Sample records for arctic winter measurements

  1. Arctic-Winter Climatology and Radiative Effects of Clouds and Aerosols Based on Lidar and Radar Measurements at PEARL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    Arctic-Winter Climatology and Radiative Effects of Clouds and Aerosols Based on Lidar and Radar Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) code. Results on the climatology and radiative effects of clouds, arctic regions are the site of interactions between aerosols, clouds, radiation and precipitations

  2. Groundbased spectroscopic measurements of stratospheric NO[sub 2] and OClO in arctic winter 1989/90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiedler, M.; Frank, H.; Gomer, T.; Hausmann, M.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Platt, U.

    1993-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report on column measurements of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide and OClO made near the arctic vortex. This is part of an effort to study ozone depletion effects in the artic region by looking for atmospheric signatures of gases which contribute to catalyzing ozone depletion, denitrification, and activation of halogen species. OClO is viewed as a sensitive indicator of activated halogene chemistry, since it is produced via chlorine oxide and bromine oxide interactions. It also is rapidly photolyzed. Using direct moonlight or zenith scattered sunlight, UV and visible spectroscopy was able to measure slant column integrated NO[sub 2] and OClO abundances, and convert them to vertical column densities. Elevated levels of OClO were detected during February 6, 8, 1990, when atmospheric temperatures may have favored formation of polar stratospheric clouds.

  3. Over-winter oceanographic profiles in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, November 1961 -June 1962: Temperature, salinity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, David W.

    1 Over-winter oceanographic profiles in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, November 1961 and silicate) were measured at five depths (2, 10, 25, 50 and 80 m) beneath the ice through the winter of 1961 the north side of the sound off Grise Fiord, Ellesmere Island, on 13 May 1962 and 12 May 1969. The over-winter

  4. Vegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    by insulating vegetation from winter wind and temperature extremes, modifying winter soil temperaturesVegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow ) open-topped fiberglass chambers (OTCs) to study the effects of changes in winter snow cover and summer

  5. Climatic responses in spring migration of boreal and arctic birds in relation to wintering area and taxonomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    and taxonomy Kalle Rainio, Toni Laaksonen, Markus Ahola, Anssi V. Va¨ha¨talo and Esa Lehikoinen Rainio, K of boreal and arctic birds in relation to wintering area and taxonomy. Á J. Avian Biol. 37: 507Á515. Large

  6. Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  7. Arctic vegetation damage by winter-generated coal mining pollution released upon thawing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bo Elberling; Jens Soendergaard; Louise A. Jensen; Lea B. Schmidt; Birger U. Hansen; Gert Asmund; Tonci BalicZunic; Joergen Hollesen; Susanne Hanson; Per-Erik Jansson; Thomas Friborg [University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark). Institute of Geography and Geology

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acid mine drainage (known as AMD) is a well-known environmental problem resulting from the oxidation of sulfidic mine waste. In cold regions, AMD is often considered limited by low temperatures most of the year and observed environmental impact is related to pollution generated during the warm summer period. Here we show that heat generation within an oxidizing, sulfidic, coal-mining waste-rock pile in Svalbard (Arctic Norway) (78{sup o}N) is high enough to keep the pile warm (roughly 5{sup o}C throughout the year) despite mean annual air temperatures below -5{sup o}C. Consequently, weathering processes continue year-round within the waste-rock pile which is characterised as a mixture of coal and a siltstone-mudstone. During the winter, weathering products accumulate within the pile because of a frozen outer layer on the pile and are released as a flush within 2 weeks of soil thawing in the spring. Consequently, spring runoff water contains elevated concentrations of metals. Several of these metals are taken up and accumulated in plants where they reach phytotoxic levels, including aluminum and manganese. Laboratory experiments document that uptake of Al and Mn in native plant species is highly correlated with dissolved concentrations. Therefore, future remedial actions to control the adverse environmental impacts of cold region coal-mining need to pay more attention to winter processes including AMD generation and accumulation of weathering products. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. WINTER

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016WINTER Table 5j . Winter

  9. Thermal measurements in the nuclear winter fire test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, M.E.; Keltner, N.R.; Kent, L.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March, 1987, a large open pool fire test was performed to provide test measurements to help define the thermal characteristics of large open pool fires and estimates of the smoke source term for the nuclear winter (global effects) scenario. This report will present the results of the thermal measurements as well as comparisons with previous test results. These measurements included flame temperatures, heat fluxes to a variety of calorimeters, and gas velocities in the lower flame regions. 13 refs., 76 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. WINTER

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016WINTER Table 5j .

  11. Near UV atmospheric absorption measurements of column abundances during Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, January-February 1989: 1. Technique and NO sub 2 observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahner, A.; Callies, J.; Dorn, H.P.; Platt, U.; Schiller, C. (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (West Germany))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic measurements of column abundances of NO{sub 2} were carried out from the NASA DC-8 airplane during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition in January and February 1989. Stratospheric airmasses inside and close to the polar vortex were found to be highly depleted of NO{sub 2} with lowest vertical column abundances of NO{sub 2} below 2 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2} compared to abundances of 3-5 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}2} south of 50{degree}N in winter (WMO, 1985).

  12. Published in: Annals of Glaciology, vol. 33, pp. 194-200, 2001 Indirect measurements of the mass balance of summer Arctic sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    of summer ablation are of great importance in determining the overall mass balance of the Arctic ice pack in determining the state of the Arctic ice pack. Measurements of annual loss and gain of ice mass are required balance of summer Arctic sea ice with an electromagnetic induction technique H. EICKEN Geophysical

  13. Near UV atmospheric absorption measurements of column abundances during Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, January-February 1989: 2. OClO observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiller, C.; Wahner, A.; Platt, U.; Dorn, H.P.; Callies, J.; Ehhalt, D.H. (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (West Germany))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Column abundances of OClO were measured during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition from January 6 to February 9, 1989 by near UV absorption spectroscopy. OClO was detected during AASE inside the vortex and at the edge of the vortex with column abundances of 3-10 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}2} under twilight conditions and up to 1 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2} during the night. For comparison, in the Antarctic winter nighttime column abundances of OClO ranged from 1-2.5 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2}, while those at mid-latitudes were below the detection limit, i.e. by at least a factor of 10 lower (Solomon et al., 1988). The measurements are broadly consistent with observed BrO column abundances and chemical model calculations.

  14. Spectroscopic measurement of bromine oxide and ozone in the high Arctic during Polar Sunrise Experiment 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hausmann, M.; Platt, U. [Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany)] [Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany)

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report the measurement of BrO radical densities and ozone in the Arctic troposphere by means of differential optical absorption using very long paths. They observed levels of BrO which varied from below the detection limit to 17 ppt. Such concentrations alone cannot account for the catalytic destruction of ozone observed during periods of episodic ozone variation. The authors offer a model which involves BrO catalyzed reactions, advection, and atmospheric mixing which they argue could account for the observed ozone depletions.

  15. Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    of fast ice formation and growth. Instead, the modeled fast ice is replaced with pack ice which driftsEvaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project with estimates of sea ice thickness derived from pan-Arctic satellite freeboard measurements (2004

  16. Arctic house

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkel, Joel A. (Joel Abram), 1969-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently available housing in the Arctic is limited to solutions that have been adapted from designs for less severe climates. This thesis has developed a new manner of residential construction designed specifically for ...

  17. Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated threedimensional model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wuhu

    Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated three­dimensional model study Chipperfield winter­spring chemical ozone loss from 1991 2003, its observed correlation with low temperatures. CTM throughout studied. The model reproduces large column winters also captures shape of ozone loss profile

  18. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  19. A multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shindell, D T; Chin, M; Dentener, F; Doherty, R M; Faluvegi, G; Fiore, A M; Hess, P; Koch, D M; MacKenzie, I A; Sanderson, M G; Schultz, M G; Schulz, M; Stevenson, D S; Teich, H; Textor, C; Wild, O; Bergmann, D J; Bey, I; Bian, H; Cuvelier, C; Duncan, B N; Folberth, G; Horowitz, L W; Jonson, J; Kaminski, J W; Marmer, E; Park, R; Pringle, K J; Schroeder, S; Szopa, S; Takemura, T; Zeng, G; Keating, T J; Zuber, A

    2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the response of Arctic gas and aerosol concentrations to perturbations in pollutant emissions from Europe, East and South Asia, and North America using results from a coordinated model intercomparison. These sensitivities to regional emissions (mixing ratio change per unit emission) vary widely across models and species. Intermodel differences are systematic, however, so that the relative importance of different regions is robust. North America contributes the most to Arctic ozone pollution. For aerosols and CO, European emissions dominate at the Arctic surface but East Asian emissions become progressively more important with altitude, and are dominant in the upper troposphere. Sensitivities show strong seasonality: surface sensitivities typically maximize during boreal winter for European and during spring for East Asian and North American emissions. Mid-tropospheric sensitivities, however, nearly always maximize during spring or summer for all regions. Deposition of black carbon (BC) onto Greenland is most sensitive to North American emissions. North America and Europe each contribute {approx}40% of total BC deposition to Greenland, with {approx}20% from East Asia. Elsewhere in the Arctic, both sensitivity and total BC deposition are dominated by European emissions. Model diversity for aerosols is especially large, resulting primarily from differences in aerosol physical and chemical processing (including removal). Comparison of modeled aerosol concentrations with observations indicates problems in the models, and perhaps, interpretation of the measurements. For gas phase pollutants such as CO and O{sub 3}, which are relatively well-simulated, the processes contributing most to uncertainties depend on the source region and altitude examined. Uncertainties in the Arctic surface CO response to emissions perturbations are dominated by emissions for East Asian sources, while uncertainties in transport, emissions, and oxidation are comparable for European and North American sources. At higher levels, model-to-model variations in transport and oxidation are most important. Differences in photochemistry appear to play the largest role in the intermodel variations in Arctic ozone sensitivity, though transport also contributes substantially in the mid-troposphere.

  20. Near UV atmospheric absorption measurements of column abundances during Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, January-February 1989: 3. BrO observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahner, A.; Callies, J.; Dorn, H.P.; Platt, U.; Schiller, C. (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (West Germany))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Column abundances of BrO were measured during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition from January 6 to February 9, 1989 by near UV absorption spectroscopy. BrO was detected during early flights by scattered sunlight observations during twilight and direct moon light observations during the night. The daytime vertical column abundances of BrO varied between 2 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}2} and 13 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}2} and are consistent with observed OClO column abundances and chemical model calculations. The nighttime presence of BrO suggests different vertical profiles of BrO and ClO.

  1. City of Winter Park Energy Conservation Rebate Program (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Winter Park is now offering rebates to Winter Park electric residential and commercial customers for implementing energy conservation measures.

  2. arctas arctic research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic. It often serves as the measuring stick for global climate change. It is where warming has been strongest in the past century, Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  3. Carbon dynamics in arctic vegetation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Street, Lorna Elizabeth

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the Arctic land surface and the global climate system. A large amount of organic carbon (C) is currently stored in Arctic soils; if ...

  4. Civil defense implications of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Broyles, A.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Possible effects of Nuclear Winter on the world's population are summarized. The implications of these effects for strategic weapons planning and civil defense measures are discussed. (ACR)

  5. Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Amy

    Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

  6. Airborne measurements during the Arctic stratospheric experiment: Observation of O[sub 3] and NO[sub 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeilsticker, K.; Platt, U. (Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany))

    1994-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on aircraft based measurements of ozone, O[sub 4], NO[sub 2], and NO[sub 3] using differential optical absorption spectroscopy. These measurements were made during EASOE, over a region from 60[degrees]W to 60[degrees]E, and 48[degrees]N to 85[degrees]N. The presence of volcanic aerosols from Mt Pinatubo affected the results.

  7. Cold thoughts on nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, J.I.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear winter controversy is a notorious example of the politicization of science. Large firestorms are followed by soot-laden black rain. It is not known what fraction of the soot produced by fires is removed from the atmosphere in this manner. A simple argument suggests that the fraction may be large. It is even possible to argue that a severe nuclear winter is not self-consistent. It is often assumed that carbonaceous soot is chemically inert in the atmosphere, despite the presence of trace amounts of chemically active species. Even if the magnitude of the nuclear winter effect were known, its implications would remain controversial. Nuclear winter chillings are usually measured as drops in mean temperature. However, reduction in solar heating reduces the diurnal variation as well.

  8. Nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrlich, A.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 13 speakers at the October 1983 Conference on the World After Nuclear War each contributed specialized knowledge to the climatic and biological effects of nuclear war. The author highlights the findings of the TTAPS (named for its authors) study and confirmation by Soviet scientists on the nuclear winter. Atmospheric consequences would come from debris blocking sunlight and creating conditions of cold and darkness that could preclude the continued existence of life. The biological consequences of cold and darkness would be reduced photosynthesis, devastating losses of food, damage and death from ionizing radiation, and a breakdown of ecosystems. Impacts on the human population would be intensified by a breakdown in social services. The author summarizes points of discussion during the conference. 4 references.

  9. arctic haze: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Srinivas 7 NASA ARCTAS PROJECT The Arctic. It often serves as the measuring stick for global climate change. It is where warming has been strongest in the past century,...

  10. 5, 90399063, 2005 Arctic aerosol effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Radiation Measurement (ARM) data, we find surface cloud radiative forcing (SCRF) is -22 W/m 2 for shortwave. If aerosols are taken into account, the SCRF has been increased during winter while15 negative SCRF has been

  11. 6, 96559722, 2006 Arctic smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Discussions Arctic smoke ­ record high air pollution levels in the European Arctic due to agricultural fires into the European Arctic and caused the most severe air pollution episodes ever recorded there. This paper confirms that biomass burning (BB) was in-5 deed the source of the observed air pollution, studies the transport

  12. Comments on: Arctic Climate Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate,CobaltColdin679April

  13. Sandia Energy - Arctic Climate Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInApplied & Computational Math Home

  14. Growing season methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at a sub-arctic wetland in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Blei, Emanuel; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes were measured at several sites in a sub-arctic wetland near Abisko, Sweden (68°28?N 18°49?E) throughout the 2008 growing season. Averaged over 92 flux measurements the sub-arctic wetland was found to be a...

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2,govCampaignsAircraft Integration

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - Millimeter-wave Radiometric Arctic Winter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) CampaigngovCampaignsMicrowave

  17. The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed Donat AboutTextiles2004 North Slope of

  18. WINTER BREAK HOUSING APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    WINTER BREAK HOUSING APPLICATION RESIDENCE HALLS WILL BE CLOSED FROM 12:00PM (NOON), DECEMBER 19-6860 WWW.UAF.EDU/RESLIFE · EMAIL UAF-HOUSING@ALASKA.EDU TEL (907) 474-7247 · FAX (907) 474-6423 WINTER halls open need to complete the winter break housing application. Students that apply for housing before

  19. Abstract Southwest Greenland provides wintering grounds for 70% (~460,000) of the northern common

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Southwest Greenland provides wintering grounds for 70% (~460,000) of the northern common in the eastern Canadian Arctic and western Greenland (Abraham and Finney 1986; Boertmann et al. 1996; Merkel 2004a). All birds from western Greenland and most Canadian breeders, about 70% (463

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Arctic sea ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic sea ice Sierra Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Begin Flights Over Arctic Sea Ice On July 25, 2013, in Climate, Customers & Partners, Global, Monitoring, News, News & Events,...

  1. Using Radar, Lidar and Radiometer Data from NSA and SHEBA to Quantify Cloud Property Effects on the Surface Heat Budget in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet Intrieri; Mathhew Shupe

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud and radiation data from two distinctly different Arctic areas are analyzed to study the differences between coastal Alaskan and open Arctic Ocean region clouds and their respective influence on the surface radiation budget. The cloud and radiation datasets were obtained from (1) the DOE North Slope of Alaska (NSA) facility in the coastal town of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) the SHEBA field program, which was conducted from an icebreaker frozen in, and drifting with, the sea-ice for one year in the Western Arctic Ocean. Radar, lidar, radiometer, and sounding measurements from both locations were used to produce annual cycles of cloud occurrence and height, atmospheric temperature and humidity, surface longwave and shortwave broadband fluxes, surface albedo, and cloud radiative forcing. In general, both regions revealed a similar annual trend of cloud occurrence fraction with minimum values in winter (60-75%) and maximum values during spring, summer and fall (80-90%). However, the annual average cloud occurrence fraction for SHEBA (76%) was lower than the 6-year average cloud occurrence at NSA (92%). Both Arctic areas also showed similar annual cycle trends of cloud forcing with clouds warming the surface through most of the year and a period of surface cooling during the summer, when cloud shading effects overwhelm cloud greenhouse effects. The greatest difference between the two regions was observed in the magnitude of the cloud cooling effect (i.e., shortwave cloud forcing), which was significantly stronger at NSA and lasted for a longer period of time than at SHEBA. This is predominantly due to the longer and stronger melt season at NSA (i.e., albedo values that are much lower coupled with Sun angles that are somewhat higher) than the melt season observed over the ice pack at SHEBA. Longwave cloud forcing values were comparable between the two sites indicating a general similarity in cloudiness and atmospheric temperature and humidity structure between the two regions.

  2. The area and volume of sea ice in the Arc-tic Ocean is decreasing, with some predict-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    , while loss of sea ice could cause stress for polar bears. Moreover, global climate may be affected ice forms in winter,which melts and/or gets exported out of the Arctic. The recent decrease in summer of this community is evi- dence that the sea ice cap has not disap- peared during the Quaternary. The remains

  3. Physicist Peter Winter wins Department of Energy Early Career...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ill. Winter's work centers on performing benchmarking tests and calibrations of the nuclear magnetic resonance probes that will be used to precisely measure the magnetic...

  4. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 1. Overview of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Background The Arctic...

  5. Winters fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The outlook for distillate fuel oil this winter is for increased demand and a return to normal inventory patterns, assuming a resumption of normal, cooler weather than last winter. With industrial production expected to grow slightly from last winter`s pace, overall consumption is projected to increase 3 percent from last winter, to 3.4 million barrels per day during the heating season (October 1, 1995-March 31, 1996). Much of the supply win come from stock drawdowns and refinery production. Estimates for the winter are from the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 4th Quarter 1995 Short-Tenn Energy Outlook (STEO) Mid-World Oil Price Case forecast. Inventories in place on September 30, 1995, of 132 million barrels were 9 percent below the unusually high year-earlier level. Inventories of high-sulfur distillate fuel oil, the principal type used for heating, were 13 percent lower than a year earlier. Supply problems are not anticipated because refinery production and the ready availability of imports should be adequate to meet demand. Residential heating off prices are expected to be somewhat higher than last winter`s, as the effects of lower crude oil prices are offset by lower distillate inventories. Heating oil is forecast to average $0.92 per gallon, the highest price since the winter of 1992-93. Diesel fuel (including tax) is predicted to be slightly higher than last year at $1.13 per gallon. This article focuses on the winter assessment for distillate fuel oil, how well last year`s STEO winter outlook compared to actual events, and expectations for the coming winter. Additional analyses include regional low-sulfur and high-sulfur distillate supply, demand, and prices, and recent trends in distillate fuel oil inventories.

  6. CEE Winter Program Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) is hosting their Winter Program Meeting, a two-day conference held in Long Beach, California.

  7. Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

  8. Winter Weather Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    Winter Weather Management #12;Introduction · Campus Facilities Staff · Other Campus Organizations #12;Purpose · Organize and coordinate the campus response to winter weather events to maintain campus for use by 7 AM. · Response will be modified depending upon forecast and current weather conditions. #12

  9. ANNUAL WINTER SCHOOLANNUAL WINTER SCHOOL Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    ANNUAL WINTER SCHOOLANNUAL WINTER SCHOOL Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute National Research February ­ 1 March, 2014 Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI) conducts the XLVIII Annual Winter Center "Kurchatov Institute" XLVIII PNPI Winter School, Roschino, 24 February ­ 1 March 2014 During 24

  10. S108 august 2009| balance (annual net balance and its summer/winter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    (relative to 2000­04 climatol- ogy) on the North Ellesmere, Agassiz, and Axel Heiberg ice caps ranged from melt duration anomalies, mostly due to early freeze-up. The total ice shelf area in Arctic Canada climate affects the health of Arctic glaciers. As most 2007­08 measurements are not yet available, we

  11. The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verlinde, J

    2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

  12. NARUC Winter Committee Meetings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Association of Regulatory Utilities Commissioners (NARUC) Winter Committee Meetings offers its members and attendees the latest information from U.S. federal policymakers, consumer advocates, industry officials, and other stakeholders.

  13. Underwater ambient noise in the Alaskan Arctic from 20062009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    , a proxy for multiyear ice. Perennial pack ice is diminishing while thin seasonal pack ice is more The Arctic Ocean has experienced diminished ice cover as record lows have been measured for sea ice thickness prevalent. These changes in sea ice affect the acoustic field as well as the sources of sound, both natural

  14. Metal Analysis of Scales Taken from Arctic Grayling A. P. Farrell,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    scales taken from Arctic grayling using laser ablation­induc- tively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA of the scales. Ten elements (Mg, Ca, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Sb, Hg, and Pb) were measured in 10 to 16 ablation

  15. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  16. Canada's Arctic Gateway: Discussion Paper Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    Canada's Arctic Gateway: Discussion Paper Summary September 2010 The following summarizes key Canada's Arctic Gateway a reality in terms of both national public policy and international presence the Government of Canada's national gateway policy framework. This discussion paper's use of the term "Arctic

  17. Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    Sciences #12;Changes in Arctic Climate What is the role of cloud cover in Arctic climate change? What is the Cloud Radiative Effect (CRE) in the Arctic? #12;CRE depends on season, cloud type CRE ­ whether clouds specifically chosen to include nighttime obs Total cloud cover and nine cloud types: - High cloud (cirriform

  18. Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    Declining September sea-ice extent #12;Clouds & Changes in Arctic Climate What is the role of cloud cover in Arctic climate change? What is the Cloud Radiative Effect (CRE) in the Arctic? #12;CRE Defined CRE nighttime obs Total cloud cover and nine cloud types: - High cloud (cirriform) - Middle Clouds: Altocumulus

  19. The Thinning of Arctic Sea Ice, 19882003: Have We Passed a Tipping Point? R. W. LINDSAY AND J. ZHANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    ­05. To determine the physical processes contributing to these changes in the Arctic pack ice, model results from ice pack is a key component of the Arctic Ocean physical and biological systems. It controls in the central pack is also thinning. Based on submarine measurements, the ice draft is reported by Rothrock et

  20. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Ian M.

    A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar properties. An initial warm, melt

  1. TIME SCHEDULE WINTER QUARTER 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    MASTER CON TIME SCHEDULE WINTER QUARTER 1970 ADVANCE REGISTRATION NOVEMBER 3-21 IN, please leave it or pass it along so that other students may use it. #12;Winter Quarter 1970. Examination

  2. WINTER 2014 Sustainability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    WINTER 2014 Sustainability and Renewable Energy in Costa Rica January 4 - 14 Dr. James Hoffmann, Program Director Lecturer Sustainability Studies Program E-511 Melville Library Stony Brook, NY 11794 sustainability and renewable energy. Students will spend 11 days in Costa Rica to participate in site visits

  3. Winter 2011 Dear Friends,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    on renewable energy in Dhaka, Bangladesh in July; Michael Doonan, Ph.D. '02, whose Massachusetts Health PolicyWinter 2011 Dear Friends, As 2011 begins I want to share my warmest wishes to you and your families to move from Brandeis' International Center for Ethics, Justice and Public Life to its new permanent home

  4. James L. Winter- Biography

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jim Winter is the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Program Lead for the NNSA Office of Environment, Safety and Health (NA-00-10) and has served in various capacities within NNSA and Defense Programs since 1991 regarding nuclear safety and environment, safety and health.

  5. Focus Article Nuclear winter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    the climatic effects of nuclear war. Smoke from the fires started by nuclear weapons, especially the black in recorded human history. Although the number of nuclear weapons in the world has fallen from 70,000 at its and Russia could still produce nuclear winter. This theory cannot be tested in the real world. However

  6. Age characteristics in a multidecadal Arctic sea ice simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitz, Cecllia M [UNIV. OF WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from adding a tracer for age of sea ice to a sophisticated sea ice model that is widely used for climate studies are presented. The consistent simulation of ice age, dynamics, and thermodynamics in the model shows explicitly that the loss of Arctic perennial ice has accelerated in the past three decades, as has been seen in satellite-derived observations. Our model shows that the September ice age average across the Northern Hemisphere varies from about 5 to 8 years, and the ice is much younger (about 2--3 years) in late winter because of the expansion of first-year ice. We find seasonal ice on average comprises about 5% of the total ice area in September, but as much as 1.34 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} survives in some years. Our simulated ice age in the late 1980s and early 1990s declined markedly in agreement with other studies. After this period of decline, the ice age began to recover, but in the final years of the simulation very little young ice remains after the melt season, a strong indication that the age of the pack will again decline in the future as older ice classes fail to be replenished. The Arctic ice pack has fluctuated between older and younger ice types over the past 30 years, while ice area, thickness, and volume all declined over the same period, with an apparent acceleration in the last decade.

  7. Arctic Ecologies: The Politics and Poetics of Northern Literary Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athens, Allison Katherine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts: Creating an Arctic Home. ” Coca-Cola Arctic Home.Coca-Cola and WWF. Web. 10 Apr. 2013. “Arctic NationalHarvard UP, 1997. Print. “Coca-Cola: Building Support for

  8. Investigation and Analysis of Winter Classroom Thermal Environment in Chongqing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J.; Li, B.; Yao, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the thermal sense value of the occupants, the winter classroom thermal environment was evaluated. Measures for improving the classroom indoor thermal environmental quality were also given. The lower limit air temperature of the non-air conditioned classrooms...

  9. Investigation and Analysis of Winter Classroom Thermal Environment in Chongqing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J.; Li, B.; Yao, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the thermal sense value of the occupants, the winter classroom thermal environment was evaluated. Measures for improving the classroom indoor thermal environmental quality were also given. The lower limit air temperature of the non-air conditioned classrooms...

  10. arctic vegetation amplify: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dynamics in arctic vegetation Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the...

  11. airborne arctic stratospheric: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  12. arctic cloudy boundary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  13. arctic ground squirrel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  14. alesund arctic base: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  15. arctic stratospheric expedition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  16. arctic ground squirrels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  17. arctic shrub tundra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sites, Abandoned Dwellings, and Trampled Tundra in the Eastern Canadian Arctic: A Multivariate Analysis CiteSeer Summary: ABSTRACT. Arctic terrestrial ecosystems subjected...

  18. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

  19. arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

  20. arctic ice islands: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analogous to the effects of the Arctic region; KEYWORDS: Arctic Ocean, ice rafting, climate change Citation: Darby, D. A., and J. F. Bischof (2004), A Holocene record of...

  1. Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremen, Universität

    Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8 with 4.240 million km2 a new historic minimum (Figure 1). Physicists of the University of Bremen now confirm the apprehension existing since July 2011 that the ice melt in the Arctic

  2. An AeroCom Assessment of Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and Sea Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, Mian; De Luca, N.; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Liu, Xiaohong; Mann, G. W.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Yun, Yuxing; Zhang, Kai

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea-ice. Here, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea-ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004-2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng g?1 for an earlier Phase of AeroCom models (Phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng g?1 for a more recent Phase of AeroCom models (Phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng g?1. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model–measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60-90?N) atmospheric residence time for BC in Phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with the fact that most Arctic BC deposition originates from extra-Arctic emissions, these results suggest that aerosol removal processes are a leading source of variation in model performance. The multi-model mean (full range) of Arctic radiative effect from BC in snow is 0.15 (0.07-0.25) W m?2 and 0.18 (0.06-0.28) W m?2 in Phase I and Phase II models, respectively. After correcting for model biases relative to observed BC concentrations in different regions of the Arctic, we obtain a multi-model mean Arctic radiative effect of 0.17 W m?2 for the combined AeroCom ensembles. Finally, there is a high correlation between modeled BC concentrations sampled over the observational sites and the Arctic as a whole, indicating that the field campaign provided a reasonable sample of the Arctic.

  3. Primary production of arctic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, D.V.S.; Platt, T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data that have become available during the last ten years they have reestimated the annual production by phytoplankton in the arctic marine ecosystem. The new figure is some sixteen times higher than an estimate made in 1975. This is of considerable significance regionally, but still does not, of itself, imply that global phytoplankton production is underestimated at present. 82 references, 3 figures, 9 tables.

  4. Final Technical Report for Project "Improving the Simulation of Arctic Clouds in CCSM3"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen J. Vavrus

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has focused on the simulation of Arctic clouds in CCSM3 and how the modeled cloud amount (and climate) can be improved substantially by altering the parameterized low cloud fraction. The new formula, dubbed 'freeezedry', alleviates the bias of excessive low clouds during polar winter by reducing the cloud amount under very dry conditions. During winter, freezedry decreases the low cloud amount over the coldest regions in high latitudes by over 50% locally and more than 30% averaged across the Arctic (Fig. 1). The cloud reduction causes an Arctic-wide drop of 15 W m{sup -2} in surface cloud radiative forcing (CRF) during winter and about a 50% decrease in mean annual Arctic CRF. Consequently, wintertime surface temperatures fall by up to 4 K on land and 2-8 K over the Arctic Ocean, thus significantly reducing the model's pronounced warm bias (Fig. 1). While improving the polar climate simulation in CCSM3, freezedry has virtually no influence outside of very cold regions (Fig. 2) or during summer (Fig. 3), which are space and time domains that were not targeted. Furthermore, the simplicity of this parameterization allows it to be readily incorporated into other GCMs, many of which also suffer from excessive wintertime polar cloudiness, based on the results from the CMIP3 archive (Vavrus et al., 2008). Freezedry also affects CCSM3's sensitivity to greenhouse forcing. In a transient-CO{sub 2} experiment, the model version with freezedry warms up to 20% less in the North Polar and South Polar regions (1.5 K and 0.5 K smaller warming, respectively) (Fig. 4). Paradoxically, the muted high-latitude response occurs despite a much larger increase in cloud amount with freezedry during non-summer months (when clouds warm the surface), apparently because of the colder modern reference climate. These results of the freezedry parameterization have recently been published (Vavrus and D. Waliser, 2008: An improved parameterization for simulating Arctic cloud amount in the CCSM3 climate model. J. Climate, 21, 5673-5687.). The article also provides a novel synthesis of surface- and satellite-based Arctic cloud observations that show how much the new freezedry parameterization improves the simulated cloud amount in high latitudes (Fig. 3). Freezedry has been incorporated into the CCSM3.5 version, in which it successfully limits the excessive polar clouds, and may be used in CCSM4. Material from this work is also appearing in a synthesis article on future Arctic cloud changes (Vavrus, D. Waliser, J. Francis, and A. Schweiger, 'Simulations of 20th and 21st century Arctic cloud amount in the global climate models assessed in the IPCC AR4', accepted in Climate Dynamics) and was used in a collaborative paper on Arctic cloud-sea ice coupling (Schweiger, A., R. Lindsay, S. Vavrus, and J. Francis, 2008: Relationships between Arctic sea ice and clouds during autumn. J. Climate, 21, 4799-4810.). This research was presented at the 2007 CCSM Annual Workshop, as well as the CCSM's 2007 Atmospheric Model Working Group and Polar Working Group Meetings. The findings were also shown at the 2007 Climate Change Prediction Program's Science Team Meeting. In addition, I served as an instructor at the International Arctic Research Center's (IARC) Summer School on Arctic Climate Modeling in Fairbanks this summer, where I presented on the challenges and techniques used in simulating polar clouds. I also contributed to the development of a new Arctic System Model by attending a workshop in Colorado this summer on this fledgling project. Finally, an outreach activity for the general public has been the development of an interactive web site () that displays Arctic cloud amount in the CMIP3 climate model archive under present and future scenarios. This site allows users to make polar and global maps of a variety of climate variables to investigate the individual and ensemble-mean GCM response to greenhouse warming and the extent to which models adequately represent Arctic clouds in the modern clima

  5. A possible mechanism for combined chlorine and bromine catalyzed destruction of tropospheric ozone in the arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Bras, G. [Laboratoire de Combustion et Systemes Reactifs, Orleans (France)] [Laboratoire de Combustion et Systemes Reactifs, Orleans (France); Platt, U. [Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)] [Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors make use of measured BrO radical densities, and ClO radical densities inferred from hydrocarbon measurements, made in the arctic troposphere, to calculate ozone depletion rates which would be expected in the spring. These rates compare favorably with field measurements.

  6. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to improve representation of the Arctic in Earth System Models Topography influences snow cover, thermal

  7. Consequences of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teller, E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is to be expected that the predictable consequences of a nuclear war are more terrible than any of the indirect effects that have been discussed. Detailed calculations on the consequences of massive release of smoke seem to bear out this general expectation. This contrast may become ever more obvious if one takes into account the consequences of defense against a nuclear attack. One cannot expect that such defense will be 100% effective. A reduction of the direct casualties by a factor of 2 will almost certainly result in a substantial reduction in the amount of smoke emitted. In case of no defense, the direct effects of nuclear winter are hard to predict. In the case of defense, the climate changes may well be minor. If one assumes that there will be residual effects on the weather, this is apt to be more important in influencing precipitation rather than the surface temperature. Indeed, the main effect of smoke is to produce a temperature inversion and thereby suppress the convective rainfall. This is particularly true in many regions that produce crops in the norther hemisphere. It seems now well established that the most dangerous potential consequence of any smoke-induced climatic change will be reduction of crops. Fortunately, this danger can be greatly reduced by food storage. Such food storage could greatly reduce domestic shortages in the United States and could also be important in alleviating suffering abroad. The efforts spent on considering the consequence of nuclear winter are not wasted.

  8. Mesoscale Modeling During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avramov, A.; Harringston, J.Y.; Verlinde, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic (Curry et al. 2000) and through various feedback mechanisms exert a strong influence on the Arctic climate. Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. It has been hypothesized that mixed-phase clouds are maintained through a balance between liquid water condensation resulting from the cloud-top radiative cooling and ice removal by precipitation (Pinto 1998; Harrington et al. 1999). In their modeling study Harrington et al. (1999) found that the maintenance of this balance depends strongly on the ambient concentration of ice forming nucleus (IFN). In a follow-up study, Jiang et al. (2002), using only 30% of IFN concentration predicted by Meyers et al. (1992) IFN parameterization were able to obtain results similar to the observations reported by Pinto (1998). The IFN concentration measurements collected during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004 over the North Slope of Alaska and the Beaufort Sea (Verlinde et al. 2005), also showed much lower values then those predicted (Prenne, pers. comm.) by currently accepted ice nucleation parameterizations (e.g. Meyers et al. 1992). The goal of this study is to use the extensive IFN data taken during M-PACE to examine what effects low IFN concentrations have on mesoscale cloud structure and coastal dynamics.

  9. The dynamic response of high Arctic glaciers to global warming and their contribution to sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, J.K.W. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Scott Polar Research Inst.; Dowdeswell, J.A. [Univ. of Wales (United Kingdom)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations with General Circulation Models have indicated that global warming will be enhanced at high latitudes. Regions in the high Arctic are highly sensitive to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, with an amplified theoretical rise of 8--14 C predicted to take place in winter and a negligible rise of 2 C in summer. Wetter conditions in these regions are quite plausible with global warming due to warmer sea surface temperatures, melting of sea ice and a greater moisture holding capacity of the atmosphere. Recent observations show a marked increase in precipitation in the high Arctic regions during the past decades, particularly in the winters. The notion of whether the increased melting of snow due to global warming would be offset by increased snowfall is investigated in this study. To make reliable predictions of the response of high Arctic glaciers to global warming and hence their contribution to sea-level rise, a numerical model has been developed to investigate the interactions of the glaciers with climate change induced by global warming. The model is a one-dimensional numerical ice-flow model coupled with a surface balance model. Accumulation and ablation at the glacier surface are determined by the surface balance model using an energy balance approach.

  10. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 27 figs, 12 tabs.

  11. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  12. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide consise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; Natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s as well as selected National average prices; Residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; Crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and A 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree days by city.

  13. Springtime Arctic haze contributions of submicron organic particles from European and Asian combustion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Jesse

    The composition of Arctic aerosol, especially during the springtime Arctic haze, may play an important role in the radiative balance of the Arctic. The contribution of organic components to Arctic haze has only recently ...

  14. Source attributions of pollution to the Western Arctic during the NASA ARCTAS field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic,Oscillation controls air pollution transport to the Arctic,al. : Source attributions of pollution to the Western Arctic

  15. Impact of a simulated nuclear winter environment on growth development and productivity of potatoes, winter wheat, pines and soybeans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palta, J.P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several recent studies predict strong land surface cooling and reduction in solar irradiance following nuclear explosions (Turco et al., 1983; Covey et al., 1984; Thompson et al., 1984). Although there is disagreement among scientists on the extent and the duration of temperature and irradiation decrease, there is a general agreement on the nuclear winter'' hypothesis following nuclear war (Covey, 1985). Agreements between the timing of excessive frost events and volcanic eruptions supports such nuclear winter scenarios (La Marche Jr. and Hirschboek, 1984). More recently Robock (1988) recorded a drop in surface temperatures following the entrapment of smoke from a forest fire in northern California. These measurements also support the nuclear winter hypothesis. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of a simulated nuclear winter environment on productivity of four plant species. 20 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    - 1 - PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2014) COURSE GOALS 1. Learn how) 3. W. R. Leo, Techniques for Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments, Springer Noise (Tyson ­ Mitchell) Continuous-Wave Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (Chiang

  17. PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    - 1 - PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2015) COURSE GOALS 1. Learn how for Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments, Springer-Verlag, 2nd edition. (UCD Library call) Continuous-Wave Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (Chiang - Stenger) Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic

  18. Select bibliography on nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, L.A.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1982 article by P.J. Crutzen and J.W. Birks first suggested that smoke from wildland and urban fires could have a significant impact on the atmosphere. The theory of nuclear winter was first presented at the World after Nuclear War conference held in 1983. Following the conference, articles describing the potential climatic and biological consequences of a global nuclear exchange were published. Most of the nuclear winter literature concentrates on atmospheric and climatic effects. There are also some work that focus on strategic policy, medical, and agricultural effects. A broad spectrum of viewpoints and theories exists in the published literature on nuclear winter. This bibliography reflects those varying viewpoints. This compilation includes works published up to 1 March 1987. Articles from popular magazines and newspapers were omitted. Citations include 129 articles, 21 books, and 54 technical reports. A further reading list composed of 80 sources relevant to the nuclear winter theory is also provided.

  19. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  20. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition, underground storage, and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 p.m. on Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB). 12 tabs.

  1. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  2. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysis, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day, 30-Day and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  3. ELG 5124: Virtual Environments, (Winter 2008) ELG 5124 Virtual Environments (Winter 2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petriu, Emil M.

    , human body modeling and animation. #12;ELG 5124: Virtual Environments, (Winter 2008) AnimationELG 5124: Virtual Environments, (Winter 2008) ELG 5124 Virtual Environments (Winter 2008) Tuesday% _______________________________________________ Calendar description Basic concepts. Virtual worlds. Hardware and software support. World modeling

  4. TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L. Mitchell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L Monopulse Amplitude Comparison method [3]. This technique estimates surface heights by comparing of good radar return where topography varies within the measurement width, and insufficient in areas

  5. Does Growth Rate Determine the Rate of Metabolism in Shorebird Chicks Living in the Arctic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    primarily of greater metabolic inten- sities of heat-generating tissues. The maximum temperature gradient500 Does Growth Rate Determine the Rate of Metabolism in Shorebird Chicks Living in the Arctic/22/2007; Electronically Published 7/13/2007 ABSTRACT We measured resting and peak metabolic rates (RMR and PMR

  6. Comparison of surface radiative flux data sets over the Arctic Ocean Jiping Liu,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The reduced surface heat loss is partly offset by the reduction of solar heating due to much higher snow of these surface parameters was compared to the high-quality in situ measurements from the Surface Heat Budget; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001]. However, physical processes in the Arctic are not well understood

  7. Expected magnitude of the aerosol shortwave indirect effect in springtime Arctic liquid water clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reflection of photons between the snow or sea ice surface and cloud base, the shortwave first indirect effect of high quality longwave spectral radiation measurements in the Arctic from which the indirect effect can clouds both absorb and scatter radiation. We therefore do not yet have a comparable spectral capability

  8. Web: http://dust.ess.uci.edu/prp/prp_ans/prp_ans.pdf NSF Arctic Natural Sciences (ANS) Proposal ARC-0714088 Submitted: December 8, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Web: http://dust.ess.uci.edu/prp/prp_ans/prp_ans.pdf NSF Arctic Natural Sciences (ANS) Proposal ARC dissemination of LGGE snow measurements as http://dust.ess.uci.edu/snw. Identified IPY sub-disciplines as Snow

  9. Tuktoyaktuk : responsive strategies for a new Arctic urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchot, Pamela (Pamela Rae)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canadian Arctic is facing a set of compounding crises that will drastically impact the future of its coastal frontier. At a time when climate change is having a detrimental impact on the Arctic landscape, Northern ...

  10. Economic feasibility of shipping containers through the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Russell (Russell Clayton)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Arctic ice cover continues to retreat, the possibility of regular transit through the Arctic becomes an increasing reality. Liner companies could take advantage of distance savings (up to 4000 nautical miles less ...

  11. arctic ocean experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

  12. arctic environmental change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

  13. MEASURED WINTER PERFORMANCE OF STORM WINDOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    problem. From existing data (U. S. Department of Energy 2002) one can estimate that 90% of the present payback of energy savings. Certainly, given the present spectrum of available products, it is difficult. Interestingly, solar heat gain was not negligible, even in north-facing orientation. Introduction Over the past

  14. Lesson Summary Students will learn about the Arctic Beaufort Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Lesson Summary Students will learn about the Arctic Beaufort Sea and research the adaptations of people and animals in the arctic regions. They will also learn about how their actions can affect the Arctic and learn about the International Polar Year. Prior Knowledge & Skills · Research skills

  15. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  16. Simulating Arctic Climate Warmth and Icefield Retreat in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    , Devon, and Meighen ice caps in the Canadian Arctic, and possibly in Camp Century (northwest Greenland the entire western Arctic from 57-N to 85-N, including Greenland and smaller scale ice caps in Iceland Project members In the future, Arctic warming and the melting of polar glaciers will be considerable

  17. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  18. Nuclear winter attracts additional scrutiny

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.J.

    1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Prodded by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Congress has asked the Pentagon to provide what amounts to an environmental impact statement on the potential for nuclear weapons explosions to create enough soot and dust to cause a nuclear winter. The request has implications for arms control and civil defense as well as for weapons procurement and deployment. Little attention was given to the atmospheric and climatic effects of nuclear war until the nuclear winter concept was introduced in October of 1983. Only the Navy and the DOE took steps to follow up until pressure was put on Congress and the Pentagon for further study. Pentagon criticism of the nuclear winter presentation argues that the scenario assumptions that cities will be targeted and that a conflict will involve 5000-6500 megatons are incorrect.

  19. CMPE 185 Winter 1999 Syllabus 1 Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    CMPE 185 Winter 1999 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and timePorter 144, MWF 3:30-4:40 (Warning: location Info 1 #12;2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Winter 1999 4

  20. Winter Weather FAQs | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Winter Weather FAQs As Argonne prepares for the winter season, employees should be aware of the laboratory's procedures and policies in severe weather events. Below are some of the...

  1. Winter Energy Savings from Lower Thermostat Settings

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This discussion provides details on the effect of lowering thermostat settings during the winter heating months of 1997.

  2. Arctic Energy Summit | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA NewslettersPartnership of theArctic Energy Summit Arctic Energy Summit

  3. Alan Roback Policy Implications of Nuclear Winter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Alan Roback Policy Implications of Nuclear Winter and Ideas for Solutions The 5 May 1988 United Nations report clearly states that the nuclear winter theory is supported by current scientific evidence the political will to work on this problem, they would still not prevent nuclear winter when fully implemented

  4. 4, 30553085, 2007 Winter climate affects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HESSD 4, 3055­3085, 2007 Winter climate affects long-term trends in stream water nitrate H. A. de and Earth System Sciences Winter climate affects long-term trends in stream water nitrate in acid Winter climate affects long-term trends in stream water nitrate H. A. de Wit et al. Title Page Abstract

  5. 2013 Winter Cardinal Softball School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    2013 Winter Cardinal Softball School @ Wesleyan University An opportunity to work on your fastpitch, please complete the form below and mail with check payable to "Cardinal Softball School" by January 7th to: Cardinal Softball School Jen Lane, Director Freeman Athletic Center 161 Cross Street Middletown

  6. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

  7. Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Received 7 December 2009; accepted 4Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked to Sea Ice Decline Uma S. Bhatt*,1 Donald A Institute, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

  8. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David D.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

  9. APPLICATION OF CARBOHYDRATES AND PHENOLS AS BIOMARKERS TO STUDY DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER RESERVOIRS IN ARCTIC RIVERS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, Rachel

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic rivers are the dominant pathways for the transport of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon to the Arctic Ocean, but knowledge of sources, transformations and transfer of organic carbon and nitrogen in Arctic river watersheds is extremely...

  10. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using EMEP measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic, showing a good agreement, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that during the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne LIDAR measurements. Evaluating the regional impacts in the Arctic of this event in terms of aerosol vertical structure, we find that during the 4 day presence of these aerosols in the lower European Arctic (< 75° N), biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface. The European plumes sampled during POLARCAT-France were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in Northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport event, the average modeled top of atmosphere (TOA) shortwave direct and semi-direct radiative effect (DSRE) north of 60° N over snow and ice-covered surfaces reaches +0.58 W m?², peaking at +3.3 W m?² at noon over Scandinavia and Finland.

  11. Winter 2015 Positive Parenting Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter 2015 Positive Parenting Group This is an eight-week parent group series starting Monday, January 12, 2015 Future parent group sessions to be held: January 26 (no group 19th ) February 2, 9 and 23 (no group 16th ) and March 2, 9 and 16 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Room 145 of the Clinical Services

  12. What Caused the Winter Drought in Western Nepal during Recent Years?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S-Y (Simon) [Simon; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Gillies, R.; Cho, Changrae

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Western Nepal has experienced consecutive and worsened winter drought conditions since 2000 culminating in a severe drought episode during 2008-2009. In this study, the meteorological conditons and a historical pespective of the winter droughts in western Nepal were analyzed using respectively instumental records and a paleoclimatic drought index. Althought decadal-scale drought conditions were found to be recurrent in the paleoclimate record, the severity of the recent decadal drought (since 2000) clearly stands out in the 700 years of record and, this is suggestive of potential anthropogenic influences in the recent decades. Meteorological diagnosis using atmospheric reanalysis in the recent decades revealed that (1) winter drought in western Nepal is linked to the Arctic Oscillation and its decadal variability, which initiates a tropospheric short-wave train across the Europe, Eurasia and South Asia, and that (2) the persistent warming of the Indian Ocean likely contributes to the suppression of rainfall through enhanced local Hadley circultion. It is therefore conceivable that the recent spells of decadal drought in Nepal drought are symptomatic of both natural variability and anthropogenic influences.

  13. A Sensitivity Study on Modeling Black Carbon in Snow and its Radiative Forcing over the Arctic and Northern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Rudong; Flanner, M. G.; Rasch, Philip J.

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Black carbon in snow (BCS) simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) is evaluated against measurements over Northern China and the Arctic, and its sensitivity to atmospheric deposition and two parameters that affect post-depositional enrichment is explored. The BCS concentration is overestimated (underestimated) by a factor of two in Northern China (Arctic) in the default model, but agreement with observations is good over both regions in the simulation with improvements in BC transport and deposition. Sensitivity studies indicate that uncertainty in the melt-water scavenging efficiency (MSE) parameter substantially affects BCS and its radiative forcing (by a factor of 2-7) in the Arctic through post-depositional enrichment. The MSE parameter has a relatively small effect on the magnitude of BCS seasonal cycle but can alter its phase in Northern China. The impact of the snow aging scaling factor (SAF) on BCS, partly through the post-depositional enrichment effect, shows more complex latitudinal and seasonal dependence. Similar to MSE, SAF affects more significantly the magnitude (phase) of BCS season cycle over the Arctic (Northern China). While uncertainty associated with the representation of BC transport and deposition processes in CAM5 is more important than that associated with the two snow model parameters in Northern China, the two uncertainties have comparable effect in the Arctic.

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic cooling silentium Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12;Abstract The Arctic is melting ...fast. 12;IMPACTS OF A WARMING ARCTIC... 's Greenhouse Effect Thesur face cools by radiating heat energyupward. ... Source: Zender, Charles -...

  15. arctic endemic brown: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences Websites Summary: 12;4 C. Duguay, Interdisciplinary Centre on Climate Change & Department of Geography-Harte, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska...

  16. arctic populations differential: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 168 Arctic catastrophes in an idealized...

  17. arctic petroleum operators: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operations waste water injection and disposal wells, geothermal resource development, and EORCO2 Southern California, University of 66 A Holocene record of changing Arctic Ocean...

  18. arctic region baltic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    look at the higher trophic re-lationships of the crustacean zooplankton of arctic polygon depression ponds, hoping not only to discover which species were predaceous, but to...

  19. arctic study area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

  20. arctic polar vortex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

  1. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Slope ANWR: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BBbls: billion barrels Bbls: barrels Daily Petroleum Production Rate: The amount of petroleum extracted per day from a well, group of...

  2. arctic crude oil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water to form an emulsion that often looks like chocolate pudding. This emulsion 89 Lesson Plan Arctic Biome Geosciences Websites Summary: -class instruction and small group...

  3. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

  4. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent...

  5. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000,...

  6. arctic ocean sediments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

  7. arctic marine environment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Technology, Cambridge, MA Patrikalakis, Nicholas M. 4 UiT The Arctic University of Norway Fakultet for biovitenskap, fiskeri og konomi -Inst. for arktisk og marin biologi...

  8. arctic ocean sediment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

  9. arctic flora origins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    combustion of fossil fuels and biomass, may have a severe impact on the sensitive Arctic climate, possibly altering the temperature profile, cloud temperature and amount, the...

  10. arctic lake correlate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

  11. arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

  12. alaskan arctic tundra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

  13. arctic charr salvelinus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have raised concern over potential responses of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, a cold-adapted freshwateranadromous fish species in (more) Sinnatamby, Ramila Niloshini...

  14. arctic char salvelinus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have raised concern over potential responses of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, a cold-adapted freshwateranadromous fish species in (more) Sinnatamby, Ramila Niloshini...

  15. arctic research station: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Rocky Mountain Research Sta- tion is one of five 19 Z .Atmospheric Research 51 1999 4575 Cloud resolving simulations of Arctic stratus Geosciences Websites Summary: Z...

  16. arctic terns sterna: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    together. Amie L. Black; Antony W. Diamond 2 Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155159 (2013) Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  17. arctic climate system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

  18. alaskan arctic coastal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

  19. arctic tundra vegetation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of woody vegetation in arctic tundra? Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: 33124, USA. Global climate warming is projected to promote the increase of woody plants, especially of...

  20. ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

  1. arctic marine food: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine Food Web: Trophic Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Perfluoroalkyl...

  2. UCSF Bioengineering Course Listing Winter 2015 Schedule Winter Quarter: January 5 March 20, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Luke P.

    UCSF Bioengineering Course Listing Winter 2015 Schedule Winter Quarter: January 5 ­ March 20, 2015 302 Annemarie.Donjacour@ucsf.edu (Contact instructor to enroll) BI 203 Imaging Probes for Nuclear

  3. Research on the seasonal snow of the Arctic Slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The original objectives of this research included a regional study of snow on the entire Arctic Slope. During the first year the scope was restricted to the R{sub 4}D area. In the second and third years the primary focus was also on the R{sub 4}D area,but measurements were made at Prudhoe Bay, Atgasuk and Wainwright to determine the flux of wind-blown snow on a wider scale. Additional broadening of scope was discussed at the San Diego R{sub 4}D meetings in April 1986 and 1987 and at the extrapolation workshop held at Penn State University in Spring 1987. The broadening of scope has also included detailed studies of chemistry and controls exerted by large-scale advection of air masses on the longwave, thermal IR, and radiation. The latter phenomena are critical in initiating snowmelt.

  4. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo Springer-Verlag 2010 Abstract Snow surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during indicated four distinct tempera- ture regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar

  5. E. Wong, BE278, UCSD Winter 2012! Bioengineering 278"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    " Lecture 1! Topics:! ·Nuclear magnetization! ·Spin excitation! ·The NMR signal! E. Wong, BE278, UCSD WinterE. Wong, BE278, UCSD Winter 2012! Bioengineering 278" Magnetic Resonance Imaging" " Winter 2011. Wong, BE278, UCSD Winter 2012! Equation of Motion for Magnetization Vector M! dM dt = M × B - Mx ^i

  6. Winter -Semester 2007 Speaker Department Date Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter - Semester 2007 Speaker Department Date Title Dr. Armin Peter Eawag, Fishecology & Evolution & Eawag, Fishecology & Evolution 19.12.07 Comparing nuclear and mitochondrial genetic signatures

  7. Be prepared. Learn how to drive in winter conditions. Winter weather challenges our

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    Be prepared. Learn how to drive in winter conditions. Winter weather challenges our driving skills in cold weather. Watch for"black ice", areas of the road with a thin, almost invisible coating of ice weather. Mother Nature's road test. Know before you go. ShiftIntoWinter.ca | DriveBC.ca This information

  8. WINTER

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0 0 1996-2013VoluntaryWINTERWINTER

  9. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic. Total PM2.5 agrees well with the measurements, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that duringmore »the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had undergone significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne lidar measurements. Model results show that the pollution event transported aerosols into the Arctic (> 66.6° N) for a 4-day period. During this 4-day period, biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~ 1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~ 4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface in anthropogenic plumes. The European plumes sampled during the POLARCAT-France campaign were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport event, the average modeled top-of-atmosphere (TOA) shortwave direct and semi-direct radiative effect (DSRE) north of 60° N over snow and ice-covered surfaces reaches +0.58 W m?2, peaking at +3.3 W m?2 at noon over Scandinavia and Finland.« less

  10. Network Modeling of Arctic Melt Ponds Meenakshi Barjatiaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    . In late spring and summer, the albedo of the ice pack is determined primarily by melt ponds that form­albedo feedback [7], and has played a significant role in the decline of the summer Arctic ice pack [8]. Sea ice precipitous losses of summer Arctic sea ice have outpaced the pro- jections of most climate models. Efforts

  11. Winter Term University of Oldenburg (Core Provider)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    Evaluation Modul Winter Term Titel Wind Energy Wind Energy I Wind Tutorial Wind Energy Systems Wind Energy Conversion (Lab) Excursion/Wind/DEWI Modul Winter Term Titel Solar Energy PV Systems I Solar Thermal I Solar Tutorial PV Cell Characteristics (Lab) Solar

  12. Bi23 BIOLOGY TUTORIALS WINTER TERM 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Bi23 BIOLOGY TUTORIALS WINTER TERM 2014 SECTIONS 1 ­ 3 The Function and Regulation of Sleep (3. Huang, x3446, MC 156-29 #12;Bi23 BIOLOGY TUTORIALS WINTER TERM 2014 SECTIONS 4-6 Physical Principles crystallography and neutron scattering; nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging; peptide and DNA

  13. WINTER TERM SEMINARS HELD ON MONDAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    WINTER TERM SEMINARS HELD ON MONDAYS @ 3:30 PM IN ALS4001 unless otherwise noted JANUARY 13 JUSTIN, Marine Genomics Unit "A first assembly of the Symbiodinium minutum nuclear genome reveals dinoflagellate Sciences "TBA" Integrative Biology (formerly the OSU Department of Zoology and OSU Biology Program) Winter

  14. THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers... "Sea ice is projected] - a phenomenon sometimes referred to as "Arctic amplification". As Arctic temperatures rise, sea ice melts for the 20th century. The rate at which the modeled 21st century Arctic warming and sea ice melting occurs

  15. Physics 214 General Information Winter 2013 Instructor: Howard Haber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 214 General Information Winter 2013 Instructor: Howard Haber Office: ISB, Room 326 Phone Tsang Modern Electrodynamics, by Andrew Zangwill #12;Physics 214 Electromagnetism II Winter 2013 COURSE

  16. 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 17 -Woodgate Global models in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    ;2 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E - Lecture 17 - Woodgate Deep waters of the Atlantic from http://sam://iodp.tamu.edu/publications/PR/303PR/images/Fig01.jpg Dickson et al, refs Denmark Strait ~ 650m deep Iceland Scotland Ridge ~ 400

  17. Physical and Chemical Implications of Mid-Winter Pumping of Trunda Lakes - North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Lilly, Michael R. (Geo-Watersheds Scientific); Kane, Douglas L. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Miller, D. Dan (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Galloway, Braden K. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Hilton, Kristie M. (Geo-Watersheds Scientific); White, Daniel M. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center)

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tundra lakes on the North Slope, Alaska, are an important resource for energy development and petroleum field operations. A majority of exploration activities, pipeline maintenance, and restoration activities take place on winter ice roads that depend on water availability at key times of the winter operating season. These same lakes provide important fisheries and ecosystem functions. In particular, overwintering habitat for fish is one important management concern. This study focused on the evaluation of winter water use in the current field operating areas to provide a better understanding of the current water use practices. It found that under the current water use practices, there were no measurable negative effects of winter pumping on the lakes studied and current water use management practices were appropriately conservative. The study did find many areas where improvements in the understanding of tundra lake hydrology and water usage would benefit industry, management agencies, and the protection of fisheries and ecosystems.

  18. International scientists on nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, T.F.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A report by the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU) leads new support to the warning of extreme climatic disruptions that would follow a nuclear war. The two-volume report does not deal explicitly with public policy questions, but focuses on scientific knowledge of physical effects and biological responses. The author reviews studies made since the warning of a nuclear winter began in 1982, and evaluates the new report. He finds the message of the report to be a clear warning that a major nuclear war would threaten the entire world. He hopes it will be a catalyst to world opinion in the same way that the public responded to the incident of radioactive fallout striking a Japanese fishing vessel in 1954.

  19. Discussion of Air-Conditioning Energy-Savings in Hot-Summer and Cold-Winter Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, W.; Gong, F.; Lou, X.; Cheng, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introducing several kinds of air-conditioning systems energy conservation measures, and according to the climate of the hot-summer and cold-winter region in China, this paper puts forward an overall conception for air-conditioning energy...

  20. The Impact of Global Warming on the Carbon Cycle of Arctic Permafrost: An Experimental and Field Based Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onstott, Tullis C [Princeton University; Pffifner, Susan M; Chourey, Karuna [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Our results to date indicate that CO2 and CH4 fluxes from organic poor, Arctic cryosols on Axel Heiberg Island are net CH4 sinks and CO2 emitters in contrast to organic-rich peat deposits at sub-Arctic latitudes. This is based upon field observations and a 1.5 year long thawing experiment performed upon one meter long intact cores. The results of the core thawing experiments are in good agreement with field measurements. Metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic analyses indicate that high affinity aerobic methanotrophs belong to the uncultivated USCalpha are present in <1% abundance in these cryosols are are active in the field during the summer and in the core thawing experiments. The methanotrophs are 100 times more abundant than the methanogens. As a result mineral cryosols, which comprise 87% of Arctic tundra, are net methane sinks. Their presence and activity may account for the discrepancies observed between the atmospheric methane concentrations observed in the Arctic predicted by climate models and the observed seasonal fluctuations and decadal trends. This has not been done yet.

  1. ANS 2006 WINTER MEETING & Nuclear Technology Expo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Axel W.

    Development Workshop: Digital Instrumentation Upgrades 52 DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program 53ANS 2006 WINTER MEETING & Nuclear Technology Expo "Ensuringthe (TOFE) 5th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Controls, and Human Machine

  2. Coming to grips with nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherr, S.J.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This editorial examines the politics related to the concept of nuclear winter which is a term used to describe temperature changes brought on by the injection of smoke into the atmosphere by the massive fires set off by nuclear explosions. The climate change alone could cause crop failures and lead to massive starvation. The author suggests that the prospect of a nuclear winter should be a deterrent to any nuclear exchange.

  3. Nuclear winter: Asymmetrical problems and unilateral solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reule, F.J.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear winter creates a dilemma for policymakers. Awareness of that dilemma may not be new, however. Long before the phrase nuclear winter became popular, policymakers may well have been aware of the possibility that the indirect effects of a nuclear exchange could be more damaging than the direct effects. Nevertheless, the more widespread public awareness of such a possibility deepens the dilemma and makes it more apparent. The policymakers' dilemma arises from their requirement to create a perception of security from any and all threats. To do this they must be able to credibly threaten to use nuclear weapons in order to deter their use by others. These threats can be tacit, arising from the very existence of nuclear delivery systems, or direct, as evidenced by the instances of missile rattling that have occurred over the years. In either case, such threats begin to ring hollow if the policymakers are known to believe that carrying them out could result in nuclear winter. If policymakers keep secret their personal beliefs about nuclear winter they can still credibly threaten to use nuclear weapons but they have difficulty believing their own threats. Further, they cannot capitalize on the deterrent value of nuclear winter and must live in fear that their bluff may some day be called or that any of the other nuclear powers could cause a nuclear winter out of ignorance.

  4. Some policy implications of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertler, J.J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of nuclear winter has had as checkered a history as any new idea since Darwin published The Origin of Species. There have been questions of its scientific validity, reviews both laudatory and damning, pleas for arms reductions, hosannahs for a newfound hope that nuclear war has at least been rendered completely unthinkable, and frustration that two generations of human toil in weapons laboratories and think tanks have been rendered by a natural doomsday machine. Some have even suggested that nuclear winter might be used as an offensive weapon. Disturbingly, a substantial number of commentators have concluded that nuclear winter carries no immediate implications for policy, because to their way of thinking, nuclear winter is a (a) just one more of the many undesirable effects of nuclear war; (b) the ulimate deterrent to nuclear use, and therefore should be welcomed rather than compensated for; or (c) an unproven theory, meaning that consideration of policy questions is premature. Those who overlook the policy questions are following a dangerous path. The nuclear winter theory contains serious short- and long-term implications for United States foreign and strategic policy. Although the theory may never be confirmed or refuted, discussion of these policy questions should begin now because many of the potential effects of nuclear winter - particularly in foreign policy - will come about regardless of whether or not the phenomenon can actually exist.

  5. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    energy deployment in the Arctic Region. The purpose of this round is to give feedback on the elements of the draft plan. DOE encourages stakeholders to provide comments on...

  6. Arctic Ecologies: The Politics and Poetics of Northern Literary Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athens, Allison Katherine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which lives mainly on pack ice and is a powerful swimmerfor this change: “Arctic pack ice has formed progressivelychanges have resulted in pack ice that is a less stable

  7. National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks February 19, 2015 9:30AM to 10:30AM AKST Fairbanks, Alaska BLM...

  8. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre...

  9. arctic ocean ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 320 The Thinning of Arctic Sea Ice, 19882003: Have...

  10. arctic cloud experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    low-level Arctic clouds in cold seasons and have a significant impact on the surface energy budget. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models...

  11. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Dutch HarborUnalaska February 27, 2015 10:00AM to 12:00PM EST Unalaska, Alaska Unalaska Public Library 64 Eleanor Dr. Unalaska, AK 99685...

  12. arctic ocean freshwater: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

  13. The Genetic Prehistory of the New World Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Maanasa; DeGiorgio, Michael; Albrechtsen, Anders; Moltke, Ida; Skoglund, Pontus; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S.; Grønnow, Bjarne; Appelt, Martin; Gulløv, Hans Christian; Friesen, T. Max; Fitzhugh, William; Malmström, Helena; Rasmussen, Simon; Olsen, Jesper; Melchior, Linea; Fuller, Benjamin T.; Fahrni, Simon M.; Stafford, Thomas Jr; Grimes, Vaughan; Renouf, M. A. Priscilla; Cybulski, Jerome; Lynnerup, Niels; Lahr, Marta Mirazon; Britton, Kate; Knecht, Rick; Arneborg, Jette; Metspalu, Mait; Cornejo, Omar E.; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Wang, Yong; Rasmussen, Morten; Raghavan, Vibha; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Pierre, Tracey; Dneprovsky, Kirill; Andreasen, Claus; Lange, Hans; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Coltrain, Joan; Spitsyn, Victor A.; Götherström, Anders; Orlando, Ludovic; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Crawford, Michael H.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Dissing, Jørgen; Heinemeier, Jan; Meldgaard, Morten; Bustamante, Carlos; O’Rourke, Dennis H.; Jakobsson, Matthias; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    archaeological phases within a culture are separated by a white line. Dark reddish-brown towards the top of the figure indicates historical times. Cultural contexts from which samples included in this study arise are highlighted in yellow. B) A two... -Eskimo beginnings in North America: a new discovery at Kuzitrin Lake, Alaska. Etudes Inuit 22, 61-81 (1998). 2. H. B. Collins, in Prehistoric cultural relations between the arctic and temperate zones of North America, J. M. Campbell, Ed. (Arctic Institute...

  14. Nuclear winter: the implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally believed possible for some range of heavy nuclear attacks directed against cities that significant but not lethal climate alteration will ensue for at least a few weeks. Three-dimensional global circulation models being developed and used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the National Center for Atmospheric Research for a reasonable attack size seem to be converging on a temperature depression of the order of 10 to 15/degree/C, averaged over all land areas of the temperate region of the northern hemisphere. Temperature depressions as large as 25/degree/C are predicted in the interiors of continents for attacks in the summertime. Winter wars produce temperature depressions of only a few degrees. The authors have drawn the following implications for civil defense of the possibility of nuclear winter: (1) Neither cold nor drought is likely to be a direct threat to human survival. (2) The principal threat of nuclear winter is to agriculture. (3) Nuclear winter does not present an entirely new threat from nuclear war to the United States or the Soviet Union. (4) The consequences of nuclear winter would fall more heavily on the Soviet Union.

  15. Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Abstract:...

  16. A Climatology of the Arctic on Mid-Tropospheric Temperature Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony, Jeremy Patrick

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic is a unique and complex environment. Many factors play a role in determining the long-term climate of the Arctic, including mesoscale weather systems and many complex ice-albedo feedback mechanisms. Previous studies determined using real...

  17. Small Thaw Ponds: An Unaccounted Source of Methane in the Canadian High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    other Archaea in high Arctic peat. ISME J 2: 37–48. 38. Højmethanogenic pathways in a peat from subarctic permafrost.Canadian Arctic tundra leads to peat erosion and slumping in

  18. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices of the following: US Geological Survey Arctic operating orders, 1979; Det Noske Vertas', rules for the design, construction and inspection of offshore technology, 1977; Alaska Oil and Gas Association, industry research projects, March 1980; Arctic Petroleum Operator's Association, industry research projects, January 1980; selected additional Arctic offshore bibliography on sea ice, icebreakers, Arctic seafloor conditions, ice-structures, frost heave and structure icing.

  19. Impacts of Climate Change on Human Access and Resource Development in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephenson, Scott Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    September 22). Reuters. 56. Budzik, P. (2009). Arctic oilin Alaska, and one in Norway (Budzik, 2009). These fields

  20. Nuclear winter: the continuing debate. Student essay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nida, A.V.

    1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This essay examines the debate over the climatic consequences of global nuclear war as related in the so-called Nuclear Winter hypothesis. This review examines the major components of the theory and traces development of the scientific knowledge leading to a second phase of the controversy two years after the first hypothesis. The conclusions of the essay are that the original nuclear winter findings have been altered by later scientific study and, therefore, the political conclusions drawn by Carl Sagan in 1983 can no longer be supported by theory or facts. Continued use of the Crutzen-Birks (Ambio, 1982) and TTAPS (Science, December 1983) studies worst-case evidence from NCAR (Foreign Affairs, Summer 86) represents selective science. Arguing for strategic policy changes based on nuclear winter risks constitutes anti-nuclear rhetoric and not scientific reasoning.

  1. arctic tundra soils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    potential climatic change. High latitudes are characterized by large annual changes in solar input. Albedo decreases strongly from winter, when the surface is snow-covered, to...

  2. arctic permafrost soil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Warming Causes Surface Permafrost Degradation Natali et al. 2010, Global Change Biology Winter warming Symposium February, 2013 12;Global Vegetation C 650 Pg...

  3. Nuclear winter: The evidence and the risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, O.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global concern over nuclear extinction, centered on the holocaust itself, now has turned to the more terrifying consequences of a post-war nuclear winter: ''the long-term effects - destruction of the environment, spread of epidemic diseases, contamination by radioactivity, and ... collapse of agriculture-(that) would spread famine and death to every country.'' Nuclear Winter, the latest in a series of studies by a number of different groups is clinical, analytical, systematic, and detailed. Two physicists and biologist analyze the effects on the climate, plants, animals, and living systems; the human costs; the policy implications.

  4. Arctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec-edented low extents in the summer of 2007,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    Arctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec- edented low extents in the summer of 2007, raising concern that the Arctic may be on the verge of a fundamental transition toward a seasonal ice cover. Arctic sea ice extent typically attains a seasonal maximum in March and minimum in September. Over

  5. Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo H. Eicken,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo H. Eicken,1 T. C. Grenfell,2 D. K. Perovich,3 J. Perovich, J. A. Richter-Menge, and K. Frey (2004), Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo, J that feedback processes involving the input of solar energy and subsequent changes in Arctic pack-ice albedo

  6. September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 warming above present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 C global warming above present Irina; published 24 March 2012. [1] The decline of Arctic sea ice is one of the most visible signs of climate change over the past several decades. Arctic sea ice area shows large interannual variability due

  7. Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations P. Rampal,1,2 J the Arctic sea ice velocity field as the superposition of a mean field and fluctuations. We study how subtracting the mean field, are analyzed in terms of diffusion properties. Although the Arctic sea ice cover

  8. Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field campaign in Barrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field on snow albedo and arctic atmospheric chemistry. During the OASIS field campaign, in March and April 2009), Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field campaign in Barrow

  9. This Page Intentionally Left Blank Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lincoln #12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;#12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic iv#12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic Contents v CONTENTS

  10. Surface salinity fields in the Arctic Ocean and statistical approaches to predicting anomalies and patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    to changing environmental conditions. Its surface layer is a key component of the Arctic climate system, which. In this context, the Arctic Ocean surface layer is a critical indicator of climate change in the Arctic [Zaharov. Petersburg, Russia. Ivan Sudakov, Department of Mathematics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

  11. Distant origins of Arctic black carbon: A Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [Wallace and Thompson, 2002]. The Arctic climate is especially sensitive to changes in the hydrological005296. 1. Introduction [2] The Arctic is a particularly sensitive region to global climate change. Observations and models indicate that as the climate warms, the Arctic warms most and fastest [e.g., Manabe et

  12. NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu National Center of the net sea ice production and the sea ice exchanges between the Arctic and its adjacent seas are studied) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning ice cover

  13. NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study Aixue The variability of net sea ice production and sea ice exchange between the Arctic and its adjacent seas export) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning

  14. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

  15. Proc. 23rd Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2007) 000000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 23rd Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2007) 000­000 23rd Winter Workshop on Nuclear collisions, where such nuclear effects should not be present. The RHIC experiments have also explored Au

  16. Proc. 20th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2003) 000000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 20th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2003) 000­000 20th Winter Workshop on Nuclear 60439-4843, USA 2 Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000, USA 3 Institute of Nuclear

  17. Proc. 17th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2001) 000000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 17th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2001) 000­000 17th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Strasbourg, France 4 Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow, Poland 5 Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland 6

  18. An indoor public space for a winter city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crane, Justin Fuller

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Winter is a marginalized season in North American design. Even though most cities in the northern United States and Canada have winter conditions-snowfall, ice, freezing temperatures, and long nights-for substantial portions ...

  19. Physics 5B General Information Winter 2009 Instructor: Howard Haber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 5B General Information Winter 2009 Instructor: Howard Haber O#ce: ISB, Room 326 Phone to Physics II Winter 2009 Brief Course Outline for Physics 5B Topic Reading 1. Fluids Giancoli, Chapter 13 2

  20. Manure Storage Winter Capacity Planning Level Guidance January 1, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    1 Manure Storage Winter Capacity Planning Level Guidance January 1, 2013 The guidance outlined in this document is to be used to determine the Manure Storage Winter Capacity Planning Level for CAFO operations must be documented in the NMP Standard Format. For determining the manure storage winter capacity

  1. ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996 DOE FRAP 1996-03 Prepared-96.............................................. 22 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Bridge Creek basin livestock wintering area back assessment, 1996 quality in the Bridge Creek basin are assessed. These sites had been inspected in the winter and spring

  2. E. Wong, BE278, UCSD Winter 2013! Bioengineering 278"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    E. Wong, BE278, UCSD Winter 2013! Bioengineering 278" Magnetic Resonance Imaging" " Winter 2013" Lecture 1! Topics:! ·Hardware Overview! ·Nuclear magnetization! ·Spin excitation! ·The NMR signal! ·The Fourier Transform! E. Wong, BE278, UCSD Winter 2013! Hardware Overview! Three fields:! ·Main Field (B0

  3. Winter Session 2008 Calendar January 2 25, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    Winter Session 2008 Calendar January 2 ­ 25, 2008 November 1 Registration begins November 22 - 23 Campus closed for Thanksgiving Holiday December 24 ­ January 1Campus closed for winter break January 2 First day of winter session Last day to drop for a 100% tuition refund* January 3 Last day to drop

  4. NEW INTERNSHIP FOR WINTER Interactive Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmers, Chris

    NEW INTERNSHIP FOR WINTER Interactive Ecology UC Santa Cruz Arboretum Internship Agency Sponsor: Brett Hall, Director of Collections and Conservation Interactive Ecology interns will work primarily, back pack tracker, GPS, google earth, etc). The Interactive Ecology internship will also explore, more

  5. Bluetooth Vulnerabilities ECE 478 Winter 05

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluetooth Vulnerabilities ECE 478 Winter 05 Victor Yee #12;Topics · What is Bluetooth? · History ­ Automobiles #12;What is Bluetooth? · Short-range (10m-100m) wireless specification · Operating at 2.4GHz radio 2Mb/s #12;History · Named from Danish King Harold Bluetooth from the 10th century ­ instrumental

  6. Winter Course 2015 Perspectives in Community Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    to the medical care system, and the role of public health in "health care reform". Mode of grading: LetterWinter Course 2015 Perspectives in Community Health SSPPHH 110011 ­­ 33 UUnniittss,, CCRRNN MMeeddiicciinnee Public Health 101 is an in-depth introductory course for students interested in understanding

  7. WINTER, 19a9 Academic quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    - I WINTER, 19a9 Academic quality and accreditation: A case of good news and bad news? liThe good.ICATION OF THE ACADEMIC SENATE, CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FUL.LERTON #12;2 · Senate Forum #12 accreditation. On the following pages are articles of how one de- partment was seen by others to be holding its

  8. Exam 1 EE531 Winter 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    . Please limit active time working on the exam to 10 hours. 1. Consider a thick Si sample doped with NaExam 1 ­ EE531 Winter 2014 The test is a take home exam due at beginning of class on Tuesday Feb and light hole bands. Consider a thin Si membrane just 5 nm thick. (a) Calculate the change in the ni 2 due

  9. WINTER PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PERMEABLE PAVEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WINTER PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PERMEABLE PAVEMENTS A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF POROUS ASPHALT, PERVIOUS CONCRETE, AND CONVENTIONAL ASPHALT IN A NORTHERN CLIMATE BY KRISTOPHER M. HOULE BS, Worcester the University of New Hampshire, the Northern New England Concrete Promotion Association (NNECPA), the Northeast

  10. Semester Project Winter 2005-2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partovi Nia, Vahid

    to illustrate the theory. 2 #12;Chapter 2 Survival models 2.1 A trivial exponential model In order to analyseSemester Project Winter 2005-2006 Survival and censored data Lefteris Samartzis Professor : A.C. Davison Assistant : Vahid Partovi Nia #12;Contents 1 Introduction 2 2 Survival models 3 2.1 A trivial

  11. CIS260: Computer Graphics Winter 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Alex

    CIS260: Computer Graphics Winter 1997 Proposals: due February 18, 1997 Draft: due March 3, 1997 Presentation: March 10 ­ March 14, 1997 Demo: 8am ­ 11am, March 18, 1997 FINAL PROJECT You get to select your ­ on or before February 18, 1997 Give me at least 3 topics that you would like to work on for your final project

  12. Chem 249 Problem Set 4 Winter 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chem 249 Problem Set 4 R. Corn Winter 2014 Basic Quantum Theory and Energy Levels in Spectroscopy). #12;2. Consider the NMR spectrum of a deuterium atom, which has a nuclear spin I of 1. a, the component of the nuclear spin in the direction of the magnetic field. Draw an energy level diagram

  13. Overview of climatic effects of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.M.; Malone, R.C.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general description of the climatic effects of a nuclear war are presented. This paper offers a short history of the subject, a discussion of relevant parameters and physical processes, and a description of plausible nuclear winter scenario. 9 refs. (ACR)

  14. Fine-scale Horizontal Structure of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rambukkange,M.; Verlinde, J.; Elorante, E.; Luke, E.; Kollias, P.; Shupe, M.

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent in situ observations in stratiform clouds suggest that mixed phase regimes, here defined as limited cloud volumes containing both liquid and solid water, are constrained to narrow layers (order 100 m) separating all-liquid and fully glaciated volumes (Hallett and Viddaurre, 2005). The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (DOE-ARM, Ackerman and Stokes, 2003) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) recently started collecting routine measurement of radar Doppler velocity power spectra from the Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR). Shupe et al. (2004) showed that Doppler spectra has potential to separate the contributions to the total reflectivity of the liquid and solid water in the radar volume, and thus to investigate further Hallett and Viddaurre's findings. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) was conducted along the NSA to investigate the properties of Arctic mixed phase clouds (Verlinde et al., 2006). We present surface based remote sensing data from MPACE to discuss the fine-scale structure of the mixed-phase clouds observed during this experiment.

  15. Nuclear Winter: Implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to the cooling hypothesized to occur in the Northern Hemisphere following a nuclear war as the result of the injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the paper was published in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. Three-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling---15 to 25/degree/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought is likely to be a direct threat to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures. The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and this could present problems to third parties who are without food reserves. Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor an unexpected threat from nuclear war to the United States and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the United States due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year.

  16. Nuclear Winter: The implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to hypothesized cooling in the northern hemisphere following a nuclear war due to injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the original paper in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. The widespread use of 3-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling; 15 to 25/sup 0/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought are likely to be direct threats to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures; The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and could present problems to third parties without food reserves; and Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor unexpected threat from nuclear war to the US and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the US due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year. 6 refs.

  17. RGPS/Model Ice Deformation July 3, 2003 1 Sea Ice Deformation Rates From Satellite Measurements and in a Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    of the Arctic geophysical environment. The deformation rate of pack ice, determined from the spatial gradientsRGPS/Model Ice Deformation July 3, 2003 1 Sea Ice Deformation Rates From Satellite Measurements The deformation of sea ice is an important element of the Arctic climate system because of its influence

  18. On the Strengthened Relationship between the East Asian Winter Monsoon and Arctic Oscillation: A Comparison of 195070 and 19832012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China, and Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center by the near- surface heating over the Barents­Kara (B­K) Seas caused by the reduction of ASIC. This further District, Beijing 100029, China. E-mail: lifei-715@163.com 1 JULY 2014 L I E T A L . 5075 DOI: 10.1175/JCLI

  19. Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuefer, Svetlana

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

  20. Radioactive contamination of the Arctic Region, Baltic Sea, and the Sea of Japan from activities in the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of the Arctic regions of northern Europe and Russia, as well as the Sea of Japan, may become a potential major hazard to the ecosystem of these large areas. Widespread poor radioactive waste management practices from nuclear fuel cycle activities in the former Soviet Union have resulted in direct discharges to this area as well as multiple sources that may continue to release additional radioactivity. Information on the discharges of radioactive materials has become more commonplace in the last year, and a clearer picture is emerging of the scale of the contamination. Radioactivity in the Arctic oceans is now reported to be four times higher than would be derived from fallout from weapons tests. Although the characteristics and extent of the contamination are not well known, it has been stated that the contamination in the Arctic may range from 1 to 3.5 billion curies. As yet, no scientific sampling or measurement program has occurred that can verify the amount or extent of the contamination, or its potential impact on the ecosystem.

  1. Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories,Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie') and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katie's dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpson's Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

  2. arctic energy technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arctic energy technology First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Energy distribution in an...

  3. arctic van test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arctic van test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Action Refinement in Testing with uioco...

  4. UnderSea Solutions, Inc. Arctic AUV Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    the conceptual design and analysis of an AUV, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, for Arctic under-ice water sampling Electrical Design: ? Power Consumption ? Battery Requirements & Selection ? Thrust Motor Requirements for nose cone Lift points Hull Form The hydrodynamic form of the AUV determines the propulsion energy

  5. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments ­ NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report December 31, 2011 A progress Dynamics Model Used to Design Permafrost Simulator 2 Details at a Glance 3 Progress and Accomplishments 3 sample in a sleeve of highly conductive copper foil (shown in red) and then cooling coils placed

  6. Arctic EnginEEring College of Engineering and Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    Arctic EnginEEring College of Engineering and Mines Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Management. See Environmental Engineering and Environmental Quality Science. See Science Engineering 907-474-7241 http://cem.uaf.edu/cee/ MS Degree Minimum Requirements for Degree: 30 credits

  7. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  8. Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley Climate System Research Center University of Massachusetts Amherst #12;How have global temperatures changed & why? 1. Average instrumental records from around the world; express all as anomalies from 1961-90 average #12;#12;Overall trend is upward ("global

  9. arctic food web: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arctic food web First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an...

  10. 9.7 Studies of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds from SHEBA/FIRE/ACE: May 1-10 Case Study , J. Intrieri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    the measured surface infrared flux, especially during the winter months (Intrieri and Shupe, 2002). Other to characterize. Measurements from surface-based remote sensors hold the promise of com- prehensive documentation measurements encourage confidence in the surface sen- sor evaluation. 2. Data and Method 2.1 Data Table 1 and 2

  11. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  12. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  13. Quality Assurance Exchange Winter 2010 Volume 6 Issue 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange Winter 2010 Volume 6 Issue 1 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Quality Assurance Policy and Assistance

  14. aythya marila wintering: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and financial Accounting I (ACCT 531) Winter Quarter 2013 Instructor: John V. Merle, MBA Angel Website: https and promotion of justice, the Department of Accounting of the Albers...

  15. annual winter legumes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and financial Accounting I (ACCT 531) Winter Quarter 2013 Instructor: John V. Merle, MBA Angel Website: https and promotion of justice, the Department of Accounting of the Albers...

  16. aspen winter conference: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and financial Accounting I (ACCT 531) Winter Quarter 2013 Instructor: John V. Merle, MBA Angel Website: https and promotion of justice, the Department of Accounting of the Albers...

  17. aumayr hannspeter winter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and financial Accounting I (ACCT 531) Winter Quarter 2013 Instructor: John V. Merle, MBA Angel Website: https and promotion of justice, the Department of Accounting of the Albers...

  18. Relationship between juvenile steelhead survival and winter habitat availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric; Kayed, Sammy; Post, Charles

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ugedal. 2007. Shelter availability affects behaviour, size-and winter habitat availability Eric Huber, Sammy Kayed, andThe establishment and availability of interstitial spaces

  19. Political and military implications of the ''nuclear winter'' theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soviet and U.S. views of the nuclear winter theory and the theory's significance for alliance relationships and military policy are discussed in this book.

  20. Extinction cascade: Biological consequence of nuclear war/winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, G.L.; Pimm, S.; Fields, D.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In very general terms, this report describes the effects on biological organisms of a nuclear war and the projected nuclear winter that would follow. (TEM)

  1. Math 503 Galois Theory Winter 2013 Instructor Amites Sarkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Amites

    Math 503 Galois Theory Winter 2013 Instructor Amites Sarkar Text Elements of Algebra John Stillwell-mail is amites.sarkar@wwu.edu #12;

  2. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  3. arctic animals-a review: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

  4. arctic-breeding glaucous gulls: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stress. Norwegian Polar Institute, Polar Environmental Centre, NO-9296 Troms, Norway. Tel.: 47 7775 0500; fax: 47 Bech, Claus 8 ARCTIC Sabines Gull (Xema...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fox pups Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Mortality of arctic ... Source: Hayssen, Virginia - Department of Biological Sciences, Smith College Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Leashing the AlphaWolves:...

  6. Radiocarbon Content of CO 2 Respired from High Arctic Tundra in Northwest Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czimczik, Claudia I; Welker, Jeffrey M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. E. , 2002: Survey of Greenland instrumental temperaturetypes in northwestern Greenland. Arctic, Antarctic, andfen ecosystem in NE-Greenland. Theoretical and Applied

  7. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

  8. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - Winter SCM IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- PolarizationgovCampaignsSummer Single ColumngovCampaignsWatergovCampaignsWinter SCM

  10. Steven Winters Associates Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,SoutheastSt.Steep Gradient FlumeEnergyStettin,Winters Associates

  11. Oceanic periglacial in the evolution of the Arctic marine ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matishov, G.G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Murmansk (Russian Federation). Murmansk Marine Biological Inst.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the Arctic marine and land environment and biota is connected with the analysis of the global climatic changes and the general history of Arctic and subarctic ecological systems. Ancient glaciation not only influenced the geomorphology of landscapes, physical and chemical properties of the ocean and its seas, but also caused the global change of the morphoclimatic zonality in the ocean as a whole. Submarine and subaqual hydrological, geomorphological and biological processes on the shelves of polar and temperate latitudes had intensified especially during the melting of continental glaciers. The study of the periglacial problem consists, as a whole, in the research of the geological and biological phenomena which take place in the pelagial and the benthal outside the ice sheets and are connected with them by causal, spatial and temporal relations.

  12. Measurement Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Catch Composition - Pelagic codes M Male F Female I Indeterminate U Unknown (not inspected) #12;Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Photos Comment Length 1 Version 1.2 6/2011 HookNo. Species name

  13. Post-Project Appraisal for the Winter Creek Restoration Redwood Grove, UC Botanical Gardens at Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiala, Shannon; Janes, Kelly; Sousa, Ricardo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in this reach of Winter Creek? 3. How did construction4. Pre-restoration. Winter Creek, looking upstream. 2005.5. Pre-restoration. Winter Creek, looking downstream. 2005.

  14. Northern winter climate change: Assessment of uncertainty in CMIP5 projections related

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    Northern winter climate change: Assessment of uncertainty in CMIP5 projections related circulation could have an important impact on northern winter tropospheric climate change, given that sea coherent variations in troposphere-stratosphere circulation. Here we assess northern winter stratospheric

  15. Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    multiple speakers, presenters listed on link below

    2011-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Particle Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 12 to February 18, 2011. Ninety-four participants from ten countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, ?New Data From the Energy Frontier.? There were 54 formal talks, and a considerable number of informal discussions held during the week. The week?s events included a public lecture (?The Hunt for the Elusive Higgs Boson? given by Ben Kilminster from Ohio State University) and attended by 119 members of the public, and a physics caf? geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists. The 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Astroparticle physics held at the Aspen Center for Physics was ?Indirect and Direct Detection of Dark Matter.? It was held from February 6 to February 12, 2011. The 70 participants came from 7 countries and attended 53 talks over five days. Late mornings through the afternoon are reserved for informal discussions. In feedback received from participants, it is often these unplanned chats that produce the most excitement due to working through problems with fellow physicists from other institutions and countries or due to incipient collaborations. In addition, Blas Cabrera of Stanford University gave a public lecture titled ?What Makes Up Dark Matter.? There were 183 members of the general public in attendance. Before the lecture, 45 people attended the physics caf? to discuss dark matter. This report provides the attendee lists, programs, and announcement posters for each event.

  16. Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

  17. Agricultural & Biological Engineering Alumni Newsletter. Winter 2009 ABE@Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    Agricultural & Biological Engineering Alumni Newsletter. Winter 2009 ABE@Illinois WINTER2009 Triple Crown for Illinois's Agricultural and Biological Engineering Program The Agricultural and Biological of Agricultural and Biological Engineering held its first annual "Celebrate ABE@Illinois" on September 5th and 6th

  18. LIGHTING UP 24 ENGI NEER I NG & SCIENCE WINTER 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIGHTING UP 24 ENGI NEER I NG & SCIENCE WINTER 2013 #12;THE DARK AGESby Marcus Y. Woo After about nuclear fusion, thus Over the course of another couple of hundred million years, more and with high any photon that might have tried to illuminate the infant universe. 25WINTER 2013 ENGI NEER I NG

  19. Proc. 19th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2003) 000000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 19th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2003) 000­000 19th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics Breckenridge, Colorado, USA February 8­15, 2003 Nuclear Astrophysics in Rare Isotope Facilities C Abstract. I discuss a few of the recent developments in nuclear reactions at very low energies

  20. Proc. 21st Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2005) 000000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Robert

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 21st Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2005) 000­000 21st Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics Breckenridge, Colorado, USA February 5­12, 2005 From the NN Interaction to Nuclear Structure present a novel approach for the treatment of realistic nucleon- nucleon interactions in nuclear many

  1. Proc. 20th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2003) 000000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 20th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2003) 000­000 20th Winter Workshop on Nuclear in the nuclear modification factor RdAu is seen as the pseudorapidity of the detected charged hadrons changes that included quantum evolution to describe how the nuclear modification factor would be mod- ified

  2. Rachel Struglia Patricia L. Winter Andrea Meyer United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Rachel Struglia Patricia L. Winter Andrea Meyer United States Department of Agriculture Forest; Winter, Patricia L.; Meyer, Andrea. 2003. Southern California socioeconomic assessment: Sociodemographic Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507-6099, e-mail: pwinter@fs.fed.us. Andrea Meyer was, at the time

  3. STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER Winter 1999, Vol. 29, No. 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER Winter 1999, Vol. 29, No. 3 #12;The Beam Line is published GEORGE TRILLING, KARL VAN BIBBER HERMAN WINICK Illustrations TERRY ANDERSON Distribution CRYSTAL TILGHMAN A PERIODICAL OF PARTICLE PHYSICS WINTER 1999 VOL. 29, NUMBER 3 Printed on recycled paper FEATURES 2 GOLDEN

  4. PACIFIC VENTILATION OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN'S LOWER HALOCLINE BY UPWELLING AND DIAPYCNAL MIXING OVER THE CONTINENTAL MARGIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    PACIFIC VENTILATION OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN'S LOWER HALOCLINE BY UPWELLING AND DIAPYCNAL MIXING OVER of nutrients and buoyancy to the Arctic Ocean, are thought to ventilate the Arctic's lower halocline either waters upwelled onto the shelf. Although ventilation at salinity (S) > 34 psu has previously been

  5. IGS 2000: RGPS Albedo June 15, 2001 1 Arctic sea ice albedo derived from RGPS-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    of Arctic pack ice ia a highly significant factor for establishing the energy balance of the ice. The netIGS 2000: RGPS Albedo June 15, 2001 1 Arctic sea ice albedo derived from RGPS-based ice thickness Geophysical Processor System (RGPS) uses sequential synthetic aperture radar images of Arctic sea ice taken

  6. Arctic ice export events and their potential impact on global climate during the late Pleistocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, Dennis

    Arctic ice export events and their potential impact on global climate during the late Pleistocene export events are identified from the Laurentide and the Innuitian ice sheets, between 14 and 34 ka, the Arctic export events appear to occur prior to Heinrich events. INDEX TERMS: 4207 Oceanography: General

  7. On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Paquita Zuidema, Paul Lawson, Hugh Morrison U of Miami/SPEC, Inc. Boulder CO/NCAR #12;Arctic clouds are often: mixed-phase (ie. both ice + supercooled water) yet long-lasting (despite disequilibrium) #12;why? - are ice nuclei over

  8. Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4BE647 #12;Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery J. F. Scinocca,1. [1] We investigate the sensitivity of Northern Hemisphere polar ozone recovery to a scenario in which

  9. Revised 1/11/05 BOWHEAD WHALE (Balaena mysticetus): Western Arctic Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the mobile polar pack ice. There is evidence of whales following each other, even when their route does+++++ +++++++ + +++++++++ Ice Front Revised 1/11/05 BOWHEAD WHALE (Balaena mysticetus): Western in seasonally ice-covered waters of the Arctic and near-Arctic, generally north of 60(N and south of 75(N

  10. Variability of sea ice cover in the Chukchi Sea (western Arctic Ocean) during the Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, Dennis

    of the Arctic Ocean during the last decades suggest a decrease in areal extent and thickness of its pack ice [e be tentatively attributed to global warming and raises concerns about the stability and fate of the pack ice of Arctic pack ice, which cannot be fully assessed from short-term instrumental observations alone

  11. Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    but occurs over a much broader area of the ice pack. Citation: Steele, M., J. Zhang, and W. Ermold (2010Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt Michael Steele,1 summertime upper ocean warming and sea ice melt during the 21st century in the Arctic Ocean. Our first

  12. Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    of radiometers at an ice station frozen into the drifting ice pack of the Arctic Ocean. The NASA/FIRE Arctic- dependent water contents and hydrometeor sizes for all-ice and all-liquid clouds. For the spring and early summer period, all-ice cloud retrievals showed a mean particle diameter of about 60 m and ice water

  13. Future abrupt reductions in the summer Arctic sea ice Marika M. Holland,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    years with considerable thinning of the ice pack [Rothrock et al., 1999; Wadhams and Davis, 2000Future abrupt reductions in the summer Arctic sea ice Marika M. Holland,1 Cecilia M. Bitz,2 12 December 2006. [1] We examine the trajectory of Arctic summer sea ice in seven projections from

  14. Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worster, M. Grae

    Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice Dirk Notz,1,4 Miles G. McPhee,2 M. Grae the simultaneous growth and ablation of a layer of ice between an under-ice melt pond and the underlying ocean. Such ``false bottoms'' are the only significant source of ice formation in the Arctic during summer. Analytical

  15. Conservative behavior of uranium vs. salinity in Arctic sea ice and brine Christelle Not a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Available online 23 December 2011 Keywords: Uranium Salinity Sea ice Brine Seawater Arctic UraniumConservative behavior of uranium vs. salinity in Arctic sea ice and brine Christelle Not a, ,1 disequilibrium The conservative behavior of uranium (U) with respect to salinity in open ocean waters is widely

  16. Be production-rate calibration for the Arctic NICOLA S E. YOUNG,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    A 10 Be production-rate calibration for the Arctic NICOLA´ S E. YOUNG,1,2 * JOERG M. SCHAEFER,1 2013; Accepted 18 April 2013 ABSTRACT: We present a Baffin Bay 10 Be production-rate calibration published 10 Be calibration datasets to develop an Arctic 10 Be production rate. Our calibration comprises

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic ice-covered lake Jessica-cover extent and dynamics on this perennially ice-covered, High Arctic lake. These pellets are interpreted growth. The pellets remain frozen in the ice until a summer or series of summers with reduced ice cover

  18. REGULAR ARTICLE Soil nitrogen cycling rates in low arctic shrub tundra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    of the soil microbial community in both ecosystems indicat- ed similar fungal dominance (epifluorescence landscape. Keywords 15 Nitrogen . Gross N mineralization . Arctic tundra . Litter. Soil microbial community). For example, remote sensing studies have characterized an increase in peak-season biomass across the Arctic

  19. JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS surface. In 1997-1998, a large multi-agency effort made the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA with the ice pack in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas for one year. Surface-based remote sensors generated

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    years due to climate change. The Arctic is one of the last and most extensive ocean wilderness areas climate change pressures, is considerable. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAOORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines for neglected

  1. The Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    Carbon sequestration Biological pump a b s t r a c t We present observation based estimatesThe Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n , A.C. Naveira Garabato a , T. Tsubouchi b , S January 2014 Keywords: Arctic Ocean Dissolved inorganic carbon Carbon budget Air­sea carbon dioxide flux

  2. Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155159 (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155­159 (2013 productive offshore waters of Argentinian Patagonia. We then explore possible reasons for this behavior-ANDEAN PASSAGE OF MIGRATING ARCTIC TERNS OVER PATAGONIA DAVID CAMERON DUFFY1 , ALY MCKNIGHT2 & DAVID B. IRONS2 1

  3. Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohling, Eelco

    Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current K. A. Cox,1 J. D cycle, Arctic sea ice decline, and increasing Greenland glacial melt. Here we use new d18 O data from the East Greenland Current system at Cape Farewell and Denmark Strait to determine the relative proportions

  4. Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

  5. Climate warming will be particularly intense over the Arctic and several observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Kimberly

    -rein- forced research ship Mirai. The icebreaker Oden supports Sweden's program. Even China is now deploying appointed by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Hu Canada Closing Arctic Ozone Observatory 6 Exploring for Gas Hydrate in the Arctic 9 Book Review: Writing

  6. Moisture budget of the Arctic atmosphere from TOVS satellite data David G. Groves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jennifer

    and radiative heating of the atmosphere. These, in turn, affect surface temperature, ice growth and melt and hemispheric atmospheric processes affect the Arctic Ocean. The lack of humidity data over the Arctic Ocean. Our method yields an average annual net precipitation of 15.1 cm yrÀ1 over the polar cap (poleward

  7. Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Laurence C.

    Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series Laurence C. Smith,1 of melt onset can be observed over small ice caps, as well as the major ice sheets and multi-year sea ice for 14 small Arctic ice caps from 1992­2000. Interannual and regional variability in the timing of melt

  8. The Arctic Oscillation, climate change and the effects on precipitation in Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    in the Mediterranean basin. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Climate change Arctic Oscillation) investigated the effect of climate change on water resources of Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East regionThe Arctic Oscillation, climate change and the effects on precipitation in Israel Amir Givati b

  9. U.S. Arctic Research Policy: What do we need to know now?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    ;11 September 2007 Arctic ice retreat ­ minimum coverage and thickness #12;Carbon dioxide climbs #12;Methane: mitigation, adaptation, Arctic feedbacks, alternative energy, sequestration, Black Carbon Task Force · Involve indigenous communities in decisions · Enhance scientific monitoring and research into local

  10. An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David. Understanding the Arctic Ocean energy balance is important because it can strengthen our understanding for Atmosphere-Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NYU, 200 Water

  11. Aerosol Effects on Cloud Emissivity and Surface Longwave Heating in the Arctic TIMOTHY J. GARRETT1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) studies show that in the Arctic cloud cover generally acts to warm the surface, while coolingAerosol Effects on Cloud Emissivity and Surface Longwave Heating in the Arctic TIMOTHY J. GARRETT1 in the atmosphere tend to increase the reflectance of solar (shortwave) radiation from water clouds, which can lead

  12. Nuclear winter from gulf war discounted

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Would a major conflagration in Kuwait's oil fields trigger a climate catastrophe akin to the 'nuclear winter' that got so much attention in the 1980s This question prompted a variety of opinions. The British Meteorological Office and researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory concluded that the effect of smoke from major oil fires in Kuwait on global temperatures is likely to be small; however, the obscuration of sunlight might significantly reduce surface temperatures locally. Michael MacCracken, leader of the researchers at Livermore, predicts that the worst plausible oil fires in the Gulf would produce a cloud of pollution about as severe as that found on a bad day at the Los Angeles airport. The results of some mathematical modeling by the Livermore research group are reported.

  13. Motor gasolines, winter 1981-1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, E M

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical data for 905 samples of motor gasoline, were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 30 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since winter 1959-1960 survey for the leaded gasolines, and since winter 1979-1980 survey for the unleaded gasolines. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R+M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.4 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.7 for unleaded 90.0 and above, and 88.9 for leaded below 93.0. Only one sample was reported as 93.0 for leaded gasolines with an antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Oliktok Point, Alaska (an AMF3 Deployment)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Located at the North Slope of Alaska on the coast of the Arctic Ocean, Oliktok Point is extremely isolated, accessible only by plane. From this remote spot researchers now have access to important data about Arctic climate processes at the intersection of land and sea ice. As of October 2013, Oliktok Point is the temporary home of ARM’s third and newest ARM Mobile Facility, or AMF3. The AMF3 is gathering data using about two dozen instruments that obtain continuous measurements of clouds, aerosols, precipitation, energy, and other meteorological variables. Site operators will also fly manned and unmanned aircraft over sea ice, drop instrument probes and send up tethered balloons. The combination of atmospheric observations with measurements from both the ground and over the Arctic Ocean will give researchers a better sense of why the Arctic sea ice has been fluctuating in fairly dramatic fashion over recent years. AMF3 will be stationed at Oliktok Point.

  15. Retrieval of Cloud Phase Using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Data during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, P.; Shupe, M.; Uttal, T.; Poellot, M.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving climate model predictions over Earth's polar regions requires a comprehensive knowledge of polar cloud microphysics. Over the Arctic, there is minimal contrast between the clouds and background snow surface, making it difficult to detect clouds and retrieve their phase from space. Snow and ice cover, temperature inversions, and the predominance of mixed-phase clouds make it even more difficult to determine cloud phase. Also, since determining cloud phase is the first step toward analyzing cloud optical depth, particle size, and water content, it is vital that the phase be correct in order to obtain accurate microphysical and bulk properties. Changes in these cloud properties will, in turn, affect the Arctic climate since clouds are expected to play a critical role in the sea ice albedo feedback. In this paper, the IR trispectral technique (IRTST) is used as a starting point for a WV and 11-{micro}m brightness temperature (T11) parameterization (WVT11P) of cloud phase using MODIS data. In addition to its ability to detect mixed-phase clouds, the WVT11P also has the capability to identify thin cirrus clouds overlying mixed or liquid phase clouds (multiphase ice). Results from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) MODIS phase model (AMPHM) are compared to the surface-based cloud phase retrievals over the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site and to in-situ data taken from University of North Dakota Citation (CIT) aircraft which flew during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE). It will be shown that the IRTST and WVT11P combined to form the AMPHM can achieve a relative high accuracy of phase discrimination compared to the surface-based retrievals. Since it only uses MODIS WV and IR channels, the AMPHM is robust in the sense that it can be applied to daytime, twilight, and nighttime scenes with no discontinuities in the output phase.

  16. Greater sage-grouse winter habitat selection and energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, K.E.; Naugle, D.E.; Walker, B.L.; Graham, J.M. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent energy development has resulted in rapid and large-scale changes to western shrub-steppe ecosystems without a complete understanding of its potential impacts on wildlife populations. We modeled winter habitat use by female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, to 1) identify landscape features that influenced sage-grouse habitat selection, 2) assess the scale at which selection occurred, 3) spatially depict winter habitat quality in a Geographic Information System, and 4) assess the effect of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development on winter habitat selection. We developed a model of winter habitat selection based on 435 aerial relocations of 200 radiomarked female sage-grouse obtained during the winters of 2005 and 2006. Percent sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) cover on the landscape was an important predictor of use by sage-grouse in winter. Sage-grouse were 1.3 times more likely to occupy sagebrush habitats that lacked CBNG wells within a 4-km{sup 2} area, compared to those that had the maximum density of 12.3 wells per 4 km{sup 2} allowed on federal lands. We validated the model with 74 locations from 74 radiomarked individuals obtained during the winters of 2004 and 2007. This winter habitat model based on vegetation, topography, and CBNG avoidance was highly predictive (validation R{sup 2} = 0.984). Our spatially explicit model can be used to identify areas that provide the best remaining habitat for wintering sage-grouse in the PRB to mitigate impacts of energy development.

  17. ARM - Field Campaign - FIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5 CampaignSP2govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic Cloud

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL)govCampaignsMixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: An Arctic Springtime

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative AbsorptionARM InArctic Facility for Atmospheric Remote

  20. Signal and System Theory II, BSc, Winter 2008 Automatic Control Laboratory D-ITET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lygeros, John

    Signal and System Theory II, BSc, Winter 2008 Automatic Control Laboratory D-ITET ETH Zurich Winter happens to the state as t using the final value theorem. 1 #12;Signal and System Theory II, BSc, Winter T seconds. Do you believe her? Justify your answer. 2 #12;Signal and System Theory II, BSc, Winter 2008

  1. National FCEV Learning Demonstration: Winter 2011 Composite Data Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes the composite data products produced in Winter 2011 as part of the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration.

  2. BEE 446546, River Engineering, Winter 2010 Instructor: Dr. Desiree Tullos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    appropriate methods of data collection for addressing engineering problem at the project site. WeBEE 446546, River Engineering, Winter 2010 Syllabus Instructor: Dr. Desiree Tullos Assistant Professor, Biological and Ecological Engineering Department 233 Gilmore Hall Phone

  3. CMPE 185 Winter 1999 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    CMPE 185 Winter 1999 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Porter 144, MWF). Everything must be turned in by the last day of class, Friday March 12. Karplus Info 1 #12; 2 Syllabus CMPE

  4. QCD results at HERAQ Aspen 2008 Winter Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QCD results at HERAQ Aspen 2008 Winter Conference "Revealing the Nature of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking" 14 January 2008, Aspen, CO, USA Yuji Yamazaki (Kobe University, ZEUS) O b h lf f th H1 d ZEUS ll

  5. ENCS 307: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PRINCIPLES AND METHODS SECOND (WINTER) TERM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erbilgin, Nadir

    -1- ENCS 307: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PRINCIPLES AND METHODS SECOND (WINTER) TERM Instructor Dr. Grading Assignments 50% Exams 50% Course Description Environmental assessments are becoming more common as increasing regulatory requirements are developed. Information collected for environmental assessments must

  6. Introduction Modern winter barley cultivars are capable of yields in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    or biosolids applications. GS 25 GS 30 Figure 1. Generalized nitrogen uptake pattern for winter bar- ley grown received manure or biosolids applications, or have received adequate N fertilization for Nitrogen

  7. Math 209 Discrete Mathematics Winter 2009 Instructor Amites Sarkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Amites

    Math 209 Discrete Mathematics Winter 2009 Instructor Amites Sarkar Text Discrete Mathematics, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, in 216 Bond Hall. My phone number is 650 7569 and my e-mail is amites.sarkar

  8. Math 204 Elementary Linear Algebra Winter 2008 Instructor Amites Sarkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Amites

    Math 204 Elementary Linear Algebra Winter 2008 Instructor Amites Sarkar Text Linear Algebra and its Hall. My phone number is 650 7569 and my e-mail is amites.sarkar@wwu.edu #12;Course Objectives

  9. Use of east Texas reservoirs by wintering bald eagles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Sandra Joy

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    roost in the United States; there are now 4 other roosting areas preserved along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers (Dunstan 1978). The Bear Valley National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon was established to protect the approximately 300 wintering bald...;. immature, 40%%u adult), b bald eagles begin arriving in east Texas in mid-November and are mostly gone by mid-14arch. Some eagles apparently wander between reservoirs and river systems throughout the winter. The eagles rely on self-caught live fish...

  10. Proc. 19th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2003) 000000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 19th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2003) 000­000 19th Winter Workshop on Nuclear and Nuclear Collisions via the Test Particle Method - Similarities and Differences Wolfgang Bauer1,a 1 momentum. PACS: 24.10.-i, 24.10.Lx, 25.70.-z, 25.75.-q, 26.50.+x, 97.60.Bw 1. Nuclear Dynamics Wong [1

  11. Response of Hard Red Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to Photoperiod and Vernilization in South Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simoneaux, Bryan Edwin

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................. 10 Photoperiod and vernalization interaction of winter wheat .. 13 CHAPTER III EVALUATION OF WINTER WHEAT GENOTYPES IN A FIELD AND CONTROLLED ENVIRO1MENT FOR THEIR RESPONES TO PHOTOPERIOD AND VERNILIZATION.... If the vernalization requirement is not met, winter wheat plants will remain in the vegetative state and will not produce grain 3 (Morgan et al., 2006). An increase in winter temperatures in South Texas could have a negative impact on winter wheat production...

  12. Status of Wind-Diesel Applications in Arctic Climates: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Corbus, D.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rising cost of diesel fuel and the environmental regulation for its transportation, use, and storage, combined with the clear impacts of increased arctic temperatures, is driving remote communities to examine alternative methods of providing power. Over the past few years, wind energy has been increasingly used to reduce diesel fuel consumption, providing economic, environmental, and security benefits to the energy supply of communities from Alaska to Antarctica. This summary paper describes the current state of wind-diesel systems, reviews the operation of wind-diesel plants in cold climates, discusses current research activities pertaining to these systems, and addresses their technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems in Alaska will be reviewed. Specific focus will also be given to the control of power systems with large amounts of wind generation and the complexities of replacing diesel engine waste heat with excess wind energy, a key factor in assessing power plants for retrofit. A brief overview of steps for assessing the viability of retrofitting diesel power systems with wind technologies will also be provided. Because of the large number of isolated diesel minigrids, the market for adding wind to these systems is substantial, specifically in arctic climates and on islands that rely on diesel-only power generation.

  13. Heavy Metal Contamination in the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberian Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen-Gil, Susan M.; Ford, Jesse; Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Monetti, Matthew; Vlasova, Tamara; Landers, Dixon H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Taimyr Peninsula is directly north of the world's largest heavy metal smelting complex (Norilsk, Russia). Despite this proximity, there has been little research to examine the extent of contamination of the Taimyr Peninsula. We analyzed heavy metal concentrations in lichen (Cetraria cucullata), moss (Hylocomium splendens), soils, lake sediment, freshwater fish (Salvelinus alpinus, Lota lota, and Coregonus spp.) and collared lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus) from 13 sites between 30 and 300 km from Norilsk. Element concentrations were low in both C. cucullata and H. splendens, although concentrations of Al, Fe, Cu, Ni, and Pb were significantly higher than those in Arctic Alaska, probably due to natural differences in the geochemical environments. Inorganic surface soils had significantly higher concentrations of Cd, Zn, Pb, and Mg than inorganic soils at depth, although a lake sediment core from the eastern Taimyr Peninsula indicated no recent enrichment by atmospherically transported elements. Tissue concentrations of heavy metals in fish and lemming were not elevated relative to other Arctic sites. Our results show that the impact of the Norilsk smelting complex is primarily localized rather than regional, and does not extend northward beyond 100 km.

  14. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory (Part 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    See OSTI ID Number 960443

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane (CH{sub 4}) in natural gas is a major energy source in the U.S., and is used extensively on Alaska's North Slope, including the oilfields in Prudhoe Bay, the community of Barrow, and the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA). Smaller villages, however, are dependent on imported diesel fuel for both power and heating, resulting in some of the highest energy costs in the U.S. and crippling local economies. Numerous CH{sub 4} gas seeps have been observed on wetlands near Atqasuk, Alaska (in the NPRA), and initial measurements have indicated flow rates of 3,000-5,000 ft{sup 3} day{sup -1} (60-100 kg CH{sub 4} day{sup -1}). Gas samples collected in 1996 indicated biogenic origin, although more recent sampling indicated a mixture of biogenic and thermogenic gas. In this study, we (1) quantified the amount of CH{sub 4} generated by several seeps and evaluated their potential use as an unconventional gas source for the village of Atqasuk; (2) collected gas and analyzed its composition from multiple seeps several miles apart to see if the source is the same, or if gas is being generated locally from isolated biogenic sources; and (3) assessed the potential magnitude of natural CH{sub 4} gas seeps for future use in climate change modeling.

  15. Mobilization pathways of organic carbon from permafrost to arctic rivers in a changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Laodong

    and subarctic river waters is dominated by contemporary sour- ces [Benner et al., 2004; Guo and Macdonald, 2006 in arctic rivers should then become older, reflecting the age of that reservoir [Schell and Ziemann, 1983

  16. Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Laura Marie

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

  17. Building skills : a construction trades training facility for the eastern Canadian Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roszler, Sarah Katherine, 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 1, 1999, the Inuit of the Eastern Canadian Arctic achieved sovereignty over a new territory, Nunavut, envisioning economic self-reliance, political self-determination, and renewal of confidence in Inuit community. ...

  18. arctic mixed-phase clouds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    low-level Arctic clouds in cold seasons and have a significant impact on the surface energy budget. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models...

  19. Real-time processing of remote sensor data as applied to Arctic ice classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Permenter, James Austin

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by JAMES AUSTIN PERMENTER partial ! Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by James Austin Permenter Approved as to style and content by: ] ( rman of Commi...

  20. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  1. 90 4,000 Meters under the Ice The Arctic is one of the habitats undergoing the most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PlanckResearch 89 RUSSIA Special RUSSIA Special #12;#12;TEXT MAREN EMMERICH The Arctic is one of the habitats

  2. Winter fuels report. Week ending, October 21, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitomer, M.; Griffith, A.; Zyren, J.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand for distillate fuel oil is expected to show a slight decline this winter (October 1, 1994-March 31, 1995) from last, according to the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 4th Quarter 1994 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Mid-World Oil Price Case forecast. EIA projects winter demand to decline one percent to 3.3 million barrels per day, assuming normal weather conditions. The effects of expected moderate growth in the economy and industrial production will likely be offset by much warmer temperatures than those a year ago. EIA projects prices for both residential heating oil and diesel fuel to be moderately higher than prices last winter. Increases are likely, primarily because crude oil prices are expected to be higher than they were a year earlier (Table FE5).

  3. Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Parameterizations in Short-Range Weather Forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, S; Boyle, J; Klein, S; Liu, X; Ghan, S

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By making use of the in-situ data collected from the recent Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment, we have tested the mixed-phase cloud parameterizations used in the two major U.S. climate models, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory climate model (AM2), under both the single-column modeling framework and the U.S. Department of Energy Climate Change Prediction Program-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Parameterization Testbed. An improved and more physically based cloud microphysical scheme for CAM3 has been also tested. The single-column modeling tests were summarized in the second quarter 2007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement metric report. In the current report, we document the performance of these microphysical schemes in short-range weather forecasts using the Climate Chagne Prediction Program Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Parameterizaiton Testbest strategy, in which we initialize CAM3 and AM2 with realistic atmospheric states from numerical weather prediction analyses for the period when Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment was conducted.

  4. Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric T. DeWeaver

    2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. The examination of present-day climate also includes diagnostic intercomparison of model simulations and observed mean climate and climate variability using reanalysis and satellite datasets. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A further objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system.

  5. Research on the seasonal snow of the Arctic Slope. Annual progress report, January 16, 1988--December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.S.

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The original objectives of this research included a regional study of snow on the entire Arctic Slope. During the first year the scope was restricted to the R{sub 4}D area. In the second and third years the primary focus was also on the R{sub 4}D area,but measurements were made at Prudhoe Bay, Atgasuk and Wainwright to determine the flux of wind-blown snow on a wider scale. Additional broadening of scope was discussed at the San Diego R{sub 4}D meetings in April 1986 and 1987 and at the extrapolation workshop held at Penn State University in Spring 1987. The broadening of scope has also included detailed studies of chemistry and controls exerted by large-scale advection of air masses on the longwave, thermal IR, and radiation. The latter phenomena are critical in initiating snowmelt.

  6. Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric T. DeWeaver

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

  7. Use of east Texas reservoirs by wintering bald eagles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Sandra Joy

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) also found wintering bald eagles relying primarily on black-tailed jackrabbits for food. These birds shared their t 1 11 d oott tth g 1d g1 Ihttit ~ht t t). Ed d successfully trapped several bald eagles and fitted them with radio transmitters... below Toledo Bend Reservoir until the nest trees were killed by inundation. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Depar t- ment conducts an aerial survey each winter to locate bald eagle nests and to verify the success rate of each active nest. In 1979...

  8. Nuclear winter. The human and environmental consequences of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwell, M.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Winter is an analysis of the consequences of nuclear war for humans and the environment. It is an account of the world after nuclear war that includes both effects on humans and the phenomenon of nuclear winter. Contents: Foreward by Russell W. Peterson. Introduction. Scenario Development. Initial Conditions: Human Health Effects; State of Physical and Biological Systems; State of Atmospheric Systems; Local Fallout Patterns; Summary of Immediate Effects. Intermediate and Long-Term Consequences: Major Problem Areas: Effects of Reduced Temperatures; Effects of Reduced Light Levels; Effects on Agricultural Production; Societal Disruptions. Relatively Lesser Problem Areas. Recovery Processes. Summary of Consequences.

  9. COLUMBIA ENGINEERING WINTER GLOBAL EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE: EXPLORING GLOBAL ENGINEERING WITH CITY UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    COLUMBIA ENGINEERING WINTER GLOBAL EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE: EXPLORING GLOBAL ENGINEERING WITH CITY UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG JANUARY 7th ­ 15TH , 2012 Program Features The Winter Global Educational Experience is open to Columbia Engineering

  10. Winter Weather Preparedness Have a Plan -Make a Kit -Stay Informed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Winter Weather Preparedness Have a Plan - Make a Kit - Stay Informed during winter weather. Move livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking. If necessary insulate walls and attic. Caulk and weather-strip doors and windowsills

  11. Proc. 17th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2001) 000--000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 17th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2001) 000--000 17th Winter Workshop on Nuclear of Nuclear Physics, Krakâ??ow, Poland, 4 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, 5

  12. Proc. 19th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2003) 7--15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 19th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2003) 7--15 19th Winter Workshop on Nuclear, IL 60439­4843, USA 2 Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973­5000, USA 3 Institute of Nuclear

  13. Fall 2013-Winter 2014 / Department Contact Person Updated: December 18, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Fall 2013- Winter 2014 / Department Contact Person Updated: December 18, 2013 Department Course for U3, follow instructions on Minerva to ask for permission for winter. Other Biology Nancy Nelson

  14. Winter2013 (Revised 1.9.13) 1 of 5 Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Winter2013 (Revised 1.9.13) 1 of 5 Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Room 200-related research 6. Discuss how safety is addressed in design #12;Winter2013 (Revised 1.9.13) 2 of 5 Course

  15. Spatial and temporal winter territory use and behavioral responses of whooping cranes to human activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFever, Kristin E.

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    cranes during winter 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 at ANWR, Texas, USA? 20 3 Percent time spent in locomotion and flight by territorial whooping crane families throughout winter 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 at ANWR, Texas, USA...????????????????????????? 22 4 Mean movement velocity (meters traveled/min) of 5 whooping crane families during winter 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 at ANWR, Texas, USA?. 34 5 Area (ha) of each habitat type within the winter territory of 5 whooping...

  16. Question of the Week: What are Your Greatest Energy Concerns as We Approach Winter?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We asked, you answered: What are your greatest energy concerns as we approach the winter heating season?

  17. Published by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States 3535 College Road Suite 101 Fairbanks, AK 99709 Arctic Research at the University of Northern British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    · Fairbanks, AK 99709 Arctic Research at the University of Northern British Columbia Establishedin1994 Columbia Prince George Campus 3333 University Way Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9 Canada 250-960-5555 sderywithconsiderablepublicendorsementandenthusiasm,theUniver- sity of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) has grown into one of Canada's premier

  18. Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the Lab Homes: Winter Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Widder, Sarah H.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field evaluation of highly insulating windows was undertaken in a matched pair of 'Lab Homes' located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus during the 2012 winter heating season. Improving the insulation and solar heat gain characteristics of a home's windows has the potential to significantly improve the home's building envelope and overall thermal performance by reducing heat loss (in the winter), and cooling loss and solar heat gain (in the summer) through the windows. A high quality installation and/or window retrofit will also minimize or reduce air leakage through the window cavity and thus also contribute to reduced heat loss in the winter and cooling loss in the summer. These improvements all contribute to decreasing overall annual home energy use. Occupant comfort (non-quantifiable) can also be increased by minimizing or eliminating the cold 'draft' (temperature) many residents experience at or near window surfaces that are at a noticeably lower temperature than the room air temperature. Lastly, although not measured in this experiment, highly insulating windows (triple-pane in this experiment) also have the potential to significantly reduce the noise transmittance through windows compared to standard double-pane windows. The metered data taken in the Lab Homes and data analysis presented here represent 70 days of data taken during the 2012 heating season. As such, the savings from highly insulating windows in the experimental home (Lab Home B) compared to the standard double-pane clear glass windows in the baseline home (Lab Home A) are only a portion of the energy savings expected from a year-long experiment that would include a cooling season. The cooling season experiment will take place in the homes in the summer of 2012, and results of that experiment will be reported in a subsequent report available to all stakeholders.

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER Wintering forest birds roost in areas of higher sun radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    with taller trees more exposed to solar radiation to enhance winter habitat suitability for birdsORIGINAL PAPER Wintering forest birds roost in areas of higher sun radiation Sara Villén latitudes of cold winter climate, birds should spend the night in areas of low altitudes, higher

  20. Organic Chemistry 51B -Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chemistry 51B Reactions List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chemistry 51B Reactions(s). Chapter 7: Nucleophilic Substitution + + NaOH CH3O- #12;Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chapter 8: Elimination Reactions #12;Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013

  1. INT David Kaplan -Schladming Winter School 2007 Supersymmetry on the Lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    for Nuclear Theory Seattle,WA - USA 1 #12;INT David Kaplan - Schladming Winter School 2007 Part 1: RelevanceINT David Kaplan - Schladming Winter School 2007 Supersymmetry on the Lattice I. Symmetries Winter School 2007 · Irrelevant: less important in the IR · Relevant: more important in the IR · Marginal

  2. Lecture 32 1 Physics 558 Winter 2013 Physics 558 Lecture 32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Steve

    Lecture 32 1 Physics 558 Winter 2013 Physics 558 ­ Lecture 32 The Strong Interactions II: The QCD Winter 2013 And the least familiar one ­ the 4-gluon vertex, which is similar to the 4-vector boson-perturbative). This scenario is illustrated in the figure. #12;Lecture 32 3 Physics 558 Winter 2013 Recall from our previous

  3. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT WINTER CAMPUS CURTAILMENT 2013-2014 FOR STAFF EMPLOYEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT WINTER CAMPUS CURTAILMENT 2013-2014 FOR STAFF EMPLOYEES versión española Our 2013-2014 Winter Campus Curtailment is scheduled for December 23, 2013 through January 1, 2014 of 8 #12;QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT WINTER CAMPUS CURTAILMENT 2013-2014 FOR STAFF EMPLOYEES Employees

  4. Newsline Winter 2003 McGill Anesthesia Newsletter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    1 Newsline Winter 2003 McGill Anesthesia Newsletter This year at our Annual Wesley Bourne Memorial Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Anesthesia. Teaching the art and science of anesthesia anesthesia. Dr. Deschamps was this year's residents' choice because of his knowledge, his enthusiasm

  5. MATH 335 Winter 2010 Mathematics of Engineering Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offin, Dan

    processing, communications and control system applications. Instructor: Serdar Y¨uksel, Jeffrey Hall 415:00-14:00 Text: Modern Signals and Systems, by H. Kwakernaak and R. Sivan, (Copies of this book are availableMATH 335 Winter 2010 Mathematics of Engineering Systems Classes held at Stirling Hall 412A, Mon 8

  6. Physics 214 Winter 2013 The Poisson sum formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 214 Winter 2013 The Poisson sum formula The Poisson sum formula takes on a number will use this version of the Poisson sum formula in solving problem 14.13 of Jackson. To prove this formula sum formula is as follows. Given a function f(t) and its Fourier transform, F() - eit f(t)dt , (7

  7. Physics 214 Winter 2013 The Poisson sum formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 214 Winter 2013 The Poisson sum formula The Poisson sum formula takes on a number of di will use this version of the Poisson sum formula in solving problem 14.13 of Jackson. To prove this formula the desired result announced in eq. (1). Actually, the most common form for the Poisson sum formula

  8. Physics 5B Winter 2009 Solving the Simple Harmonic Oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 5B Winter 2009 Solving the Simple Harmonic Oscillator 1. The harmonic oscillator solution: displacement as a function of time We wish to solve the equation of motion for the simple harmonic oscillator shall employ for solving this di#erential equation is called the method of inspired guessing. In class

  9. Physics 5B Winter 2009 Solving the Simple Harmonic Oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 5B Winter 2009 Solving the Simple Harmonic Oscillator 1. The harmonic oscillator solution: displacement as a function of time We wish to solve the equation of motion for the simple harmonic oscillator employ for solving this differential equation is called the method of inspired guessing. In class, we

  10. 12 MONTHS OF SAFETY & WELLNESS DECEMBER: WINTER DRIVING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    , winter weather hazards result in thousands of motor vehicle accidents each year: · Heavy fog can reduce vehicle Solution: · Plan ahead & consider delaying your trip if the weather is bad · Turn on your in the rain & increase the distance between you & the vehicle ahead · Maintain your vehicle & regularly check

  11. Ecology of Puget Sound Winter 2001: All Level Group Contract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thuesen, Erik V.

    - 1 - Ecology of Puget Sound Winter 2001: All Level Group Contract Faculty: Erik Thuesen (thuesene@evergreen.edu), Lab 1 3065 This program will investigate ecological interactions of the organisms in the Puget Sound in Puget Sound for hands-on observations and field work. There will be one multi-day field trip to Friday

  12. Physics 116A Winter 2011 The Alternating Series Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 116A Winter 2011 The Alternating Series Test An alternating series is defined to be a series of the form: S = # # n=0 (-1) n a n , (1) where all the a n > 0. The alternating series test but property 1 and/or property 2 do not hold, then the alternating series test is inconclusive. Note

  13. Physics 116A Winter 2011 The Alternating Series Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 116A Winter 2011 The Alternating Series Test An alternating series is defined to be a series of the form: S = n=0 (-1)n an , (1) where all the an > 0. The alternating series test is a set and/or property 2 do not hold, then the alternating series test is inconclusive. Note that property 1

  14. Aspen Winter Conference on Unifying Themes in Condensed Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspen Winter Conference on Unifying Themes in Condensed Matter Mon Jan 12, 2009 Classical vs + poster presentations 8pm - 11pm Dinner at Aspen Meadows Tue Jan 13, 2009 Strong Correlation; Host: Subir Correlated Systems 7:35pm - 7:50pm Discussion + poster presentations 8pm - 11pm Dinner at Aspen Meadows Wed

  15. Managing Winter Annual Grasses in South & Southwest Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles; Livingston, Stephen

    1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    rate (lbs/acre) 75 - 100 75 - 100 15 - 25 75 - 100 75 -100 1 Production Times: Fall, October-December; Winter, January-February; Spring, March-April; Late spring, May-June. vest in addition to livestock grazing. However, such plant diseases as Barley...

  16. FACULTY OF INFORMATICS WINTER EXAM SESSION 2012 BACHELOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Rolf

    FACULTY OF INFORMATICS WINTER EXAM SESSION 2012 BACHELOR Computer Graphics 13.3016.30 written SI008 Kai Hormann Information and Knowledge Management II 13.3016.30 written SI008 Fabio Crestani Software Development 13.3016.30 written SI006 Mauro Pezzè Discrete Mathematics I 13.3016.30 written SI008

  17. FACULTY OF INFORMATICS WINTER EXAM SESSION 2012 MASTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Rolf

    FACULTY OF INFORMATICS WINTER EXAM SESSION 2012 MASTER Enterprise Resource Planning 13.1517.00 oral SI004 Chiara Francalanci Uncertain Reasoning and Data Mining 13.3016.30 written SI006 Marco Zaffalon Fundamentals of Programming 13.3016.30 written SI004 Antonio Carzaniga Intelligent Systems 13

  18. EECE 493 -Winter 2012 Introduction to Power Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    DC-DC Converter Analysis (Ch. 2) Sept 17-19: the DC-Transformer Model and Component Losses (Ch. 3, 4EECE 493 - Winter 2012 Introduction to Power Electronics Instructor: Nathan Ozog Office: BC Hydro) Phone: 604 528 2639 (BC Hydro Direct Line) TA: Soroush Amini Sajjad Zadkhast Office: Power Lab - 3rd

  19. Physics 116A Winter 2011 Asymptotic Power Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 116A Winter 2011 Asymptotic Power Series In this note, I will define an asymptotic power series, and contrast its definition with that of a convergent power series. All convergent power series are asymptotic series. However, an asymptotic power series may be convergent or divergent. We first consider

  20. Math/AMath 595: Finite Element Methods (Winter 2001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, William

    for Elliptic Problems by Philippe G. Ciarlet (1978). 3. An Analysis of the Finite Element Method by GilbertMath/AMath 595: Finite Element Methods (Winter 2001) Lectures: MW 3:30{4:50, room 121 RAI Professor Element Methods by Susanne C. Brenner and L. Ridgway Scott (1994). 2. The Finite Element Method

  1. Winter Performance and Maintenance of Porous Asphalt Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concrete (HSG-B)Porous Asphalt (HSG-C) #12;Cold Climate Performance Results #12;12 Porous Asphalt SurfaceWinter Performance and Maintenance of Porous Asphalt Pavements Robert M. Roseen, Ph.D., P.E., D impacts for new development and reverse impacts in areas with redevelopment. #12;Porous Asphalt Design

  2. SWAIN LIBRARY -INTERSESSION AND WINTER CLOSURE HOURS DECEMBER 14TH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    Green Library will be open December 22-23, 26, 29-31, and January 2, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. with limited servicesSWAIN LIBRARY - INTERSESSION AND WINTER CLOSURE HOURS DECEMBER 14TH , 2008 ­ JANUARY 5TH , 2009. Branch Libraries that are open, circulation desks will be open for borrowing only. All other services

  3. The long darkness: Psychological and moral perspectives on nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinspoon, L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents papers on the risks of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include nuclear war and climatic catastrophe, evolutionary and developmental considerations, a biological comment on Erikson's notion of pseudospeciation, national security, unexamined assumptions and inescapable consequences, opposing the nuclear threat (the convergence of moral analysis and empirical data), and nuclear winter.

  4. Physics 116A Winter 2011 The generalized Stirling series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 116A Winter 2011 The generalized Stirling series In these notes, a generalization of the asymptotic Stirling series for the logarithm of the Gamma function is derived. This generalization is then used to examine the behavior of (x + iy) as |y| . 1. Derivation of the generalized Stirling series We

  5. Physics 116A Winter 2011 The generalized Stirling series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 116A Winter 2011 The generalized Stirling series In these notes, a generalization of the asymptotic Stirling series for the logarithm of the Gamma function is derived. This generalization is then used to examine the behavior of #(x + iy) as |y| ##. 1. Derivation of the generalized Stirling series

  6. Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) is a demand-side management strategy to reduce electricity use during times of high peak electric loads;1 Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings of a series of field test of automated demand response systems in large buildings in the Pacific Northwest

  7. Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziari, Fred

    2002-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the findings of the Echo Meadows Project (BPA Project 2001-015-00). The main purpose of this project is to artificially recharge an alluvial aquifer, WITH water from Umatilla River during the winter high flow period. In turn, this recharged aquifer will discharge an increased flow of cool groundwater back to the river, thereby improving Umatilla River water quality and temperature. A considerable side benefit is that the Umatilla River should improve as a habitat for migration, spanning, and rearing of anadromous and resident fish. The scope of this project is to provide critical baseline information about the Echo Meadows and the associated reach of the Umatilla River. Key elements of information that has been gathered include: (1) Annual and seasonal groundwater levels in the aquifer with an emphasis on the irrigation season, (2) Groundwater hydraulic properties, particularly hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, and (3) Groundwater and Umatilla River water quality including temperature, nutrients and other indicator parameters. One of the major purposes of this data gathering was to develop input to a groundwater model of the area. The purpose of the model is to estimate our ability to recharge this aquifer using water that is only available outside of the irrigation season (December through the end of February) and to estimate the timing of groundwater return flow back to the river. We have found through the data collection and modeling efforts that this reach of the river had historically returned as much as 45 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water to the Umatilla River during the summer and early fall. However, this return flow was reduced to as low as 10 cfs primarily due to reduced quantities of irrigation application, gain in irrigation efficiencies and increased groundwater pumping. Our modeling indicated that it is possible to restore these critical return flows using applied water outside of the irrigation season. We further found that this water can be timed to return to the river during the desired time of the year (summer to early fall). This is because the river stage, which remains relatively high until this time, drops during the irrigation season-thereby releasing the stored groundwater and increasing river flows. A significant side benefit is that these enhanced groundwater return flows will be clean and cold, particularly as compared to the Umatilla River. We also believe that this same type of application of water could be done and the resulting stream flows could be realized in other watersheds throughout the Pacific Northwest. This means that it is critical to compare the results from this baseline report to the full implementation of the project in the next phase. As previously stated, this report only discusses the results of data gathered during the baseline phase of this project. We have attempted to make the data that has been gathered accessible with the enclosed databases and spreadsheets. We provide computer links in this report to the databases so that interested parties can fully evaluate the data that has been gathered. However, we cannot emphasize too strongly that the real value of this project is to implement the phases to come, compare the results of these future phases to this baseline and develop the science and strategies to successfully implement this concept to other rivers in the Pacific Northwest. The results from our verified and calibrated groundwater model matches the observed groundwater data and trends collected during the baseline phase. The modeling results indicate that the return flows may increase to their historic values with the addition of 1 acre-ft/acre of recharge water to the groundwater system (about 9,600 acre-feet total). What this means is that through continued recharge project, you can double to quadruple the annual baseflow of the Umatilla River during the low summer and fall flow periods as compared to the present base-flow. The cool and high quality recharge water is a significant beneficial impact to the river system.

  8. Critical mechanisms for the formation of extreme arctic sea-ice extent in the summers of 2007 and 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    deformation on top of the long-term thinning of an Arctic ice pack that had become more dominated by seasonalCritical mechanisms for the formation of extreme arctic sea-ice extent in the summers of 2007 system, the largest year-to-year variation in sea-ice extent (SIE) has occurred in the Laptev, East

  9. The 2007 Bering Strait Oceanic Heat Flux and anomalous Arctic Sea-ice Retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate*, Tom Weingartner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    where heat carried by northward flowing PW weakens the ice-pack thereby promoting more sea-ice motionThe 2007 Bering Strait Oceanic Heat Flux and anomalous Arctic Sea-ice Retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate Abstract: To illuminate the role of Pacific Waters in the 2007 Arctic sea-ice retreat, we use observational

  10. UiT The Arctic University of Norway Fakultet for biovitenskap, fiskeri og konomi -Inst. for arktisk og marin biologi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uppsala Universitet

    UiT The Arctic University of Norway Fakultet for biovitenskap, fiskeri og økonomi - Inst/616 The Faculty of Biosciences, Fishery and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway has a PhD position and participate in field work in Norway and Russia. The candidate must have a god command of written and spoken

  11. Modelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios of future climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). A consequence of climatic warming in the high Arctic will be an increase in surface melting of glaciers and ice component of the mass accumulation of many glaciers and ice caps in thModelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios

  12. Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types in Relation to Sea Ice RYAN EASTMAN AND STEPHEN G. WARREN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    longwave cloud radiative effect (CRE), sug- gesting that infrared radiation emitted toward the surface and cloud temperatures greater than 2318C. Cloud radiative effect over the Arctic likely varies seasonally of clouds have different effects on sea ice. Visual cloud reports from land and ocean regions of the Arctic

  13. Sea-ice thickness measurement based on the dispersion of ice swell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -year pack ice, although other char- acteristics (Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson coefficientSea-ice thickness measurement based on the dispersion of ice swell David Marsana) ISTerre, CNRS propagating in the Arctic sea ice cover is exploited in order to locally measure the ice thickness

  14. Non-nuclear submarine tankers could cost-effectively move Arctic oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumm, W.H.

    1984-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Before the advent of nuclear propulsion for U.S. Navy submarines, fuel cells were considered to be the next logical step forward from battery powered submarines which required recharging. But with the launching of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954, the development of fuel-cell propulsion was sidelined by the naval community. Nearly 30 years later fuel-cell propulsion on board submarines is actually more cost-effective than the use of nuclear propulsion. In the Artic Ocean, the use of the submarine tanker has long been considered commercially appropriate because of the presence of the polar ice cap, which inhibits surface ship transport. The technical difficulty and high operating cost of Arctic icebreaking tankers are strong arguments in favor of the cheaper, more efficient submarine tanker. Transiting under the polar ice cap, the submarine tanker is not an ''Arctic'' system, but merely a submerged system. It is a system usable in any ocean around the globe where sufficient depth exists (about 65% of the global surface). Ice breakers are another story; their design only makes them useful for transit through heavy sea ice in coastal environments. Used anywhere else, such as in the open ocean or at the Arctic ice cap, they are not a cost-effective means of transport. Arctic sea ice conditions require the Arctic peculiar icebreaking tanker system to do the job the hard way-on the surface. But on the other hand, Arctic sea ice conditions are neatly set aside by the submarine tanker, which does it the energy-efficient, elegant way submerged. The submarine tanker is less expensive to build, far less expensive to operate, and does not need to be nuclear propelled.

  15. Fundamental problems of modeling the dynamics of internal gravity waves with applications to the Arctic Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitaly V. Bulatov; Yuriy V. Vladimirov

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider fundamental problems of the dynamics of internal gravity waves. We present analytical and numerical algorithms for calculating the wave fields for a set of values of the parameters, as observed in the ocean. We show that our mathematical models can describe the wave dynamics of the Arctic Basin, taking into account the actual physical characteristics of sea water, topography of its floor, etc. The numerical and analytical results show that the internal gravity waves have a significant effect on underwater sea objects in the Arctic Basin.

  16. Annotated bibliography of the Northwest Territories action on water component of the Arctic environmental strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, R.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-related research conducted under the 1991--97 Arctic Environmental Strategy resulted in the production of 215 publications listed in this bibliography. The main section sorts citations by author and then by title. All citations are annotated and are keyed to the database of the Arctic Science and Technology Information System (ASTIS). The bibliography has three indexes that refer back to the main section: Subject, geographic area, and title. Topics covered include Northwest Territories hydrology, environmental fate of contaminants, water quality, snow, the water cycle, modelling, and limnology.

  17. An analysis of US propane markets, winter 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In late summer 1996, in response to relatively low inventory levels and tight world oil markets, prices for crude oil, natural gas, and products derived from both began to increase rapidly ahead of the winter heating season. Various government and private sector forecasts indicated the potential for supply shortfalls and sharp price increases, especially in the event of unusually severe winter weather. Following a rapid runup in gasoline prices in the spring of 1996, public concerns were mounting about a possibly similar situation in heating fuels, with potentially more serious consequences. In response to these concerns, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) participated in numerous briefings and meetings with Executive Branch officials, Congressional committee members and staff, State Energy Offices, and consumers. EIA instituted a coordinated series of actions to closely monitor the situation and inform the public. This study constitutes one of those actions: an examination of propane supply, demand, and price developments and trends.

  18. EA-1894: Albeni Falls Flexible Winter Lake Operations, Bonner, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, as co-lead Federal agencies, prepared this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to operate Albeni Falls dam during the winter months (approximately December 15th to March 31st) and determine whether the existing Columbia River System Operation Review EIS (DOE/EIS-0170) is adequate or a supplemental or new EIS is required.

  19. Habitat classification and wintering duck use of Mission Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alldredge, Judy Meuth

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the day. From winter to spring, preening and resting becmne more common across the study area. The complex of factors including water coverage and depth, human disturbances, food availability, and duck activities should be considered in formulating... Percent water coverage and depth Duck activity . . . Food availability . 6 7 10 10 12 13 15 15 15 24 29 31 46 46 47 47 47 48 56 56 65 72 73 73 73 75 78 83 90 DISCUSSION TABLE OF CONTENTS (cont. ) Page 99 Food...

  20. Medical Imaging: ECE-4BF3 Winter 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    : ETB-406 x23727 Hospital Office SJH-F126-4 x35218 Lab: Imaging Research Centre, St. Joseph's Healthcare:00am-2:00pm (Hospital Office) Thursdays 1:00pm-3:00pm (ETB-406) Teaching Assistant (TA) Alireza Akbari; offered in winter 2012. Lectures: Thurs. 5:30pm - 7:20pm ETB-228 Tutorial: Tues. 9:30am ­ 10:20am BSB-B138

  1. The long darkness: Psychological and moral perspectives on nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinspoon, L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aftermath of nuclear war - a sustained period of devastation called nuclear winter - would threaten the survival of civilization, even of the human species. In this book some opponents of the arms race describe the consequences of nuclear warfare and offer explanations - drawn from their knowledge of psychiatry, history, religion, and biology - for the irrational behavior of political leaders who risk these consequences and for the reluctance of ordinary citizens to face the horror of the nuclear threat.

  2. Form EIA-411 for 2009",,"WINTER

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Light-Duty Vehicles,YearWINTER" ,"Released:

  3. The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

  4. Implications of atmospheric test fallout data for nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, G.H. III

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric-test fallout data were used to determine admissable-dust particle-size distributions for nuclear-winter studies. The research was originally motivated by extreme differences noted in the magnitude and longevity of dust effects predicted by particle-size distributions routinely used in fallout predictions versus those used for nuclear-winter studies. Three different sets of historical data were analyzed: (1) stratospheric burden of strontium-90 and tungsten-185, 1954-1967 (92 contributing events); (2) continental US strontium-90 fallout through 1958 (75 contributing events); (3) local fallout from selected Nevada tests (16 events). The contribution of dust to possible long-term climate effects following a nuclear exchange depends strongly on the particle-size distribution. The distribution affects both the atmospheric residence time and optical depth. One-dimensional models of stratospheric/tropospheric fallout removal were developed and used to identify optimum particle distributions. Results indicate that particle distributions that properly predict bulk stratospheric activity transfer tend to be somewhat smaller than number size distributions used in initial nuclear winter studies. In addition, both /sup 90/Sr and /sup 185/W fallout behavior is better predicted by the log normal distribution function than the prevalent power-law hybrid function.

  5. Extinction cascade: biological consequence of nuclear war/winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, G.L.; Pimm, S.; Fields, D.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current estimates suggest that direct human casualties in a full-scale nuclear war will exceed one billion people, largely centered around urban and military/industrial centers of the northern hemisphere. The sheer magnitude of potential for immediate human death and suffering in nuclear attack and retaliatory response has served as an effective deterrent for >40 yr. It has become apparent, however, that short-term human mortality and mobidity may not be the factors of greatest concern. It is probable that a larger impact may be attributable to long-term environmental degradation. The general consensus is that a large nuclear war would produce enough smoke to alter and darken the atmosphere so that most of the northern hemisphere would experience reduced temperature, low light levels, altered rainfall patterns, and toxic smog/rain as well as significant exposure to radioactive fallout. Analysis of the environmental changes associated with early nuclear winter scenarios showed a potential for the extinction of a large portion of the earth's plants and animals. Estimates of nuclear winter consequences contain considerable uncertainty. The considerable uncertainties contained in nuclear winter predictions are mentioned. Considering these uncertainties, it is difficult to make definitive statements about the survival of any individual species. It is not, however, difficult to predict that, even with the mitigated nuclear autumn scenario, a mass extinction of biological species, floral and faunal, will result from large-scale nuclear war.

  6. Nuclear winter: implications for US and Soviet nuclear strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, P.J.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In November 1983 Dr. Carl Sagan and his colleagues reported to press on the results of their study of the atmospheric consequences of nuclear war. The TTAPS study found that for a wide range of possible U.S. -Soviet nuclear exchanges, including relatively small ones, the fires from nuclear detonations would inject into the stratosphere quantities of dust and soot that would obscure sunlight for months. Under the cloud, which would spread over most of the Northern Hemisphere, temperatures might drop scores of degrees, well below the freezing point of water; thus, nuclear winter. The TTAPS team's findings suggested that the consequences of a nuclear war might be even more gruesome than previously supposed, and the long-term climatic and biological results might be nearly as severe for a war of 100 megatons as for 5,000. From the point of view of informing policymakers and the public concerning the consequences of wars involving nuclear weapons, the politicization of the nuclear winter issue is unfortunate. We can hope that in the next few years the criticism and defense of the initial TTAPS work will give rise to significant additional analyses, to illuminate the question. Realistically, further study will probably include both confirmations and contradictions of the original findings, without necessarily resolving the issue. Sadly, the surrounding political atmosphere may obstruct sober consideration of the policy implications of the possibility of nuclear winter.

  7. Research agenda for ecological effects of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, J.R.; Mooney, H.A.; Grow, G.R. (eds.)

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential ecological effects of a nuclear winter were discussed by 27 scientists, mostly terrestrial biologists, at a workshop held at Stanford University from June 11 to 14, 1984. The workshop focused on the experimental/observational programs and model-development programs that would be required to develop a capability for predicting nuclear-winter effects on three levels of biological organization - organism, community, and region. For each of the three levels of organization, participants summarized available biological data and models that could serve as starting points for developing a nuclear-winter predictive capability and provided an overview of ecological-assessment programs that must be undertaken to develop such a capability. Guidelines were established for designing an integrated ecological assessment program and for developing the required biological models. Finally, a list of recommendations was prepared for high-priority tasks that should be undertaken in the immediate future, including experiments at the individual-organism and community levels and analyses of regional observations.

  8. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

  9. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  10. Winter study of power plant effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrinos, A.A.N.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of DOE's Meteorological Effects of Thermal Energy Releases (METER) program a field study was undertaken at the Bowen Electric Generating Plant (Plant Bowen) in December 1979. The study was a joint endeavor of Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the main objective of determining the effects of the plant's smokestack effluents on aerosol characteristics and precipitation chemistry. Other objectives included studies of cooling tower temperature and humidity (T/h) plumes and drift drop concentrations. Conducted over a period of three weeks, the study involved an instrumented aircraft, pilot balloons, a tethered balloon system, a dense network of wetfall chemistry collectors and numerous ground- and tower-based meteorological instruments. Rainfall samples collected during the precipitation event of December 13, 1979, revealed some evidence of plume washout. The tethered balloon flights rarely detected the faint presence of the T/h plumes while the airborne measurements program concentrated on the study of SO/sub 2/ to sulfate conversion. A series of plume observations confirmed the suitability of the plant's windset for plume direction determinations.

  11. Export of nutrients from the Arctic Ocean Sinhu Torres-Valds,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    Export of nutrients from the Arctic Ocean Sinhué Torres-Valdés,1 Takamasa Tsubouchi,2 Sheldon Bacon Strait, the Barents Sea Opening (BSO), and Bering Strait. We found that the major exports of all three budgets show that statistically robust net silicate and phosphate exports exist, while the net nitrate

  12. Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    /crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterizationIntercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud

  13. Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean W. R. Peltier,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean freshening W. R. Peltier,1 G to the response to North Atlantic freshening. Citation: Peltier, W. R., G. Vettoretti, and M. Stastna (2006 of the Atlantic by Heinrich Event 1 [Peltier, 2005]. Simi- larly, the onset of the Younger Dryas (Y-D) cold

  14. Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice H. Eicken) program's field site in the northern Chukchi Sea, snow and ice meltwater flow was found to have a strong impact on the heat and mass balance of sea ice during the summer of 1998. Pathways and rates of meltwater

  15. Peeking through a frosty window: molecular insights into the ecology of Arctic soil fungi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Lee

    TIMLING*, D. Lee TAYLOR Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA a r Mycological Society. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.funeco.2012.01.009 f u n g a l e c o l o g y 5 ( 2 0 1

  16. Ventilation of the Miocene Arctic Ocean: An idealized model study Bijoy Thompson,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nycander, Jonas

    Ventilation of the Miocene Arctic Ocean: An idealized model study Bijoy Thompson,1 Johan Nilsson,2 the early Miocene, a feature presumably related to the opening of the Fram Strait. Here, the ventilation circulation model that includes a passive age tracer. In particular, we investigate how the ventilation

  17. 255FEBRUARY 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | he Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    that determine the surface energy budget and the sea­ice mass balance in the Arctic (Moritz et al. 1993; Perovich of the vertical and horizontal energy exchanges within the ocean­ice­atmosphere system. The SHEBA pro- gram for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; TURENNE--Canadian Coast Guard, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; SERREZE

  18. Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere S, such as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). This study examines relationships between changes in total sea ice extent north of 70. These results suggest that a decrease in seasonal ice cover influencing other mechanisms of DMS production could

  19. Underwater radiated noise levels of a research icebreaker in the central Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , and search and rescue. The thinning Arctic ice pack and advances in ship design are allowing for longer of ice-breaking operations. Propulsion modes included transit in variable ice cover, breaking heavy iceHz when breaking ice. The highest noise levels resulted while the ship was engaged in backing

  20. Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment (AIDJEX) assumptions revisited and found inadequate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulsky, Deborah L.

    the Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment (AIDJEX) assumptions about pack ice behavior with an eye to modeling the behavior of pack ice. A model based on these assumptions is needed to represent the deformation and stress in pack ice on scales from 10 to 100 km, and would need to explicitly resolve discontinuities

  1. SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS Yuliya Tarabalka Research Association, MD, USA. e-mail: yuliya.tarabalka@inria.fr ABSTRACT The melting of sea ice, it is important to investigate how rapidly sea ice floes melt. For this purpose, a new TempoSeg method

  2. Five Stages of the Alaskan Arctic Cold Season with Ecosystem Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturm, Matthew

    1 Five Stages of the Alaskan Arctic Cold Season with Ecosystem Implications Peter Q. Olsson1 ecosystem processes. During the two autumnal stages (Early Snow and Early Cold) soils remain warm, unfrozen with the least amount of biological activity and have the least impact on the ecosystem. However, Early Snow

  3. Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS) Pamela Spier, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK Abstract This paper presents an evaluation of the Hydro. Introduction and Motivation The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS, Kramm et al. 1996, Mölders

  4. Validation of Water Vapour Profiles from GPS Radio Occultations in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gas in the Earth's atmosphere, in- ducing about two third of the natural greenhouse effect anthropogenic effects from natural variability and to understand the radiative feed back from increasing water Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) will be investigated for Arctic conditions. RO humidity

  5. Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    will indirectly alter energy transfer through the pelagic food web and ultimately impact apex predators. We-based observations of sea ice concentration from the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR, 1979 recession of high Arctic seasonal ice cover created a temporally predictable primary production bloom

  6. Migratory connectivity in Arctic geese: spring stopovers are the weak links in meeting targets for breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    makes geese particularly vul- nerable to the impact of climate change. There is an increasing mismatch trends in the Arctic target areas. Keywords Capital breeding Á Climate change Á Energetic costs 119313, Russia J. Stahl Landscape Ecology Group, University of Oldenburg, 26111 Oldenburg, Germany 123 J

  7. Topographic Controls on LAI in Arctic Tundra Luke Spadavecchia -54 -2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and surface energy balance, which can vary by an order of magnitude among Arctic tundra communities. We Spadavecchia - 55 - 2008 4.1 Declaration The following chapter was submitted to the Journal of Ecology and plant functional type of a tundra ecosystem'. Journal of Ecology 96(6): 1238-1251) we correct

  8. Response of the Greenland-Scotland overflow to changing deep water supply from the Arctic Mediterranean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response of the Greenland-Scotland overflow to changing deep water supply from the Arctic with a topographic barrier is used to study the response of the overflows across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge of the exchanges across the ridge is seen when the supply decreases. Transport variations in the East-Greenland

  9. Greenland's Island Rule and the Arctic Ocean circulation by Terrence M. Joyce1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joyce, Terrence M.

    Greenland's Island Rule and the Arctic Ocean circulation by Terrence M. Joyce1,2 and Andrey made for the flow around Greenland. Godfrey's theory has been extended to permit inclusion of Bering Archipelago in the modeled flow west of Greenland. In both models, the forcing has been applied in a quasi

  10. Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario John C. Moore1 , Annette Rinke1,2 , Xiaoyong Yu1 , Duoying Ji1 , Xuefeng Cui1 , Yan Li3 , Kari Alterskjær4 , Jón Egill Centre, Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract We analyze simulated sea ice

  11. Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo Stephen Warren, University wavelengths: ice is nearly transparent. Absorptive impurities: Black carbon (soot) Brown carbon (organics broadband albedo: 83% 71% (2) by addition of black carbon (BC) (20 ppb): 0.5% for r = 100 µm 1.6% for r

  12. Arctic methane sources: Isotopic evidence for atmospheric inputs R. E. Fisher,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Arctic methane sources: Isotopic evidence for atmospheric inputs R. E. Fisher,1 S. Sriskantharajah,1 D. Lowry,1 M. Lanoisellé,1 C. M. R. Fowler,1 R. H. James,2 O. Hermansen,3 C. Lund Myhre,3 A. Stohl,3 J. Greinert,4 P. B. R. NisbetJones,5 J. Mienert,6 and E. G. Nisbet1 Received 16 August 2011

  13. NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu, Claes Rooth and Rainer Bleck February 18, 2003 Abstract The variability of the net sea ice production and the sea ice circulation model. The wind driven divergence (or ice flux export) is the major factor controlling the net sea

  14. U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Gautier; Timothy Klett

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.

  15. The great 2012 Arctic Ocean summer cyclone enhanced biological productivity on the shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    The great 2012 Arctic Ocean summer cyclone enhanced biological productivity on the shelves Jinlun influences the marine planktonic ecosystem by enhancing productivity on the shelves of the Chukchi, East days, the simulated biological effects on the shelves last 1 month or longer. At some locations

  16. This chapter describes observations of continuing change in the Arctic environmental system. It is or-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    for the longest period and largest area of ice sheet melt since at least 1978, and the highest melt rate since in the Canadian Arctic, where the rate of mass loss from small glaciers and ice caps continued to increase system. It is or- ganized into five broad sections: atmosphere, ocean, sea ice cover, land, and Greenland

  17. Author's personal copy Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glaciation of Baffin Island, Arctic Canada: key

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    t Melting glaciers and ice caps on Baffin Island contribute roughly half of the sea-level rise from all ice future response of arctic glaciers and ice caps to climate change motivates the use of paleodata throughout the Holocene to its present margin (Barnes Ice Cap) except for two periods of rapid retreat

  18. Short-lived pollutants in the Arctic: their climate impact and possible mitigation strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Quinn, P.K.; Bates, T.S.; Baum, E.; Doubleday, N.; Fiore, A.M.; Flanner, M.; Fridlind, A.; Garrett, T.J.; Koch, D.; Menon, S.; Shindell, D.; Stohl, A.; Warren, S.G.

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Several short-lived pollutants known to impact Arctic climate may be contributing to the accelerated rates of warming observed in this region relative to the global annually averaged temperature increase. Here, we present a summary of the short-lived pollutants that impact Arctic climate including methane, tropospheric ozone, and tropospheric aerosols. For each pollutant, we provide a description of the major sources and the mechanism of forcing. We also provide the first seasonally averaged forcing and corresponding temperature response estimates focused specifically on the Arctic. The calculations indicate that the forcings due to black carbon, methane, and tropospheric ozone lead to a positive surface temperature response indicating the need to reduce emissions of these species within and outside the Arctic. Additional aerosol species may also lead to surface warming if the aerosol is coincident with thin, low lying clouds. We suggest strategies for reducing the warming based on current knowledge and discuss directions for future research to address the large remaining uncertainties.

  19. Quaternary Science Reviews 21 (2002) 9971021 Responses of an arctic landscape to Lateglacial and early Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The Arctic is important to global climate because its Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY 10964, USA c Reanier and Associates, 1807 Thirty Second Avenue, Seattle to the YD are rare, suggesting that rates of paludification slowed. Immediately after 10,000 14 C yr BP

  20. Radiative and microphysical properties of Arctic stratus clouds from multiangle downwelling infrared radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    climate is strongly influenced by an extensive and persistent pattern of cloud cover [Francis, 1997 properties can have significant effects on long- wave radiation, which dominates the radiation energy budgetRadiative and microphysical properties of Arctic stratus clouds from multiangle downwelling

  1. How does the atmospheric variability drive the aerosol residence time in the Arctic region?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for enhanced cloud evaporation and hence a decrease in the fraction of solar radiation reflected by the cloud cover. This strong climatic retroaction is referred to as the `semi-direct effect' of BC aerosols. BC of the atmospheric aerosol concentration is paramount to assess its radiative effects in the Arctic, a region

  2. Interannual variations of Arctic cloud types in relation to Ryan Eastman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    increasing cloud cover, which may promote ice loss by the longwave effect. The trends are positive in all in sea ice extent and thickness may be affected by cloud radiative effect (CRE), and seaice changes may in turn impart changes to cloud cover. Visual cloud reports from land and ocean regions of the Arctic

  3. Relationships between Arctic Sea Ice and Clouds during Autumn AXEL J. SCHWEIGER AND RON W. LINDSAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jennifer

    , as the direct radiative effects of cloud cover changes are compensated for by changes in the temperature The connection between sea ice variability and cloud cover over the Arctic seas during autumn is investigated that cloud cover variability near the sea ice margins is strongly linked to sea ice variability. Sea ice

  4. Arctic Oscillation response to the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption: Effects of volcanic aerosols and ozone depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    of perturbation experiments, the full radiative effects of the observed Pinatubo aerosol cloud were included eruption, which produced the largest global volcanic aerosol cloud in the twentieth century. A seriesArctic Oscillation response to the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption: Effects of volcanic aerosols

  5. Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

  6. Sustainability E-Newsletter Fall/Winter 2013-2014 Like "Office of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Sustainability E-Newsletter Fall/Winter 2013-2014 Like "Office of Environmental Policy" on FacebookDay..........................................................................................2 Campus Sustainability Day our Sustainability Coordinators......................................................6 Campus

  7. Trait Correlation and Confirmation of QTLs for Rhizome Growth and Over-wintering in Sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washburn, Jacob

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    in the field for a second season during the winter of 2011-2012 in order to obtain data on the longevity of 15 these lines. In the spring of 2012 the plants were again rated phenotypically for over- wintering. Special caution was taken during both... temperatures were experience on 8 days (OCS 2012). Of the 33 plots that survived the first winter 26 survived the second winter as well (81.8% survival rate). Because of severe drought, wildlife pressure, and moderate temperatures during the second year...

  8. Math 582 Teaching Core College Mathematics Winter 2013 Instructor Amites Sarkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Amites

    Math 582 Teaching Core College Mathematics Winter 2013 Instructor Amites Sarkar Text How to Solve e-mail is amites.sarkar@wwu.edu #12;

  9. Sources of spread in simulations of Arctic sea ice loss over the twenty-first century: A letter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boé, Julien; Hall, Alex; Qu, Xin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the ultimate fate of the ice pack. 1 Introduction Over theof the entire year’s ice pack (Fig. 3b). The relationshipultimate fate of the Arctic ice pack. In Boé et al. (2009b)

  10. Breaking the Ice: Navigation in the Arctic Grace Xingxin Gao, Liang Heng, Todd Walter, and Per Enge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    Breaking the Ice: Navigation in the Arctic Grace Xingxin Gao, Liang Heng, Todd Walter, and Per Enge (ION) Early Achievement Award. Liang Heng is a Ph.D. candidate under the guidance of Professor Per Enge

  11. Phylogenetic relationships, host affinity, and geographic structure of boreal and arctic endophytes from three major plant lineages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    Phylogenetic relationships, host affinity, and geographic structure of boreal and arctic endophytes Although associated with all plants, fungal endophytes (microfungi that live within healthy plant tissues, or phylogenetic relationships. We surveyed endophytic Ascomycota from healthy photosyn- thetic tissues of three

  12. A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Products for the Arctic Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in Air–Sea Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

    The uncertainties related to atmospheric fields in the Arctic Ocean from commonly used and recently available reanalysis products are investigated. Fields from the 1) ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) Common ...

  13. Nuclear winter: smoke generation, deposition, and removal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Winter scenario predicts a major worldwide cooling arising from the large quantities of soot deposited in the atmosphere from fires ignited by the explosions in a large nuclear exchange. This document reviews the source function for smoke associated with urban and forest fires, addressing the smoke composition and predicted smoke cloud rise height. The interaction of the smoke cloud with the atmosphere is complex and depends on weather conditions. Results from past forest fires demonstrate what can actually happen to smoke clouds.

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - Winter Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- PolarizationgovCampaignsSummer Single ColumngovCampaignsWatergovCampaignsWinter

  15. Energy-Efficient Cooking for Winter | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPowerHome |Cooking for Winter Energy-Efficient Cooking

  16. EIA-877 WINTER HEATING FUELS TELEPHONE SURVEY INSTRUCTIONS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:DeploymentSite Name: Email: Terminal2,7,7, "Winter Heating

  17. 2014 NCAI Executive Council Winter Session | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergy VehicleSessionOffice4 NCAI Executive Council Winter

  18. The development of a signal processing network for a real-time Arctic sea ice classification system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordhaus, William D

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIGNAL PROCESSING NETWORK FOR A REAL-TIME ARCTIC SEA ICE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM A Thesis by WILLIAM DOUGLAS NORDHAUS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIGNAL PROCESSING NETWORK FOR A REAL-TIME ARCTIC SEA ICE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM A Thesis by William Douglas Nordhaus Approved as to style...

  19. Representativeness-Based Sampling Network Design and Scaling Strategies for Measurements in Arctic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    developed a Multivariate Spatiotemporal Clustering (MSTC) methodology based on k-means clustering that uses for the present and future are shown in Figure 1. Comparison of present with future maps shows how environmental

  20. Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Cathleen

    Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness Jacqueline A the Ice Mass Balance buoy (IMB) in response to the need for monitoring changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover. The IMB is an autonomous, ice-based system. IMB buoys provide a time series of ice

  1. Effects of dirty snow in nuclear winter simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A.M.; Robock, A.; Ellingson, R.G.

    1988-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale nuclear war would inject smoke into the atmosphere from burning forests, cities, and industries in targeted areas. This smoke could fall out onto snow and ice and would lower cryospheric albedos by as much as 50%. A global energy balance climate model is used to investigate the maximum effect these ''dirty snow'' albedos have on the surface temperature in nuclear winter simulations which span several years. These effects are investigated for different nuclear winter scenarios, snow precipitation rates, latitudinal distributions of smoke, and seasonal timings. We find that dirty snow, in general, would have a small temperature effect at mid- and low latitudes but could have a large temperature effect at polar latitudes, particularly if the soot is able to reappear significantly in later summers. Factors which limit the climatic importance of the dirty snow are (1) the dirty snow albedo is lowest when the atmosphere still contains a large amount of light-absorbing smoke; (2) even with dirty snow, sea ice areas can still increase, which helps maintain colder temperatures through the sea ice thermal inertial feedback; (3) the snow and ice areas affected by the dirty snow albedos are largest when there is little seasonal solar insolation; and (4) the area affected by the dirty snow is relatively small under all circumstances. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  2. Climate and smoke: An appraisal of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turco, R.P. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA)); Toon, O.B.; Pollack, J.B. (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (USA)); Ackerman, T.P. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (USA)); Sagan, C. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    1990-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest understanding of nuclear winter is reviewed. Considerable progress has been made in quantifying the production and injection of soot by large-scale fires, the regional and global atmospheric dispersion of the soot, and the resulting physical, environmental, and climatic perturbations. New information has been obtained from laboratory studies, field experiments, and numerical modeling on a variety of scales (plume, mesoscale, and global). For the most likely soot injections from a full-scale nuclear exchange, three-dimensional climate simulations yield midsummer land temperature decreases that average 10{degree} to 20{degree}C in northern mid-latitudes, with local cooling as large as 35{degree}C, and subfreezing summer temperatures in some regions. Anomalous atmospheric circulations caused by solar heating of soot is found to stabilize the upper atmosphere against overturning, thus increasing the soot lifetime, and to accelerate interhemispheric transport, leading to persistent effects in the Southern Hemisphere. Serious new environmental problems associated with soot injection have been identified, including disruption of monsoon precipitation and severe depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer in the Northern Hemisphere. The basic physics of nuclear winter has been reaffirmed through several authoritative international technical assessments and numerous individual scientific investigations. Remaining areas of uncertainty and research priorities are discussed in view of the latest findings.

  3. Studies on protein degradation and carbohydrate fermentation of the grasses from the winter pastures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Studies on protein degradation and carbohydrate fermentation of the grasses from the winter of the winter grasses. The purpose of this research was to investigate the protein and carbohydrate degradation Anim Sci, 58, 714). The degradation parameters were calculated using equations: in which «a

  4. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy, and F. C. Blomquist. 2014. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for Greater Sage-Grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development. Ecosphere 5(2):15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES13-00238. 1 Abstract

  5. Mesoscale-resolving simulations of summer and winter bora events in the Adriatic Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    Mesoscale-resolving simulations of summer and winter bora events in the Adriatic Sea Benoit CushmanCAST model on a 1.2-min grid (about 2-km resolution) and resolve the mesoscale variability because the grid-Roisin, B., and K. A. Korotenko (2007), Mesoscale-resolving simulations of summer and winter bora events

  6. Lecture 25 1 Physics 558 Winter 2013 Physics 558 Lecture 25

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Steve

    Lecture 25 1 Physics 558 Winter 2013 Physics 558 ­ Lecture 25 Neutrino masses, mixing represents just 2 degrees of freedom. There #12;Lecture 25 2 Physics 558 Winter 2013 are also several the "known" nuclear physics at the center of the sun is approximately 50% of that expected. This situation

  7. Proc. 19th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2003) 000{000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 19th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2003) 000{000 19th Winter Workshop on Nuclear:9 Nuclear Stopping, Baryon Distributions PACS: 25.75DW5 1. Introduction The major goal for relativistic heavy ion reactions is to form hot and dense nuclear matter

  8. Lecture 36 1 Physics 558 Winter 2013 Physics 558 Lecture 36

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Steve

    Lecture 36 1 Physics 558 Winter 2013 Physics 558 ­ Lecture 36 Some Final Comments on QCD of normal nuclear interactions (the spatially asymptotic states of the high energy analysis) is dominatedD L (36.3) #12;Lecture 36 2 Physics 558 Winter 2013 In this chiral limit we see that this Lagrangian

  9. HABITAT USE DOES NOT REFLECT HABITAT QUALITY FOR HENSLOW'S SPARROWS (AMMODRAMUS HENSLOWII) WINTERING IN FIRE-MANAGED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stouffer, Phil

    School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center and Louisiana State, especially for migrants on the wintering grounds. Wintering Henslow's Sparrow (Ammodramus henslowii energy availability, but not plant speci

  10. Know before you go. Don't get left out in the cold. Prepare your vehicle for winter weather.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    . Change your wiper blades to winter blades. They are heavier and push snow and ice more easily. 4. Clear

  11. arctic troposphere northeast: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P. Talvenmaa; M. Tasanen; J. Vanhala 2000-01-01 224 Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Measurements of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Environmental Sciences and Ecology...

  12. Spatial and seasonal variations of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in the arctic atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Yushan; Hung, Hayley; Blanchard, Pierrette; Patton, Gregory W.; Kallenborn, Roland; Konoplev, Alexei V.; Fellin, Phil; Li, Henrik; Geen, Charles; Stern, Gary; Rosenburg, Bruno; Barrie, Leonard A.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weekly high volume air samples were concurrently collected between 2000 and 2003 at six arctic sites, namely Alert, Little Fox Lake, Kinngait in Canada; Point Barrow in Alaska, USA; Zeppelin in Norway; and Valkarkai in Russia. Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were quantified in all samples. Data comparison showed that ?-HCH and HCB were relatively homogeneously distributed in the circumpolar atmosphere and fairly uniform throughout the seasons. However, significantly high atmospheric ?-HCH and HCB concentrations and strong seasonality of ?-HCH and ?-HCH were found at the low arctic site of Little Fox Lake. Stronger temperature dependence of ?-HCH and ?-HCH at this location suggests that secondary emissions (or re-evaporation from surface environmental media) were more important at this site than others. Tendency of the secondary emissions also appeared increased compared to a decade ago in this region. It is thus hypothesized that higher precipitation rate at this topographically elevated station facilitated the transfer of ?-HCH from the atmosphere to surface media when technical HCH was still being used worldwide. On the other hand, relatively higher temperature at this southerly station enhanced re-evaporation to the atmosphere after the global ban of technical HCH. In contrast, larger spatial and seasonal discrepancies were apparent for ''current-use'' ?-HCH than ?-HCH and HCB in the arctic atmosphere. It likely reflected different influences of primary contaminant sources on various arctic locations. Calculations of fugacity ratio suggest slight net deposition potential of HCB from air to seawater in the circumpolar environment, whereas air/seawater exchange direction of ?-HCH varied from location to location in this region.

  13. The controls on net ecosystem productivity along an Arctic transect: a model comparison with ux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The controls on net ecosystem productivity along an Arctic transect: a model comparison with ¯ux , * J O S E P H P . M C F A D D E N ² and F . S T U A R T C H A P I N I I I ² 2 *The Ecosystems Center ecosystem CO2-exchange data along a transect in northern Alaska. We use an extant process-based model

  14. New Olodels COnfirOl nuclear winter Everything from purely mathematical models to forest fire studies shows that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    New Olodels COnfirOl nuclear winter Everything from purely mathematical models to forest fire conclusion is that nuclear war must be prevented- by Star Wars. by Alan Roback THE THEORY OF nuclear winter. The basic theory of nuclear winter has remained un- changed since it was first described by Paul Crutzen

  15. he theory of nuclear winter has provoked argu-ments since it was first proposed in 1982. While the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    T he theory of nuclear winter has provoked argu- ments since it was first proposed in 1982. While of nuclear winter. The U. N. report, whose authors include eleven scientists from six continents, en- dorsed and supported nuclear winter theory, stating: "It appears evident that none would escape the awful conse

  16. Winter Fuels Report week ending: November 8, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for PADD's 1, 2, and 3; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city.

  17. Winter fuels report, week ending November 9, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Winter fuels report, week ending October 12, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city.

  19. Winter fuels report, week ending January 4, 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information on the following: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD), I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 34 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Winter fuels report, week ending October 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for PADD's 1, 2, and 3; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 37 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. Winter fuels report, week ending January 11, 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/ State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 34 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Winter fuels report, week ending December 7, 1990. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Winter fuels report, week ending November 30, 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cites; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. Winter fuels report, week ending November 16, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Winter fuels report week ending: November 17, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  6. Winter Fuels Report: Week ending November 10, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all PADD and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and, a 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  7. Winter fuels report, week ending December 16, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local Governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s 1, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  8. Winter fuels report, week ending October 6, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topcs: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s, I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Informatoin Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  9. Winter fuels reports, week ending: November 24, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices. Residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  10. Winter fuels report, week ending December 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices. Residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  11. Effect of dust models on global nuclear winter. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pontier, P.Q.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of optical-depth calculations were accomplished to assess the effects of various existing dust and soot models on the transmission of incident sunlight. A change in the standard deviation of the particle-size distribution from two to four, assuming constant total density, resulted in a decrease in the visible optical depth by a factor of ten. A technique using a method of direct integration was developed for the calculation of the effective optical depth of nuclear-induced dust and soot clouds. Contributions from directly transmitted photons, first scattered photons using anisotropic cross sections, and all subsequently scattered photons were used to calculate the amount of light transmitted through the cloud. Absorption effects were also included. The results of this study were comparable to the results of several recent nuclear winter studies.

  12. arctic shorebird system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 to 109 g. To accurately measure the interacting effects of air temperature and wind speed, we used two or more air temperatures between 15 and 30C that produced cold...

  13. [1] S. F. Ackley, V. I. Lytle, K. M. Golden, M. N. Darling, and G. A. Kuehn. Sea ice measure-ments during ANZFLUX. Antarctic J. U. S., 30:133135, 1995.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    -Menge, and K. Frey. Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo. J. Geophys. Res. (Oceans), 109(C18):C] C. H. Fritsen, V. I. Lytle, S. F. Ackley, and C. W. Sullivan. Autumn bloom of Antarctic pack-ice. Sea ice measure- ments during ANZFLUX. Antarctic J. U. S., 30:133­135, 1995. [2] G. Allaire

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Winter habitat use does not influence spring arrival dates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    success of Yellow Warblers breeding in the arctic Anna Drake · Michaela Martin · David J. Green Received passerines can influence bird condi- tion (Sherry and Holmes 1996; Studds and Marra 2005; Smith et al. 2011 with delayed arrival (Tulp A. Drake (&) Á M. Martin Á D. J. Green Centre for Wildlife Ecology, Department

  15. The impact of an intense summer cyclone on 2012 Arctic sea ice retreat Jinlun Zhang, Ron Lindsay, Axel Schweiger, and Michael Steele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Arctic ice volume had already declined ~40% from the 2007­2011 mean. The thin sea ice pack of the low-pressure system was well within the sea ice pack, with a minimum central pressure of 974.5 hThe impact of an intense summer cyclone on 2012 Arctic sea ice retreat Jinlun Zhang, Ron Lindsay

  16. Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from the southeastern Canada Basin2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from (Arctic Ocean) to act as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions12 expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high13 pCO2sw (~290-320 atm

  17. L. Jean Camp & Ka-Ping Yee Human implications of technology, Practical Handbook of Internet Computing ed. M. P. Singh, CRC Press (New York, NY) Winter 2003.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camp, L. Jean

    Press (New York, NY) Winter 2003. 3 designer that the single reliable principle of responsible design

  18. Proceedings of the 2013 Winter Simulation Conference R. Pasupathy, S.-H. Kim, A. Tolk, R. Hill, and M. E. Kuhl, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of the 2013 Winter Simulation Conference R. Pasupathy, S.-H. Kim, A. Tolk, R. Hill the clarity and readability of their papers in the Proceedings of the Winter Simulation Conference, this paper at the Winter Simulation Conference (WSC) as well as publication in the Proceedings of the Winter Simulation

  19. Proceedings of the 2011 Winter Simulation Conference S. Jain, R. R. Creasey, J. Himmelspach, K. P. White, and M. Fu, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of the 2011 Winter Simulation Conference S. Jain, R. R. Creasey, J. Himmelspach, K. P the clarity and readability of their papers in the Proceedings of the Winter Simulation Conference, this paper at the Winter Simulation Conference (WSC) as well as publication in the Proceedings of the Winter Simulation

  20. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairbanks performed hydrologic analyses using the physically-based model WaSiM-ETH that was forced by data, and processes such as evaporation. Measurement of chemical constituents that vary in concentration according transformations such as mineralization of organic matter to ammonia, nitrate, CO2, and methane. To determ