Sample records for arctic slope regional

  1. Research on the seasonal snow of the Arctic Slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The original objectives of this research included a regional study of snow on the entire Arctic Slope. During the first year the scope was restricted to the R{sub 4}D area. In the second and third years the primary focus was also on the R{sub 4}D area,but measurements were made at Prudhoe Bay, Atgasuk and Wainwright to determine the flux of wind-blown snow on a wider scale. Additional broadening of scope was discussed at the San Diego R{sub 4}D meetings in April 1986 and 1987 and at the extrapolation workshop held at Penn State University in Spring 1987. The broadening of scope has also included detailed studies of chemistry and controls exerted by large-scale advection of air masses on the longwave, thermal IR, and radiation. The latter phenomena are critical in initiating snowmelt.

  2. The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed Donat AboutTextiles2004 North Slope of

  3. Research on the seasonal snow of the Arctic Slope. Annual progress report, January 16, 1988--December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.S.

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The original objectives of this research included a regional study of snow on the entire Arctic Slope. During the first year the scope was restricted to the R{sub 4}D area. In the second and third years the primary focus was also on the R{sub 4}D area,but measurements were made at Prudhoe Bay, Atgasuk and Wainwright to determine the flux of wind-blown snow on a wider scale. Additional broadening of scope was discussed at the San Diego R{sub 4}D meetings in April 1986 and 1987 and at the extrapolation workshop held at Penn State University in Spring 1987. The broadening of scope has also included detailed studies of chemistry and controls exerted by large-scale advection of air masses on the longwave, thermal IR, and radiation. The latter phenomena are critical in initiating snowmelt.

  4. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    energy deployment in the Arctic Region. The purpose of this round is to give feedback on the elements of the draft plan. DOE encourages stakeholders to provide comments on...

  5. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Dutch HarborUnalaska February 27, 2015 10:00AM to 12:00PM EST Unalaska, Alaska Unalaska Public Library 64 Eleanor Dr. Unalaska, AK 99685...

  6. NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu National Center of the net sea ice production and the sea ice exchanges between the Arctic and its adjacent seas are studied) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning ice cover

  7. NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study Aixue The variability of net sea ice production and sea ice exchange between the Arctic and its adjacent seas export) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning

  8. arctic region baltic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    look at the higher trophic re-lationships of the crustacean zooplankton of arctic polygon depression ponds, hoping not only to discover which species were predaceous, but to...

  9. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  10. Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS) Pamela Spier, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK Abstract This paper presents an evaluation of the Hydro. Introduction and Motivation The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS, Kramm et al. 1996, Mölders

  11. NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu, Claes Rooth and Rainer Bleck February 18, 2003 Abstract The variability of the net sea ice production and the sea ice circulation model. The wind driven divergence (or ice flux export) is the major factor controlling the net sea

  12. How does the atmospheric variability drive the aerosol residence time in the Arctic region?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for enhanced cloud evaporation and hence a decrease in the fraction of solar radiation reflected by the cloud cover. This strong climatic retroaction is referred to as the `semi-direct effect' of BC aerosols. BC of the atmospheric aerosol concentration is paramount to assess its radiative effects in the Arctic, a region

  13. Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane Seepage from Thermokarst Lakes on the Alaska North Slope in Response to Arctic Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this research were to characterize the source, magnitude and temporal variability of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes (TKL) within the Alaska North Slope gas hydrate province, assess the vulnerability of these areas to ongoing and future arctic climate change and determine if gas hydrate dissociation resulting from permafrost melting is contributing to the current lake emissions. Analyses were focused on four main lake locations referred to in this report: Lake Qalluuraq (referred to as Lake Q) and Lake Teshekpuk (both on Alaska?s North Slope) and Lake Killarney and Goldstream Bill Lake (both in Alaska?s interior). From analyses of gases coming from lakes in Alaska, we showed that ecological seeps are common in Alaska and they account for a larger source of atmospheric methane today than geologic subcap seeps. Emissions from the geologic source could increase with potential implications for climate warming feedbacks. Our analyses of TKL sites showing gas ebullition were complemented with geophysical surveys, providing important insight about the distribution of shallow gas in the sediments and the lake bottom manifestation of seepage (e.g., pockmarks). In Lake Q, Chirp data were limited in their capacity to image deeper sediments and did not capture the thaw bulb. The failure to capture the thaw bulb at Lake Q may in part be related to the fact that the present day lake is a remnant of an older, larger, and now-partially drained lake. These suggestions are consistent with our analyses of a dated core of sediment from the lake that shows that a wetland has been present at the site of Lake Q since approximately 12,000 thousand years ago. Chemical analyses of the core indicate that the availability of methane at the site has changed during the past and is correlated with past environmental changes (i.e. temperature and hydrology) in the Arctic. Discovery of methane seeps in Lake Teshekpuk in the northernmost part of the lake during 2009 reconnaissance surveys provided a strong impetus to visit this area in 2010. The seismic methods applied in Lake Teshekpuk were able to image pockmarks, widespread shallow gas in the sediments, and the relationship among different sediment packages on the lake?s bottom, but even boomer seismics did not detect permafrost beneath the northern part of the lake. By characterizing the biogeochemistry of shallow TKL with methane seeps we showed that the radical seasonal shifts in ice cover and temperature. These seasonal environmental differences result in distinct consumption and production processes of biologically-relevant compounds. The combined effects of temperature, ice-volume and other lithological factors linked to seepage from the lake are manifest in the distribution of sedimentary methane in Lake Q during icecovered and ice-free conditions. The biogeochemistry results illustrated very active methanotrophy in TKLs. Substantial effort was subsequently made to characterize the nature of methanotrophic communities in TKLs. We applied stable isotope probing approaches to genetically characterize the methanotrophs most active in utilizing methane in TKLs. Our study is the first to identify methane oxidizing organisms active in arctic TKLs, and revealing that type I methanotrophs and type II methanotrophs are abundant and active in assimilating methane in TKLs. These organisms play an important role in limiting the flux of methane from these sites. Our investigations indicate that as temperatures increase in the Arctic, oxidation rates and active methanotrophic populations will also shift. Whether these changes can offset predicted increases in methanogenesis is an important question underlying models of future methane flux and resultant climate change. Overall our findings indicate that TKLs and their ability to act as both source and sink of methane are exceedingly sensitive to environmental change.

  14. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

  15. Carbon dynamics in arctic vegetation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Street, Lorna Elizabeth

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the Arctic land surface and the global climate system. A large amount of organic carbon (C) is currently stored in Arctic soils; if ...

  16. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  17. Spatial distribution of geotechnical properties in surficial marine sediments-Northwestern slope region, Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Matthew Kael

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recent periods of geologic time. The only silty sediments encountered in this study were retrieved from these three general locations. In general, the study illustrated that highly localized sedimentation environments occur along the continental slope...

  18. Radioactive contamination of the Arctic Region, Baltic Sea, and the Sea of Japan from activities in the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of the Arctic regions of northern Europe and Russia, as well as the Sea of Japan, may become a potential major hazard to the ecosystem of these large areas. Widespread poor radioactive waste management practices from nuclear fuel cycle activities in the former Soviet Union have resulted in direct discharges to this area as well as multiple sources that may continue to release additional radioactivity. Information on the discharges of radioactive materials has become more commonplace in the last year, and a clearer picture is emerging of the scale of the contamination. Radioactivity in the Arctic oceans is now reported to be four times higher than would be derived from fallout from weapons tests. Although the characteristics and extent of the contamination are not well known, it has been stated that the contamination in the Arctic may range from 1 to 3.5 billion curies. As yet, no scientific sampling or measurement program has occurred that can verify the amount or extent of the contamination, or its potential impact on the ecosystem.

  19. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Slope ANWR: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BBbls: billion barrels Bbls: barrels Daily Petroleum Production Rate: The amount of petroleum extracted per day from a well, group of...

  20. arctic vegetation amplify: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dynamics in arctic vegetation Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the...

  1. arctic ice islands: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analogous to the effects of the Arctic region; KEYWORDS: Arctic Ocean, ice rafting, climate change Citation: Darby, D. A., and J. F. Bischof (2004), A Holocene record of...

  2. North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigtoDepartment of Energy NorthBOE

  3. North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigtoDepartment of Energy

  4. North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigtoDepartment of EnergyLiquids

  5. Satellite Microwave remote sensing of contrasting surface water inundation changes within the ArcticBoreal Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    -atmosphere water, energy and carbon (CO2, CH4) fluxes, and potential feedbacks to climate change. Here we report fractional open water (Fw) cover from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E). The AMSR ) of regions above 49°N (Brown et al., 1998). Although permafrost is widespread at high latitudes due to low

  6. Slope parameter for the differential cross-section for the reaction p + d. -->. X + d in the region of small momentum transfer at Fermilab energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimov, Yu.K.; Bartenev, V.D.; Izyurov, V.M.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A deuterium gas jet target was used in the circulating beam of the Fermilab accelerator to study the M/sup 2//sub x/ and s dependence and the slope parameter for pd ..-->.. Xd in the region 0.025 less than or equal to vertical bar t vertical bar less than or equal to 0.17 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ and 5 less than or equal to M/sup 2//sub x/ less than or equal to 0.068s GeV/sup 2/. A simple parametrization in terms of the variable (1 - x) is found.

  7. Arctic house

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkel, Joel A. (Joel Abram), 1969-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently available housing in the Arctic is limited to solutions that have been adapted from designs for less severe climates. This thesis has developed a new manner of residential construction designed specifically for ...

  8. Lesson Summary Students will learn about the Arctic Beaufort Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Lesson Summary Students will learn about the Arctic Beaufort Sea and research the adaptations of people and animals in the arctic regions. They will also learn about how their actions can affect the Arctic and learn about the International Polar Year. Prior Knowledge & Skills · Research skills

  9. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  10. Primary production of arctic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, D.V.S.; Platt, T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data that have become available during the last ten years they have reestimated the annual production by phytoplankton in the arctic marine ecosystem. The new figure is some sixteen times higher than an estimate made in 1975. This is of considerable significance regionally, but still does not, of itself, imply that global phytoplankton production is underestimated at present. 82 references, 3 figures, 9 tables.

  11. Distant origins of Arctic black carbon: A Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [Wallace and Thompson, 2002]. The Arctic climate is especially sensitive to changes in the hydrological005296. 1. Introduction [2] The Arctic is a particularly sensitive region to global climate change. Observations and models indicate that as the climate warms, the Arctic warms most and fastest [e.g., Manabe et

  12. Regional long-term production modeling from a single well test, Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Brian; Kurihara, Masanori; White, Mark D.; Moridis, George J.; Wilson, Scott J.; Pooladi-Darvish, Mehran; Gaddipati, Manohar; Masuda, Yoshihiro; Collett, T. S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Narita, Hideo; Rose, Kelly K.; Boswell, Ray

    2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the results from the open-hole formation pressure response test in the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well (Mount Elbert well) using Schlumberger’s Modular Dynamics Formation Tester (MDT) wireline tool, the International Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison project performed long-term reservoir simulations on three different model reservoirs. These descriptions were based on 1) the Mount Elbert gas hydrate accumulation as delineated by an extensive history-matching exercise, 2) an estimation of the hydrate accumulation near the Prudhoe Bay L-pad, and 3) a reservoir that would be down-dip of the Prudhoe Bay L-pad and therefore warmer and deeper. All of these simulations were based, in part, on the results of the MDT results from the Mount Elbert Well. The comparison group’s consensus value for the initial perme- ability of the hydrate-filled reservoir (k = 0.12 mD) and the permeability model based on the MDT history match were used as the basis for subsequent simulations on the three regional scenarios. The simulation results of the five different simulation codes, CMG STARS, HydrateResSim, MH-21 HYDRES, STOMP-HYD, and TOUGHþHYDRATE exhibit good qualitative agreement and the variability of potential methane production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs is illustrated. As expected, the pre- dicted methane production rate increased with increasing in situ reservoir temperature; however, a significant delay in the onset of rapid hydrate dissociation is observed for a cold, homogeneous reservoir and it is found to be repeatable. The inclusion of reservoir heterogeneity in the description of this cold reservoir is shown to eliminate this delayed production. Overall, simulations utilized detailed information collected across the Mount Elbert reservoir either obtained or determined from geophysical well logs, including thickness (37 ft), porosity (35%), hydrate saturation (65%), intrinsic permeability (1000 mD), pore water salinity (5 ppt), and formation temperature (3.3–3.9 ?C). This paper presents the approach and results of extrapolating regional forward production modeling from history-matching efforts on the results from a single well test.

  13. Steep Slope Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep Slope Calculator Estimates Cooling and Heating

  14. Using Radar, Lidar and Radiometer Data from NSA and SHEBA to Quantify Cloud Property Effects on the Surface Heat Budget in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet Intrieri; Mathhew Shupe

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud and radiation data from two distinctly different Arctic areas are analyzed to study the differences between coastal Alaskan and open Arctic Ocean region clouds and their respective influence on the surface radiation budget. The cloud and radiation datasets were obtained from (1) the DOE North Slope of Alaska (NSA) facility in the coastal town of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) the SHEBA field program, which was conducted from an icebreaker frozen in, and drifting with, the sea-ice for one year in the Western Arctic Ocean. Radar, lidar, radiometer, and sounding measurements from both locations were used to produce annual cycles of cloud occurrence and height, atmospheric temperature and humidity, surface longwave and shortwave broadband fluxes, surface albedo, and cloud radiative forcing. In general, both regions revealed a similar annual trend of cloud occurrence fraction with minimum values in winter (60-75%) and maximum values during spring, summer and fall (80-90%). However, the annual average cloud occurrence fraction for SHEBA (76%) was lower than the 6-year average cloud occurrence at NSA (92%). Both Arctic areas also showed similar annual cycle trends of cloud forcing with clouds warming the surface through most of the year and a period of surface cooling during the summer, when cloud shading effects overwhelm cloud greenhouse effects. The greatest difference between the two regions was observed in the magnitude of the cloud cooling effect (i.e., shortwave cloud forcing), which was significantly stronger at NSA and lasted for a longer period of time than at SHEBA. This is predominantly due to the longer and stronger melt season at NSA (i.e., albedo values that are much lower coupled with Sun angles that are somewhat higher) than the melt season observed over the ice pack at SHEBA. Longwave cloud forcing values were comparable between the two sites indicating a general similarity in cloudiness and atmospheric temperature and humidity structure between the two regions.

  15. 6, 96559722, 2006 Arctic smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Discussions Arctic smoke ­ record high air pollution levels in the European Arctic due to agricultural fires into the European Arctic and caused the most severe air pollution episodes ever recorded there. This paper confirms that biomass burning (BB) was in-5 deed the source of the observed air pollution, studies the transport

  16. Mathematics ON SLOPE GENERA OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Yi

    Pacific Journal of Mathematics ON SLOPE GENERA OF KNOTTED TORI IN 4-SPACE YI LIU, YI NI, HONGBIN, HONGBIN SUN AND SHICHENG WANG We investigate genera of slopes of a knotted torus in the 4-sphere analogous. 117 #12;118 YI LIU, YI NI, HONGBIN SUN AND SHICHENG WANG from the torus to the 4-sphere. By slightly

  17. Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

  18. Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Laurence C.

    Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series Laurence C. Smith,1 of melt onset can be observed over small ice caps, as well as the major ice sheets and multi-year sea ice for 14 small Arctic ice caps from 1992­2000. Interannual and regional variability in the timing of melt

  19. The Arctic Oscillation, climate change and the effects on precipitation in Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    in the Mediterranean basin. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Climate change Arctic Oscillation) investigated the effect of climate change on water resources of Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East regionThe Arctic Oscillation, climate change and the effects on precipitation in Israel Amir Givati b

  20. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Arctic sea ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic sea ice Sierra Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Begin Flights Over Arctic Sea Ice On July 25, 2013, in Climate, Customers & Partners, Global, Monitoring, News, News & Events,...

  2. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

  3. Retrieval of Cloud Phase Using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Data during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, P.; Shupe, M.; Uttal, T.; Poellot, M.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving climate model predictions over Earth's polar regions requires a comprehensive knowledge of polar cloud microphysics. Over the Arctic, there is minimal contrast between the clouds and background snow surface, making it difficult to detect clouds and retrieve their phase from space. Snow and ice cover, temperature inversions, and the predominance of mixed-phase clouds make it even more difficult to determine cloud phase. Also, since determining cloud phase is the first step toward analyzing cloud optical depth, particle size, and water content, it is vital that the phase be correct in order to obtain accurate microphysical and bulk properties. Changes in these cloud properties will, in turn, affect the Arctic climate since clouds are expected to play a critical role in the sea ice albedo feedback. In this paper, the IR trispectral technique (IRTST) is used as a starting point for a WV and 11-{micro}m brightness temperature (T11) parameterization (WVT11P) of cloud phase using MODIS data. In addition to its ability to detect mixed-phase clouds, the WVT11P also has the capability to identify thin cirrus clouds overlying mixed or liquid phase clouds (multiphase ice). Results from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) MODIS phase model (AMPHM) are compared to the surface-based cloud phase retrievals over the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site and to in-situ data taken from University of North Dakota Citation (CIT) aircraft which flew during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE). It will be shown that the IRTST and WVT11P combined to form the AMPHM can achieve a relative high accuracy of phase discrimination compared to the surface-based retrievals. Since it only uses MODIS WV and IR channels, the AMPHM is robust in the sense that it can be applied to daytime, twilight, and nighttime scenes with no discontinuities in the output phase.

  4. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 1. Overview of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Background The Arctic...

  5. Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

  6. 65J.M. Grebmeier and W. Maslowski (eds.), The Pacific Arctic Region: Ecosystem Status and Trends in a Rapidly Changing Environment, DOI 10.1007/978-94-017-8863-2_4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    , Sapporo, Japan K. Mizobata Department of Ocean Sciences, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo, Japan J.E. Overland Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric mechanisms responsible for the diminishing sea ice cannot be explained by the leading Arctic Oscillation (AO

  7. Arctic-Winter Climatology and Radiative Effects of Clouds and Aerosols Based on Lidar and Radar Measurements at PEARL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    Arctic-Winter Climatology and Radiative Effects of Clouds and Aerosols Based on Lidar and Radar Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) code. Results on the climatology and radiative effects of clouds, arctic regions are the site of interactions between aerosols, clouds, radiation and precipitations

  8. Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types in Relation to Sea Ice RYAN EASTMAN AND STEPHEN G. WARREN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    longwave cloud radiative effect (CRE), sug- gesting that infrared radiation emitted toward the surface and cloud temperatures greater than 2318C. Cloud radiative effect over the Arctic likely varies seasonally of clouds have different effects on sea ice. Visual cloud reports from land and ocean regions of the Arctic

  9. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

  10. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einstein, Herbert H.

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical ...

  11. Resource Characterization and Quantification of Natural Gas-Hydrate and Associated Free-Gas Accumulations in the Prudhoe Bay - Kuparuk River Area on the North Slope of Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas hydrates have long been considered a nuisance by the petroleum industry. Hydrates have been hazards to drilling crews, with blowouts a common occurrence if not properly accounted for in drilling plans. In gas pipelines, hydrates have formed plugs if gas was not properly dehydrated. Removing these plugs has been an expensive and time-consuming process. Recently, however, due to the geologic evidence indicating that in situ hydrates could potentially be a vast energy resource of the future, research efforts have been undertaken to explore how natural gas from hydrates might be produced. This study investigates the relative permeability of methane and brine in hydrate-bearing Alaska North Slope core samples. In February 2007, core samples were taken from the Mt. Elbert site situated between the Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk oil fields on the Alaska North Slope. Core plugs from those core samples have been used as a platform to form hydrates and perform unsteady-steady-state displacement relative permeability experiments. The absolute permeability of Mt. Elbert core samples determined by Omni Labs was also validated as part of this study. Data taken with experimental apparatuses at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, ConocoPhillips laboratories at the Bartlesville Technology Center, and at the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation's facilities in Anchorage, Alaska, provided the basis for this study. This study finds that many difficulties inhibit the ability to obtain relative permeability data in porous media-containing hydrates. Difficulties include handling unconsolidated cores during initial core preparation work, forming hydrates in the core in such a way that promotes flow of both brine and methane, and obtaining simultaneous two-phase flow of brine and methane necessary to quantify relative permeability using unsteady-steady-state displacement methods.

  12. Mesoscale Modeling During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avramov, A.; Harringston, J.Y.; Verlinde, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic (Curry et al. 2000) and through various feedback mechanisms exert a strong influence on the Arctic climate. Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. It has been hypothesized that mixed-phase clouds are maintained through a balance between liquid water condensation resulting from the cloud-top radiative cooling and ice removal by precipitation (Pinto 1998; Harrington et al. 1999). In their modeling study Harrington et al. (1999) found that the maintenance of this balance depends strongly on the ambient concentration of ice forming nucleus (IFN). In a follow-up study, Jiang et al. (2002), using only 30% of IFN concentration predicted by Meyers et al. (1992) IFN parameterization were able to obtain results similar to the observations reported by Pinto (1998). The IFN concentration measurements collected during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004 over the North Slope of Alaska and the Beaufort Sea (Verlinde et al. 2005), also showed much lower values then those predicted (Prenne, pers. comm.) by currently accepted ice nucleation parameterizations (e.g. Meyers et al. 1992). The goal of this study is to use the extensive IFN data taken during M-PACE to examine what effects low IFN concentrations have on mesoscale cloud structure and coastal dynamics.

  13. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  14. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities Kathleen E. Duncan,in Alaskan North Slope oil production facilities. Title:in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities Authors: Kathleen E.

  15. Canada's Arctic Gateway: Discussion Paper Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    Canada's Arctic Gateway: Discussion Paper Summary September 2010 The following summarizes key Canada's Arctic Gateway a reality in terms of both national public policy and international presence the Government of Canada's national gateway policy framework. This discussion paper's use of the term "Arctic

  16. Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    Sciences #12;Changes in Arctic Climate What is the role of cloud cover in Arctic climate change? What is the Cloud Radiative Effect (CRE) in the Arctic? #12;CRE depends on season, cloud type CRE ­ whether clouds specifically chosen to include nighttime obs Total cloud cover and nine cloud types: - High cloud (cirriform

  17. Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    Declining September sea-ice extent #12;Clouds & Changes in Arctic Climate What is the role of cloud cover in Arctic climate change? What is the Cloud Radiative Effect (CRE) in the Arctic? #12;CRE Defined CRE nighttime obs Total cloud cover and nine cloud types: - High cloud (cirriform) - Middle Clouds: Altocumulus

  18. Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

  19. Arctic Ecologies: The Politics and Poetics of Northern Literary Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athens, Allison Katherine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts: Creating an Arctic Home. ” Coca-Cola Arctic Home.Coca-Cola and WWF. Web. 10 Apr. 2013. “Arctic NationalHarvard UP, 1997. Print. “Coca-Cola: Building Support for

  20. Characterizing and Modeling Arctic Shrub Expansion on the North Slope of Alaska, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naito, Adam Takashi

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    plain of ANWR .................................................................... 279 Figure A-29 Location of the flightlines for the 1984/1985 ANWR images... ....................................................................................... 280 Figure A-30 Location of the flightlines for the 1984/1985 ANWR images, subsection 1 ................................................................. 281 Figure A-31 Location of the flightlines for the 1984/1985 ANWR...

  1. Session Papers North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9 September 2009Energy,ServicesServicesSession Papers

  2. Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    of fast ice formation and growth. Instead, the modeled fast ice is replaced with pack ice which driftsEvaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project with estimates of sea ice thickness derived from pan-Arctic satellite freeboard measurements (2004

  3. airborne arctic stratospheric: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  4. arctic cloudy boundary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  5. arctic ground squirrel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  6. alesund arctic base: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  7. arctic stratospheric expedition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  8. arctic ground squirrels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  9. arctic shrub tundra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sites, Abandoned Dwellings, and Trampled Tundra in the Eastern Canadian Arctic: A Multivariate Analysis CiteSeer Summary: ABSTRACT. Arctic terrestrial ecosystems subjected...

  10. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

  11. arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

  12. Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremen, Universität

    Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8 with 4.240 million km2 a new historic minimum (Figure 1). Physicists of the University of Bremen now confirm the apprehension existing since July 2011 that the ice melt in the Arctic

  13. A multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shindell, D T; Chin, M; Dentener, F; Doherty, R M; Faluvegi, G; Fiore, A M; Hess, P; Koch, D M; MacKenzie, I A; Sanderson, M G; Schultz, M G; Schulz, M; Stevenson, D S; Teich, H; Textor, C; Wild, O; Bergmann, D J; Bey, I; Bian, H; Cuvelier, C; Duncan, B N; Folberth, G; Horowitz, L W; Jonson, J; Kaminski, J W; Marmer, E; Park, R; Pringle, K J; Schroeder, S; Szopa, S; Takemura, T; Zeng, G; Keating, T J; Zuber, A

    2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the response of Arctic gas and aerosol concentrations to perturbations in pollutant emissions from Europe, East and South Asia, and North America using results from a coordinated model intercomparison. These sensitivities to regional emissions (mixing ratio change per unit emission) vary widely across models and species. Intermodel differences are systematic, however, so that the relative importance of different regions is robust. North America contributes the most to Arctic ozone pollution. For aerosols and CO, European emissions dominate at the Arctic surface but East Asian emissions become progressively more important with altitude, and are dominant in the upper troposphere. Sensitivities show strong seasonality: surface sensitivities typically maximize during boreal winter for European and during spring for East Asian and North American emissions. Mid-tropospheric sensitivities, however, nearly always maximize during spring or summer for all regions. Deposition of black carbon (BC) onto Greenland is most sensitive to North American emissions. North America and Europe each contribute {approx}40% of total BC deposition to Greenland, with {approx}20% from East Asia. Elsewhere in the Arctic, both sensitivity and total BC deposition are dominated by European emissions. Model diversity for aerosols is especially large, resulting primarily from differences in aerosol physical and chemical processing (including removal). Comparison of modeled aerosol concentrations with observations indicates problems in the models, and perhaps, interpretation of the measurements. For gas phase pollutants such as CO and O{sub 3}, which are relatively well-simulated, the processes contributing most to uncertainties depend on the source region and altitude examined. Uncertainties in the Arctic surface CO response to emissions perturbations are dominated by emissions for East Asian sources, while uncertainties in transport, emissions, and oxidation are comparable for European and North American sources. At higher levels, model-to-model variations in transport and oxidation are most important. Differences in photochemistry appear to play the largest role in the intermodel variations in Arctic ozone sensitivity, though transport also contributes substantially in the mid-troposphere.

  14. Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

  15. Environmental Remediation program to perform slope-side cleanup...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Perform slope-side cleanup Environmental Remediation program to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace Los Alamos National Laboratory is performing a high-angle...

  16. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to improve representation of the Arctic in Earth System Models Topography influences snow cover, thermal

  17. An AeroCom Assessment of Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and Sea Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, Mian; De Luca, N.; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Liu, Xiaohong; Mann, G. W.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Yun, Yuxing; Zhang, Kai

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea-ice. Here, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea-ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004-2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng g?1 for an earlier Phase of AeroCom models (Phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng g?1 for a more recent Phase of AeroCom models (Phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng g?1. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model–measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60-90?N) atmospheric residence time for BC in Phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with the fact that most Arctic BC deposition originates from extra-Arctic emissions, these results suggest that aerosol removal processes are a leading source of variation in model performance. The multi-model mean (full range) of Arctic radiative effect from BC in snow is 0.15 (0.07-0.25) W m?2 and 0.18 (0.06-0.28) W m?2 in Phase I and Phase II models, respectively. After correcting for model biases relative to observed BC concentrations in different regions of the Arctic, we obtain a multi-model mean Arctic radiative effect of 0.17 W m?2 for the combined AeroCom ensembles. Finally, there is a high correlation between modeled BC concentrations sampled over the observational sites and the Arctic as a whole, indicating that the field campaign provided a reasonable sample of the Arctic.

  18. Decision guide for roof slope selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, T.R.; Wendt, R.L.; McCorkle, J.E.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision guide has been written for personnel who are responsible for the design, construction, and replacement of Air Force roofs. It provides the necessary information and analytical tools for making prudent and cost-effective decisions regarding the amount of slope to provide in various roofing situations. Because the expertise and experience of the decision makers will vary, the guide contains both basic slope-related concepts as well as more sophisticated technical data. This breadth of information enables the less experienced user to develop an understanding of roof slope issues before applying the more sophisticated analytical tools, while the experienced user can proceed directly to the technical sections. Although much of this guide is devoted to the analysis of costs, it is not a cost-estimating document. It does, however, provide the reader with the relative costs of a variety of roof slope options; and it shows how to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of different options. The selection of the proper roof slope coupled with good roof design, a quality installation, periodic inspection, and appropriate maintenance and repair will achieve the Air Force's objective of obtaining the best possible roofing value for its buildings. 21 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Interannual variations of Arctic cloud types in relation to Ryan Eastman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    increasing cloud cover, which may promote ice loss by the longwave effect. The trends are positive in all in sea ice extent and thickness may be affected by cloud radiative effect (CRE), and seaice changes may in turn impart changes to cloud cover. Visual cloud reports from land and ocean regions of the Arctic

  20. Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao Zhu; Jack A. Walker; J. Liang

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to increasing oil demand, oil companies are moving into arctic environments and deep-water areas for oil production. In these regions of lower temperatures, wax deposits begin to form when the temperature in the wellbore falls below wax appearance temperature (WAT). This condition leads to reduced production rates and larger pressure drops. Wax problems in production wells are very costly due to production down time for removal of wax. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a solution to wax deposition. In order to develop a solution to wax deposition, it is essential to characterize the crude oil and study phase behavior properties. The main objective of this project was to characterize Alaskan North Slope crude oil and study the phase behavior, which was further used to develop a dynamic wax deposition model. This report summarizes the results of the various experimental studies. The subtasks completed during this study include measurement of density, molecular weight, viscosity, pour point, wax appearance temperature, wax content, rate of wax deposition using cold finger, compositional characterization of crude oil and wax obtained from wax content, gas-oil ratio, and phase behavior experiments including constant composition expansion and differential liberation. Also, included in this report is the development of a thermodynamic model to predict wax precipitation. From the experimental study of wax appearance temperature, it was found that wax can start to precipitate at temperatures as high as 40.6 C. The WAT obtained from cross-polar microscopy and viscometry was compared, and it was discovered that WAT from viscometry is overestimated. From the pour point experiment it was found that crude oil can cease to flow at a temperature of 12 C. From the experimental results of wax content, it is evident that the wax content in Alaskan North Slope crude oil can be as high as 28.57%. The highest gas-oil ratio for a live oil sample was observed to be 619.26 SCF/STB. The bubblepoint pressure for live oil samples varied between 1600 psi and 2100 psi. Wax precipitation is one of the most important phenomena in wax deposition and, hence, needs to be modeled. There are various models present in the literature. Won's model, which considers the wax phase as a non-ideal solution, and Pedersen's model, which considers the wax phase as an ideal solution, were compared. Comparison indicated that Pedersen's model gives better results, but the assumption of wax phase as an ideal solution is not realistic. Hence, Won's model was modified to consider different precipitation characteristics of the various constituents in the hydrocarbon fraction. The results obtained from the modified Won's model were compared with existing models, and it was found that predictions from the modified model are encouraging.

  1. STUDY OF TRANSPORTATION OF GTL PRODUCTS FROM ALASKAN NORTH SLOPE (ANS) TO MARKETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin A. Chukwu, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alaskan North Slope is one of the largest hydrocarbon reserves in the US where Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology can be successfully implemented. The proven and recoverable reserves of conventional natural gas in the developed and undeveloped fields in the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) are estimated to be 38 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF) and estimates of additional undiscovered gas reserves in the Arctic field range from 64 TCF to 142 TCF. Transportation of the natural gas from the remote ANS is the key issue in effective utilization of this valuable and abundance resource. The throughput of oil through the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) has been on decline and is expected to continue to decline in future. It is projected that by the year 2015, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level that there will be a critical need for pumping additional liquid from GTL process to provide an adequate volume for economic operation of TAPS. The pumping of GTL products through TAPS will significantly increase its economic life. Transporting GTL products from the North Slope of Alaska down to the Marine terminal at Valdez is no doubt the great challenge facing the Gas to Liquids options of utilizing the abundant natural gas resource of the North Slope. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate and assess the economic feasibility of transporting GTL products through the TAPS. Material testing program for GTL and GTL/Crude oil blends was designed and implemented for measurement of physical properties of GTL products. The measurement and evaluation of the properties of these materials were necessary so as to access the feasibility of transporting such materials through TAPS under cold arctic conditions. Results of the tests indicated a trend of increasing yield strength with increasing wax content. GTL samples exhibited high gel strengths at temperatures as high as 20 F, which makes it difficult for cold restart following winter shutdowns. Simplified analytical models were developed to study the flow of GTL and GTL/crude oil blends through TAPS in both commingled and batch flow models. The economics of GTL transportations by either commingled or batching mode were evaluated. The choice of mode of transportation of GTL products through TAPS would depend on the expected purity of the product and a trade-off between loss in product value due to contamination and cost of keeping the product pure at the discharge terminal.

  2. Springtime Arctic haze contributions of submicron organic particles from European and Asian combustion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Jesse

    The composition of Arctic aerosol, especially during the springtime Arctic haze, may play an important role in the radiative balance of the Arctic. The contribution of organic components to Arctic haze has only recently ...

  3. Source attributions of pollution to the Western Arctic during the NASA ARCTAS field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic,Oscillation controls air pollution transport to the Arctic,al. : Source attributions of pollution to the Western Arctic

  4. The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

  5. TRANSPORTATION ISSUES IN THE DELIVERY OF GTL PRODUCTS FROM ALASKAN NORTH SLOPE TO MARKET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin Chukwu

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alaskan North Slope (ANS) is one of the largest hydrocarbon reserves in the United States where Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology can be successfully implemented. The proven and recoverable reserves of conventional natural gas in the developed and undeveloped fields in the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) are estimated to be 38 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF) and estimates of additional undiscovered gas reserves in the Arctic field range from 64 TCF to 142 TCF. Because the domestic gas market in the continental United States is located thousands of miles from the ANS, transportation of the natural gas from the remote ANS to the market is the key issue in effective utilization of this valuable and abundant resource. The focus of this project is to study the operational challenges involved in transporting the gas in converted liquid (GTL) form through the existing Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS). A three-year, comprehensive research program was undertaken by the Petroleum Development Laboratory, University of Alaska Fairbanks, under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40016 to study the feasibility of transporting GTL products through TAPS. Cold restart of TAPS following an extended winter shutdown and solids deposition in the pipeline were identified as the main transportation issues in moving GTL products through the pipeline. The scope of work in the current project (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41248) included preparation of fluid samples for the experiments to be conducted to augment the comprehensive research program.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is a permanent site providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. These data are being used to refine models and parameterizations as they relate to the Arctic. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. Approximately 300,000 NSA data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  7. Microbial carbon sources on the shelf and slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauschenberg, Carlton David

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    , hypoxic regions that occur seasonally and deep slope and abyssal plain sediments of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Previous reports using the Laguna Madre data as examples, have been used to make comparisons of PLFA 16:0 and PLFA 15:0 isotope ratios and PLFA 16...

  8. Tuktoyaktuk : responsive strategies for a new Arctic urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchot, Pamela (Pamela Rae)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canadian Arctic is facing a set of compounding crises that will drastically impact the future of its coastal frontier. At a time when climate change is having a detrimental impact on the Arctic landscape, Northern ...

  9. Economic feasibility of shipping containers through the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Russell (Russell Clayton)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Arctic ice cover continues to retreat, the possibility of regular transit through the Arctic becomes an increasing reality. Liner companies could take advantage of distance savings (up to 4000 nautical miles less ...

  10. arctic ocean experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

  11. arctic environmental change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

  12. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  13. Simulating Arctic Climate Warmth and Icefield Retreat in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    , Devon, and Meighen ice caps in the Canadian Arctic, and possibly in Camp Century (northwest Greenland the entire western Arctic from 57-N to 85-N, including Greenland and smaller scale ice caps in Iceland Project members In the future, Arctic warming and the melting of polar glaciers will be considerable

  14. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  15. LYCEN 9721 May 1997 LOCAL NUCLEAR SLOPE and CURVATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    LYCEN 9721 May 1997 LOCAL NUCLEAR SLOPE and CURVATURE in HIGH ENERGY pp and ¯pp ELASTIC SCATTERING The local nuclear slope B(s, t) = d dt ln dn(s,t) dt is reconstructed from the exper- imental angular agreement with the (non fitted) slope data, in particular for the evolution of B(s, t) with s as a function

  16. alaska north slope: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: integrated hunter observations on wind with statistical analysis of daily wind speed data collectedARCTIC VOL. 66, NO. 4 (DECEMBER 2013) P. 448-458 Changing Daily Wind...

  17. Heavy Metal Contamination in the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberian Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen-Gil, Susan M.; Ford, Jesse; Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Monetti, Matthew; Vlasova, Tamara; Landers, Dixon H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Taimyr Peninsula is directly north of the world's largest heavy metal smelting complex (Norilsk, Russia). Despite this proximity, there has been little research to examine the extent of contamination of the Taimyr Peninsula. We analyzed heavy metal concentrations in lichen (Cetraria cucullata), moss (Hylocomium splendens), soils, lake sediment, freshwater fish (Salvelinus alpinus, Lota lota, and Coregonus spp.) and collared lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus) from 13 sites between 30 and 300 km from Norilsk. Element concentrations were low in both C. cucullata and H. splendens, although concentrations of Al, Fe, Cu, Ni, and Pb were significantly higher than those in Arctic Alaska, probably due to natural differences in the geochemical environments. Inorganic surface soils had significantly higher concentrations of Cd, Zn, Pb, and Mg than inorganic soils at depth, although a lake sediment core from the eastern Taimyr Peninsula indicated no recent enrichment by atmospherically transported elements. Tissue concentrations of heavy metals in fish and lemming were not elevated relative to other Arctic sites. Our results show that the impact of the Norilsk smelting complex is primarily localized rather than regional, and does not extend northward beyond 100 km.

  18. Short-lived pollutants in the Arctic: their climate impact and possible mitigation strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Quinn, P.K.; Bates, T.S.; Baum, E.; Doubleday, N.; Fiore, A.M.; Flanner, M.; Fridlind, A.; Garrett, T.J.; Koch, D.; Menon, S.; Shindell, D.; Stohl, A.; Warren, S.G.

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Several short-lived pollutants known to impact Arctic climate may be contributing to the accelerated rates of warming observed in this region relative to the global annually averaged temperature increase. Here, we present a summary of the short-lived pollutants that impact Arctic climate including methane, tropospheric ozone, and tropospheric aerosols. For each pollutant, we provide a description of the major sources and the mechanism of forcing. We also provide the first seasonally averaged forcing and corresponding temperature response estimates focused specifically on the Arctic. The calculations indicate that the forcings due to black carbon, methane, and tropospheric ozone lead to a positive surface temperature response indicating the need to reduce emissions of these species within and outside the Arctic. Additional aerosol species may also lead to surface warming if the aerosol is coincident with thin, low lying clouds. We suggest strategies for reducing the warming based on current knowledge and discuss directions for future research to address the large remaining uncertainties.

  19. Arctic Energy Summit | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA NewslettersPartnership of theArctic Energy Summit Arctic Energy Summit

  20. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using EMEP measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic, showing a good agreement, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that during the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne LIDAR measurements. Evaluating the regional impacts in the Arctic of this event in terms of aerosol vertical structure, we find that during the 4 day presence of these aerosols in the lower European Arctic (< 75° N), biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface. The European plumes sampled during POLARCAT-France were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in Northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport event, the average modeled top of atmosphere (TOA) shortwave direct and semi-direct radiative effect (DSRE) north of 60° N over snow and ice-covered surfaces reaches +0.58 W m?², peaking at +3.3 W m?² at noon over Scandinavia and Finland.

  1. Final Technical Report for Project "Improving the Simulation of Arctic Clouds in CCSM3"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen J. Vavrus

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has focused on the simulation of Arctic clouds in CCSM3 and how the modeled cloud amount (and climate) can be improved substantially by altering the parameterized low cloud fraction. The new formula, dubbed 'freeezedry', alleviates the bias of excessive low clouds during polar winter by reducing the cloud amount under very dry conditions. During winter, freezedry decreases the low cloud amount over the coldest regions in high latitudes by over 50% locally and more than 30% averaged across the Arctic (Fig. 1). The cloud reduction causes an Arctic-wide drop of 15 W m{sup -2} in surface cloud radiative forcing (CRF) during winter and about a 50% decrease in mean annual Arctic CRF. Consequently, wintertime surface temperatures fall by up to 4 K on land and 2-8 K over the Arctic Ocean, thus significantly reducing the model's pronounced warm bias (Fig. 1). While improving the polar climate simulation in CCSM3, freezedry has virtually no influence outside of very cold regions (Fig. 2) or during summer (Fig. 3), which are space and time domains that were not targeted. Furthermore, the simplicity of this parameterization allows it to be readily incorporated into other GCMs, many of which also suffer from excessive wintertime polar cloudiness, based on the results from the CMIP3 archive (Vavrus et al., 2008). Freezedry also affects CCSM3's sensitivity to greenhouse forcing. In a transient-CO{sub 2} experiment, the model version with freezedry warms up to 20% less in the North Polar and South Polar regions (1.5 K and 0.5 K smaller warming, respectively) (Fig. 4). Paradoxically, the muted high-latitude response occurs despite a much larger increase in cloud amount with freezedry during non-summer months (when clouds warm the surface), apparently because of the colder modern reference climate. These results of the freezedry parameterization have recently been published (Vavrus and D. Waliser, 2008: An improved parameterization for simulating Arctic cloud amount in the CCSM3 climate model. J. Climate, 21, 5673-5687.). The article also provides a novel synthesis of surface- and satellite-based Arctic cloud observations that show how much the new freezedry parameterization improves the simulated cloud amount in high latitudes (Fig. 3). Freezedry has been incorporated into the CCSM3.5 version, in which it successfully limits the excessive polar clouds, and may be used in CCSM4. Material from this work is also appearing in a synthesis article on future Arctic cloud changes (Vavrus, D. Waliser, J. Francis, and A. Schweiger, 'Simulations of 20th and 21st century Arctic cloud amount in the global climate models assessed in the IPCC AR4', accepted in Climate Dynamics) and was used in a collaborative paper on Arctic cloud-sea ice coupling (Schweiger, A., R. Lindsay, S. Vavrus, and J. Francis, 2008: Relationships between Arctic sea ice and clouds during autumn. J. Climate, 21, 4799-4810.). This research was presented at the 2007 CCSM Annual Workshop, as well as the CCSM's 2007 Atmospheric Model Working Group and Polar Working Group Meetings. The findings were also shown at the 2007 Climate Change Prediction Program's Science Team Meeting. In addition, I served as an instructor at the International Arctic Research Center's (IARC) Summer School on Arctic Climate Modeling in Fairbanks this summer, where I presented on the challenges and techniques used in simulating polar clouds. I also contributed to the development of a new Arctic System Model by attending a workshop in Colorado this summer on this fledgling project. Finally, an outreach activity for the general public has been the development of an interactive web site () that displays Arctic cloud amount in the CMIP3 climate model archive under present and future scenarios. This site allows users to make polar and global maps of a variety of climate variables to investigate the individual and ensemble-mean GCM response to greenhouse warming and the extent to which models adequately represent Arctic clouds in the modern clima

  2. A Sensitivity Study on Modeling Black Carbon in Snow and its Radiative Forcing over the Arctic and Northern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Rudong; Flanner, M. G.; Rasch, Philip J.

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Black carbon in snow (BCS) simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) is evaluated against measurements over Northern China and the Arctic, and its sensitivity to atmospheric deposition and two parameters that affect post-depositional enrichment is explored. The BCS concentration is overestimated (underestimated) by a factor of two in Northern China (Arctic) in the default model, but agreement with observations is good over both regions in the simulation with improvements in BC transport and deposition. Sensitivity studies indicate that uncertainty in the melt-water scavenging efficiency (MSE) parameter substantially affects BCS and its radiative forcing (by a factor of 2-7) in the Arctic through post-depositional enrichment. The MSE parameter has a relatively small effect on the magnitude of BCS seasonal cycle but can alter its phase in Northern China. The impact of the snow aging scaling factor (SAF) on BCS, partly through the post-depositional enrichment effect, shows more complex latitudinal and seasonal dependence. Similar to MSE, SAF affects more significantly the magnitude (phase) of BCS season cycle over the Arctic (Northern China). While uncertainty associated with the representation of BC transport and deposition processes in CAM5 is more important than that associated with the two snow model parameters in Northern China, the two uncertainties have comparable effect in the Arctic.

  3. Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Received 7 December 2009; accepted 4Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked to Sea Ice Decline Uma S. Bhatt*,1 Donald A Institute, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

  4. North Slope action holds West Coast spotlight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, H.M.

    1981-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The first oil from a North Slope reservoir outside Prudhoe Bay will begin flowing next year at rate of 80,000 bpd from Kuparuk field now under development by Atlantic Richfield Co. west of Prudhoe Bay. Just north of the Kuparuk development, Conoco Inc. has found a commercial reservoir in the Milne Point unit and will be drilling confirmation and delineation wells later this year and in 1982. Another area which very likely will be developed for production is located northeast of Prudhoe Bay, where Sohio Alaska Petroleum Co. has announced discoveries in 2 Sag Delta wells. In California's San Joaquin Valley, 3 Kern County fields - South Belridge, Elk Hills, and Lost Hills - are the sites of intensive drilling. Seven rigs are working in the Santa Barbara Channel, 3 of them developing known fields from permanent platforms.

  5. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7, 2015 1:30PM to 3:30PM EST Unalaska, Alaska Unalaska Public Library 64 Eleanor Dr. Unalaska, AK 99685...

  6. National Strategy for the Arctic Region | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake Your NextHowNQA-1.pdfLab Day 2014

  7. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of EnergyInMay 22, 2009NSAR - T en

  8. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of EnergyInMay 22, 2009NSAR - T

  9. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of EnergyInMay 22, 2009NSAR - TBethel

  10. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of EnergyInMay 22, 2009NSAR -

  11. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Dutch

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of EnergyInMay 22, 2009NSAR

  12. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Nome

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of EnergyInMay 22, 2009NSAR|

  13. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Barrow

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of EnergyInMay 22, 2009NSAR||

  14. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Bethel

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of EnergyInMay 22, 2009NSAR|||

  15. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Dutch

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of EnergyInMay 22,

  16. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Nome |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of EnergyInMay 22,Department of

  17. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation and Stakeholder

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of EnergyInMay 22,Department

  18. APPLICATION OF CARBOHYDRATES AND PHENOLS AS BIOMARKERS TO STUDY DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER RESERVOIRS IN ARCTIC RIVERS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, Rachel

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic rivers are the dominant pathways for the transport of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon to the Arctic Ocean, but knowledge of sources, transformations and transfer of organic carbon and nitrogen in Arctic river watersheds is extremely...

  19. Fine-scale Horizontal Structure of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rambukkange,M.; Verlinde, J.; Elorante, E.; Luke, E.; Kollias, P.; Shupe, M.

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent in situ observations in stratiform clouds suggest that mixed phase regimes, here defined as limited cloud volumes containing both liquid and solid water, are constrained to narrow layers (order 100 m) separating all-liquid and fully glaciated volumes (Hallett and Viddaurre, 2005). The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (DOE-ARM, Ackerman and Stokes, 2003) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) recently started collecting routine measurement of radar Doppler velocity power spectra from the Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR). Shupe et al. (2004) showed that Doppler spectra has potential to separate the contributions to the total reflectivity of the liquid and solid water in the radar volume, and thus to investigate further Hallett and Viddaurre's findings. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) was conducted along the NSA to investigate the properties of Arctic mixed phase clouds (Verlinde et al., 2006). We present surface based remote sensing data from MPACE to discuss the fine-scale structure of the mixed-phase clouds observed during this experiment.

  20. alaskan north slope: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    response Geosciences Websites Summary: wind field Mountain et al., 1976; Aagaard and Roach, 1990. This led Mountain et al. 1976 to suggest the Beaufort slope, Aagaard and...

  1. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Alaskan North Slope oil production facilities. Title:Profiling Despite oil production from several major16) was isolated from oil-production water and has optimal

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic cooling silentium Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12;Abstract The Arctic is melting ...fast. 12;IMPACTS OF A WARMING ARCTIC... 's Greenhouse Effect Thesur face cools by radiating heat energyupward. ... Source: Zender, Charles -...

  3. arctic endemic brown: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences Websites Summary: 12;4 C. Duguay, Interdisciplinary Centre on Climate Change & Department of Geography-Harte, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska...

  4. arctic populations differential: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 168 Arctic catastrophes in an idealized...

  5. arctic petroleum operators: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operations waste water injection and disposal wells, geothermal resource development, and EORCO2 Southern California, University of 66 A Holocene record of changing Arctic Ocean...

  6. arctic study area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

  7. arctic polar vortex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

  8. arctic crude oil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water to form an emulsion that often looks like chocolate pudding. This emulsion 89 Lesson Plan Arctic Biome Geosciences Websites Summary: -class instruction and small group...

  9. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

  10. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent...

  11. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000,...

  12. arctic ocean sediments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

  13. arctic marine environment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Technology, Cambridge, MA Patrikalakis, Nicholas M. 4 UiT The Arctic University of Norway Fakultet for biovitenskap, fiskeri og konomi -Inst. for arktisk og marin biologi...

  14. arctic ocean sediment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

  15. arctic flora origins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    combustion of fossil fuels and biomass, may have a severe impact on the sensitive Arctic climate, possibly altering the temperature profile, cloud temperature and amount, the...

  16. arctic lake correlate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

  17. arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

  18. alaskan arctic tundra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

  19. arctic charr salvelinus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have raised concern over potential responses of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, a cold-adapted freshwateranadromous fish species in (more) Sinnatamby, Ramila Niloshini...

  20. arctic char salvelinus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have raised concern over potential responses of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, a cold-adapted freshwateranadromous fish species in (more) Sinnatamby, Ramila Niloshini...

  1. arctic research station: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Rocky Mountain Research Sta- tion is one of five 19 Z .Atmospheric Research 51 1999 4575 Cloud resolving simulations of Arctic stratus Geosciences Websites Summary: Z...

  2. arctic terns sterna: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    together. Amie L. Black; Antony W. Diamond 2 Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155159 (2013) Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  3. arctic climate system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

  4. alaskan arctic coastal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

  5. arctic tundra vegetation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of woody vegetation in arctic tundra? Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: 33124, USA. Global climate warming is projected to promote the increase of woody plants, especially of...

  6. arctas arctic research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic. It often serves as the measuring stick for global climate change. It is where warming has been strongest in the past century, Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  7. ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

  8. arctic marine food: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine Food Web: Trophic Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Perfluoroalkyl...

  9. Spatial and seasonal variations of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in the arctic atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Yushan; Hung, Hayley; Blanchard, Pierrette; Patton, Gregory W.; Kallenborn, Roland; Konoplev, Alexei V.; Fellin, Phil; Li, Henrik; Geen, Charles; Stern, Gary; Rosenburg, Bruno; Barrie, Leonard A.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weekly high volume air samples were concurrently collected between 2000 and 2003 at six arctic sites, namely Alert, Little Fox Lake, Kinngait in Canada; Point Barrow in Alaska, USA; Zeppelin in Norway; and Valkarkai in Russia. Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were quantified in all samples. Data comparison showed that ?-HCH and HCB were relatively homogeneously distributed in the circumpolar atmosphere and fairly uniform throughout the seasons. However, significantly high atmospheric ?-HCH and HCB concentrations and strong seasonality of ?-HCH and ?-HCH were found at the low arctic site of Little Fox Lake. Stronger temperature dependence of ?-HCH and ?-HCH at this location suggests that secondary emissions (or re-evaporation from surface environmental media) were more important at this site than others. Tendency of the secondary emissions also appeared increased compared to a decade ago in this region. It is thus hypothesized that higher precipitation rate at this topographically elevated station facilitated the transfer of ?-HCH from the atmosphere to surface media when technical HCH was still being used worldwide. On the other hand, relatively higher temperature at this southerly station enhanced re-evaporation to the atmosphere after the global ban of technical HCH. In contrast, larger spatial and seasonal discrepancies were apparent for ''current-use'' ?-HCH than ?-HCH and HCB in the arctic atmosphere. It likely reflected different influences of primary contaminant sources on various arctic locations. Calculations of fugacity ratio suggest slight net deposition potential of HCB from air to seawater in the circumpolar environment, whereas air/seawater exchange direction of ?-HCH varied from location to location in this region.

  10. LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING GEOSYTNTHETICS Virginia L. Wilson: Geosynthetics: Lessons Learned from Failures International Geosynthetics Society editors J.P. Giroud, K.L. Soderman and G.P. Raymond November 12, 1998 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING

  11. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  12. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  13. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic. Total PM2.5 agrees well with the measurements, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that duringmore »the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had undergone significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne lidar measurements. Model results show that the pollution event transported aerosols into the Arctic (> 66.6° N) for a 4-day period. During this 4-day period, biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~ 1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~ 4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface in anthropogenic plumes. The European plumes sampled during the POLARCAT-France campaign were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport event, the average modeled top-of-atmosphere (TOA) shortwave direct and semi-direct radiative effect (DSRE) north of 60° N over snow and ice-covered surfaces reaches +0.58 W m?2, peaking at +3.3 W m?2 at noon over Scandinavia and Finland.« less

  14. Seasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport of cold, fresh surface waters onto the continental shelf. Offshore, the warmer, saltier Warm DeepSeasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope masses and transport in the region. Rapid fluctuations in temperature and salinity throughout the year

  15. Network Modeling of Arctic Melt Ponds Meenakshi Barjatiaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    . In late spring and summer, the albedo of the ice pack is determined primarily by melt ponds that form­albedo feedback [7], and has played a significant role in the decline of the summer Arctic ice pack [8]. Sea ice precipitous losses of summer Arctic sea ice have outpaced the pro- jections of most climate models. Efforts

  16. THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers... "Sea ice is projected] - a phenomenon sometimes referred to as "Arctic amplification". As Arctic temperatures rise, sea ice melts for the 20th century. The rate at which the modeled 21st century Arctic warming and sea ice melting occurs

  17. 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 17 -Woodgate Global models in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    ;2 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E - Lecture 17 - Woodgate Deep waters of the Atlantic from http://sam://iodp.tamu.edu/publications/PR/303PR/images/Fig01.jpg Dickson et al, refs Denmark Strait ~ 650m deep Iceland Scotland Ridge ~ 400

  18. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; Wehrli, C.; Stohl, A.; Mazzola, M.; Lanconelli, C.; Vitale, V.; Stebel, K.; Aaltonen, V.; de Leeuw, G.; Rodriguez, E.; Herber, A. B.; Radionov, V. F.; Zielinski, T.; Petelski, T.; Sakerin, S. M.; Kabanov, D. M.; Xue, Y.; Mei, L.; Istomina, L.; Wagener, R.; McArthur, B.; Sobolewski, P. S.; Kivi, R.; Courcoux, Y.; Larouche, P.; Broccardo, S.; Piketh, S. J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i) a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.

  19. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; et al

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i)more »a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.« less

  20. Quantitative laboratory observations of internal wave reflection on ascending slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dauxois, Thierry

    a stratified fluid with an angle that is fixed with respect to gravity. Upon reflection on a sloping bed that for a fixed frequency, the direction in which energy propagates with respect to the horizontal, , is fixed

  1. atlantic slope waters: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ho, Mei Yung 2007-01-01 24 On alpha stable distribution of wind driven water surface wave slope CERN Preprints Summary: We propose a new formulation of the probability...

  2. Slope stability of geosynthetic clay liner test plots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Koerner, R.M. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Geosynthetic Research Inst.; Bonaparte, R. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Atlanta, GA (United States); Landreth, R.E. [Landreth, (Robert E.), West Chester, OH (United States); Carson, D.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Scranton, H.B. [Haley and Aldrich, Boston, MA (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourteen full-scale field test plots containing five types of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) were constructed on 2H:1V and 3H:1V slopes for the purpose of assessing slope stability. The test plots were designed to simulate typical final cover systems for landfills. Slides occurred in two of the 2H:1V test plots along interfaces between textured geomembranes and the woven geotextile components of internally reinforced GCLs. One additional slide occurred within the unreinforced GCL component of a 2H:1V test plot, when the GCL unexpectedly became hydrated. All 3H:1V slopes have remained stable. Results of laboratory direct shear tests compared favorably with field observations, providing support for the current design procedures that engineers are using for assessing the stability of slopes containing GCLs.

  3. Linear and nonlinear stratified spindown over sloping topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benthuysen, Jessica A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a stratified rotating fluid, frictionally driven circulations couple with the buoyancy field over sloping topography. Analytical and numerical methods are used to quantify the impact of this coupling on the vertical ...

  4. The dynamic response of high Arctic glaciers to global warming and their contribution to sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, J.K.W. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Scott Polar Research Inst.; Dowdeswell, J.A. [Univ. of Wales (United Kingdom)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations with General Circulation Models have indicated that global warming will be enhanced at high latitudes. Regions in the high Arctic are highly sensitive to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, with an amplified theoretical rise of 8--14 C predicted to take place in winter and a negligible rise of 2 C in summer. Wetter conditions in these regions are quite plausible with global warming due to warmer sea surface temperatures, melting of sea ice and a greater moisture holding capacity of the atmosphere. Recent observations show a marked increase in precipitation in the high Arctic regions during the past decades, particularly in the winters. The notion of whether the increased melting of snow due to global warming would be offset by increased snowfall is investigated in this study. To make reliable predictions of the response of high Arctic glaciers to global warming and hence their contribution to sea-level rise, a numerical model has been developed to investigate the interactions of the glaciers with climate change induced by global warming. The model is a one-dimensional numerical ice-flow model coupled with a surface balance model. Accumulation and ablation at the glacier surface are determined by the surface balance model using an energy balance approach.

  5. Microstructure and conductance-slope of InAs/GaSb tunnel diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iutzi, Ryan M., E-mail: iutzi@mit.edu; Fitzgerald, Eugene A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    InAs/GaSb and similar materials systems have generated great interest as a heterojunction for tunnel field effect transistors (TFETs) due to favorable band alignment. However, little is currently understood about how such TFETs are affected by materials defects and nonidealities. We present measurements of the conductance slope for various InAs/GaSb heterojunctions via two-terminal electrical measurements, which removes three-terminal parasitics and enables direct study on the effect of microstructure on tunnelling. Using this, we can predict how subthreshold swings in TFETs can depend on microstructure. We also demonstrate growth and electrical characterization for structures grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)—a generally more scalable process compared with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We determine that misfit dislocations and point defects near the interface can lead to energy states in the band-gap and local band bending that result in trap-assisted leakage routes and nonuniform band alignment across the junction area that lower the steepness of the conductance slope. Despite the small lattice mismatch, misfit dislocations still form in InAs on GaSb due to relaxation as a result of large strain from intermixed compositions. This can be circumvented by growing GaSb on InAs, straining the GaSb underlayer, or lowering the InAs growth temperature in the region of the interface. The conductance slope can also be improved by annealing the samples at higher temperatures, which we believe acts to annihilate point defects and average out major fluctuations in band alignment across the interface. Using a combination of these techniques, we can greatly improve the steepness of the conductance slope which could result in steeper subthreshold swings in TFETs in the future.

  6. Slope Error Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed an optical measurement tool for parabolic solar collectors that measures the combined errors due to absorber misalignment and reflector slope error. The combined absorber alignment and reflector slope errors are measured using a digital camera to photograph the reflected image of the absorber in the collector. Previous work using the image of the reflection of the absorber finds the reflector slope errors from the reflection of the absorber and an independent measurement of the absorber location. The accuracy of the reflector slope error measurement is thus dependent on the accuracy of the absorber location measurement. By measuring the combined reflector-absorber errors, the uncertainty in the absorber location measurement is eliminated. The related performance merit, the intercept factor, depends on the combined effects of the absorber alignment and reflector slope errors. Measuring the combined effect provides a simpler measurement and a more accurate input to the intercept factor estimate. The minimal equipment and setup required for this measurement technique make it ideal for field measurements.

  7. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

  8. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

  9. Arctic Ecologies: The Politics and Poetics of Northern Literary Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athens, Allison Katherine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which lives mainly on pack ice and is a powerful swimmerfor this change: “Arctic pack ice has formed progressivelychanges have resulted in pack ice that is a less stable

  10. National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks February 19, 2015 9:30AM to 10:30AM AKST Fairbanks, Alaska BLM...

  11. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre...

  12. arctic ocean ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 320 The Thinning of Arctic Sea Ice, 19882003: Have...

  13. arctic cloud experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    low-level Arctic clouds in cold seasons and have a significant impact on the surface energy budget. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models...

  14. arctic ocean freshwater: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

  15. arctic haze: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Srinivas 7 NASA ARCTAS PROJECT The Arctic. It often serves as the measuring stick for global climate change. It is where warming has been strongest in the past century,...

  16. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Takacs, Peter Z.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Assoufid, Lahsen; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas

    2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A collaboration, including all DOE synchrotron labs, industrial vendors of x-ray optics, and with active participation of the HBZ-BESSY-II optics group has been established to work together on a new slope measuring profiler -- the optical slope measuring system (OSMS). The slope measurement accuracy of the instrument is expected to be<50 nrad for the current and future metrology of x-ray optics for the next generation of light sources. The goals were to solidify a design that meets the needs of mirror specifications and also be affordable; and to create a common specification for fabrication of a multi-functional translation/scanning (MFTS) system for the OSMS. This was accomplished by two collaborative meetings at the ALS (March 26, 2010) and at the APS (May 6, 2010).

  17. The Genetic Prehistory of the New World Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Maanasa; DeGiorgio, Michael; Albrechtsen, Anders; Moltke, Ida; Skoglund, Pontus; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S.; Grønnow, Bjarne; Appelt, Martin; Gulløv, Hans Christian; Friesen, T. Max; Fitzhugh, William; Malmström, Helena; Rasmussen, Simon; Olsen, Jesper; Melchior, Linea; Fuller, Benjamin T.; Fahrni, Simon M.; Stafford, Thomas Jr; Grimes, Vaughan; Renouf, M. A. Priscilla; Cybulski, Jerome; Lynnerup, Niels; Lahr, Marta Mirazon; Britton, Kate; Knecht, Rick; Arneborg, Jette; Metspalu, Mait; Cornejo, Omar E.; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Wang, Yong; Rasmussen, Morten; Raghavan, Vibha; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Pierre, Tracey; Dneprovsky, Kirill; Andreasen, Claus; Lange, Hans; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Coltrain, Joan; Spitsyn, Victor A.; Götherström, Anders; Orlando, Ludovic; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Crawford, Michael H.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Dissing, Jørgen; Heinemeier, Jan; Meldgaard, Morten; Bustamante, Carlos; O’Rourke, Dennis H.; Jakobsson, Matthias; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    archaeological phases within a culture are separated by a white line. Dark reddish-brown towards the top of the figure indicates historical times. Cultural contexts from which samples included in this study arise are highlighted in yellow. B) A two... -Eskimo beginnings in North America: a new discovery at Kuzitrin Lake, Alaska. Etudes Inuit 22, 61-81 (1998). 2. H. B. Collins, in Prehistoric cultural relations between the arctic and temperate zones of North America, J. M. Campbell, Ed. (Arctic Institute...

  18. Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis in Coll Cardús Landfill Li Yu using mechanical models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1 models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1) Analytical solution

  19. Adverse Tunnelling Conditions Arising from Slope Instabilities A Case History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Hindustan-Tibet-Highway by a rock fall (LEFT). Rock slide at the dam site blocking the Satluj River (RIGHT) has been under con- struction. The project includes a 60.5 m high concrete gravity dam, an underground-side slopes. SURFACE INSTABILITIES Due to foliation parallel sliding planes and cross cutting orthogonal joint

  20. Placement of Traffic Barriers on Roadside and Median Slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferdous, Md Rubiat

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    on the findings obtained from crash tests performed on flat terrain. For barriers placed on roadside and median slopes, vehicle impact height varies depending on the trajectory of the vehicle along the ditch section and lateral offset of the barrier. Thus...

  1. Stress distribution and development within geosynthetic-reinforced soil slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    September 2011, accepted 2 December 2011 ABSTRACT: Numerical methods combined with centrifuge tests are used by centrifuge tests of two GRS slopes with different backfill densities. Numerical results indicate that soil, Centrifuge test REFERENCE: Yang, K.-H., Zornberg, J. G., Liu, C.-N. & Lin, H.-D. (2012). Stress distribution

  2. BULK MICROMACHINED TITANIUM MICROMIRROR DEVICE WITH SLOPING ELECTRODE GEOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Noel C.

    BULK MICROMACHINED TITANIUM MICROMIRROR DEVICE WITH SLOPING ELECTRODE GEOMETRY Masa P. Rao1 , Marco micromachined hybrid torsional micromirror device composed of titanium mirror structures bonded to an underlying time, high aspect ratio micromachining capability in bulk titanium; and 2) the High Aspect Ratio

  3. Slope stability and CCF The impact of forests and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Road building and harvesting operations that are essential for forest management reduce the stabilizing of slope instability which are closely linked; surface erosion and landslides. Surface erosion is a water capacity, or ability to absorb and hold water (Schoenholtz et al., 2000). Surface flow is therefore rare

  4. Hydrological Evaluation of Septic Disposal Field Design in Sloping Terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    . Steenhuis7 Abstract: The most common form of onsite domestic wastewater treatment in the United States; Slopes; Wastewater treatment; Waste disposal. Introduction The most common form of onsite wastewater treatment is the septic system Wastewater 1991 . Over 50 million people in the United States use septic

  5. Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Abstract:...

  6. A Climatology of the Arctic on Mid-Tropospheric Temperature Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony, Jeremy Patrick

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic is a unique and complex environment. Many factors play a role in determining the long-term climate of the Arctic, including mesoscale weather systems and many complex ice-albedo feedback mechanisms. Previous studies determined using real...

  7. Small Thaw Ponds: An Unaccounted Source of Methane in the Canadian High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    other Archaea in high Arctic peat. ISME J 2: 37–48. 38. Højmethanogenic pathways in a peat from subarctic permafrost.Canadian Arctic tundra leads to peat erosion and slumping in

  8. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David D.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

  9. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices of the following: US Geological Survey Arctic operating orders, 1979; Det Noske Vertas', rules for the design, construction and inspection of offshore technology, 1977; Alaska Oil and Gas Association, industry research projects, March 1980; Arctic Petroleum Operator's Association, industry research projects, January 1980; selected additional Arctic offshore bibliography on sea ice, icebreakers, Arctic seafloor conditions, ice-structures, frost heave and structure icing.

  10. Impacts of Climate Change on Human Access and Resource Development in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephenson, Scott Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    September 22). Reuters. 56. Budzik, P. (2009). Arctic oilin Alaska, and one in Norway (Budzik, 2009). These fields

  11. Arctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec-edented low extents in the summer of 2007,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    Arctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec- edented low extents in the summer of 2007, raising concern that the Arctic may be on the verge of a fundamental transition toward a seasonal ice cover. Arctic sea ice extent typically attains a seasonal maximum in March and minimum in September. Over

  12. Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo H. Eicken,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo H. Eicken,1 T. C. Grenfell,2 D. K. Perovich,3 J. Perovich, J. A. Richter-Menge, and K. Frey (2004), Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo, J that feedback processes involving the input of solar energy and subsequent changes in Arctic pack-ice albedo

  13. September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 warming above present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 C global warming above present Irina; published 24 March 2012. [1] The decline of Arctic sea ice is one of the most visible signs of climate change over the past several decades. Arctic sea ice area shows large interannual variability due

  14. Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations P. Rampal,1,2 J the Arctic sea ice velocity field as the superposition of a mean field and fluctuations. We study how subtracting the mean field, are analyzed in terms of diffusion properties. Although the Arctic sea ice cover

  15. Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field campaign in Barrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field on snow albedo and arctic atmospheric chemistry. During the OASIS field campaign, in March and April 2009), Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field campaign in Barrow

  16. This Page Intentionally Left Blank Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lincoln #12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;#12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic iv#12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic Contents v CONTENTS

  17. Surface salinity fields in the Arctic Ocean and statistical approaches to predicting anomalies and patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    to changing environmental conditions. Its surface layer is a key component of the Arctic climate system, which. In this context, the Arctic Ocean surface layer is a critical indicator of climate change in the Arctic [Zaharov. Petersburg, Russia. Ivan Sudakov, Department of Mathematics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

  18. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  19. HIGH FIELD Q-SLOPE AND THE BAKING EFFECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing RF losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by a low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated at high temperature in the presence of a small partial pressure of nitrogen. Improvement of the cavity performances have been obtained, while surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  20. Materials Science Problems of the SCRF Q-Slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Insepov, Z.; Norem, J.; Hassanein, A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Swenson, D. R. [Epion Corporation, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States)

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    None of the existing theoretical models can explain all the observed features of the Q-slope. In the present work, we review this problem and show how Atom Probe Tomography and Gas Cluster Ion Beam smoothing can study the basic mechanisms that may be involved. The gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) treatment method has recently been proposed as a new way to significantly reduce the surface roughness and the dark current from the rf-cavity surfaces. In addition to the suppression of the dark current, GCIB might also be an important treatment for mitigation of the Q-slope in superconducting cavities. Niobium surface treatment by cluster ion irradiation was studied based on atomistic and mesoscopic simulation methods and the surface modification dynamics results were compared to experiments.

  1. Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we have developed streamline generation and convection subroutines for miscible gas injection. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The new relative permeability formulations are being incorporated into the simulator. Wettabilities and relative permeabilities are being measured. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, relative permeability studies with cores, incorporation of complex well-architecture.

  3. North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnabel, William; Brumbelow, Kelly

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to enhance the water resource decision-making process with respect to oil and gas exploration/production activities on Alaska’s North Slope. To this end, a web-based software tool was developed to allow stakeholders to assemble, evaluate, and communicate relevant information between and amongst themselves. The software, termed North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS), is a visually-referenced database that provides a platform for running complex natural system, planning, and optimization models. The NSDSS design was based upon community input garnered during a series of stakeholder workshops, and the end product software is freely available to all stakeholders via the project website. The tool now resides on servers hosted by the UAF Water and Environmental Research Center, and will remain accessible and free-of-charge for all interested stakeholders. The development of the tool fostered new advances in the area of data evaluation and decision support technologies, and the finished product is envisioned to enhance water resource planning activities on Alaska’s North Slope.

  4. Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharabaghi, B. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: bgharaba@uoguelph.ca; Singh, M.K. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Inkratas, C. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: cinkrata@uoguelph.ca; Fleming, I.R. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada)], E-mail: ian.fleming@usask.ca; McBean, E. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects.

  5. The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verlinde, J

    2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

  6. Los Alamos Lab to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Lab to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace The Lab is performing a...

  7. Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean-deltaic lateral slopes in perialpine, fjord-type Lake Lucerne (Central Switzerland); (ii) their control

  8. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Mapping basin-wide subaquatic slope failure susceptibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Science+Business Media B.V. 2010 Abstract This study of subaquatic slope failures in Lake Lucerne, central. Keywords Submarine landslides Á Slope stability Á Limit equilibrium Á Paleoseismology Á Lake Lucerne

  9. Slope stability analysis by nite elements D. V. GRIFFITHS and P. A. LANE{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , regarding the failure mechanism. Slope failure in the ®nite element model occurs `naturally' through methods, including the in¯uence of a free surface on slope and dam stability. Graphical output is included to illustrate defor- mations and mechanisms of failure. It is argued that the ®nite element method of slope

  10. Geological investigation of a portion of upper continental slope: northern Alaminos Canyon region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appelbaum, Bruce Sanford

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supplied +o the Iior=hern Gulf o Mexico (af Cer van Andel and i'cole, lo60). . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Average Clay Mineral Percentage Composition of 5-2 micron Samples. . . . . . . . . . . 28 Plate 3. 5 kHz suboot+om pro ile across salt eiapir...

  11. Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated threedimensional model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wuhu

    Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated three­dimensional model study Chipperfield winter­spring chemical ozone loss from 1991 2003, its observed correlation with low temperatures. CTM throughout studied. The model reproduces large column winters also captures shape of ozone loss profile

  12. Underwater ambient noise in the Alaskan Arctic from 20062009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    , a proxy for multiyear ice. Perennial pack ice is diminishing while thin seasonal pack ice is more The Arctic Ocean has experienced diminished ice cover as record lows have been measured for sea ice thickness prevalent. These changes in sea ice affect the acoustic field as well as the sources of sound, both natural

  13. arctic energy technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arctic energy technology First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Energy distribution in an...

  14. arctic van test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arctic van test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Action Refinement in Testing with uioco...

  15. UnderSea Solutions, Inc. Arctic AUV Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    the conceptual design and analysis of an AUV, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, for Arctic under-ice water sampling Electrical Design: ? Power Consumption ? Battery Requirements & Selection ? Thrust Motor Requirements for nose cone Lift points Hull Form The hydrodynamic form of the AUV determines the propulsion energy

  16. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments ­ NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report December 31, 2011 A progress Dynamics Model Used to Design Permafrost Simulator 2 Details at a Glance 3 Progress and Accomplishments 3 sample in a sleeve of highly conductive copper foil (shown in red) and then cooling coils placed

  17. Arctic EnginEEring College of Engineering and Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    Arctic EnginEEring College of Engineering and Mines Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Management. See Environmental Engineering and Environmental Quality Science. See Science Engineering 907-474-7241 http://cem.uaf.edu/cee/ MS Degree Minimum Requirements for Degree: 30 credits

  18. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  19. Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley Climate System Research Center University of Massachusetts Amherst #12;How have global temperatures changed & why? 1. Average instrumental records from around the world; express all as anomalies from 1961-90 average #12;#12;Overall trend is upward ("global

  20. arctic food web: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arctic food web First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an...

  1. PVT Compensation for Wilkinson Single-Slope Measurement Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; Blalock, Benjamin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tham, Kevin [Intel Corporation; Ulaganathan, Chandradevi [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Greenwell, Robert E [ORNL; Holleman, Jeremy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse-width locked loop (PWLL) circuit is reported that compensates for process, voltage, and temperature (PVT) variations of a linear ramp generator within a 12-bit multi-channel Wilkinson (single-slope integrating) Analog-to-Digital (ADC). This PWLL was designed and fabricated in a 0.5- m Silicon Germanium (SiGe) BiCMOS process. Simulation and silicon measurement data are shown that demonstrate a large improvement in the accuracy of the PVT-compensated ADC over the uncompensated ADC.

  2. West Slope, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED JumpHills, New York: EnergyMountain,PuenteSimsbury,Slope,

  3. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  4. Precision Tiltmeter as a Reference for Slope MeasuringInstruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron lasers require extremely high-performance x-ray optical systems for proper focusing. The necessary optics cannot be fabricated without the use of precise optical metrology instrumentation. In particular, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) based on the pencil-beam interferometer is a valuable tool for low-spatial-frequency slope measurement with x-ray optics. The limitations of such a device are set by the amount of systematic errors and noise. A significant improvement of LTP performance was the addition of an optical reference channel, which allowed to partially account for systematic errors associated with wiggling and wobbling of the LTP carriage. However, the optical reference is affected by changing optical path length, non-homogeneous optics, and air turbulence. In the present work, we experimentally investigate the questions related to the use of a precision tiltmeter as a reference channel. Dependence of the tiltmeter performance on horizontal acceleration, temperature drift, motion regime, and kinematical scheme of the translation stage has been investigated. It is shown that at an appropriate experimental arrangement, the tiltmeter provides a slope reference for the LTP system with accuracy on the level of 0.1 {micro}rad (rms).

  5. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory (Part 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    See OSTI ID Number 960443

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane (CH{sub 4}) in natural gas is a major energy source in the U.S., and is used extensively on Alaska's North Slope, including the oilfields in Prudhoe Bay, the community of Barrow, and the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA). Smaller villages, however, are dependent on imported diesel fuel for both power and heating, resulting in some of the highest energy costs in the U.S. and crippling local economies. Numerous CH{sub 4} gas seeps have been observed on wetlands near Atqasuk, Alaska (in the NPRA), and initial measurements have indicated flow rates of 3,000-5,000 ft{sup 3} day{sup -1} (60-100 kg CH{sub 4} day{sup -1}). Gas samples collected in 1996 indicated biogenic origin, although more recent sampling indicated a mixture of biogenic and thermogenic gas. In this study, we (1) quantified the amount of CH{sub 4} generated by several seeps and evaluated their potential use as an unconventional gas source for the village of Atqasuk; (2) collected gas and analyzed its composition from multiple seeps several miles apart to see if the source is the same, or if gas is being generated locally from isolated biogenic sources; and (3) assessed the potential magnitude of natural CH{sub 4} gas seeps for future use in climate change modeling.

  6. Erosion control on a steeply sloped pipeline right-of-way in southwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zellmer, S.D.; Edgar, D.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Isaacson, H.R. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of precipitation on steeply sloped pipeline rights-of-way (ROWs) during the time between ROW rehabilitation and the establishment of a dense, self-sustaining vegetative ground cover can cause locally severe soil erosion. This erosion results in elevated sediment loads in receiving streams and increases the difficulty and costs of ROW maintenance. A field study was completed that compared the environmental effectiveness of nine treatments on a 28% ROW slope in southwestern Pennsylvania. The six erosion-control methods investigated in the study, selected to represent a wide range in material type and installation cost, were (1) heavy application of straw mulch, (2) light application of straw mulch, (3) processed wood fiber, (4) chemical soil binder, (5) paper strips in netting, and (6) light straw mulch with a tacking agent. Each of the test plots also received the basic treatment of limestone, fertilizer, and a seed mixture commonly used to rehabilitate ROWs in the region. Precipitation, runoff volumes, and sediment yields were measured on each of 51 plots for 45 precipitation events during the 18-month study. Vegetation data were collected by the point-intercept method four times during the study to determine the amount of plant cover and species composition. Differences in sediment yield were observed among methods and between ROW location, but plant cover development was not influenced by erosion-control method or location. The relationship between environmental and cost data indicated that, of the six erosion-control methods tested, a light application of straw mulch was the most effective erosion-control treatment. 19 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Assessment of technologies for constructing self-drying low-slope roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, D.M.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues associated with removing excessive moisture from low-slope roofs have been assessed. The economic costs associated with moisture trapped in existing roofs have been estimated. The evidence suggests that existing moisture levels cause approximately a 40% overall reduction in the R-value of installed roofing insulation in the United States. Excess operating costs are further increased by a summertime heat transfer mode unique to wet insulation, caused by the daily migration of water within the roof. By itself, this effect can increase peak electrical demand for air conditioning by roughly 15 W/m{sup 2} of roofing, depending on the type of insulation. This effect will increase peak demand capacity required of utilities in any geographic region (e.g., 900 MW in the South). A simple formula has been derived for predicting the effect that self-drying roofs can have upon time-averaged construction costs. It is presumed that time-averaged costs depend predominantly upon (1) actual service life and (2) the likelihood that the less expensive recover membranes can be installed safely over old roofs. For example, an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years should reduce the current cost of roofing ($12 billion/year) by 21%. Another simple formula for predicting the reroofing waste volume indicates that an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years might reduce the current estimated 0.4 billion ft{sup 3}/year of waste by 25%. A finite-difference computer program has been used to study the flow of heat and moisture within typical existing roofs for a variety of US climates. Nearly all publicly available experimental drying data have been consulted. The drying times for most existing low-slope roofs in the United States are controlled largely climate and the permeability of the structural deck to water vapor.

  8. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Kathleen E.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Parisi, Victoria A.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Green Tringe, Susannah; Bristow, Jim; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines by microorganisms is a costly but poorly understood phenomenon, with standard treatment methods targeting mesophilic sulfatereducing bacteria. In assessing biocorrosion potential at an Alaskan North Slope oil field, we identified thermophilic hydrogen-using methanogens, syntrophic bacteria, peptideand amino acid-fermenting bacteria, iron reducers, sulfur/thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing archaea. These microbes can stimulate metal corrosion through production of organic acids, CO2, sulfur species, and via hydrogen oxidation and iron reduction, implicating many more types of organisms than are currently targeted. Micromolar quantities of putative anaerobic metabolites of C1-C4 n-alkanes in pipeline fluids were detected, implying that these low molecular weight hydrocarbons, routinely injected into reservoirs for oil recovery purposes, are biodegraded and provide biocorrosive microbial communities with an important source of nutrients.

  9. The slopes determined by n points in the plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeremy L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    field k,andletG be a graph with vertices V and edges E.Apicture P of G consists of a point P(v)for each vertex and a line P(e) for each edge, subject to the condition that P(v) ? P(e) whenever v is an endpoint of e.Thusthedataofn points and parenleftbig... of generic pictures is called the picture variety V(G). This is an irreducible component of X(G) of dimension 2|V |. Passing to an affine open subset ˜ V(G) ? V(G) and projecting onto an affine space A |E| k whose coordinates correspond to the slopes of lines...

  10. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  11. arctic animals-a review: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

  12. arctic-breeding glaucous gulls: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stress. Norwegian Polar Institute, Polar Environmental Centre, NO-9296 Troms, Norway. Tel.: 47 7775 0500; fax: 47 Bech, Claus 8 ARCTIC Sabines Gull (Xema...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fox pups Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Mortality of arctic ... Source: Hayssen, Virginia - Department of Biological Sciences, Smith College Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Leashing the AlphaWolves:...

  14. Radiocarbon Content of CO 2 Respired from High Arctic Tundra in Northwest Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czimczik, Claudia I; Welker, Jeffrey M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. E. , 2002: Survey of Greenland instrumental temperaturetypes in northwestern Greenland. Arctic, Antarctic, andfen ecosystem in NE-Greenland. Theoretical and Applied

  15. Oceanic periglacial in the evolution of the Arctic marine ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matishov, G.G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Murmansk (Russian Federation). Murmansk Marine Biological Inst.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the Arctic marine and land environment and biota is connected with the analysis of the global climatic changes and the general history of Arctic and subarctic ecological systems. Ancient glaciation not only influenced the geomorphology of landscapes, physical and chemical properties of the ocean and its seas, but also caused the global change of the morphoclimatic zonality in the ocean as a whole. Submarine and subaqual hydrological, geomorphological and biological processes on the shelves of polar and temperate latitudes had intensified especially during the melting of continental glaciers. The study of the periglacial problem consists, as a whole, in the research of the geological and biological phenomena which take place in the pelagial and the benthal outside the ice sheets and are connected with them by causal, spatial and temporal relations.

  16. Sub-microradian Surface Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Trace Profiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Barber, Samuel; Domning, Edward E.; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas; Geckeler, Ralf; Just, Andreas

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A new low budget slope measuring instrument, the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP), was recently brought to operation at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory. The design, instrumental control and data acquisition system, initial alignment and calibration procedures, as well as the developed experimental precautions and procedures are described in detail. The capability of the DLTP to achieve sub-microradian surface slope metrology is verified via cross-comparison measurements with other high performance slope measuring instruments when measuring the same high quality test optics. The directions of future work to develop a surface slope measuring profiler with nano-radian performance are also discussed.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. Coreflood, quarter 5-spot study, compositional simulation, wettability, relative permeability study and streamline-based simulation were conducted in this project. 1D compositional simulation results agree reasonably well with those of the slim tube experiments. Injection of CO{sub 2}-NGL is preferable over that of PBG-NGL. MME is sensitive to pressure (in the range of 1300-1800 psi) for the injection of PBG-NGL, but not for CO{sub 2}-NGL. Three hydrocarbon phases form in this pressure range. As the mean thickness of the adsorbed organic layer on minerals increases, the oil-water contact angle increases. The adsorbed organic films left behind after extraction of oil by common aromatic solvents used in core studies, such as toluene and decalin, are thinner than those left behind by non-aromatic solvents, such as cyclohexane. The force of adhesion for minerals aged with just the asphaltene fraction is similar to that of the whole oil implying that asphaltenes are responsible for the mixed-wettability in this reservoir. A new relative permeability model for a four-phase, mixed-wet system has been proposed. A streamline module is developed which can be incorporated in an existing finite-difference based compositional simulator to model water flood, gas flood and WAG flood. Horizontal wells increase well deliverability over vertical wells, but sweep efficiency can decrease. The well performance depends on the well length, position, heterogeneity, and viscosity ratio. The productivity increase due to electromagnetic heating is a function of power intensity, flow rate, and frequency etc. The productivity of a well can be doubled by electromagnetic heating. A high-pressure quarter 5-spot model has been constructed to evaluate the sweep efficiency of miscible WAG floods. WAG displacement reduces bypassing compared to gas floods and improves oil recovery in cores. As the WAG ratio decreased and slug size increased, oil recovery increased. Oil was recovered faster with increased slug size and decreased WAG ratio in the simulations for field cases studied.

  18. Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Amy

    Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

  19. PACIFIC VENTILATION OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN'S LOWER HALOCLINE BY UPWELLING AND DIAPYCNAL MIXING OVER THE CONTINENTAL MARGIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    PACIFIC VENTILATION OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN'S LOWER HALOCLINE BY UPWELLING AND DIAPYCNAL MIXING OVER of nutrients and buoyancy to the Arctic Ocean, are thought to ventilate the Arctic's lower halocline either waters upwelled onto the shelf. Although ventilation at salinity (S) > 34 psu has previously been

  20. IGS 2000: RGPS Albedo June 15, 2001 1 Arctic sea ice albedo derived from RGPS-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    of Arctic pack ice ia a highly significant factor for establishing the energy balance of the ice. The netIGS 2000: RGPS Albedo June 15, 2001 1 Arctic sea ice albedo derived from RGPS-based ice thickness Geophysical Processor System (RGPS) uses sequential synthetic aperture radar images of Arctic sea ice taken

  1. Arctic ice export events and their potential impact on global climate during the late Pleistocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, Dennis

    Arctic ice export events and their potential impact on global climate during the late Pleistocene export events are identified from the Laurentide and the Innuitian ice sheets, between 14 and 34 ka, the Arctic export events appear to occur prior to Heinrich events. INDEX TERMS: 4207 Oceanography: General

  2. On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Paquita Zuidema, Paul Lawson, Hugh Morrison U of Miami/SPEC, Inc. Boulder CO/NCAR #12;Arctic clouds are often: mixed-phase (ie. both ice + supercooled water) yet long-lasting (despite disequilibrium) #12;why? - are ice nuclei over

  3. Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4BE647 #12;Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery J. F. Scinocca,1. [1] We investigate the sensitivity of Northern Hemisphere polar ozone recovery to a scenario in which

  4. Revised 1/11/05 BOWHEAD WHALE (Balaena mysticetus): Western Arctic Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the mobile polar pack ice. There is evidence of whales following each other, even when their route does+++++ +++++++ + +++++++++ Ice Front Revised 1/11/05 BOWHEAD WHALE (Balaena mysticetus): Western in seasonally ice-covered waters of the Arctic and near-Arctic, generally north of 60(N and south of 75(N

  5. Variability of sea ice cover in the Chukchi Sea (western Arctic Ocean) during the Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, Dennis

    of the Arctic Ocean during the last decades suggest a decrease in areal extent and thickness of its pack ice [e be tentatively attributed to global warming and raises concerns about the stability and fate of the pack ice of Arctic pack ice, which cannot be fully assessed from short-term instrumental observations alone

  6. Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    but occurs over a much broader area of the ice pack. Citation: Steele, M., J. Zhang, and W. Ermold (2010Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt Michael Steele,1 summertime upper ocean warming and sea ice melt during the 21st century in the Arctic Ocean. Our first

  7. Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    of radiometers at an ice station frozen into the drifting ice pack of the Arctic Ocean. The NASA/FIRE Arctic- dependent water contents and hydrometeor sizes for all-ice and all-liquid clouds. For the spring and early summer period, all-ice cloud retrievals showed a mean particle diameter of about 60 m and ice water

  8. Future abrupt reductions in the summer Arctic sea ice Marika M. Holland,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    years with considerable thinning of the ice pack [Rothrock et al., 1999; Wadhams and Davis, 2000Future abrupt reductions in the summer Arctic sea ice Marika M. Holland,1 Cecilia M. Bitz,2 12 December 2006. [1] We examine the trajectory of Arctic summer sea ice in seven projections from

  9. Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worster, M. Grae

    Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice Dirk Notz,1,4 Miles G. McPhee,2 M. Grae the simultaneous growth and ablation of a layer of ice between an under-ice melt pond and the underlying ocean. Such ``false bottoms'' are the only significant source of ice formation in the Arctic during summer. Analytical

  10. Conservative behavior of uranium vs. salinity in Arctic sea ice and brine Christelle Not a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Available online 23 December 2011 Keywords: Uranium Salinity Sea ice Brine Seawater Arctic UraniumConservative behavior of uranium vs. salinity in Arctic sea ice and brine Christelle Not a, ,1 disequilibrium The conservative behavior of uranium (U) with respect to salinity in open ocean waters is widely

  11. Be production-rate calibration for the Arctic NICOLA S E. YOUNG,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    A 10 Be production-rate calibration for the Arctic NICOLA´ S E. YOUNG,1,2 * JOERG M. SCHAEFER,1 2013; Accepted 18 April 2013 ABSTRACT: We present a Baffin Bay 10 Be production-rate calibration published 10 Be calibration datasets to develop an Arctic 10 Be production rate. Our calibration comprises

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic ice-covered lake Jessica-cover extent and dynamics on this perennially ice-covered, High Arctic lake. These pellets are interpreted growth. The pellets remain frozen in the ice until a summer or series of summers with reduced ice cover

  13. REGULAR ARTICLE Soil nitrogen cycling rates in low arctic shrub tundra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    of the soil microbial community in both ecosystems indicat- ed similar fungal dominance (epifluorescence landscape. Keywords 15 Nitrogen . Gross N mineralization . Arctic tundra . Litter. Soil microbial community). For example, remote sensing studies have characterized an increase in peak-season biomass across the Arctic

  14. JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS surface. In 1997-1998, a large multi-agency effort made the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA with the ice pack in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas for one year. Surface-based remote sensors generated

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    years due to climate change. The Arctic is one of the last and most extensive ocean wilderness areas climate change pressures, is considerable. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAOORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines for neglected

  16. The Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    Carbon sequestration Biological pump a b s t r a c t We present observation based estimatesThe Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n , A.C. Naveira Garabato a , T. Tsubouchi b , S January 2014 Keywords: Arctic Ocean Dissolved inorganic carbon Carbon budget Air­sea carbon dioxide flux

  17. Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155159 (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155­159 (2013 productive offshore waters of Argentinian Patagonia. We then explore possible reasons for this behavior-ANDEAN PASSAGE OF MIGRATING ARCTIC TERNS OVER PATAGONIA DAVID CAMERON DUFFY1 , ALY MCKNIGHT2 & DAVID B. IRONS2 1

  18. Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohling, Eelco

    Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current K. A. Cox,1 J. D cycle, Arctic sea ice decline, and increasing Greenland glacial melt. Here we use new d18 O data from the East Greenland Current system at Cape Farewell and Denmark Strait to determine the relative proportions

  19. Growing season methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at a sub-arctic wetland in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Blei, Emanuel; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes were measured at several sites in a sub-arctic wetland near Abisko, Sweden (68°28?N 18°49?E) throughout the 2008 growing season. Averaged over 92 flux measurements the sub-arctic wetland was found to be a...

  20. Climate warming will be particularly intense over the Arctic and several observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Kimberly

    -rein- forced research ship Mirai. The icebreaker Oden supports Sweden's program. Even China is now deploying appointed by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Hu Canada Closing Arctic Ozone Observatory 6 Exploring for Gas Hydrate in the Arctic 9 Book Review: Writing

  1. Moisture budget of the Arctic atmosphere from TOVS satellite data David G. Groves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jennifer

    and radiative heating of the atmosphere. These, in turn, affect surface temperature, ice growth and melt and hemispheric atmospheric processes affect the Arctic Ocean. The lack of humidity data over the Arctic Ocean. Our method yields an average annual net precipitation of 15.1 cm yrÀ1 over the polar cap (poleward

  2. U.S. Arctic Research Policy: What do we need to know now?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    ;11 September 2007 Arctic ice retreat ­ minimum coverage and thickness #12;Carbon dioxide climbs #12;Methane: mitigation, adaptation, Arctic feedbacks, alternative energy, sequestration, Black Carbon Task Force · Involve indigenous communities in decisions · Enhance scientific monitoring and research into local

  3. An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David. Understanding the Arctic Ocean energy balance is important because it can strengthen our understanding for Atmosphere-Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NYU, 200 Water

  4. Aerosol Effects on Cloud Emissivity and Surface Longwave Heating in the Arctic TIMOTHY J. GARRETT1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) studies show that in the Arctic cloud cover generally acts to warm the surface, while coolingAerosol Effects on Cloud Emissivity and Surface Longwave Heating in the Arctic TIMOTHY J. GARRETT1 in the atmosphere tend to increase the reflectance of solar (shortwave) radiation from water clouds, which can lead

  5. BACK-ANALYSES OF LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURES Nejan Huvaj-Sarihan Timothy D. Stark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BACK-ANALYSES OF LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURES Nejan Huvaj-Sarihan Timothy D. Stark University strength of MSW. The back-analysis of failed waste slopes in the Gnojna Grora landfill in Poland, Istanbul Landfill in Turkey, Hiriya Landfill in Israel, and Payatas Landfill in Philippines are presented

  6. Control of a Mobile Modular Manipulator Moving on a Slope Yangmin Li, Yugang Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yangmin

    Control of a Mobile Modular Manipulator Moving on a Slope Yangmin Li, Yugang Liu Department. An effective control method is applied to the ntobile mudular manipulator control in case of moving on a slope mobile basis and manipulator were studied in [I]. A hybrid control idea was presented for robot control

  7. Stability Charts for Uniform Slopes Radoslaw L. Michalowski, F.ASCE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalowski, Radoslaw L.

    . Charts are presented for slopes subjected to pore water pressure and also for those exposed to seismic analysis; Limit states; Failures; Graphic methods. Introduction Stability assessments of earth slopes require limit state calcula- tions, which differ significantly from those in structural engineer- ing

  8. Evaluation of a CCD-based high resolution autocollimator for use as a slope sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    Evaluation of a CCD-based high resolution autocollimator for use as a slope sensor Rohan Isaac the focused beam profile to broaden and decrease its peak intensity Project: Evaluation of a compact CCD-based high resolution autocollimator with a small probe beam for potential use as a slope sensor Optics Group

  9. THIN FILM EPITAXY WITH OR WITHOUT SLOPE SELECTION BO LI AND JIAN-GUO LIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    THIN FILM EPITAXY WITH OR WITHOUT SLOPE SELECTION BO LI AND JIAN-GUO LIU Abstract. Two nonlinear diffusion equations for thin film epitaxy, with or without slope se- lection, are studied in this work = - · h 1 + | h|2 + h (1.1) and th = - · 1 - | h|2 h + h (1.2) that model epitaxial growth of thin films

  10. Northsouth topographic slope asymmetry on Mars: Evidence for insolation-related erosion at high obliquity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Head III, James William

    asymmetry. Specifically, we suggest that summertime melting of ground ice on pole-facing slopes occurred, asymmetric troughs in the polar cap deposits of Mars have been interpreted to be due to insolation derived from the gridded topo- graphic map are affected by strongly anisotropic errors. The slopes along

  11. Arctic vegetation damage by winter-generated coal mining pollution released upon thawing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bo Elberling; Jens Soendergaard; Louise A. Jensen; Lea B. Schmidt; Birger U. Hansen; Gert Asmund; Tonci BalicZunic; Joergen Hollesen; Susanne Hanson; Per-Erik Jansson; Thomas Friborg [University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark). Institute of Geography and Geology

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acid mine drainage (known as AMD) is a well-known environmental problem resulting from the oxidation of sulfidic mine waste. In cold regions, AMD is often considered limited by low temperatures most of the year and observed environmental impact is related to pollution generated during the warm summer period. Here we show that heat generation within an oxidizing, sulfidic, coal-mining waste-rock pile in Svalbard (Arctic Norway) (78{sup o}N) is high enough to keep the pile warm (roughly 5{sup o}C throughout the year) despite mean annual air temperatures below -5{sup o}C. Consequently, weathering processes continue year-round within the waste-rock pile which is characterised as a mixture of coal and a siltstone-mudstone. During the winter, weathering products accumulate within the pile because of a frozen outer layer on the pile and are released as a flush within 2 weeks of soil thawing in the spring. Consequently, spring runoff water contains elevated concentrations of metals. Several of these metals are taken up and accumulated in plants where they reach phytotoxic levels, including aluminum and manganese. Laboratory experiments document that uptake of Al and Mn in native plant species is highly correlated with dissolved concentrations. Therefore, future remedial actions to control the adverse environmental impacts of cold region coal-mining need to pay more attention to winter processes including AMD generation and accumulation of weathering products. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuefer, Svetlana

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

  13. Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - FIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5 CampaignSP2govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic Cloud

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL)govCampaignsMixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

  16. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: An Arctic Springtime

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative AbsorptionARM InArctic Facility for Atmospheric Remote

  17. Ordovician platform, slope, and basin facies in subsurface of southern North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alberstadt, L.P.; Colvin, G.; Sauve, J.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ordovician carbonates of the Nashville dome and Ozark dome regions have long been considered typical shelf deposits. In the subsurface to the south, in the Black Warrior basin, Mississippi Embayment, and Arkoma basin, these shelf carbonate units changed facies. The most significant change is the occurrence of a thick limestone unit characterized by a faunal and floral assemblage of Nuia, Girvanella (isolated long strands), Sphaerocodium, a delicate stacked-chambered organism (.algal), and sponge spicules and sponge mudstone clumps. In ascending order, the complete Ordovician sequence consists of: a lower dolostone, the Nuia-sponge limestone, a dolostone, and a limestone. The upper part of this four-fold sequence changes character westward into the Arkoma basin. The lower two units maintain their character for long distances along depositional strike and occur in parts of the Appalachians as far north as Newfoundland, and on the opposite side of the continent in Nevada. The Nuia-sponge assemblage is a distinctive petrographic marker and seems to be a persistent Ordovician rock and fossil assemblage of widespread occurrence. In Nevada, it occurs on the surface where it is associated with slump and slide features that suggest that it is an outer shelf or upper slope deposit. Coeval carbonates in the Ouachita Mountains are different and show indications of being deep water (basinal). Biostratigraphic evidence indicates that the succession in the subsurface is continuous; the regional Lower Ordovician-Middle Ordovician unconformity is absent. The Lower Ordovician-Middle Ordovician boundary falls near the top of the Nuia-sponge mudstone unit and not at the top of the underlying thick dolostone unit.

  18. Status of Wind-Diesel Applications in Arctic Climates: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Corbus, D.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rising cost of diesel fuel and the environmental regulation for its transportation, use, and storage, combined with the clear impacts of increased arctic temperatures, is driving remote communities to examine alternative methods of providing power. Over the past few years, wind energy has been increasingly used to reduce diesel fuel consumption, providing economic, environmental, and security benefits to the energy supply of communities from Alaska to Antarctica. This summary paper describes the current state of wind-diesel systems, reviews the operation of wind-diesel plants in cold climates, discusses current research activities pertaining to these systems, and addresses their technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems in Alaska will be reviewed. Specific focus will also be given to the control of power systems with large amounts of wind generation and the complexities of replacing diesel engine waste heat with excess wind energy, a key factor in assessing power plants for retrofit. A brief overview of steps for assessing the viability of retrofitting diesel power systems with wind technologies will also be provided. Because of the large number of isolated diesel minigrids, the market for adding wind to these systems is substantial, specifically in arctic climates and on islands that rely on diesel-only power generation.

  19. Age characteristics in a multidecadal Arctic sea ice simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitz, Cecllia M [UNIV. OF WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from adding a tracer for age of sea ice to a sophisticated sea ice model that is widely used for climate studies are presented. The consistent simulation of ice age, dynamics, and thermodynamics in the model shows explicitly that the loss of Arctic perennial ice has accelerated in the past three decades, as has been seen in satellite-derived observations. Our model shows that the September ice age average across the Northern Hemisphere varies from about 5 to 8 years, and the ice is much younger (about 2--3 years) in late winter because of the expansion of first-year ice. We find seasonal ice on average comprises about 5% of the total ice area in September, but as much as 1.34 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} survives in some years. Our simulated ice age in the late 1980s and early 1990s declined markedly in agreement with other studies. After this period of decline, the ice age began to recover, but in the final years of the simulation very little young ice remains after the melt season, a strong indication that the age of the pack will again decline in the future as older ice classes fail to be replenished. The Arctic ice pack has fluctuated between older and younger ice types over the past 30 years, while ice area, thickness, and volume all declined over the same period, with an apparent acceleration in the last decade.

  20. On the Form of the HII Region Luminosity Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey; C. J. Clarke

    1997-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Observed variations in the HII region luminosity function (HII LF) seen in spiral arm vs. interarm regions, and different galactic Hubble type, can be explained simply by evolutionary effects and maximum number of ionizing stars per cluster. We present Monte Carlo simulations of the HII LF, drawing the number of ionizing stars N_* from a power-law distribution of constant slope, and the stellar masses from a Salpeter IMF with an upper-mass limit of 100 M_sol. We investigate the evolution of the HII LF, as determined by stellar main-sequence lifetimes and ionizing luminosities, for a single burst case and continuous creation of the nebular population. Shallower HII LF slopes measured for the arms of spiral galaxies can be explained as a composite slope, expected for a zero-age burst population, whereas the interarm regions tend to be dominated by evolved rich clusters described by a single, steeper slope. Steeper slopes in earlier-type galaxies can be explained simply by a lower maximum N_* cutoff found for the parent OB associations. The form of the HII LF can reveal features of the most recent (~< 10 Myr) star formation history in nearby galaxies.

  1. Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanical Behavior of a Fractured Porous Slope in Response to Free Water-Surface Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guglielmi, Y.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanicalinstrumented for mesoscale hydraulic and mechanicalwords: Fracture; Rock slope; Mesoscale; In situ poroelastic

  2. Groundbased spectroscopic measurements of stratospheric NO[sub 2] and OClO in arctic winter 1989/90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiedler, M.; Frank, H.; Gomer, T.; Hausmann, M.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Platt, U.

    1993-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report on column measurements of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide and OClO made near the arctic vortex. This is part of an effort to study ozone depletion effects in the artic region by looking for atmospheric signatures of gases which contribute to catalyzing ozone depletion, denitrification, and activation of halogen species. OClO is viewed as a sensitive indicator of activated halogene chemistry, since it is produced via chlorine oxide and bromine oxide interactions. It also is rapidly photolyzed. Using direct moonlight or zenith scattered sunlight, UV and visible spectroscopy was able to measure slant column integrated NO[sub 2] and OClO abundances, and convert them to vertical column densities. Elevated levels of OClO were detected during February 6, 8, 1990, when atmospheric temperatures may have favored formation of polar stratospheric clouds.

  3. Geotechnical in situ characterization of subaquatic slopes: The role of pore pressure transients versus frictional strength in landslide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    -triggered slope deposits in Lake Lucerne (Switzerland) in addition to geophysical characterization and laboratory-induced subaquatic slope failure in Lake Lucerne (Switzerland) using in situ vane shear and Cone Penetrating Testing- overdeepened Lake Lucerne, central Switzerland (Figure 1). A detailed description of the slope and sediment

  4. Evolution of depositional and slope instability processes on Bryant Canyon area, Northwest Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripsanas, Efthymios

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    . At about 11 ky B.P. the melt water discharges of the North America switched from Mississippi River to St Lawrence Seaway, causing the domination of hemipelagic sedimentation on the continental slope of the northwest Gulf of Mexico....

  5. Clay mineralogy and its effect on physical properties in the Gulf of Mexico northwestern continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berti, Debora

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The clay mineral composition of sediments deposited in the last six oxygen isotope stages in the Gulf of Mexico continental slope was characterized. Smectite and illite were found to be the two major clay minerals of the clay fraction while...

  6. ,Altitudinal distribution of monthly norms of precipitation on the northern slope of the Kyrgyz range (Kyrgyzstan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    range (Kyrgyzstan) Korobitsina . 1. Introduction Our main task was to identify territorial distribution of precipitation on the northern slope of the Kyrgyz range (NSKR) (within Kyrgyzstan), where over 30 rivers, widely

  7. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements with x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    slope measurements with x-ray optics Zulfiqar Ali, Curtis L.with state-of-the-art x-ray optics. Significant suppressionscanning, metrology of x-ray optics, deflectometry Abstract

  8. New evidence of slope instability in the Outardes Bay delta area, Quebec, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    features are in direct relationship with the seismic interpretation of the data collected upslope multibeam sonar (95 kHz) on the slope to provide high-resolution seismic and bathy- metric data. The seismic

  9. Sub-microradian Surface Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Trace Profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Device for X-ray Optics at BESSY,” Proc. AIP 705, [2] R.D.Elektronenspeicherring BESSY-II, Albert- Einstein-Str. 15,Machine) slope profiler at BESSY (Germany) [1] and the

  10. Engineering properties of Resedimented Ugnu Clay from the Alaskan North Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Cullen A. (Cullen Albert)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research determined the engineering properties of laboratory Resedimented Ugnu Clay (RUC) specimens created using recovered material from 3800 ft below the surface of the Alaskan Northern Slope to aid with future ...

  11. Interpretation of side-scan sonar images from hydrocarbon seep areas of the Louisiana continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Rusheng

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Side-scan sonar images from the Louisiana continental slope were examined to study hydrocarbon seepage and related surficial geologic seafloor features. Three study areas are located in the Green Canyon area and the Garden Bank area. Hydrocarbon...

  12. Evolution of depositional and slope instability processes on Bryant Canyon area, Northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripsanas, Efthymios

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    . At about 11 ky B.P. the melt water discharges of the North America switched from Mississippi River to St Lawrence Seaway, causing the domination of hemipelagic sedimentation on the continental slope of the northwest Gulf of Mexico....

  13. MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Melanie 1989-

    2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA Approved by... of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON iii ABSTRACT Monitoring Stratification and Currents at the Continental Slope of the Scotia Sea, Antarctica. (April 2011...

  14. Sea Ice Dynamics and Regional Meteorology for the Arctic Polynya Experiment (APEX) -Bering Sea 1985

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..-.'''~:..~t:.'~.;,..... ,'" 'J.~~l~ · ._. fiv· ~ .. ~ .·. I ' . . . .1. . ""V' ·· I' ~ _',~ " · A e · . ~. ,': ~:'P'." ,i' -.t ' "'ft.""~"~.I r,J, ...'~"'".~".. "'~..J. ~.·.".'l :..' ti.;~.I.... ,.. ,'t ·. " , .:~..~....·~ j':.. ',' /~.,..~'I":'F' r/tr. tIlL. [i'" " . 4 . . . , l. '.. .. ,~"" It~ . '~ 1"r ,. ~ ' .' .' .' '1'.:. ..-' ~ Vl7

  15. The Arctic Region Supercomputing Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks is an allocated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freericks, Jim

    Characteristic low and high frequencies 3D iso-surface of p=0.5P/ Simulations suggest and experiments confirm low turbulence and shock waves. For example, when the space shuttle re-enters orbit its speed is so swift the shuttle at high speed create friction, which creates intense heat. "If we can't predict the flow

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic-arctic region present Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sources for the radionuclides in the ... Source: Drange, Helge - Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center Collection: Geosciences 3 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Syringeal anatomy and...

  17. National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR) - 10-Year Renewable Energy Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of EnergyInMay 22, 2009NSAR - T en Y

  18. Mobilization pathways of organic carbon from permafrost to arctic rivers in a changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Laodong

    and subarctic river waters is dominated by contemporary sour- ces [Benner et al., 2004; Guo and Macdonald, 2006 in arctic rivers should then become older, reflecting the age of that reservoir [Schell and Ziemann, 1983

  19. Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Laura Marie

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

  20. Metal Analysis of Scales Taken from Arctic Grayling A. P. Farrell,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    scales taken from Arctic grayling using laser ablation­induc- tively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA of the scales. Ten elements (Mg, Ca, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Sb, Hg, and Pb) were measured in 10 to 16 ablation

  1. Building skills : a construction trades training facility for the eastern Canadian Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roszler, Sarah Katherine, 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 1, 1999, the Inuit of the Eastern Canadian Arctic achieved sovereignty over a new territory, Nunavut, envisioning economic self-reliance, political self-determination, and renewal of confidence in Inuit community. ...

  2. arctic mixed-phase clouds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    low-level Arctic clouds in cold seasons and have a significant impact on the surface energy budget. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models...

  3. Real-time processing of remote sensor data as applied to Arctic ice classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Permenter, James Austin

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by JAMES AUSTIN PERMENTER partial ! Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by James Austin Permenter Approved as to style and content by: ] ( rman of Commi...

  4. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  5. LES Simulations of Roll Clouds Observed During Mixed- Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, S.D.; Harrington, J.Y.; Prenni, A.; DeMott, P.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Roll clouds, and associated roll convection, are fairly common features of the atmospheric boundary layer. While these organized cumuliform clouds are found over many regions of the planet, they are quite ubiquitous near the edge of the polar ice sheets. In particular, during periods of off-ice flow, when cold polar air flows from the ice pack over the relatively warm ocean water, strong boundary layer convection develops along with frequent rolls. According to Bruemmer and Pohlman (2000), most of the total cloud cover in the Arctic is due to roll clouds. In an effort to examine the influences of mixed-phase microphysics on the boundary layer evolution of roll clouds during off-ice flow, Olsson and Harrington (2000) used a 2D mesoscale model coupled to a bulk microphysical scheme (see Section 2). Their results showed that mixed-phase clouds produced more shallow boundary layers with weaker turbulence than liquid-phase cases. Furthermore, their results showed that because of th e reduced turbulent drag on the atmosphere in the mixed-phase case, regions of mesoscale divergence in the marginal ice-zone were significantly affected. A follow-up 2D study (Harrington and Olsson 2001) showed that the reduced turbulent intensity in mixed-phase cases was due to precipitation. Ice precipitation caused downdraft stabilization which fed back and caused a reduction in the surface heat fluxes. In this work, we extend the work of Olsson and Harrington (2000) and Harrington and Olsson (2001) by examining the impacts of ice microphysics on roll convection. We will present results that illustrate how microphysics alters roll cloud structure and dynamics.

  6. Stability of submerged slopes on the flanks of the Hawaiian Islands, a simplified approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H.J.; Torresan, M.E.; McArthur, W.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Undersea transmission lines and shoreline AC-DC conversion stations and near-shore transmission lines are being considered as part of a system for transporting energy between the Hawaiian Islands. These facilities will need to be designed so that they will not be damaged or destroyed by coastal or undersea landslides. Advanced site surveys and engineering design of these facilities will require detailed site specific analyses, including sediment sampling and laboratory testing of samples, in situ testing of sediment and rock, detailed charting of bathymetry, and two- or three-dimensional numerical analyses of the factors of safety of the slopes against failure from the various possible loading mechanisms. An intermediate approximate approach can be followed that involves gravity and piston cores, laboratory testing and the application of simplified models to determine a seismic angle of repose for actual sediment in the vicinity of the planned facility. An even simpler and more approximate approach involves predictions of angles of repose using classification of the sediment along a proposed route as either a coarse volcaniclastic sand, a calcareous ooze, or a muddy terrigenous sediment. The steepest slope that such a sediment can maintain is the static angle of repose. Sediment may be found on slopes as steep as these, but it must be considered metastable and liable to fail in the event of any disturbance, storm or earthquake. The seismic angle of repose likely governs most slopes on the Hawaiian Ridge. This declivity corresponds to the response of the slope to a continuing seismic environment. As a long history of earthquakes affects the slopes, they gradually flatten to this level. Slopes that exceed or roughly equal this value can be considered at risk to fail during future earthquakes. Seismic and static angles of repose for three sediment types are tabulated in this report.

  7. Sub-microradian Surface Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Trace Profiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Barber, Samuel; Domning, Edward E.; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas; Geckeler, Ralf; Just, Andreas

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of X-ray optics for 3rd and 4th generation X-ray light sources with a level of surface slope precision of 0.1-0.2 {micro}rad requires the development of adequate fabrication technologies and dedicated metrology instrumentation and methods. Currently, the best performance of surface slope measurement has been achieved with the NOM (Nanometer Optical Component Measuring Machine) slope profiler at BESSY (Germany) [1] and the ESAD (Extended Shear Angle Difference) profiler at the PTB (Germany) [2]. Both instruments are based on electronic autocollimators (AC) precisely calibrated for the specific application [3] with small apertures of 2.5-5 mm in diameter. In the present work, we describe the design, initial alignment and calibration procedures, the instrumental control and data acquisition system, as well as the measurement performance of the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP) slope measuring instrument recently brought into operation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) Optical Metrology Laboratory (OML). Similar to the NOM and ESAD, the DLTP is based on a precisely calibrated autocollimator. However, this is a reasonably low budget instrument used at the ALS OML for the development and testing of new measuring techniques and methods. Some of the developed methods have been implemented into the ALS LTP-II (slope measuring long trace profiler [4]) which was recently upgraded and has demonstrated a capability for 0.25 {micro}rad surface metrology [5]. Performance of the DLTP was verified via a number of measurements with high quality reference mirrors. A comparison with the corresponding results obtained with the world's best slope measuring instrument, the BESSY NOM, proves the accuracy of the DLTP measurements on the level of 0.1-0.2 {micro}rad depending on the curvature of a surface under test. The directions of future work to develop a surface slope measuring profiler with nano-radian performance are also discussed.

  8. 90 4,000 Meters under the Ice The Arctic is one of the habitats undergoing the most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PlanckResearch 89 RUSSIA Special RUSSIA Special #12;#12;TEXT MAREN EMMERICH The Arctic is one of the habitats

  9. Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric T. DeWeaver

    2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. The examination of present-day climate also includes diagnostic intercomparison of model simulations and observed mean climate and climate variability using reanalysis and satellite datasets. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A further objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system.

  10. Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric T. DeWeaver

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

  11. Published by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States 3535 College Road Suite 101 Fairbanks, AK 99709 Arctic Research at the University of Northern British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    · Fairbanks, AK 99709 Arctic Research at the University of Northern British Columbia Establishedin1994 Columbia Prince George Campus 3333 University Way Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9 Canada 250-960-5555 sderywithconsiderablepublicendorsementandenthusiasm,theUniver- sity of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) has grown into one of Canada's premier

  12. Published in: Annals of Glaciology, vol. 33, pp. 194-200, 2001 Indirect measurements of the mass balance of summer Arctic sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    of summer ablation are of great importance in determining the overall mass balance of the Arctic ice pack in determining the state of the Arctic ice pack. Measurements of annual loss and gain of ice mass are required balance of summer Arctic sea ice with an electromagnetic induction technique H. EICKEN Geophysical

  13. Bringing Alaska North Slope Natural Gas to Market (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At least three alternatives have been proposed over the years for bringing sizable volumes of natural gas from Alaska's remote North Slope to market in the lower 48 states: a pipeline interconnecting with the existing pipeline system in central Alberta, Canada; a gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant on the North Slope; and a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at Valdez, Alaska. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) explicitly models the pipeline and GTL options. The what if LNG option is not modeled in NEMS.

  14. Drilling fluids and the arctic tundra of Alaska: assessing contamination of wetlands habitat and the toxicity to aquatic invertebrates and fish (journal version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, D.F.; Snyder-Conn, E.; Riley, R.G.; Garland, T.R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling for oil on the North Slope of Alaska results in the release of large volumes of used drilling fluids into arctic wetlands. These releases usually come from regulated discharges or seepage from reserve pits constructed to hold used drilling fluids. A study of five drill sites and their reserve pits showed an increase in common and trace elements and organic hydrocarbons in ponds near to and distant from reserve pits. Ions elevated in water were Ba, Cl, Cr, K, SO4 and Zn. Concentrations of Cu, Cr, Fe, Pb, and Si in sediments were higher in near and distant ponds than in control ponds. The predominant organics in drill-site waters and sediments consisted of aromatic and paraffinic hydrocarbons characteristic of petroleum or a refined product of petroleum. In 96-hr exposures in the field, toxicity to Daphnia Middendorffiana was observed in water from all reserve pits, and from two of five near ponds, but not from distant ponds. In laboratory tests with Daphnia magna, growth and reproduction were reduced in dilutions of 2.5% drilling fluid (2.5 drilling fluid: 97.5 dilution water) from one reserve pit, and 25% drilling fluid from a second.

  15. Mars outflow channels: A reappraisal of the estimation of water flow velocities from water depths, regional slopes, and channel floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Head III, James William

    of estimating water flow velocities in Martian outflow channels using equations based on the Darcy of the Manning equation should be replaced by the modern form or, preferably, by the Darcy-Weisbach equation channel systems on Mars have relied widely on various versions of the Manning equation. This has led

  16. Rutgers Regional Report # Regional Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    , population, income, and building permits over a 32-year period from 1969 to 2001 for the 31-county Tri counties of the Tri-State (Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York) Region have been divided for analytical the nation and the Tri-State Region. What has not been fully documented, however, is the apparent shift

  17. Critical mechanisms for the formation of extreme arctic sea-ice extent in the summers of 2007 and 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    deformation on top of the long-term thinning of an Arctic ice pack that had become more dominated by seasonalCritical mechanisms for the formation of extreme arctic sea-ice extent in the summers of 2007 system, the largest year-to-year variation in sea-ice extent (SIE) has occurred in the Laptev, East

  18. The 2007 Bering Strait Oceanic Heat Flux and anomalous Arctic Sea-ice Retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate*, Tom Weingartner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    where heat carried by northward flowing PW weakens the ice-pack thereby promoting more sea-ice motionThe 2007 Bering Strait Oceanic Heat Flux and anomalous Arctic Sea-ice Retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate Abstract: To illuminate the role of Pacific Waters in the 2007 Arctic sea-ice retreat, we use observational

  19. The Thinning of Arctic Sea Ice, 19882003: Have We Passed a Tipping Point? R. W. LINDSAY AND J. ZHANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    ­05. To determine the physical processes contributing to these changes in the Arctic pack ice, model results from ice pack is a key component of the Arctic Ocean physical and biological systems. It controls in the central pack is also thinning. Based on submarine measurements, the ice draft is reported by Rothrock et

  20. UiT The Arctic University of Norway Fakultet for biovitenskap, fiskeri og konomi -Inst. for arktisk og marin biologi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uppsala Universitet

    UiT The Arctic University of Norway Fakultet for biovitenskap, fiskeri og økonomi - Inst/616 The Faculty of Biosciences, Fishery and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway has a PhD position and participate in field work in Norway and Russia. The candidate must have a god command of written and spoken

  1. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Ian M.

    A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar properties. An initial warm, melt

  2. Modelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios of future climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). A consequence of climatic warming in the high Arctic will be an increase in surface melting of glaciers and ice component of the mass accumulation of many glaciers and ice caps in thModelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios

  3. Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical Jean-Alain FLEURISSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 GHGT-9 Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical approach all natural geological and geomechanical features and the geological structures as well and geomechanical data; 2) determination of the potential mechanisms of deformation and failure, and their numerical

  4. A chronostratigraphic framework for the northwestern slope of the gulf of mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elston, Kristen Eileen

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediments from two cores, JPC31 and JPC46, were analyzed to better understand the relationship between climate and sediment deposition on the continental slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. These two cores were selected from a suite of cores...

  5. Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An; Xu, Jun.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness Delta r(np) of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E(sym)(rho(0)) and its density slope L at saturation density rho(0). Combining...

  6. EVIDENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE CONCENTRATIONS ON FORESTED SLOPES OF THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKendry, Ian

    EVIDENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE CONCENTRATIONS ON FORESTED SLOPES OF THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH, hourly average ozone concentrations were mea- sured at three sites of differing elevation (188, 588. Sites experienced ozone concentrations ranging from 0 to 88 ppb in 2001, and 0 to 96 ppb in 2002. Daily

  7. The epibenthic megafauna of the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, Matthew Peek

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The epibenthic megafauna of the continental slope and abyssal plain of the northern Gulf of Mexico have been investigated using multi-shot bottom photography. A total of 10,388 photographs were analyzed from 100 sites encompassing a total area...

  8. MODELING OF SKID-STEERED WHEELED ROBOTIC VEHICLES ON SLOPED TERRAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Emmanuel

    MODELING OF SKID-STEERED WHEELED ROBOTIC VEHICLES ON SLOPED TERRAINS Camilo Ordonez Center radii. This work presents the analysis and experimental verification of a dynamic model for skid-steered for Intelligent Systems, Controls and Robotics (CISCOR) Department of Mechanical Engineering Florida A

  9. DRAFT TECHNICAL GUIDANCE DOCUMENT ON STATIC AND SEISMIC SLOPE STABILITY FOR SOLID WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRAFT TECHNICAL GUIDANCE DOCUMENT ON STATIC AND SEISMIC SLOPE STABILITY FOR SOLID WASTE CONTAINMENT FACILITIES PRODUCED BY THE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY MISSOURI IN GEOSYNTHETIC MATERIALS Page 33 5.0 ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE Page 36 I. STATIC PROPERTIES

  10. Recent glacially influenced sedimentary processes on the East Greenland continental slope and deep Greenland Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakobsson, Martin

    Recent glacially influenced sedimentary processes on the East Greenland continental slope and deep Greenland Basin Marga García a,*, Julian A. Dowdeswell a , Gemma Ercilla b , Martin Jakobsson c a Scott June 2012 Available online xxx Keywords: Greenland Basin Glacially influenced sedimentary processes

  11. Probabilistic slope stability analysis by finite elements D.V. Griffiths*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probabilistic slope stability analysis by finite elements D.V. Griffiths* and Gordon A. Fenton. The advanced method, called the random finite element method (RFEM), uses elasto- plasticity combined nonlinear finite element methods are combined with ran- dom field generation techniques. This method, called

  12. 1 INTRODUCTION Geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) with geomembranes (GMs) placed on slopes as part of composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    143 1 INTRODUCTION Geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) with geomembranes (GMs) placed on slopes as part and interface shear strength of geosynthetic clay liners J.G. ZORNBERG The University of Texas at Austin, Austin of composite liner systems may be subject to a complex, time-dependent state of stresses. Stability is a major

  13. A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE on the global warming that can be tolerated without risking dangerous anthropogenic interference with climate. I" mainly as a metaphor for the danger posed by global warming. So I changed "Hell" to "disaster." What

  14. Non-nuclear submarine tankers could cost-effectively move Arctic oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumm, W.H.

    1984-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Before the advent of nuclear propulsion for U.S. Navy submarines, fuel cells were considered to be the next logical step forward from battery powered submarines which required recharging. But with the launching of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954, the development of fuel-cell propulsion was sidelined by the naval community. Nearly 30 years later fuel-cell propulsion on board submarines is actually more cost-effective than the use of nuclear propulsion. In the Artic Ocean, the use of the submarine tanker has long been considered commercially appropriate because of the presence of the polar ice cap, which inhibits surface ship transport. The technical difficulty and high operating cost of Arctic icebreaking tankers are strong arguments in favor of the cheaper, more efficient submarine tanker. Transiting under the polar ice cap, the submarine tanker is not an ''Arctic'' system, but merely a submerged system. It is a system usable in any ocean around the globe where sufficient depth exists (about 65% of the global surface). Ice breakers are another story; their design only makes them useful for transit through heavy sea ice in coastal environments. Used anywhere else, such as in the open ocean or at the Arctic ice cap, they are not a cost-effective means of transport. Arctic sea ice conditions require the Arctic peculiar icebreaking tanker system to do the job the hard way-on the surface. But on the other hand, Arctic sea ice conditions are neatly set aside by the submarine tanker, which does it the energy-efficient, elegant way submerged. The submarine tanker is less expensive to build, far less expensive to operate, and does not need to be nuclear propelled.

  15. Fundamental problems of modeling the dynamics of internal gravity waves with applications to the Arctic Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitaly V. Bulatov; Yuriy V. Vladimirov

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider fundamental problems of the dynamics of internal gravity waves. We present analytical and numerical algorithms for calculating the wave fields for a set of values of the parameters, as observed in the ocean. We show that our mathematical models can describe the wave dynamics of the Arctic Basin, taking into account the actual physical characteristics of sea water, topography of its floor, etc. The numerical and analytical results show that the internal gravity waves have a significant effect on underwater sea objects in the Arctic Basin.

  16. Annotated bibliography of the Northwest Territories action on water component of the Arctic environmental strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, R.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-related research conducted under the 1991--97 Arctic Environmental Strategy resulted in the production of 215 publications listed in this bibliography. The main section sorts citations by author and then by title. All citations are annotated and are keyed to the database of the Arctic Science and Technology Information System (ASTIS). The bibliography has three indexes that refer back to the main section: Subject, geographic area, and title. Topics covered include Northwest Territories hydrology, environmental fate of contaminants, water quality, snow, the water cycle, modelling, and limnology.

  17. A guidebook for insulated low-slope roof systems. IEA Annex 19, Low-slope roof systems: International Energy Agency Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-slope roof systems are common on commercial and industrial buildings and, to a lesser extent, on residential buildings. Although insulating materials have nearly always been a component of low-slope roofs, the amount of insulation used has increased in the past two decades because of escalation of heating and cooling costs and increased awareness of the need for energy conservation. As the amount of insulation has increased, the demand has intensified for design, installation, and maintenance information specifically for well-insulated roofs. Existing practices for design, installation, and maintenance of insulated roofs have evolved from experience. Typically, these practices feature compromises due to the different properties of materials making up a given roof system. Therefore, they should be examined from time to time to ensure that they are appropriate as new materials continue to enter the market and as the data base on existing systems expands. A primary purpose of this International Energy Agency (IEA) study is to assess current roofing insulation practices in the context of an accumulating data base on performance.

  18. Phreatic flow on sloping soil layers from a finite source: An analytical solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filley, T.H.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sloping clay layers beneath percolation ponds can cause infiltrating wastewater to pond and move in directions not predicted by vertical infiltration equations. This report presents a method for estimating the potential of wastewater from percolation sumps located over sloping clay layers to interact with nearby groundwater resources. The analytical solution developed is for steady-state conditions and includes a procedure to estimate the time needed to reach steady state. The fundamental assumption used in the mathematical development requires that elevation-head gradients be much larger than pressure-head gradients. A method for testing the validity of this assumption is also included. An example calculation was performed for percolation sumps on the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in Elk Hills, California. That analysis showed that, under the assumptions used, the sumps may have enabled oil field wastewater to reach groundwater resources within the adjacent San Joaquin Valley. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Is the friction angle the maximum slope of a free surface of a non cohesive material?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Modaressi; P. Evesque

    2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from a symmetric triangular pile with a horizontal basis and rotating the basis in the vertical plane, we have determined the evolution of the stress distribution as a function of the basis inclination using Finite Elements method with an elastic-perfectly plastic constitutive model, defined by its friction angle, without cohesion. It is found that when the yield function is the Drucker-Prager one, stress distribution satisfying equilibrium can be found even when one of the free-surface slopes is larger than the friction angle. This means that piles with a slope larger than the friction angle can be (at least) marginally stable and that slope rotation is not always a destabilising perturbation direction. On the contrary, it is found that the slope cannot overpass the friction angle when a Mohr-Coulomb yield function is used. Theoretical explanation of these facts is given which enlightens the role plaid by the intermediate principal stress in both cases of the Mohr-Coulomb criterion and of the Drucker-Prager one. It is then argued that the Mohr-Coulomb criterion assumes a spontaneous symmetry breaking, as soon as the two smallest principal stresses are different ; this is not physical most likely; so this criterion shall be replaced by a Drucker-Prager criterion in the vicinity of the equality, which leads to the previous anomalous behaviour ; so these numerical computations enlighten the avalanche process: they show that no dynamical angle larger than the static one is needed to understand avalanching. It is in agreement with previous experimental results. Furthermore, these results show that the maximum angle of repose can be modified using cyclic rotations; we propose a procedure that allows to achieve a maximum angle of repose to be equal to the friction angle .

  20. A probabilistic investigation of slope stability in the Wasatch Range, Davis County, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eblen, James Storey

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . LISA (Level I Stability Analysis), a U. S. Forest Service probabilistic, slope stability model, and a deterministic model, dLISA, will be used in this study. The applicability of the two models will be established as follows: 1) Establish parametric... processes. Keaton (1988) developed a probabilistic model to evaluate hazards that are associated with alluvial fan sedimentation in Davis County, Utah. Keaton concluded that most of the canyons which yielded large volumes of sediment in 1983 and 1984 had...

  1. Distribution of high molecular weight hydrocarbons in northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sericano, Jose Luis

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program (SPR). This program plans to store one billion barrels of oil in solution-mined salt cavities near existing petroleum distribution facilities along the Gulf of Mexico coast. This study, conducted... of petroleum on the deep ocean benthos. The outer continental shelf and slope in many areas of the world include sites of potential oil and gas reserves which have not been previously developed due to technological constraints. However, new technology...

  2. VEHICLE 1vlOBILITY TES'J'S SOFT SOIL SLOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    VEHICLE 1vlOBILITY TES'J'S SOFT SOIL SLOPES June 2 5 , 1970 J E T P R O P U L S I O N L A B C A L f;760-51 FOREWORD The investigation documented in this report constitutes part of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV. :;: These vehicle mobility tests have been performed to develop :: National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  3. Export of nutrients from the Arctic Ocean Sinhu Torres-Valds,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    Export of nutrients from the Arctic Ocean Sinhué Torres-Valdés,1 Takamasa Tsubouchi,2 Sheldon Bacon Strait, the Barents Sea Opening (BSO), and Bering Strait. We found that the major exports of all three budgets show that statistically robust net silicate and phosphate exports exist, while the net nitrate

  4. Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    /crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterizationIntercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud

  5. Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean W. R. Peltier,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean freshening W. R. Peltier,1 G to the response to North Atlantic freshening. Citation: Peltier, W. R., G. Vettoretti, and M. Stastna (2006 of the Atlantic by Heinrich Event 1 [Peltier, 2005]. Simi- larly, the onset of the Younger Dryas (Y-D) cold

  6. Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice H. Eicken) program's field site in the northern Chukchi Sea, snow and ice meltwater flow was found to have a strong impact on the heat and mass balance of sea ice during the summer of 1998. Pathways and rates of meltwater

  7. Peeking through a frosty window: molecular insights into the ecology of Arctic soil fungi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Lee

    TIMLING*, D. Lee TAYLOR Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA a r Mycological Society. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.funeco.2012.01.009 f u n g a l e c o l o g y 5 ( 2 0 1

  8. Ventilation of the Miocene Arctic Ocean: An idealized model study Bijoy Thompson,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nycander, Jonas

    Ventilation of the Miocene Arctic Ocean: An idealized model study Bijoy Thompson,1 Johan Nilsson,2 the early Miocene, a feature presumably related to the opening of the Fram Strait. Here, the ventilation circulation model that includes a passive age tracer. In particular, we investigate how the ventilation

  9. 255FEBRUARY 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | he Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    that determine the surface energy budget and the sea­ice mass balance in the Arctic (Moritz et al. 1993; Perovich of the vertical and horizontal energy exchanges within the ocean­ice­atmosphere system. The SHEBA pro- gram for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; TURENNE--Canadian Coast Guard, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; SERREZE

  10. Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere S, such as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). This study examines relationships between changes in total sea ice extent north of 70. These results suggest that a decrease in seasonal ice cover influencing other mechanisms of DMS production could

  11. Underwater radiated noise levels of a research icebreaker in the central Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , and search and rescue. The thinning Arctic ice pack and advances in ship design are allowing for longer of ice-breaking operations. Propulsion modes included transit in variable ice cover, breaking heavy iceHz when breaking ice. The highest noise levels resulted while the ship was engaged in backing

  12. Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment (AIDJEX) assumptions revisited and found inadequate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulsky, Deborah L.

    the Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment (AIDJEX) assumptions about pack ice behavior with an eye to modeling the behavior of pack ice. A model based on these assumptions is needed to represent the deformation and stress in pack ice on scales from 10 to 100 km, and would need to explicitly resolve discontinuities

  13. A possible mechanism for combined chlorine and bromine catalyzed destruction of tropospheric ozone in the arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Bras, G. [Laboratoire de Combustion et Systemes Reactifs, Orleans (France)] [Laboratoire de Combustion et Systemes Reactifs, Orleans (France); Platt, U. [Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)] [Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors make use of measured BrO radical densities, and ClO radical densities inferred from hydrocarbon measurements, made in the arctic troposphere, to calculate ozone depletion rates which would be expected in the spring. These rates compare favorably with field measurements.

  14. SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS Yuliya Tarabalka Research Association, MD, USA. e-mail: yuliya.tarabalka@inria.fr ABSTRACT The melting of sea ice, it is important to investigate how rapidly sea ice floes melt. For this purpose, a new TempoSeg method

  15. TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L. Mitchell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L Monopulse Amplitude Comparison method [3]. This technique estimates surface heights by comparing of good radar return where topography varies within the measurement width, and insufficient in areas

  16. Five Stages of the Alaskan Arctic Cold Season with Ecosystem Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturm, Matthew

    1 Five Stages of the Alaskan Arctic Cold Season with Ecosystem Implications Peter Q. Olsson1 ecosystem processes. During the two autumnal stages (Early Snow and Early Cold) soils remain warm, unfrozen with the least amount of biological activity and have the least impact on the ecosystem. However, Early Snow

  17. Validation of Water Vapour Profiles from GPS Radio Occultations in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gas in the Earth's atmosphere, in- ducing about two third of the natural greenhouse effect anthropogenic effects from natural variability and to understand the radiative feed back from increasing water Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) will be investigated for Arctic conditions. RO humidity

  18. Does Growth Rate Determine the Rate of Metabolism in Shorebird Chicks Living in the Arctic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    primarily of greater metabolic inten- sities of heat-generating tissues. The maximum temperature gradient500 Does Growth Rate Determine the Rate of Metabolism in Shorebird Chicks Living in the Arctic/22/2007; Electronically Published 7/13/2007 ABSTRACT We measured resting and peak metabolic rates (RMR and PMR

  19. Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    will indirectly alter energy transfer through the pelagic food web and ultimately impact apex predators. We-based observations of sea ice concentration from the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR, 1979 recession of high Arctic seasonal ice cover created a temporally predictable primary production bloom

  20. Comparison of surface radiative flux data sets over the Arctic Ocean Jiping Liu,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The reduced surface heat loss is partly offset by the reduction of solar heating due to much higher snow of these surface parameters was compared to the high-quality in situ measurements from the Surface Heat Budget; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001]. However, physical processes in the Arctic are not well understood

  1. Migratory connectivity in Arctic geese: spring stopovers are the weak links in meeting targets for breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    makes geese particularly vul- nerable to the impact of climate change. There is an increasing mismatch trends in the Arctic target areas. Keywords Capital breeding Á Climate change Á Energetic costs 119313, Russia J. Stahl Landscape Ecology Group, University of Oldenburg, 26111 Oldenburg, Germany 123 J

  2. Topographic Controls on LAI in Arctic Tundra Luke Spadavecchia -54 -2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and surface energy balance, which can vary by an order of magnitude among Arctic tundra communities. We Spadavecchia - 55 - 2008 4.1 Declaration The following chapter was submitted to the Journal of Ecology and plant functional type of a tundra ecosystem'. Journal of Ecology 96(6): 1238-1251) we correct

  3. Response of the Greenland-Scotland overflow to changing deep water supply from the Arctic Mediterranean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response of the Greenland-Scotland overflow to changing deep water supply from the Arctic with a topographic barrier is used to study the response of the overflows across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge of the exchanges across the ridge is seen when the supply decreases. Transport variations in the East-Greenland

  4. Greenland's Island Rule and the Arctic Ocean circulation by Terrence M. Joyce1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joyce, Terrence M.

    Greenland's Island Rule and the Arctic Ocean circulation by Terrence M. Joyce1,2 and Andrey made for the flow around Greenland. Godfrey's theory has been extended to permit inclusion of Bering Archipelago in the modeled flow west of Greenland. In both models, the forcing has been applied in a quasi

  5. Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario John C. Moore1 , Annette Rinke1,2 , Xiaoyong Yu1 , Duoying Ji1 , Xuefeng Cui1 , Yan Li3 , Kari Alterskjær4 , Jón Egill Centre, Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract We analyze simulated sea ice

  6. Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo Stephen Warren, University wavelengths: ice is nearly transparent. Absorptive impurities: Black carbon (soot) Brown carbon (organics broadband albedo: 83% 71% (2) by addition of black carbon (BC) (20 ppb): 0.5% for r = 100 µm 1.6% for r

  7. Arctic methane sources: Isotopic evidence for atmospheric inputs R. E. Fisher,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Arctic methane sources: Isotopic evidence for atmospheric inputs R. E. Fisher,1 S. Sriskantharajah,1 D. Lowry,1 M. Lanoisellé,1 C. M. R. Fowler,1 R. H. James,2 O. Hermansen,3 C. Lund Myhre,3 A. Stohl,3 J. Greinert,4 P. B. R. NisbetJones,5 J. Mienert,6 and E. G. Nisbet1 Received 16 August 2011

  8. U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Gautier; Timothy Klett

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.

  9. The great 2012 Arctic Ocean summer cyclone enhanced biological productivity on the shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    The great 2012 Arctic Ocean summer cyclone enhanced biological productivity on the shelves Jinlun influences the marine planktonic ecosystem by enhancing productivity on the shelves of the Chukchi, East days, the simulated biological effects on the shelves last 1 month or longer. At some locations

  10. This chapter describes observations of continuing change in the Arctic environmental system. It is or-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    for the longest period and largest area of ice sheet melt since at least 1978, and the highest melt rate since in the Canadian Arctic, where the rate of mass loss from small glaciers and ice caps continued to increase system. It is or- ganized into five broad sections: atmosphere, ocean, sea ice cover, land, and Greenland

  11. Author's personal copy Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glaciation of Baffin Island, Arctic Canada: key

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    t Melting glaciers and ice caps on Baffin Island contribute roughly half of the sea-level rise from all ice future response of arctic glaciers and ice caps to climate change motivates the use of paleodata throughout the Holocene to its present margin (Barnes Ice Cap) except for two periods of rapid retreat

  12. Vegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    by insulating vegetation from winter wind and temperature extremes, modifying winter soil temperaturesVegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow ) open-topped fiberglass chambers (OTCs) to study the effects of changes in winter snow cover and summer

  13. Quaternary Science Reviews 21 (2002) 9971021 Responses of an arctic landscape to Lateglacial and early Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The Arctic is important to global climate because its Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY 10964, USA c Reanier and Associates, 1807 Thirty Second Avenue, Seattle to the YD are rare, suggesting that rates of paludification slowed. Immediately after 10,000 14 C yr BP

  14. Radiative and microphysical properties of Arctic stratus clouds from multiangle downwelling infrared radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    climate is strongly influenced by an extensive and persistent pattern of cloud cover [Francis, 1997 properties can have significant effects on long- wave radiation, which dominates the radiation energy budgetRadiative and microphysical properties of Arctic stratus clouds from multiangle downwelling

  15. Relationships between Arctic Sea Ice and Clouds during Autumn AXEL J. SCHWEIGER AND RON W. LINDSAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jennifer

    , as the direct radiative effects of cloud cover changes are compensated for by changes in the temperature The connection between sea ice variability and cloud cover over the Arctic seas during autumn is investigated that cloud cover variability near the sea ice margins is strongly linked to sea ice variability. Sea ice

  16. Expected magnitude of the aerosol shortwave indirect effect in springtime Arctic liquid water clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reflection of photons between the snow or sea ice surface and cloud base, the shortwave first indirect effect of high quality longwave spectral radiation measurements in the Arctic from which the indirect effect can clouds both absorb and scatter radiation. We therefore do not yet have a comparable spectral capability

  17. Arctic Oscillation response to the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption: Effects of volcanic aerosols and ozone depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    of perturbation experiments, the full radiative effects of the observed Pinatubo aerosol cloud were included eruption, which produced the largest global volcanic aerosol cloud in the twentieth century. A seriesArctic Oscillation response to the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption: Effects of volcanic aerosols

  18. Optimal tuning and calibration of bendable mirrors with slope measuring profilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, Wayne; Kirschman, Jonathan; MacDowell, Alastair; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a technique to optimally tune and calibrate bendable x-ray optics for sub-micron focusing. The focusing is divided between two elliptically cylindrical reflecting elements, a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) pair. Each optic is shaped by applying unequal bending couples to each end of a flat mirror. The developed technique allowsoptimal tuning of these systems using surface slope data obtained with a slope measuring instrument, the long trace profiler (LTP). Due to the near linearity of the problem, the minimal set of data necessary for the tuning of each bender, consists of only three slope traces measured before and after a single adjustment of each bending couple. The data are analyzed with software realizing a method of regression analysis with experimentally found characteristic functions of the benders. The resulting approximation to the functional dependence of the desired shape provides nearly final settings. Moreover, the characteristic functions of the benders found in the course of tuning, can be used for retuning to a new desired shape without removal from the beamline and re-measuring. We perform a ray trace, using profiler data for the finally tuned optics, predicting the performance to be expected during use of the optics on the beamline.

  19. Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

  20. Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, H.; Zuidema, Paquita; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Luo, Yali; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shipway, Ben

    2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN) concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel studies of the cloud phase parameter space. Large sensitivity to the IN/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterization in models.

  1. The bends in the slopes of radial abundance gradients in the disks of spiral galaxies -- do they exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2002-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Spiral galaxies with a reported bend in the slope of gradient in the oxygen abundances (O/H)_R23, derived with traditionally used R23 - method, were examined. It is shown that the artificial origin of the reported bends can be naturally explained. Two reasons that result in a false bend in the slope of (O/H)_R23 gradient are indicated. It is concluded that at the present time there is no example of a galaxy with an undisputable established bend in the slope of the oxygen abundance gradient.

  2. Sources of spread in simulations of Arctic sea ice loss over the twenty-first century: A letter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boé, Julien; Hall, Alex; Qu, Xin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the ultimate fate of the ice pack. 1 Introduction Over theof the entire year’s ice pack (Fig. 3b). The relationshipultimate fate of the Arctic ice pack. In Boé et al. (2009b)

  3. Climatic responses in spring migration of boreal and arctic birds in relation to wintering area and taxonomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    and taxonomy Kalle Rainio, Toni Laaksonen, Markus Ahola, Anssi V. Va¨ha¨talo and Esa Lehikoinen Rainio, K of boreal and arctic birds in relation to wintering area and taxonomy. Á J. Avian Biol. 37: 507Á515. Large

  4. Breaking the Ice: Navigation in the Arctic Grace Xingxin Gao, Liang Heng, Todd Walter, and Per Enge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    Breaking the Ice: Navigation in the Arctic Grace Xingxin Gao, Liang Heng, Todd Walter, and Per Enge (ION) Early Achievement Award. Liang Heng is a Ph.D. candidate under the guidance of Professor Per Enge

  5. Phylogenetic relationships, host affinity, and geographic structure of boreal and arctic endophytes from three major plant lineages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    Phylogenetic relationships, host affinity, and geographic structure of boreal and arctic endophytes Although associated with all plants, fungal endophytes (microfungi that live within healthy plant tissues, or phylogenetic relationships. We surveyed endophytic Ascomycota from healthy photosyn- thetic tissues of three

  6. A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Products for the Arctic Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in Air–Sea Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

    The uncertainties related to atmospheric fields in the Arctic Ocean from commonly used and recently available reanalysis products are investigated. Fields from the 1) ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) Common ...

  7. The development of a signal processing network for a real-time Arctic sea ice classification system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordhaus, William D

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIGNAL PROCESSING NETWORK FOR A REAL-TIME ARCTIC SEA ICE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM A Thesis by WILLIAM DOUGLAS NORDHAUS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIGNAL PROCESSING NETWORK FOR A REAL-TIME ARCTIC SEA ICE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM A Thesis by William Douglas Nordhaus Approved as to style...

  8. Surface circulation in the Gulf of Cadiz: 2. Inflow-outflow coupling and the Gulf of Cadiz slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    that of the atmospheric forcing in driving the upper slope currents. The Mediteranean outflow forces a surface open ocean filaments con- touring Cape St. Vincent and penetrating eastward into the warmer GoC waters that suggest

  9. Vegetation patterns of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas, in relation to elevation and slope aspect 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bryan Joseph

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and richness, and stem density are also analyzed. Communities encountered on the south-facing slope, from low to high elevation, are: Chihuahuan Desert shrubland, sotol grassland, open oak shrubland, mixed shrubland, and oak-pinyon-juniper woodland. Communities...

  10. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH{sub 4}H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results detennined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components.

  11. Slump dominated upper slope reservoir facies, Intra Qua Iboe (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integration of sedimentologic and 3D seismic data provides a basis for unraveling complex depositional processes and sand distribution of the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Nearly 3,000 feet of conventional core was examined in interpreting slump/slide/debris flow, bottom current, turbidity current, pelagic/hemipelagic, wave and tide dominated facies. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated seaward, deposition began with a turbidite channel dominated slope system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated slope system (IQI 3, the principal reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated, collapsed shelf-edge deltaic system (IQI 4). Using seismic time slices and corresponding depositional facies in the core, a sandy {open_quotes}fairway{open_quotes} has been delineated in the IQI 3. Because of differences in stacking patterns of sandy and muddy slump intervals, seismic facies show: (1) both sheet-like and mounded external forms (geometries), and (2) parallel/continuous as well as chaotic/hummocky internal reflections. In wireline logs, slump facies exhibits blocky, coarsening-up, fining-up, and serrated motifs. In the absence of conventional core, slump facies may be misinterpreted and even miscorrelated because seismic facies and log motifs of slumps and debris flows tend to mimic properties of turbidite fan deposits. The slump dominated reservoir facies is composed of unconsolidated fine-grained sand. Thickness of individual units varies from 1 to 34 feet, but amalgamated intervals reach a thickness of up to 70 feet and apparently form connected sand bodies. Porosity commonly ranges from 20 to 35%. Horizontal permeability commonly ranges from 1,000 to 3,000 md.

  12. Sandia Energy - Alaskan North Slope Climate: Hard Data from a Hard Place

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton6 thCONTRACTORSAlaskan North Slope

  13. Dissolved organic matter discharge in the six largest arctic rivers-chemical composition and seasonal variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinehart, Amanda J.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . ................................................................................................. 31 3 Relationship of Yukon discharge to DOC (mg L -1 ), spectral slope (?m -1 ), and SUVA (L (mg OC) -1 m -1 )..................................................... 37 4 Fluorescence EEM?s measured in Yukon samples from low flow... .................................................................................................. 46 8 Relationship of Mackenzie discharge to DOC (mg L -1 ), spectral slope (?m -1 ), and SUVA (L (mg OC) -1 m -1 )...................................................... 47 x FIGURE Page 9 Fluorescence EEM?s measured...

  14. Paleo-reconstruction of shelf-slope margin along San Emigdio Mountains, southern San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, K.R.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deformation along the San Emigdio Mountains, California, is characterized by large overthrust sheets that carried Eocene through Miocene nonmarine to shallow marine strata over their deeper marine equivalents. The Pleito thrust has at least 20,000 ft of throw and is the major structural feature of this overthrust belt. The upper plate of the Pleito thrust carries an extensively exposed block of three prograding sequences and, along strike, partially exposes the shelf-slope boundaries of these units. Equivalent changes are observed in the subsurface beneath the overthrust. Total crustal shortening along this region ranges from 25 to 50%, with most of the shortening taken up by the Pleito thrust. The thrust has a low-angle, ramp-and-glide configuration, but on the south, the strata eventually extend downward into basement. The northern boundary to the deformation belt is the White Wolf and Pioneer fold and thrust structures. These features form a transfer zone, where one structure ends and the other feature begins. The amplitude of these folds can be up to 10,000 ft from crest to trough. Because of the large overthrust of the Pleito thrust, reservoir rocks are found up to 7 mi south of the fault's surface trace in the lower plate. The buried strata lie south and west of producing fields along the White Wolf fault and the Tejon embayment. The complicated stratigraphic changes combined with the thrust-belt structures require retrodeformable crustal profiles to take into account the facies distributions to model the hydrocarbon potential of this lightly explored province.

  15. Paleoenviromental data from less-investigated polar regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaikmae, R.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic holds extensive records of past climatic and environmental changes. Stable isotope variations in polar ice are in many cases important records of paleoclimatic information. Deep ice cores from Antarctica and Greenland, reaching back through the last glaciation, have provided valuable information about the Earth's climate in the past. This paper discusses the oxygen-18 variations in intermediate-depth ice cores from smaller ice caps of Svalbard, Severnaya Zemlya (North Land) and from the marginal area of the Antarctic ice sheet, covering the time span from 1000 to 8000 years B.P. All profiles studied clearly reflect the main climatic events during this time interval. However, small shifts in time exist between details on different curves. Most probably this is due to certain asynchronity in climatic changes in the various regions. There are extensive areas in the Arctic, especially in its eastern sector, where no glaciers currently exist and, possibly, in some areas never existed in the past either. These are the areas of permafrost where several forms of ice occur Within the ground. The source water for most types of ground ice originates from precipitation, but unlike glacier ice, the range of mechanisms for the formation of ground ice is very large, which considerably complicates the interpretation of their isotopic characteristics. For paleoclimatic and paleopermafrost reconstructions, the isotopic content of polygonal wedge ice seems to be most promising. The attempts to use isotopic records from segregated ice for paleoenvironmental research will also be discussed.

  16. Construction of an innovative retaining wall and slope protection for controlling erosion of asbestos in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, C.G.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Resources Management (ERM) is constructing an innovative H-Pile retaining wall and slope protection to control erosion of soil mixed with asbestos-containing material (ACM) along a half-mile long section of a flowing creek in a metropolitan area. Former manufacturing plants adjacent to the creek historically produced ACM-reinforced construction materials. ACM was apparently used as subgrade fill consistent with industry practices at the time, and when manufacturing ceased, the site was closed with approval by the state and the U.S. EPA. Erosion along the creek has resulted in exposure of the ACM and the need to stabilize the bank due to backwater flooding and storm water discharge from a large urban area. Through a cooperative effort among the state regulatory agency, the municipal sewer district, the U.S. Army Corps. of Engineers (USACOE), and the local community, construction is in progress for an H-Pile beam and concrete lagging wall that extends the length of the project reach. Behind the wall, cabled concrete mats are placed over the graded slope to stabilize ACM-bearing soil. Premier to the success of the project is protecting the environment from release of ACM during construction, and minimizing the disturbance of ACM-bearing soil. Unique soil sampling, testing, and handling procedures were negotiated through the state's voluntary cleanup program, with the intent of receiving a No Further Action letter for the completed project.

  17. The Effects of Roof Membrane Color on Moisture Accumulation in Low-slope Commercial Roof Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of highly reflective roof membrane systems is being promoted and in some cases required in energy codes and green building codes and standards. Highly reflective membranes, which typically are light in color, have demonstrated reduced overall energy consumption in cooling dominated climate. These membranes also are theorized to reduce the heat island effect. Concern has been expressed about using highly reflective roof membrane systems in cool to cold climate zones because they potentially increase moisture accumulation in roof systems. Roof membranes are vapor retarders. The theory is that highly reflective membranes reflect the heat that could enter the roof assembly, potentially providing a condensing surface on the cold side of the roof assembly during winter months. The other concern is that roof systems using highly reflective membranes will not get hot enough during the summer months to dry out moisture that may have condensed or otherwise entered the roof assembly. This study focuses on mechanically attached, highly reflective, single-ply roof systems installed on low-slope (less than 2:12) structures in cool to cold climate zones. Three sources of data are considered when determining the moisture accumulation potential of these systems. 1.Test roof cuts taken during the winter months 2.Modeling data from a building envelope model specifically designed to evaluate moisture accumulation 3.Data from previous studies to determine the effects of roof membrane color on the drying rate of low-slope roof assemblies

  18. Photoisomerization for a model protonated Schiff base in solution: Sloped/peaked conical intersection perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhado, Joao Pedro [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hynes, James T. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Chemistry Department, Ecole Normale Superieure, UMR ENS-CNRS-UPMC 8640, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France)

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The topographical character of conical intersections (CIs)-either sloped or peaked-has played a fundamental and important role in the discussion of the efficiency of CIs as photochemical 'funnels.' Here this perspective is employed in connection with a recent study of a model protonated Schiff base (PSB) cis to trans photoisomerization in solution [Malhado et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 115, 3720 (2011)]. In that study, the calculated reduced photochemical quantum yield for the successful production of trans product versus cis reactant in acetonitrile solvent compared to water was interpreted in terms of a dynamical solvent effect related to the dominance, for the acetonitrile case, of S{sub 1} to S{sub 0} nonadiabatic transitions prior to the reaching the seam of CIs. The solvent influence on the quantum yield is here re-examined in the sloped/peaked CI topographical perspective via conversion of the model's two PSB internal coordinates and a nonequilibrium solvent coordinate into an effective branching space description, which is then used to re-analyze the generalized Langevin equation/surface hopping results. The present study supports the original interpretation and enriches it in terms of topographical detail.

  19. Determination of Limit Cycles Using Both the Slope of Correlation Integral and Dominant Lyapunov Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillo, Rogelio; Alonso, Gustavo; Palacios, Javier C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico)

    2004-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for nonlinear analysis of instabilities in boiling water reactors (BWRs) is presented. Both the Dominant Lyapunov Exponent method and the Slope of the Correlation Integral (SOCI) method are used to analyze the average power reactor monitor (APRM) signals from a BWR. The main advantage of using the two methods in a complementary manner is that doing so results in an enhancement of the capability to analyze noisy systems, such as the APRM signals in a BWR. Previously, such nonlinear analysis had been performed using independently either the Dominant Lyapunov Exponent Method or the SOCI method. These two methods are sensitive to noise in a signal and normally require large amounts of data for a reliable analysis.This proposed system for nonlinear analysis is composed first of a home-developed computer program called 'SLOPE', which is based on the SOCI method. Then, the signal analysis is also performed by the 'LENNS' code, which is used to obtain the dominant Lyapunov exponent. Since only the dominant Lyapunov exponent is computed, there is no need to acquire large amounts of data; thus, computational processing time is greatly reduced, even in the case of noisy data.The system was used to analyze BWR signals containing stationary and nonstationary limit cycles. It was found that this method satisfactorily calculates the limit cycles, extracting useful information from noisy signals.

  20. The controls on net ecosystem productivity along an Arctic transect: a model comparison with ux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The controls on net ecosystem productivity along an Arctic transect: a model comparison with ¯ux , * J O S E P H P . M C F A D D E N ² and F . S T U A R T C H A P I N I I I ² 2 *The Ecosystems Center ecosystem CO2-exchange data along a transect in northern Alaska. We use an extant process-based model

  1. Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , for the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and the Western and Central Pacific Fishery Commission, for the Western PacificRegional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  2. Phase Behavior, Solid Organic Precipitation, and Mobility Characterization Studies in Support of Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery on the Alaska North Slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The medium-heavy oil (viscous oil) resources in the Alaska North Slope are estimated at 20 to 25 billion barrels. These oils are viscous, flow sluggishly in the formations, and are difficult to recover. Recovery of this viscous oil requires carefully designed enhanced oil recovery processes. Success of these recovery processes is critically dependent on accurate knowledge of the phase behavior and fluid properties, especially viscosity, of these oils under variety of pressure and temperature conditions. This project focused on predicting phase behavior and viscosity of viscous oils using equations of state and semi-empirical correlations. An experimental study was conducted to quantify the phase behavior and physical properties of viscous oils from the Alaska North Slope oil field. The oil samples were compositionally characterized by the simulated distillation technique. Constant composition expansion and differential liberation tests were conducted on viscous oil samples. Experiment results for phase behavior and reservoir fluid properties were used to tune the Peng-Robinson equation of state and predict the phase behavior accurately. A comprehensive literature search was carried out to compile available compositional viscosity models and their modifications, for application to heavy or viscous oils. With the help of meticulously amassed new medium-heavy oil viscosity data from experiments, a comparative study was conducted to evaluate the potential of various models. The widely used corresponding state viscosity model predictions deteriorate when applied to heavy oil systems. Hence, a semi-empirical approach (the Lindeloff model) was adopted for modeling the viscosity behavior. Based on the analysis, appropriate adjustments have been suggested: the major one is the division of the pressure-viscosity profile into three distinct regions. New modifications have improved the overall fit, including the saturated viscosities at low pressures. However, with the limited amount of geographically diverse data, it is not possible to develop a comprehensive predictive model. Based on the comprehensive phase behavior analysis of Alaska North Slope crude oil, a reservoir simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performance of a gas injection enhanced oil recovery technique for the West Sak reservoir. It was found that a definite increase in viscous oil production can be obtained by selecting the proper injectant gas and by optimizing reservoir operating parameters. A comparative analysis is provided, which helps in the decision-making process.

  3. The impact of an intense summer cyclone on 2012 Arctic sea ice retreat Jinlun Zhang, Ron Lindsay, Axel Schweiger, and Michael Steele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Arctic ice volume had already declined ~40% from the 2007­2011 mean. The thin sea ice pack of the low-pressure system was well within the sea ice pack, with a minimum central pressure of 974.5 hThe impact of an intense summer cyclone on 2012 Arctic sea ice retreat Jinlun Zhang, Ron Lindsay

  4. Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from the southeastern Canada Basin2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from (Arctic Ocean) to act as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions12 expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high13 pCO2sw (~290-320 atm

  5. Physical and Chemical Implications of Mid-Winter Pumping of Trunda Lakes - North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Lilly, Michael R. (Geo-Watersheds Scientific); Kane, Douglas L. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Miller, D. Dan (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Galloway, Braden K. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Hilton, Kristie M. (Geo-Watersheds Scientific); White, Daniel M. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center)

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tundra lakes on the North Slope, Alaska, are an important resource for energy development and petroleum field operations. A majority of exploration activities, pipeline maintenance, and restoration activities take place on winter ice roads that depend on water availability at key times of the winter operating season. These same lakes provide important fisheries and ecosystem functions. In particular, overwintering habitat for fish is one important management concern. This study focused on the evaluation of winter water use in the current field operating areas to provide a better understanding of the current water use practices. It found that under the current water use practices, there were no measurable negative effects of winter pumping on the lakes studied and current water use management practices were appropriately conservative. The study did find many areas where improvements in the understanding of tundra lake hydrology and water usage would benefit industry, management agencies, and the protection of fisheries and ecosystems.

  6. HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM date ­ November 23, 2004 · Contract end date ­ March 31, 2006 #12;Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania · Objectives ­ Capture

  7. Laboratory measurements of the drying rates of low-slope roofing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A.O.; Kyle, D.M.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The service life of a roofing system typically ends when excessive amounts of water have entered the system. Roofing professionals determine whether the existing failed roofing system can be repaired or salvaged by recovering. A key element in this decision is whether the accumulated water will be able to leave the roofing system in a time frame that will prevent irreparable structural damage. There are several combined heat and mass transfer models that can be used to predict drying times for low-slope roofing systems. Very little experimental data exists that can be used to validate the performance of these models. To satisfy these needs, a series of laboratory experiments has been performed. Five test panels, comprised of a plywood deck, four types of roofing insulation, and a single ply membrane were installed in a climate simulator. The test panels were outfitted with temperature sensors and heat flux transducers, and were mounted on load cells. Water was added to the test panels and they were subjected to external diurnal cycles representative of summer and winter conditions for a southern US continental climate. The load cells supplied continuous records of the weights of the test panels; these data were used to compute the drying rates of the test panels. When these experiments were completed, the test panels were ``recovered`` with different thicknesses of insulation and the environmental conditions were reapplied to the test panels. This paper reports on the design and performance of these experiments. The data compiled during these tests supply insight into the effects of meteorological conditions, insulation R-value, insulation water vapor permeance, and roof recover on the rate that water will be removed from low-slope roofing systems.

  8. Alaska North Slope National Energy Strategy initiative: Analysis of five undeveloped fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Allaire, R.B.; Doughty, T.C.; Faulder, D.D.; Irving, J.S.; Jamison, H.C.; White, G.J.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy was directed in the National Energy Strategy to establish a federal interagency task force to identify specific technical and regulatory barriers to the development of five undeveloped North Slope Alaska fields and make recommendations for their resolution. The five fields are West Sak, Point Thomson, Gwydyr Bay, Seal Island/Northstar, and Sandpiper Island. Analysis of environmental, regulatory, technical, and economic information, and data relating to the development potential of the five fields leads to the following conclusions: Development of the five fields would result in an estimated total of 1,055 million barrels of oil and 4.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and total investment of $9.4 billion in 1992 dollars. It appears that all five of the fields will remain economically marginal developments unless there is significant improvement in world oil prices. Costs of regulatory compliance and mitigation, and costs to reduce or maintain environmental impacts at acceptable levels influence project investments and operating costs and must be considered in the development decision making process. The development of three of the fields (West Sak, Point Thomson, and Gwydyr Bay) that are marginally feasible would have an impact on North Slope production over the period from about 2000 to 2014 but cannot replace the decline in Prudhoe Bay Unit production or maintain the operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) beyond about 2014 with the assumption that the TAPS will shut down when production declines to the range of 400 to 200 thousand barrels of oil/day. Recoverable reserves left in the ground in the currently producing fields and soon to be developed fields, Niakuk and Point McIntyre, would range from 1 billion to 500 million barrels of oil corresponding to the time period of 2008 to 2014 based on the TAPS shutdown assumption.

  9. Understanding Spatial and Spectral Morphologies of Ultracompact H II Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Thomas; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, Ralf S.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of ultracompact H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of ultracompact H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  10. UNDERSTANDING SPATIAL AND SPECTRAL MORPHOLOGIES OF ULTRACOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, New York 10024-5192 (United States); Dullemond, Cornelis P., E-mail: thomas.peters@ita.uni-heidelberg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact (UC) H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears to be able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of UC H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of UC H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  11. Theoretical analysis of reflected ray error from surface slope error and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface slope error of concentrator is one of the main factors to influence the performance of the solar concentrated collectors which cause deviation of reflected ray and reduce the intercepted radiation. This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from slope error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 5 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope error is transferred to the reflected ray in more than 2 folds when the incidence angle is more than 0. The equation for reflected ray error is generally fit for all reflection surfaces, and can also be applied to control the error in designing an abaxial optical system.

  12. Spectroscopic measurement of bromine oxide and ozone in the high Arctic during Polar Sunrise Experiment 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hausmann, M.; Platt, U. [Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany)] [Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany)

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report the measurement of BrO radical densities and ozone in the Arctic troposphere by means of differential optical absorption using very long paths. They observed levels of BrO which varied from below the detection limit to 17 ppt. Such concentrations alone cannot account for the catalytic destruction of ozone observed during periods of episodic ozone variation. The authors offer a model which involves BrO catalyzed reactions, advection, and atmospheric mixing which they argue could account for the observed ozone depletions.

  13. Summer in the Arctic | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1USummer in the Arctic News News Home

  14. A comparison of cloud properties at a coastal and inland site at the North Slope of Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakob, Christian

    (Barrow) and an inland (Atqasuk) location on the North Slope of Alaska using microwave radiometer (MWR) data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program contaminated by wet windows on the MWRs were employed to extract high-quality data suitable for this study

  15. Radiation dose reduction in medical CT through equally sloped tomography Benjamin P. Fahimian1,2,6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements10 , CT accounts for about 15% of the total radiological50Radiation dose reduction in medical CT through equally sloped tomography Benjamin P. Fahimian1 Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 3 Biomedical Physics

  16. Quadratic Program based Control of Fully-Actuated Transfemoral Prosthesis for Flat-Ground and Up-Slope Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ames, Aaron

    Quadratic Program based Control of Fully-Actuated Transfemoral Prosthesis for Flat-Ground and Up to achieve flat-ground and up-slope walking on a fully-actuated above-knee prosthesis. CLF based quadratic--implemented as a feed-forward term--the end result is a prosthesis controller that utilizes only local information while

  17. DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E. Sherry'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE 1 ~) ~ ~ By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E solid waste landfill in which lateral displacements of up to 900 ft (275 m) and vertical settlements municipal solid waste landfill occupies 135 acres (546 km 2 ) approximately 9 miles (15.3 km) n

  18. An analysis of cattle-farming in the coffee producing area of the Pacific Slope in Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordon, Oscar Humberto

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    new native species which can be es- tablished and to maintain grass-legume mixtures for the production of herbage with higher protein and mineral con- tent. Thus far, the most promising legume in the Pacific slope is Tropical Kudzu (Pueraria...

  19. Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry L. Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    within a thin boundary layer above the bottom surface. The resonant wave is unstable because of strong for the intense boundary flows on continental slopes. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.244504 PACS numbers: 47.35.Bb waves in the oceans are generated by oscillatory tides flowing over ocean to- pography

  20. Bipedal Robotic Walking on Flat-Ground, Up-Slope and Rough Terrain with Human-Inspired Hybrid Zero Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadubettu Yadukumar, Shishir 1986-

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis shows how to achieve bipedal robotic walking on flat-ground, up-slope and rough terrain by using Human-Inspired control. We begin by considering human walking data and find outputs (or virtual constraints) that, when calculated from...

  1. Effect of roof slope and thickness on the performance of a saltstone vault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, A.D.; Lam, Poh-Sang; Hsu, R.H.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Savannah River Site, low-level radioactive decontaminated salt solution is mixed with slag, flyash, and cement to form a grout-like material called ``Saltstone.`` The Saltstone is poured into concrete vaults constructed at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SDF is designed for the release of contaminants in a slow, controlled manner over thousands of years. The impact of SDF on groundwater has been studied in a radiological performance assessment (PA). Groundwater models were used to predict the fluid flow and contaminant transport at SDF. The models predicted a spatial contaminant concentration distribution in groundwater as a function of time. This study focuses on the roof configuration of Saltstone vault, with special interests in cost-effectiveness. We conducted a study to evaluate the effect of roof slope and thickness on the performance of a Saltstone vault. Four roof configurations were simulated. The tool used for the simulation was ECLIPSE, a finite-difference petroleum reservoir engineering code with an environmental tracer option. Nitrate was used as the ``tracer`` contaminant. In this study, ECLIPSE solves the two-phase two-dimensional flow and transport problem up to 10,000 years. This paper describes a modeling study used to evaluate roof design options for the Saltstone vault.

  2. Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

  3. Proposal for a Universal Test Mirror for Characterization of SlopeMeasuring Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Warwick, Tony; Noll,Tino; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas; Geckeler, Ralf D.

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of third generation light sources like theAdvanced Light Source (ALS) or BESSY II brought to a focus the need forhigh performance synchrotron optics with unprecedented tolerances forslope error and micro roughness. Proposed beam lines at Free ElectronLasers (FEL) require optical elements up to a length of one meter,characterized by a residual slope error in the range of 0.1murad (rms),and rms values of 0.1 nm for micro roughness. These optical elements mustbe inspected by highly accurate measuring instruments, providing ameasurement uncertainty lower than the specified accuracy of the surfaceunder test. It is essential that metrology devices in use at synchrotronlaboratories be precisely characterized and calibrated to achieve thistarget. In this paper we discuss a proposal for a Universal Test Mirror(UTM) as a realization of a high performance calibration instrument. Theinstrument would provide an ideal calibration surface to replicate aredundant surface under test of redundant figure. The application of asophisticated calibration instrument will allow the elimination of themajority of the systematic error from the error budget of an individualmeasurement of a particular optical element. We present the limitationsof existing methods, initial UTM design considerations, possiblecalibration algorithms, and an estimation of the expectedaccuracy.

  4. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

  5. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate technology transfer to the national user community. Foster a collaborative spirit across agencies

  6. Backfill Stress and Strain Information within a Centrifuge Geosynthetic-Reinforced Slope Model under Working Stress and Large Soil Strain Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Backfill Stress and Strain Information within a Centrifuge Geosynthetic-Reinforced Slope Model with a centrifuge test are used to investigate the mobilization of backfill stress and strain within a geosynthetic a centrifuge GRS slope model. Numerical results indicate that soil stress mobilization can be described

  7. An alternative to the determination of the effective zero point in instrumented indentation: use of the slope of the indentation curve at indentation load values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the slope of the indentation curve at indentation load values P. Brammer1,2,* , O. Bartier1 , X. Hernot1 , G on instrumented indentation rely on the knowledge of the indentation load-penetration depth curve corresponding which is based on the slope of the indentation curve at indentation load values and provides accurate

  8. PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOSKOWITZ,P.; COWGILL,M.; GRIFFITH,A.; CHERNAENKO,L.; DIASHEV,A.; NAZARIAN,A.

    2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of using a polymer-based coating, Polibrid 705, to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment has been successfully demonstrated using a combination of field and laboratory testing. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Northern Navy and deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading dock. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors, exposed to the full annual Arctic weather cycle. The 12 months of field testing gave rise to little degradation of the sealant coating, except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at a research laboratory in St. Petersburg. The laboratory tests examined a variety of properties, including bond strength between the coating and the substrate, thermal cycling resistance, wear resistance, flammability, and ease of decontamination. The Polibrid 705 coating met all the Russian Navy qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities.

  9. PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOSKOWITZ,P.; COWGILL,M.; GRIFFITH,A.; CHERNAENKO,L.; DIASHEV,A.; NAZARIAN,A.

    2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of using a polymer-based coating, Polibrid 705, to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment has been successfully demonstrated using a combination of field and laboratory testing. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Northern Navy and deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading dock. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors, exposed to the full annual Arctic weather cycle. The 12 months of field testing gave rise to little degradation of the sealant coating, except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at a research laboratory in St. Petersburg. The laboratory tests examined a variety of properties, including bond strength between the coating and the substrate, thermal cycling resistance, wear resistance, flammability, and ease of decontamination. The Polibrid 705 coating met all the Russian Navy qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities.

  10. Dome takes a 20% interest in the Arctic pilot project to move LNG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, B.; Bell, J.

    1980-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    According to B. Richards of Dome Petroleum Ltd., Dome's interest will be shared with its partially owned subsidiary, Trans-Canada Pipe Lines Ltd. According to J. Bell of Petro-Canada, the operator for the Arctic project, negotiations are under way with Tenneco Inc. for gas sales of up to 225 million cu ft/day to begin in 1985-86. At first, two tankers would ship LNG to a delivery terminal at an as yet unselected site on Canada's east coast, but by 1992, nine ships capable of delivering 1.23 billion cu ft/day of LNG, could be in service. The U.S. and European potential LNG markets amounts to 3-4 trillion cu ft/yr and 3.5-4 trillion cu ft/yr, respectively. Petro-Canada also supports the Polar Gas Ltd. project to lay a gas pipeline from the Arctic Islands and Mackenzie Delta to the south; the projects are not considered to be in competition.

  11. Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories,Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie') and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katie's dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpson's Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

  12. Brown snow: A long-range transport event in the Canadian Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, H.E.; Muir, D.C.G.; Billeck, B.N.; Lockhart, W.L.; Brunskill, G.J.; Kling, H.J. (Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg (Canada)); Olson, M.P. (Atmospheric Environment Service, Downsview, Ontario (Canada)); Lemoine, R.M. (Hardy BBT Ltd., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors document the occurrence of a long-range transport event that deposited thousands of tons of fine particulates on the District of Keewatin, central Canadian Arctic, {approximately}63 N. Air mass trajectories, clay mineral composition, soot particles, and visible organic remains point to Asian sources for the brown snow material, probably western China. Semivolatile organic pollutants detected in the brown snow included polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ({Sigma}PAH), PCB congeners, and DDT-related compounds ({Sigma}DDT), polychlorinated camphenes (PCCs), as well as the herbicide trifuluralin and insecticides methoxychlor, endosulfan, and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH). {Sigma}PAH, PCB, and PCC concentrations were within the range reported in other studies of Arctic snow but {Sigma}DDT levels were 2-10 times higher than previous reports. High molecular weight PAH may have been associated with soot particles in the brown snow but evidence for Asian sources of the pesticides was not strong because of unknown source signal strengths and possible atmospheric transformations of the compounds. Fluxes of these pollutants were also determined by analyzing sediment cores from two small headwater lakes near the sampling site. The quantities of pollutants deposited in this single event may have comprised a significant fraction (>10%) of total annual input {Sigma}PAH and {Sigma}DDT, as determined from lake sedimentation records.

  13. Surficial sediments of the continental rise and slope, Niger Delta, West Africa: properties and geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobilka, David William

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The submarine portions of the Niger Delta, West Africa are undergoing active gravity tectonic deformation due to thick deposits of ductile shale overlain by paralic sands. Because the region is rich in hydrocarbon reserves, the subdermal Niger Delta...

  14. Correction to ``Stratospheric CO2 isotopic anomalies and SF6 and CFC tracer concentrations in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Becky

    Correction to ``Stratospheric CO2 isotopic anomalies and SF6 and CFC tracer concentrations anomalies and SF6 and CFC tracer concentrations in the Arctic polar vortex'' [Alexander et al., 2001 of the approx- imate mean SF6 ages versus Á17 O (diamonds) and d18 O (circles). References Alexander, B., M. K

  15. The 2007 Bering Strait oceanic heat flux and anomalous Arctic sea-ice Rebecca A. Woodgate,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    flowing PW weakens the ice-pack thereby promoting more sea-ice motion in response to wind, which in turnThe 2007 Bering Strait oceanic heat flux and anomalous Arctic sea-ice retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate,1 sea-ice retreat, we use observational data to estimate Bering Strait volume and heat transports from

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Age Characteristics in a Multidecadal Arctic Sea Ice1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    significant changes, the22 most threatening being a shift from a mostly perennial pack to an ice cover is of fundamental concern for native peoples and wildlife that depend on the pack ice for25 their livelihoods. We do brightness temperatures [Gloersen32 et al., 1992], substantive changes to the Arctic sea ice pack over

  17. 20th-Century Industrial Black Carbon Emissions Altered Arctic Climate Forcing Joseph R. McConnell,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Eric

    in ice cores indicate that sources and concentrations of BC in Greenland precipitation varied greatly, industrial emissions resulted in a seven-fold increase in ice core BC concentrations with most change to 1910, estimated surface climate forcing in early summer from BC in Arctic snow was about 3 W m­2

  18. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo Springer-Verlag 2010 Abstract Snow surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during indicated four distinct tempera- ture regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar

  19. The Arctic Ocean--a Canadian perspective from IPY H. Melling & R. Francois & P. G. Myers & W. Perrie &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    ice, enhanced shelf-break upwelling and a maximum in freshwater retention in the Beaufort Gyre the Arctic Oscillation as a dominant cause of long- period climate variations during the Holocene. One a reliable affordable logistic framework, while a wave forecast model developed by another for the Beaufort

  20. Widespread Distribution of Soluble Di-Iron Monooxygenase (SDIMO) Genes in Arctic Groundwater Impacted by 1,4-Dioxane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Widespread Distribution of Soluble Di-Iron Monooxygenase (SDIMO) Genes in Arctic Groundwater and propane monooxygenases), are of significant interest due to their potential role in the initiation of 1 bioremediation is precluded by our very limited understanding of the diversity and spatial distribution

  1. The Impact of Global Warming on the Carbon Cycle of Arctic Permafrost: An Experimental and Field Based Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onstott, Tullis C [Princeton University; Pffifner, Susan M; Chourey, Karuna [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Our results to date indicate that CO2 and CH4 fluxes from organic poor, Arctic cryosols on Axel Heiberg Island are net CH4 sinks and CO2 emitters in contrast to organic-rich peat deposits at sub-Arctic latitudes. This is based upon field observations and a 1.5 year long thawing experiment performed upon one meter long intact cores. The results of the core thawing experiments are in good agreement with field measurements. Metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic analyses indicate that high affinity aerobic methanotrophs belong to the uncultivated USCalpha are present in <1% abundance in these cryosols are are active in the field during the summer and in the core thawing experiments. The methanotrophs are 100 times more abundant than the methanogens. As a result mineral cryosols, which comprise 87% of Arctic tundra, are net methane sinks. Their presence and activity may account for the discrepancies observed between the atmospheric methane concentrations observed in the Arctic predicted by climate models and the observed seasonal fluctuations and decadal trends. This has not been done yet.

  2. The area and volume of sea ice in the Arc-tic Ocean is decreasing, with some predict-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    , while loss of sea ice could cause stress for polar bears. Moreover, global climate may be affected ice forms in winter,which melts and/or gets exported out of the Arctic. The recent decrease in summer of this community is evi- dence that the sea ice cap has not disap- peared during the Quaternary. The remains

  3. Temperature and precipitation history of the Arctic G.H. Miller a,*, J. Brigham-Grette b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswich, NJ 08901, USA q Cooperative Institute. During the penultimate interglaciation, w130 to w120 ka ago, solar energy in summer in the Arctic ice sheets had melted by 6 ka ago. Solar energy reached a summer maximum (9% higher than at present) w

  4. Modeling the formation and fate of the nearsurface temperature maximum in the Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    at the end of summer 2007, using both model output (described in section 2) and observed data. [3] Jackson et of the Arctic Ocean over the years 2000­2009. The NSTM is formed from local summertime absorption of solar., 2008; Nghiem et al., 2007]. This allowed 500% more solar energy into the surface layers of the Beaufort

  5. Over-winter oceanographic profiles in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, November 1961 -June 1962: Temperature, salinity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, David W.

    1 Over-winter oceanographic profiles in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, November 1961 and silicate) were measured at five depths (2, 10, 25, 50 and 80 m) beneath the ice through the winter of 1961 the north side of the sound off Grise Fiord, Ellesmere Island, on 13 May 1962 and 12 May 1969. The over-winter

  6. Assessment of Alaska's North Slope Oil Field Capacity to Sequester CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umekwe, Pascal, E-mail: wpascals@gmail.com [Baker Hughes (United States)] [Baker Hughes (United States); Mongrain, Joanna, E-mail: Joanna.Mongrain@shell.com [Shell International Exploration and Production Co (United States)] [Shell International Exploration and Production Co (United States); Ahmadi, Mohabbat, E-mail: mahmadi@alaska.edu [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Petroleum Engineering Department (United States)] [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Petroleum Engineering Department (United States); Hanks, Catherine, E-mail: chanks@gi.alaska.edu [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute (United States)] [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute (United States)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The capacity of 21 major fields containing more than 95% of the North Slope of Alaska's oil were investigated for CO{sub 2} storage by injecting CO{sub 2} as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agent. These fields meet the criteria for the application of miscible and immiscible CO{sub 2}-EOR methods and contain about 40 billion barrels of oil after primary and secondary recovery. Volumetric calculations from this study indicate that these fields have a static storage capacity of 3 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2}, assuming 100% oil recovery, re-pressurizing the fields to pre-fracturing pressure and applying a 50% capacity reduction to compensate for heterogeneity and for water invasion from the underlying aquifer. A ranking produced from this study, mainly controlled by field size and fracture gradient, identifies Prudhoe, Kuparuk, and West Sak as possessing the largest storage capacities under a 20% safety factor on pressures applied during storage to avoid over-pressurization, fracturing, and gas leakage. Simulation studies were conducted using CO{sub 2} Prophet to determine the amount of oil technically recoverable and CO{sub 2} gas storage possible during this process. Fields were categorized as miscible, partially miscible, and immiscible based on the miscibility of CO{sub 2} with their oil. Seven sample fields were selected across these categories for simulation studies comparing pure CO{sub 2} and water-alternating-gas injection. Results showed that the top two fields in each category for recovery and CO{sub 2} storage were Alpine and Point McIntyre (miscible), Prudhoe and Kuparuk (partially miscible), and West Sak and Lisburne (immiscible). The study concludes that 5 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} can be stored while recovering 14.2 billion barrels of the remaining oil.

  7. Moisture effects in low-slope roofs: Drying rates after water addition with various vapor retarders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersen, C.R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Petrie, T.W. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Courville, G.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Childs, P.W.; Wilkes, K.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests have been conducted in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) of the US. Building Envelope Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate downward drying rates of various unvented, low-slope roof systems. A secondary objective was to study heat flow patterns so as to understand how to control latent heat effects on impermeable heat flux transducers. Nine test sections were tested simultaneously. The sections had a p deck above fibrous-glass insulation and were examples of cold-deck systems. These five sections had various vapor retarder systems on a gypsum board ceiling below the insulation. The other four sections had a lightweight insulating concrete deck below expanded polystyrene insulation and the same vapor retarder systems, and were examples of warm-deck systems. The cold-deck systems had materials that were relatively permeable to water vapor, while the materials in the warm-deck systems were less permeable. All test sections were topped by an impermeable roofing membrane. The test sections were instrumented with thermocouples between all layers and with small heat flux transducers at the bottom and top of the fibrous-glass insulation and in the middle of the expanded polystyrene insulation. Two different kinds of moisture probes were used to qualitatively monitor the movement of the moisture. The heat flux measurements showed that heat conduction dominates the system using impermeable insulation materials, with only a slight increase due to increased thermal conductivity of wet expanded polystyrene. There was significant transfer of latent heat in the test sections with permeable insulation, causing the peak heat fluxes to increase by as much as a factor of two. With temperatures imposed that are typical of summer days, latent heat transfer associated with condensation and evaporation of moisture in the test sections was measured to be as important as the heat transfer by conduction.

  8. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-8:4 Fuel Storage Basin West Side Adjacent and Side Slope Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. D. Habel

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance with cleanup criteria for the 118-F-8:4 Fuel Storage Basin West Side Adjacent and Side Slope Soils. The rectangular-shaped concrete basin on the south side of the 105-F Reactor building served as an underwater collection, storage, and transfer facility for irradiated fuel elements discharged from the reactor.

  9. Radiocarbon in particulate matter from the eastern sub-arctic Pacific Ocean; evidence of a source of terrestrial carbon to the deep sea.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druffel, Ellen R M; Honju, Susumu; Griffin, Sheila; Wong, C S

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EASTERN SUB-ARCTIC PACIFIC OCEAN: EVIDENCE OF A SOURCEfrom the deep Northeast Pacific Ocean. Due to the largeMap of the North Pacific Ocean (after Favorite, Dodimead &

  10. Web: http://dust.ess.uci.edu/prp/prp_ans/prp_ans.pdf NSF Arctic Natural Sciences (ANS) Proposal ARC-0714088 Submitted: December 8, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Web: http://dust.ess.uci.edu/prp/prp_ans/prp_ans.pdf NSF Arctic Natural Sciences (ANS) Proposal ARC dissemination of LGGE snow measurements as http://dust.ess.uci.edu/snw. Identified IPY sub-disciplines as Snow

  11. Solid bitumen at Atigun Gorge, central Brooks Range front: Implications for oil exploration in the North Slope fold and thrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, D.G.; Johnsson, M.J.; Bird, K.J. (U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atigun Gorge area of the north-central Brooks range is a structurally complex region in which a sequence of north-verging duplex structures involving Paleozoic and Mesozoic Ellesmerian continental margin deposits are structurally overlain by a south-verging thrust of Brookian foreland basin deposits of Albian age. The resulting structural triangle zone is marked by numerous small-scale thrusts involving Permian and Triassic strata in which solid bitumen, occupying fissures up to 10 cm wide and several meters in length, has been found. The presence of aromatics in the odorless, black material was confirmed by ultraviolet fluorescence following extraction in dichloromethane. The occurrence of solid bitumen at Atigun Gorge adds to a growing inventory of hydrocarbon-filled fractures found mostly in Cretaceous rocks in the Brooks Range foothills. These occurrences are consistent with a model of hydrocarbon generation beneath the northern margin of the Brooks Range. The regional distribution of vitrinite reflectance isograds suggests that the northern margin of the Brooks Range and the adjoining foreland basin deposits of the North Slope have experienced similar thermal histories. The 0.6% vitrinite reflectance isograd intersects the land surface along the southern margin of the foreland and the 2.0% isograd lies within the northern part of the range. Although these relations suggest the possibility of petroleum resources at shallow depths beneath the Brooks Range foothills, they also indicate that a considerable amount of differential uplift has occurred, probably resulting in redistribution and some leakage of any oil and gas accumulations.

  12. EA-1193: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site

  13. EA-1193: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site

  14. Radionuclides in the Arctic seas from the former Soviet Union: Potential health and ecological risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, D W; Edson, R; Varela, M; Napier, B

    1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the assessment reported here is to evaluate the health and environmental threat to coastal Alaska posed by radioactive-waste dumping in the Arctic and Northwest Pacific Oceans by the FSU. In particular, the FSU discarded 16 nuclear reactors from submarines and an icebreaker in the Kara Sea near the island of Novaya Zemlya, of which 6 contained spent nuclear fuel (SNF); disposed of liquid and solid wastes in the Sea of Japan; lost a {sup 90}Sr-powered radioisotope thermoelectric generator at sea in the Sea of Okhotsk; and disposed of liquid wastes at several sites in the Pacific Ocean, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. In addition to these known sources in the oceans, the RAIG evaluated FSU waste-disposal practices at inland weapons-development sites that have contaminated major rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean. The RAIG evaluated these sources for the potential for release to the environment, transport, and impact to Alaskan ecosystems and peoples through a variety of scenarios, including a worst-case total instantaneous and simultaneous release of the sources under investigation. The risk-assessment process described in this report is applicable to and can be used by other circumpolar countries, with the addition of information about specific ecosystems and human life-styles. They can use the ANWAP risk-assessment framework and approach used by ONR to establish potential doses for Alaska, but add their own specific data sets about human and ecological factors. The ANWAP risk assessment addresses the following Russian wastes, media, and receptors: dumped nuclear submarines and icebreaker in Kara Sea--marine pathways; solid reactor parts in Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean--marine pathways; thermoelectric generator in Sea of Okhotsk--marine pathways; current known aqueous wastes in Mayak reservoirs and Asanov Marshes--riverine to marine pathways; and Alaska as receptor. For these waste and source terms addressed, other pathways, such as atmospheric transport, could be considered under future-funded research efforts for impacts to Alaska. The ANWAP risk assessment does not address the following wastes, media, and receptors: radioactive sources in Alaska (except to add perspective for Russian source term); radioactive wastes associated with Russian naval military operations and decommissioning; Russian production reactor and spent-fuel reprocessing facilities nonaqueous source terms; atmospheric, terrestrial and nonaqueous pathways; and dose calculations for any circumpolar locality other than Alaska. These other, potentially serious sources of radioactivity to the Arctic environment, while outside the scope of the current ANWAP mandate, should be considered for future funding research efforts.

  15. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

  16. Variations in the age of Arctic sea-ice and summer sea-ice extent Ignatius G. Rigor1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigor, Ignatius G.

    pack is determined by the effects of the atmosphere and ocean upon the sea-ice on various time scalesVariations in the age of Arctic sea-ice and summer sea-ice extent Ignatius G. Rigor1,2 and John M] Three of the past six summers have exhibited record low sea-ice extent on the Arctic Ocean. These minima

  17. Decline in ice thickness from sub data 1 10/16/07 The decline in arctic sea-ice thickness: separating the spatial, annual, and1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    Decline in ice thickness from sub data 1 10/16/07 The decline in arctic sea-ice thickness/14/07 & 10/16/079 10 11 #12;Decline in ice thickness from sub data 2 10/16/07 Abstract11 Naval submarines have collected operational data of sea-ice draft (90% of thickness) in the12 Arctic Ocean since 1958

  18. arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Yi-Ping Ma,1, USA The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area

  19. Chemical and Microbial Characterization of North Slope Viscous Oils to Assess Viscosity Reduction and Enhanced Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Mary Beth Leigh

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A large proportion of Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil exists in the form of viscous deposits, which cannot be produced entirely using conventional methods. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a promising approach for improving oil recovery for viscous deposits. MEOR can be achieved using either ex situ approaches such as flooding with microbial biosurfactants or injection of exogenous surfactant-producing microbes into the reservoir, or by in situ approaches such as biostimulation of indigenous surfactant-producing microbes in the oil. Experimental work was performed to analyze the potential application of MEOR to the ANS oil fields through both ex situ and in situ approaches. A microbial formulation containing a known biosurfactant-producing strain of Bacillus licheniformis was developed in order to simulate MEOR. Coreflooding experiments were performed to simulate MEOR and quantify the incremental oil recovery. Properties like viscosity, density, and chemical composition of oil were monitored to propose a mechanism for oil recovery. The microbial formulation significantly increased incremental oil recovery, and molecular biological analyses indicated that the strain survived during the shut-in period. The indigenous microflora of ANS heavy oils was investigated to characterize the microbial communities and test for surfactant producers that are potentially useful for biostimulation. Bacteria that reduce the surface tension of aqueous media were isolated from one of the five ANS oils (Milne Point) and from rock oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), and may prove valuable for ex situ MEOR strategies. The total bacterial community composition of the six different oils was evaluated using molecular genetic tools, which revealed that each oil tested possessed a unique fingerprint indicating a diverse bacterial community and varied assemblages. Collectively we have demonstrated that there is potential for in situ and ex situ MEOR of ANS oils. Future work should focus on lab and field-scale testing of ex situ MEOR using Bacillus licheniformis as well as the biosurfactant-producing strains we have newly isolated from the Milne Point reservoir and the EVOS environment.

  20. HIIphot: Automated Photometry of HII Regions Applied to M51

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Thilker; Robert Braun; Rene A. M. Walterbos

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a robust, automated method, hereafter designated HIIphot, which enables accurate photometric characterization of HII regions while permitting genuine adaptivity to irregular source morphology. HIIphot utilizes object-recognition techniques to make a first guess at the shapes of all sources then allows for departure from such idealized ``seeds'' through an iterative growing procedure. Photometric corrections for spatially coincident diffuse emission are derived from a low-order surface fit to the background after exclusion of all detected sources. We present results for the well-studied, nearby spiral M51 in which 1229 HII regions are detected above the 5-sigma level. A simple, weighted power-law fit to the measured H-alpha luminosity function (HII LF) above log L_H-alpha = 37.6 gives alpha = -1.75+/-0.06, despite a conspicuous break in the HII LF observed near L_H-alpha = 10^38.9. Our best- fit slope is marginally steeper than measured by Rand (1992), perhaps reflecting our increased sensitivity at low luminosities and to notably diffuse objects. HII regions located in interarm gaps are preferentially less luminous than counterparts which constitute M51's grand-design spiral arms and are best fit with a power-law slope of alpha = -1.96+/-0.15. We assign arm/interarm status for HII regions based upon the varying surface brightness of diffuse emission as a function of position throughout the image. Using our measurement of the integrated flux contributed by resolved HII regions in M51, we estimate the diffuse fraction to be approximately 0.45 -- in agreement with the determination of Greenawalt et al. (1998). Automated processing of degraded datasets is undertaken to gauge systematic effects associated with limiting spatial resolution and sensitivity.

  1. Macrofaunal community structure on the gulf of mexico continental slope: the role of disturbance and habitat heterogeneity at local and regional scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammons, Archie Wood

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    /coexist via habitat and/or resource partitioning •communities operate at/near carrying capacities •competitive exclusion minimized due to extreme species specialization 1. Stability-Time (Sanders, 1968; Slobodkin and Sanders, 1969; Grassle... carrying capacity •competitive exclusion inhibited by environmental and/or biological disturbances that keep populations in early growth phase 1. Biological Disturbance (Dayton and Hessler, 1972) •effects of large feeding predators...

  2. Radiance in the ocean: effects of wave slope and raman scattering near the surface and at depths through the asymptotic region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slanker, Julie Marie

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three investigations were conducted on the nature of the radiance field in clear ocean water. It is important to understand the sunlight intensity below the sea surface because this leads to an understanding of how ocean creatures navigate...

  3. SITN Regional Outreach Map

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Region States in Region Awardee(s) Location of Awardee(s) Contact(s) Northeast (Photovoltaics) CT * ME * MA * NH NY * RI * VT Hudson Valley Community College Troy, NY Richard...

  4. Ultracompact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stan Kurtz; Jose Franco

    2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some recent observational results on the properties of ultracompact HII regions, in particular the presence of extended continuum emission surrounding ultracompact sources and the discovery of a new class of so-called ``Hypercompact'' HII regions. In addition, we discuss recent attempts to probe the density structure within UC HII regions using the technique of spectral index analysis.

  5. RENFORCEMENT ET CONTROLE DE PAREMENTS DANS UNE MINE A CffiL OUVERT DE CHARBON REINFORCEMENT AND CONTROL OF FOOTWALL SLOPES IN AN OPEN PIT COAL MINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AND CONTROL OF FOOTWALL SLOPES IN AN OPEN PIT COAL MINE VERSTÄRKUNG UND KONTROLLE VON STOSSER IM KOHLETAGEBAU to exploit the stephanian coal.TheNorth West area ofthis open pit is composed of an overthrust fold. The coal

  6. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs ...

  7. PCBs have declined more than DDT-group residues in Arctic ringed seals (Phoca hispida) between 1972 and 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addison, R.F.; Zinck, M.E.; Smith, T.G.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mean DDT-group concentrations in the blubber of western Arctic ringed seals (Phoca hispida) sampled in 1981 were less than 1..mu..g.g/sup -1/ wet weight. Male seals had higher concentrations than did females. PCB concentrations were about half of those in a sample of the same population taken in 1972, when allowance was made for the variation of residue concentrations with age, sex, and condition. This decline probably results from the ban on PCB manufacture and use imposed in the early 1970s. Concentrations of DDT-group residues did not show any clear decline over the same interval, and the relative proportions of p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE suggested that there is a continuing supply of DDT to the western Arctic. The most probable source of this is by atmospheric or water transport from the Far East, where DDT was used until at least the late 1970s.

  8. DIAGNOSING THE TIME-DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. I. LOW-FREQUENCY NANOFLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, S. J.; Reep, J. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational measurements of active region emission measures contain clues to the time dependence of the underlying heating mechanism. A strongly nonlinear scaling of the emission measure with temperature indicates a large amount of hot plasma relative to warm plasma. A weakly nonlinear (or linear) scaling of the emission measure indicates a relatively large amount of warm plasma, suggesting that the hot active region plasma is allowed to cool and so the heating is impulsive with a long repeat time. This case is called low-frequency nanoflare heating, and we investigate its feasibility as an active region heating scenario here. We explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. For each model run, we calculate the slope {alpha} of the emission measure distribution EM(T){proportional_to}T {sup {alpha}}. Our conclusions are: (1) low-frequency nanoflare heating is consistent with about 36% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are not accounted for; (2) proper consideration of uncertainties yields a range in which as many as 77% of observed active regions are consistent with low-frequency nanoflare heating and as few as zero; (3) low-frequency nanoflare heating cannot explain observed slopes greater than 3; (4) the upper limit to the volumetric energy release is in the region of 50 erg cm{sup -3} to avoid unphysical magnetic field strengths; (5) the heating timescale may be short for loops of total length less than 40 Mm to be consistent with the observed range of slopes; (6) predicted slopes are consistently steeper for longer loops.

  9. The component slope linear model for calculating intensive partial molar properties /application to waste glasses and aluminate solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH){sub 4}-H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results determined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components.

  10. RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

    2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

  11. CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for...

  12. CEMI Western Regional Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please Join Assistant Secretary of Energy Dr. David Danielson for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's Western Regional Summit. Register now for this free event.

  13. 4/25/11 12:25 PMRedOrbit NEWS | Scientists Tracking Black Carbon In The Arctic Page 1 of 3http://www.redorbit.com/modules/news/tools.php?tool=print&id=2033713

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigor, Ignatius G.

    carbon, has on the rapidly changing Arctic climate. Although the Arctic is typically viewed as a vast an impact on the world's climate for years to come. Black carbon is produced by vehicle engines, aircraft back into the atmosphere," explained Bates. Scientists from The United States, Norway, Russia, Germany

  14. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  15. Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

  16. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Arctic NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J. (comps.) [comps.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Arctic NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into stream sediment samples. For the group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report.

  17. Distribution kinetics of dietary methylmercury in the arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro, C.A.O. [Univ. Federal do Parana, Curitiba, Parana (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Celular] [Univ. Federal do Parana, Curitiba, Parana (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Celular; Rouleau, C. [Inst. Maurice-Lamontagne, Mont-Joli, Quebec (Canada)] [Inst. Maurice-Lamontagne, Mont-Joli, Quebec (Canada); Pelletier, E.; Audet, C. [Univ. du Quebec, Rimouski, Quebec (Canada). INRS-Oceanologie] [Univ. du Quebec, Rimouski, Quebec (Canada). INRS-Oceanologie; Tjaelve, H. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)] [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors fed immature 1+ arctic charr with a single dose of methyl[{sup 203}Hg]mercury (MeHg) and quantified distribution kinetics with a new and simple three-compartment caternary model having well-perfused viscera and blood as the central compartment (VB), whereas gut (G) and the rest of body (R) constituted the peripheral compartments. The model accurately described distribution kinetics of MeHg in the fish, using either data of MeHg content in compartments or blood concentration data. Despite the known fast translocation of MeHg between binding sites at the molecular level, its translocation rate between compartments was surprisingly slow, 27 days being needed to complete 95% of the transfer from gut to blood and 48 days for the subsequent transfer to compartment R. This probably results from a limitation of the stepwise transfer rate of MeHg from red blood cells, which contain most of blood MeHg, to plasma and then to tissues due to low plasmatic concentration of small mobile sulfhydryl ligands. The model presented is a convenient tool that could be used to compare the fate of MeHg and other organometals, such as butyltins and alkylleads, in various aquatic and terrestrial animal species.

  18. Regional Districts (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Adjacent Water Control and Improvement Districts and Municipal Utility Districts can opt to form a Regional District to oversee water issues. Such districts may be created:(1) to purchase, own,...

  19. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  20. Gas Production From a Cold, Stratigraphically Bounded Hydrate Deposit at the Mount Elbert Site, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Silpngarmlert, S.; Reagan, M. T.; Collett, T.S.; Zhang, K.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an effort to identify suitable targets for a planned long-term field test, we investigate by means of numerical simulation the gas production potential from unit D, a stratigraphically bounded (Class 3) permafrost-associated hydrate occurrence penetrated in the ount Elbert well on North Slope, Alaska. This shallow, low-pressure deposit has high porosities, high intrinsic permeabilities and high hydrate saturations. It has a low temperature because of its proximity to the overlying permafrost. The simulation results indicate that vertical ells operating at a constant bottomhole pressure would produce at very low rates for a very long period. Horizontal wells increase gas production by almost two orders of magnitude, but production remains low. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the initial deposit temperature is y the far the most important factor determining production performance (and the most effective criterion for target selection) because it controls the sensible heat available to fuel dissociation.

  1. Full-Wave Algorithm to Model Effects of Bedding Slopes on the Response of Subsurface Electromagnetic Geophysical Sensors near Unconformities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sainath, Kamalesh

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a full-wave pseudo-analytical numerical electromagnetic (EM) algorithm to model subsurface induction sensors, traversing planar-layered geological formations of arbitrary EM material anisotropy and loss, which are used, for example, in the exploration of hydrocarbon reserves. Unlike past pseudo-analytical planar-layered modeling algorithms that impose parallelism between the formation's bed junctions however, our method involves judicious employment of Transformation Optics techniques to address challenges related to modeling arbitrarily-oriented, relative slope (i.e., tilting) between said junctions. The algorithm exhibits this flexibility, both with respect to anisotropy in the formation layers as well as junction tilting, via employing special planar slabs that coat each "flattened" (i.e., originally tilted) planar interface, locally redirecting the incident wave within the coating slabs to cause wave fronts to interact with the flattened interfaces as if they were still tilted with a specific, ...

  2. Correlations between the nuclear matter symmetry energy, its slope, and curvature from a nonrelativistic solvable approach and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Santos; M. Dutra; O. Lourenço; A. Delfino

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    By using point-coupling versions of finite range nuclear relativistic mean field models containing cubic and quartic self interactions in the scalar field $\\sigma$, a nonrelativistic limit is achieved. This approach allows an analytical expression for the symmetry energy ($J$) as a function of its slope ($L$) in a unified form, namely, $\\,L\\,=\\,3J\\,+f(m^{*},\\rho_{o},B_{o},K_{o})$, where the quantities $m^{*}$, $\\rho_{o}$, $B_{o}$ and $K_{o}$ are bulk parameters at the nuclear matter saturation density $\\rho_{o}$. This result establishes a linear correlation between $L$ and $J$ which is reinforced by exact relativistic calculations. An analogous analytical correlation is also found for $J$, $L$ and the symmetry energy curvature ($K_{sym}$). Based on these results, we propose graphic constraints in $L\\times J$ and $K_{sym}\\times L$ planes which finite range models must satisfy.

  3. Theoretical analysis of error transfer from surface slope to refractive ray and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from optical error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 8 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope errors in two direction is transferred to any one direction of the focus ray when the incidence angle is more than 0 for solar trough and heliostats reflector; for point focus Fresnel lens, point focus parabolic glass mirror, line focus parabolic galss mirror, the error transferring coefficient from optical to focus ray will increase when the rim angle increase; for TIR-R concentrator, it will decrease; for glass heliostat, it relates to the incidence angle and azimuth of the reflecting point. Keywords: optic error, standard deviation, refractive ray error, concentrated solar collector

  4. Spectral analysis of the efficiency of vertical mixing in the deep ocean due to interaction of tidal currents with a ridge running down a continental slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibragimov, Ranis N.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency of mixing, resulting from the reflection of an internal wave field imposed on the oscillatory background flow with a three-dimensional bottom topography, is investigated using a linear approximation. The radiating wave field is associated with the spectrum of the linear model, which consists of those mode numbers n and slope values ?, for which the solution represents the internal waves of frequencies ? = n?0 radiating upwrad of the topography, where ?0 is the fundamental frequency at which internal waves are generated at the topography. The effects of the bottom topography and the earth’s rotation on the spectrum is analyzed analytically and numerically in the vicinity of the critical slope, which is a slope with the same angle to the horizontal as the internal wave characteristic. In this notation, ? is latitude, f is the Coriolis parameter and N is the buoyancy frequency, which is assumed to be a constant, which corresponds to the uniform stratification.

  5. Comparison of slope and height profiles for flat synchrotron x-ray mirrors measured with a long trace profiler and a Fizeau interferometer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, J.; Assoufid, L.; Macrander, A.; X-Ray Science Division

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long trace profilers (LTPS) have been used at many synchrotron radiation laboratories worldwide for over a decade to measure surface slope profiles of long grazing incidence x-ray mirrors. Phase measuring interferometers (PMIs) of the Fizeau type, on the other hand, are being used by most mirror manufacturers to accomplish the same task. However, large mirrors whose dimensions exceed the aperture of the Fizeau interferometer require measurements to be carried out at grazing incidence, and aspheric optics require the use of a null lens. While an LTP provides a direct measurement of ID slope profiles, PMIs measure area height profiles from which the slope can be obtained by a differentiation algorithm. Measurements of the two types of instruments have been found by us to be in good agreement, but to our knowledge there is no published work directly comparing the two instruments. This paper documents that comparison. We measured two different nominally flat mirrors with both the LTP in operation at the Advanced Photon Source (a type-II LTP) and a Fizeau-type PMI interferometer (Wyko model 6000). One mirror was 500 mm long and made of Zerodur, and the other mirror was 350 mm long and made of silicon. Slope error results with these instruments agree within nearly 100% (3.11 {+-} 0.15 {micro}rad for the LTP, and 3.11 {+-} 0.02 {micro}rad for the Fizeau PMI interferometer) for the medium quality Zerodur mirror with 3 {micro}rad rms nominal slope error. A significant difference was observed with the much higher quality silicon mirror. For the Si mirror, slope error data is 0.39 {+-} 0.08 {micro}rad from LTP measurements but it is 0.35 {+-} 0.01 {micro}rad from PMI interferometer measurements. The standard deviations show that the Fizeau PMI interferometer has much better measurement repeatability.

  6. Starburst Anatomy: Stellar and Nebular Properties of Nearby Giant HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William H. Waller

    1996-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Resolution of nearby giant HII regions into their stellar and nebular constituents provides fundamental insights for interpreting more distant and powerful starburst activity. The following summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the stellar populations and nebular energetics associated with giant HII regions. Photometry and spectroscopy of ionizing clusters in the Galaxy, LMC, and SMC reveal no significant relation between metallicity and the slope of the power-law initial mass function (IMF). HST/WFPC2 photometry of 3 giant HII regions in M33 also does not show any consistent trend involving metal abundance and IMF slope -- contrary to predictions based on emission-line ratios. The upper stellar mass limit appears to be constrained more by cluster age than by anything else. The ionizing luminosities from some of the resolved stellar populations are insufficient to account for the ionization rates inferred from measurements of the composite (integrated) H-alpha emission. Absorption of stellar EUV emission by nebular dust grains would only amplify these photoionizing shortfalls. Leakage of ionizing photons from the HII regions would further exacerbate the situation. What then is providing the additional ionization? Prospects for higher stellar EUV luminosities and/or alternative sources of nebular ionization (e.g. shocks) are evaluated with this question in mind.

  7. Novel Chemically-Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Borehole Sealants (Ceramicretes) for Arctic Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Godwin A. Chukwu; Gang Chen; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramic borehole sealant, i.e. Ceramicrete, has many advantages over conventionally used permafrost cement at Alaska North Slope (ANS). However, in normal field practices when Ceramicrete is mixed with water in blenders, it has a chance of being contaminated with leftover Portland cement. In order to identify the effect of Portland cement contamination, recent tests have been conducted at BJ services in Tomball, TX as well as at the University of Alaska Fairbanks with Ceramicrete formulations proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory. The tests conducted at BJ Services with proposed Ceramicrete formulations and Portland cement contamination have shown significant drawbacks which has caused these formulations to be rejected. However, the newly developed Ceramicrete formulation at the University of Alaska Fairbanks has shown positive results with Portland cement contamination as well as without Portland cement contamination for its effective use in oil well cementing operations at ANS.

  8. March 12th 2013 hOtEL bristOL, OsLO www.economistconferences.com/Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    R O f f i C i A L P R Ag E n C Y arCtiC suMMit A nEW ViSTA fOR tRADe, eneRgy AnD tHe envIROnment #12Igen yAng Director Polar Research Institute of China nInA JenSen Chief Executive Officer and Secretary-CHAIR JAmeS AStIll Political Editor The Economist AqqAluK lynge Chair Inuit Circumpolar Council #12;t

  9. Wellbore Heat Transfer Model for Wax Deposition in Permafrost Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Xiaoting

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Producing waxy oil in arctic area may cause wax deposited on the well wall. Since wax deposition is strongly thermal related, accurate heat transfer model is necessary in predicting and preventing wax depostion. A mathematical model was derived...

  10. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  11. Radioactive and other environmental threats to the United States and the Arctic resulting from past Soviet activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Earlier this year the Senate Intelligence Committee began to receive reports from environmental and nuclear scientists in Russia detailing the reckless nuclear waste disposal practices, nuclear accidents and the use of nuclear detonations. We found that information disturbing to say the least. Also troubling is the fact that 15 Chernobyl style RBMK nuclear power reactors continue to operate in the former Soviet Union today. These reactors lack a containment structure and they`re designed in such a way that nuclear reaction can actually increase when the reactor overheats. As scientists here at the University of Alaska have documented, polar air masses and prevailing weather patterns provide a pathway for radioactive contaminants from Eastern Europe and Western Russia, where many of these reactors are located. The threats presented by those potential radioactive risks are just a part of a larger Arctic pollution problem. Every day, industrial activities of the former Soviet Union continue to create pollutants. I think we should face up to the reality that in a country struggling for economic survival, environment protection isn`t necessarily the high priority. And that could be very troubling news for the Arctic in the future.

  12. Regional Report Issue Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regional Report Introduction The economy of the United States is more than three and one-half years accounting for both increasing shares of the economy and of recessionary employment losses. Manufacturing, driven by globalization and advancing information technology. Recoveries now produce jobs new

  13. Exports of Alaskan north slope oil. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, June 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The bill addresses H.R. 70 a bill to permit exports of certain domestically produced oil. The background and need for the legislation is provided. The bill would amend the Mineral Leasing Act to allow exports of Alaskan North Slope oil under certain conditions.

  14. The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY* AND JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    affiliation: University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia. Corresponding author address: Samuel M. Kelly, University of Western Australia, M015 SESE, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. EThe Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY

  15. Last spring, an Ohio waste slope collapsed, displacing 1.5 million cu yd of waste. Remedial measures can prevent similar failures at ~~grandfathered" landfills.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measures can prevent similar failures at ~~grandfathered" landfills. r I n the early morning hours of March of "grandfathered" landfill slopes. (Grandfathered landfills do not have an engineered liner system.) Because following case history are ap- plicable to the design, operation and expan- sion of many landfills. BEFORE

  16. Dynamic Modeling and Adaptive Neural-Fuzzy Control for Nonholonomic Mobile Manipulators Moving on a Slope 1 Dynamic Modeling and Adaptive Neural-Fuzzy Control for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yangmin

    Dynamic Modeling and Adaptive Neural-Fuzzy Control for Nonholonomic Mobile Manipulators Moving on a Slope 1 Dynamic Modeling and Adaptive Neural-Fuzzy Control for Nonholonomic Mobile Manipulators Moving manipulator, neural-fuzzy control, nonholonomic. 1. INTRODUCTION Intelligent and autonomous mobile

  17. Where does a glacier end ? GPR measurements to identify the limits between the slopes and the real glacier area. Application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Where does a glacier end ? GPR measurements to identify the limits between the slopes and the real glacier area. Application to the Austre Lov´enbreen, Spitsbergen Bernard ´E. Th´eMA, CNRS/Universit´e de, Orsay, France Abstract Glacier limits are usually mapped according to a spatial discrimination based

  18. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis...

  19. A New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part II: Single-Column Modeling of Arctic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    of the arctic bound- ary layer, the presence of leads (cracks) in the sea ice surface, the persistence of mixed-phaseA New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part- dicted cloud boundaries and total cloud fraction compare reasonably well with observations. Cloud phase

  20. Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend R. W. LINDSAY, J. ZHANG, A. SCHWEIGER, M. STEELE, AND H. STERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend R. W. LINDSAY, J. ZHANG, A. SCHWEIGER, M ice extent in the summer of 2007 was unprecedented in the historical record. A coupled ice­ocean model is used to determine the state of the ice and ocean over the past 29 yr to investigate the causes