirable in biomedical applications. With absolute calibrated spectroscopy of the discharge, electron density of 0.4 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} and electron temperature of 1.5 eV are obtained from continuum Bremsstrahlung radiation of the source. Time and spatial resolved emission spectroscopy is used to analyze discharge generation mechanism and active species formation. It is found that discharge dynamics strongly correlates with the discharge current waveform. Strong Ar(2p) excited states emission is observed nearby the electrodes surface on a distance up to 200 μm in the plasma sheath region at 10 ns after the current peak, whereas OH(A) emission is uniform along of the interelectrode gap.

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIGUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Pak, D.; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.; Caldwell, T.

    2011-11-29

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive is used to improve stripping performance and to mitigate the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008.

  7. 200 area TEDF sample schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.

    1995-03-22

    This document summarizes the sampling criteria associated with the 200 Area Treatment Effluent Facility (TEDF) that are needed to comply with the requirements of the Washington State Discharge Permit No. WA ST 4502 and good engineering practices at the generator streams that feed into TEDF. In addition, this document Identifies the responsible parties for both sampling and data transference.

  8. Large-area sol-gel highly-reflective coatings processed by the dipping technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belleville, P.; Pegon, P.

    1997-12-01

    The Centre d`Etudes de Limeil-Valenton is currently involved in a project which consists of the construction of a 2 MJ/500TW (351-nm) pulsed Nd:glass laser devoted to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. With 240 laser beams, the proposed megajoule-class laser conceptual design necessitates 44-cm x 2 44-cm x 6-cm cavity-end mirrors (1053-nm) representing more than 50-m{sup 2} of coated area. These dielectric mirrors are made of quaterwave stacks of SiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}-PVP (PolyVinylPyrrolidone) and are prepared from colloidal suspensions (sols) using the sol-gel route. After a sustained search effort. we have prepared (SiO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2}-PVP){sup 10} mirrored coatings with up to 99% reflection at 1053-nm and for different incidence use. Adequate laser-conditioned damage thresholds ranging 14 - 15 J/cm{sup 2} at 1053-nm wavelength and with 3-ns pulse duration were achieved. Large-area mirrors with good coating uniformity and weak edge-effect were produced by dip-coating at room temperature and atmospheric pressure.

  9. Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reformulated Gasoline Program Contents * Introduction * Mandated RFG Program Areas o Table 1. Mandated RFG Program Areas * RFG Program Opt-In Areas o Table 2. RFG Program Opt-In Areas * RFG Program Opt-Out Procedures and Areas o Table 3. History of EPA Rulemaking on Opt-Out Procedures o Table 4. RFG Program Opt-Out Areas * State Programs o Table 5. State Reformulated Gasoline Programs * Endnotes Spreadsheets Referenced in this Article * Reformulated Gasoline Control Area Populations Related EIA

  10. Molecular eigenstate spectroscopy: Application to the intramolecular dynamics of some polyatomic molecules in the 3000 to 7000 cm{sup {minus}1} region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    Intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) appears to be a universal property of polyatomic molecules in energy regions where the vibrational density of states is greater than about 5 to 30 states per cm{sup {minus}1}. Interest in IVR stems from its central importance to the spectroscopy, photochemistry, and reaction kinetics of these molecules. A bright state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which may be a C-H stretching vibration, carries the oscillator strength from the ground state. This bright state may mix with bath rotational-vibrational levels to form a clump of molecular eigenstates, each of which carries a portion of the oscillator strength from the ground state. In this work the authors explicitly resolve transitions to each of these molecular eigenstates. Detailed information about the nature of IVR is contained in the frequencies and intensities of the observed discrete transitions. The primary goal of this research is to probe the coupling mechanisms by which IVR takes place. The most fundamental distinction to be made is between anharmonic coupling which is independent of molecular rotation and rotationally-mediated coupling. The authors are also interested in the rate at which IVR takes place. Measurements are strictly in the frequency domain but information is obtained about the decay of the zero order state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which could be prepared in a hypothetical experiment as a coherent excitation of the clump of molecular eigenstates. As the coherent superposition dephases, the energy would flow from the initially prepared mode into nearby overtones and combinations of lower frequency vibrational modes. The decay of the initially prepared mode is related to a pure sequence infrared absorption spectrum by a Fourier transform.

  11. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

  12. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, Thomas C.

    1986-01-01

    Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

  13. Final DOE Areas Feasibility Study

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Management, Washington, DC Weiss Associates Environmental Science, Engineering and Management FINAL DOE AREAS FEASIBILITY STUDY for the: LABORATORY FOR ENERGY-RELATED HEALTH RESEARCH UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS Prepared for: SM Stoller Corporation 2597 B ¾ Road Grand Junction, Colorado 81503 Prepared by: Weiss Associates 5801 Christie Avenue, Suite 600 Emeryville, California 94608-1827 March 07, 2008 Rev. 0 J:\DOE_STOLLER\4110\143\FEASIBILITY_STUDY\20080307_FS_TEXT_REV0.DOC WEISS ASSOCIATES

  14. Innovation investment area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

  15. EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

  16. Nevada Geothermal Area | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nevada Geothermal Area Nevada Geothermal Area The extensive Steamboat Springs geothermal area contains three geothermal power-generating plants. The plants provide approximately 30% of the total Nevada geothermal power output. Photo of Nevada power plant

  17. Southern CA Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CA Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Southern CA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Southern CA Area 1.2 Research and Development...

  18. Fenton Hill Hdr Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hill Hdr Area Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFentonHillHdrArea&oldid...

  19. Carlsbad Area Office strategic plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This edition of the Carlsbad Area Office Strategic Plan captures the U.S. Department of Energy`s new focus, and supercedes the edition issued previously in 1995. This revision reflects a revised strategy designed to demonstrate compliance with environmental regulations earlier than the previous course of action; and a focus on the selected combination of scientific investigations, engineered alternatives, and waste acceptance criteria for supporting the compliance applications. An overview of operations and historical aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico is presented.

  20. East Brawley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: Coordinates: 32.99, -115.35 Resource...

  1. New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp:...

  2. Canby Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Transition Zone GEA Development Phase: Coordinates: 41.438, -120.8676 Resource Estimate...

  3. Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration | ...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Magnetized High Energy Density Plasma Physics Specific areas of interest include, but are ... Nonlinear Optics of Plasmas and Laser-Plasma Interactions Specific areas of interest ...

  4. AREA USA LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AREA USA LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: AREA USA LLC Place: Washington, DC Zip: 20004 Sector: Services Product: Washington, D.C.-based division of Fabiani & Company...

  5. Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid...

  6. La Primavera Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid...

  7. Florida Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid...

  8. Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid...

  9. Cerro Prieto Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid...

  10. Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid...

  11. Jemez Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid...

  12. Los Azufres Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid...

  13. Outdoor Area Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for outdoor areas. Outdoor Area Lighting (June 2008) More Documents & Publications Philadelphia International Airport Apron Lighting: LED System Performance in a Trial...

  14. Western Area Power Administration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Western Area Power Administration Jump to: navigation, search Name: Western Area Power Administration Place: Colorado Phone Number: 720-962-7000 Website: ww2.wapa.govsites...

  15. Ahuachapan Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: El Salvador Exploration Region: Central American Volcanic Arc Chain GEA Development Phase:...

  16. Area Science Park | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Science Park Jump to: navigation, search Name: Area Science Park Place: Italy Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Government Public sector )...

  17. Kizildere Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Denizli, Turkey Exploration Region: Aegean-West Anatolian Extensional Province - Western Anatolian...

  18. Western Area Power Administration Borrowing Authority, Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Western Area Power Administration Borrowing Authority, Recovery Act Western Area Power Administration Borrowing Authority, Recovery Act PDF icon Microsoft Word - PSRP May 15 2009 ...

  19. 300 Area signal cable study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whattam, J.W.

    1994-09-15

    This report was prepared to discuss the alternatives available for removing the 300 Area overhead signal cable system. This system, installed in 1969, has been used for various monitoring and communication signaling needs throughout the 300 Area. Over the years this cabling system has deteriorated, has been continually reconfigured, and has been poorly documented to the point of nonreliability. The first step was to look at the systems utilizing the overhead signal cable that are still required for operation. Of the ten systems that once operated via the signal cable, only five are still required; the civil defense evacuation alarms, the public address (PA) system, the criticality alarms, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Facilities Management Control System (FMCS), and the 384 annunciator panel. Of these five, the criticality alarms and the FMCS have been dealt with under other proposals. Therefore, this study focused on the alternatives available for the remaining three systems (evacuation alarms, PA system, and 384 panel) plus the accountability aid phones. Once the systems to be discussed were determined, then three alternatives for providing the signaling pathway were examined for each system: (1) re-wire using underground communication ducts, (2) use the Integrated Voice/Data Telecommunications System (IVDTS) already installed and operated by US West, and (3) use radio control. Each alternative was developed with an estimated cost, advantages, and disadvantages. Finally, a recommendation was provided for the best alternative for each system.

  20. Wide area continuous offender monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoshen, J.; Drake, G.; Spencer, D.

    1996-11-01

    The corrections system in the U.S. is supervising over five million offenders. This number is rising fast and so are the direct and indirect costs to society. To improve supervision and reduce the cost of parole and probation, first generation home arrest systems were introduced in 1987. While these systems proved to be helpful to the corrections system, their scope is rather limited because they only cover an offender at a single location and provide only a partial time coverage. To correct the limitations of first-generation systems, second-generation wide area continuous electronic offender monitoring systems, designed to monitor the offender at all times and locations, are now on the drawing board. These systems use radio frequency location technology to track the position of offenders. The challenge for this technology is the development of reliable personal locator devices that are small, lightweight, with long operational battery life, and indoors/outdoors accuracy of 100 meters or less. At the center of a second-generation system is a database that specifies the offender`s home, workplace, commute, and time the offender should be found in each. The database could also define areas from which the offender is excluded. To test compliance, the system would compare the observed coordinates of the offender with the stored location for a given time interval. Database logfiles will also enable law enforcement to determine if a monitored offender was present at a crime scene and thus include or exclude the offender as a potential suspect.

  1. Effects of cell area on the performance of dye sensitized solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khatani, Mehboob E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com Mohamed, Norani Muti E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com Hamid, Nor Hisham E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com Sahmer, Ahmad Zahrin E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com Samsudin, Adel E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com

    2014-10-24

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have significant advantage over the current silicon cells by having low manufacturing cost and potentially high conversion efficiency. Therefore, DSCs are expected to be used as the next generation solar cell device that covers wide range of new applications. In order to achieve highly efficient DSCs for practical application, study on the effect of increasing the cell’s area on the performance of dye sensitized solar need to be carried out. Three different DSC cell areas namely, 1, 12.96 and 93.5 cm{sup 2} respectively were fabricated and analyzed through solar simulator and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). From the analysis of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), it was observed that the cell’s electron lifetime was influenced significantly by the cell’s area. Although the collection efficiency of all cells recorded to be approximately 100% but higher recombination rate with increased cell area reduced the performance of the cell.

  2. Fabrication of stable large-area thin-film CdTe photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 10 May 1992--9 May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nolan, J.F.; Meyers, P.V.

    1993-08-01

    This report highlights the progress made by Solar Cells, Inc. (SCI), in its program to produce 60-cm {times} 120-cm solar modules based on CdTe films. During the past year, confirmed efficiency has increased to 10.4% (active area) on a 1 cm{sup 2} cell, 9.8% (aperture area) on a 64-cm{sup 2} 8-cell submodule, and 6.6% (total area) on a 7200-cm{sup 2} module. A module measured in-house had a power output of 53 W, for a total-area efficiency of 7.4%. Average efficiency of modules produced is steadily increasing and standard deviation is decreasing; in a limited run of 12 modules, results were 6.3% ({plus_minus} 0.2%). Field testing has begun; a nominal 1-kW array of 24 modules was set up adjacent to SCI`s facilities. Analysis indicates that present modules are limited in efficiency by shunt resistance and optical absorption losses in the glass superstrate. Loss analysis of present devices allows us to project a module efficiency of 11.8%. A third generation deposition method -- atmospheric pressure elemental vapor deposition (APEVD) has been brought on-line and has produced good quality CdTe. In addition, SCI is expanding its proactive safety, health, environmental, and disposal program dealing with issues surrounding cadmium.

  3. Sealed head access area enclosure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Martin P.; Govi, Aldo R.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder power reactor is provided with a sealed head access area enclosure disposed above the reactor vessel head consisting of a plurality of prefabricated structural panels including a center panel removably sealed into position with inflatable seals, and outer panels sealed into position with semipermanent sealant joints. The sealant joints are located in the joint between the edge of the panels and the reactor containment structure and include from bottom to top an inverted U-shaped strip, a lower layer of a room temperature vulcanizing material, a separator strip defining a test space therewithin, and an upper layer of a room temperature vulcanizing material. The test space is tapped by a normally plugged passage extending to the top of the enclosure for testing the seal or introducing a buffer gas thereinto.

  4. Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

    1985-11-29

    This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)

  5. Biomass Program 2007 Accomplishments - Infrastructure Technology Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glickman, Joan

    2007-09-01

    This document details the accomplishments of the Biomass Program Infrastructure Technoloy Area in 2007.

  6. Outdoor Area Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outdoor Area Lighting Outdoor Area Lighting This document reviews the major design and specification concerns for outdoor area lighting, and discusses the potential for LED luminaires to save energy plant-wide while providing high quality lighting for outdoor areas. Outdoor Area Lighting (June 2008) (3.16 MB) More Documents & Publications Philadelphia International Airport Apron Lighting: LED System Performance in a Trial Installation Model Specification for LED Roadway Luminaires, V2.0

  7. Evolution of the surface area of a snow layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanot, L.; Domine, F.

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric trace gases can partition between the atmosphere and the snow surface. Because snow has a large surface-to-volume ratio, an important interaction potential between ice and atmospheric trace gases exists. Quantifying this partitioning requires the knowledge of the surface area (SA) of snow. Eleven samples were taken from a 50 cm thick snow fall at Col de Porte, near Grenoble (French Alps) between January 20 and February 4, 1998. Fresh snow and 3, 8, and 15-day-old snow were sampled at three different depths. Surface hoar, formed after the fall, was also sampled. Air and surface snow temperature, snow density, and snow fall rate were measured. Snow temperature always remained below freezing. Snow SA was measured using methane adsorption at 77.15 K. Values ranged from 2.25 m{sup 2}/g for fresh snow to 0.25 m{sup 2}/g for surface hoar and surface snow after 15 days. These values are much too high to be explained by the macroscopic aspect of snow crystals, and microstructures such as small rime droplets must have been present. Large decrease in SA with time were observed. The first meter of snowpack had a total surface area of about 50,000 m{sup 2} per m{sup 2} of ground. Reduction in SA will lead to the emission of adsorbed species by the snowpack, with possible considerable increase in atmospheric concentrations.

  8. High Resolution Far-Infrared Spectra of Thiophosgene with a Synchrotron Source: The nu{sub 2} and nu{sub 4} Bands Near 500 cm{sup -1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKellar, A. R. W.; Billinghurst, B. E.

    2010-02-03

    Thiophosgene (Cl{sub 2}CS) is a favorite model system for studies of vibrational dynamics. But there are no previous rotationally-resolved infrared studies because the spectra are very congested due to its (relatively) large mass and multiple isotopic species. Here we report a detailed gas-phase study of the nu{sub 2} (approx504 cm{sup -1}) and nu{sub 4} (approx471 cm{sup -1}) fundamental bands, based on spectra obtained at the Canadian Light Source far-infrared beamline using synchrotron radiation and a Bruker IFS125 FT spectrometer.

  9. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Administration Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD No downloads found for this office.

  10. West Flank Cosa, CA FORGE Test Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Doug Blankenship

    2015-11-15

    A map with the Coso West Flank FORGE test area outlined, along with regional seismicity, the aeromagnetic data set and the area currently being utilized for the creation of the 3D model.