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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2004 North Slope of Alaska 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment E. R. Westwater, M. A. Klein, and V. Leuski Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado A. J. Gasiewski, T. Uttal, and D. A. Hazen National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Cimini Remote Sensing Division, CETEMPS Universita' dell'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy V. Mattioli Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettronica e dell'Informazione Perugia, Italy B. L. Weber and S. Dowlatshahi Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado J. A. Shaw Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

2

National Strategy for the Arctic Region | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to provide input on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region 10-year plan to develop renewable energy resources in the Arctic region. DOE supports the goals and activities of...

3

Carbon dioxide in Arctic and subarctic regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three year research project was presented that would define the role of the Arctic ocean, sea ice, tundra, taiga, high latitude ponds and lakes and polar anthropogenic activity on the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere. Due to the large physical and geographical differences between the two polar regions, a comparison of CO/sub 2/ source and sink strengths of the two areas was proposed. Research opportunities during the first year, particularly those aboard the Swedish icebreaker, YMER, provided additional confirmatory data about the natural source and sink strengths for carbon dioxide in the Arctic regions. As a result, the hypothesis that these natural sources and sinks are strong enough to significantly affect global atmospheric carbon dioxide levels is considerably strengthened. Based on the available data we calculate that the whole Arctic region is a net annual sink for about 1.1 x 10/sup 15/ g of CO/sub 2/, or the equivalent of about 5% of the annual anthropogenic input into the atmosphere. For the second year of this research effort, research on the seasonal sources and sinks of CO/sub 2/ in the Arctic will be continued. Particular attention will be paid to the seasonal sea ice zones during the freeze and thaw periods, and the tundra-taiga regions, also during the freeze and thaw periods.

Gosink, T. A.; Kelley, J. J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Kotzebue November 5, 2014 10:00AM to 12:00PM AKST Kotzebue, Alaska Northwest Arctic Heritage Center 171 3rd Ave. Kotzebue, AK 9975...

5

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Kotzebue November 5, 2014 1:30PM to 3:30PM AKST Kotzebue, Alaska Northwest Arctic Heritage Center 171 3rd Ave. Kotzebue, AK 9975...

6

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic slope annual Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

7

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Kotzebue  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

8

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Barrow  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

9

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Nome  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

10

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Bethel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

11

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Bethel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

12

Sources and sinks of carbon dioxide in the Arctic regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data base required to adequately ascertain seasonal source and sink strengths in the arctic regions is difficult to obtain. However, there are now a reasonable quantity of data for this polar region to estimate sources and sinks within the Arctic which may contribute significantly to the annual tropospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration fluctuation. The sea-ice-air and the sea-air interfaces account for most of the contribution to the sources and sinks for carbon dioxide. Although the arctic and subarctic region is small in extent, it certainly is not impervious and ice sealed. Our estimate, based on historical data and current research, indicates that the Arctic, which is about 4% of the earth's surface, is an annual net sink for approx. 10/sup 15/ g CO/sub 2/ accounting for an equivalent of approx. 3% of the annual anthropogenic contribution of CO/sub 2/ to the troposphere.

Gosink, T. A.; Kelley, J. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Anchorage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

14

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Unalaska  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

15

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Barrow  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

16

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Nome  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

17

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Kotzebue  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

18

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Anchorage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

19

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Unalaska  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven tribal consultation sessions and seven stakeholder outreach meetings between October and December 2014.

20

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Fairbanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven tribal consultation sessions and seven stakeholder outreach meetings between October and December 2014.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic regions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

et G... in some Arctic regions in the late 1980s and early 1990s during the decline of industrial activity... of Representatives October 18, 2007 Arctic Climate Effects of Black...

22

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice cover suppresses the development of thermal insulation during the ice formation processNAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study Aixue The variability of net sea ice production and sea ice exchange between the Arctic and its adjacent seas

Hu, Aixue

23

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suppresses the development of thermal insulation during the ice formation process. The North AtlanticNAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu National Center of the net sea ice production and the sea ice exchanges between the Arctic and its adjacent seas are studied

Hu, Aixue

24

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

Lettenmaier, Dennis P

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

25

Strategic Energy Management Plan: General Services Administration, Region 10, Northwest/Arctic Region  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the mission of the General Services the mission of the General Services Administration is to help federal agencies better serve the public by offering, at best value, superior workplaces and expert solutions, acquisition services, and management policies. our vision as staff of GSA's Northwest/Arctic Region is to serve as strategic real estate advisors who provide superior, sustainable workspace solutions that exceed customer expectations, enhance worker productivity, and reflect our understanding of client needs while providing environmental leadership within the communities we serve. our core values are "SAIL ON" which stands for Support, Accountability, Integrity, Loyalty and trust, Ownership/commitment, and Nurture a fun workplace. i table of contents

26

Tafel slopes and corrosion rates obtained in the pre-Tafel region of polarization curves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A short review of previous attempts to determine Tafel slopes and corrosion rates from data obtained in the pre-Tafel region of polarization curves is followed by a description of the approach taken in the POLFIT program. Several examples are given of the application of this program including the use of factorial design experiments to determine the optimum conditions for formation of a chromate-free conversion coating on hot dipped galvanized steel.

Florian Mansfeld

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

insulation during the ice formation process. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) related atmosphericNAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu, Claes Rooth and Rainer Bleck February 18, 2003 Abstract The variability of the net sea ice production and the sea ice

Hu, Aixue

28

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

Gutowski, William J.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

The regional geothermal heat flow regime of the north-central Gulf of Mexico continental slope.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Eighty-eight oil and gas wells located in the Texas-Louisiana continental slope were analyzed to obtain heat flow and geothermal gradient values. Present-day geothermal heat flow (more)

Jones, Michael S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Spatial distribution of geotechnical properties in surficial marine sediments-Northwestern slope region, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

set out to identify the depositional environment of that region, and reflect on surface sedimentation patterns, regional and local. In order to achieve these goals, this study employed select geotechnical tests, shear strength measurements, lithologic...

Meyer, Matthew Kael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Seasonal snow of arctic Alaska R4D investigations. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seasonal snow is present on the Arctic Slope of Alaska for nine months each year. Its presence or absence determines whether 80% of the solar radiation is reflected or absorbed, respectively. Although life on the Arctic Slope is adapted to, and in some cases dependent upon seasonal snow, little is known about it from a scientific point of view. Its quantity has been grossly underestimated, and knowledge of its distribution and the extent of wind transport and redistribution is very limited. This research project dealt with the amount, regional distribution and physical properties of wind blown snow and its biological role in the R4D area of the Arctic Slope. Physical processes which operate within the snow that were studied included the flux of heat and vapor and the fractionation of stable isotopes through it during fall and winter, and the complex heat and mass transfer within the snow and between snow, its substrate and the overlying atmosphere during the melt period.

Benson, C.S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Impact on acoustic propagation by internal waves and tides in the region of shelf and slope.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Internal waves (IWS) and tidal activities were investigated in the South China Sea (SCS) and the northeastern seas of Taiwan. These oceanic processes cause large fluctuations and impact on underwater acoustic propagation. These effects include two?dimensional (2?D) and three?dimensional (3?D) effects. The 2?D and 3?D effects are related to the angle between the directions of sound propagation and IW front. When the IW front are from 20 to 90 deg with respect to the acoustic propagation direction acoustic mode coupling is the dominant factor which could be sufficiently predicted by the N2D simulations. Acoustic energy is exchanged between modes and is re?distributed among the water columns. However when the angles between the wave front and the acoustic wave propagation are 020 deg the horizontal refraction effect dominates over mode coupling and the fully 3?D calculation is needed. The acoustic energy would be refracted as a consequence resulting in energy focusing and defocusing. These effects are clearly seen by the series of data collected in the SCS and the region of Northern East of Taiwan. Computer modeling results are used to manifest experiment data results in this research. [This work is supported by National Science Council of Taiwan.

Chi?Fang Chen; Yung?Sheng Linus Chiu; Yuan?Ying Chang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Editorial: Arctic marine biodiversity under change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marine biodiversity in the Arctic is changing in response...2011). The Arctic region has become warmer in the past three decades (ACIA 2005), and most global climate models indicate a continued, likely accelerate...

Haakon Hop; Tore Haug; Stig Falk-Petersen

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Reserve Class Liquids Reserve Class ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , ! ! ! ! ! £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , COLVILLE RIVER COLVILLE RIVER 150°50'0"W 150°50'0"W 150°55'0"W 150°55'0"W 151°0'0"W 151°0'0"W 151°5'0"W 151°5'0"W 151°10'0"W 151°10'0"W 151°15'0"W 151°15'0"W 151°20'0"W 151°20'0"W 151°25'0"W 151°25'0"W 151°30'0"W 151°30'0"W 151°35'0"W 150°45'0"W 70°25'0"N 70°25'0"N 70°20'0"N 70°20'0"N 70°15'0"N 142°0'W 142°0'W 142°40'W 142°40'W 143°20'W 143°20'W 144°0'W 144°0'W 144°40'W 144°40'W 145°20'W 145°20'W 146°0'W 146°0'W 146°40'W 70°20'N 70°0'N 70°0'N 69°40'N

35

North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , ! ! ! ! ! £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , COLVILLE RIVER COLVILLE RIVER 150°50'0"W 150°50'0"W 150°55'0"W 150°55'0"W 151°0'0"W 151°0'0"W 151°5'0"W 151°5'0"W 151°10'0"W 151°10'0"W 151°15'0"W 151°15'0"W 151°20'0"W 151°20'0"W 151°25'0"W 151°25'0"W 151°30'0"W 151°30'0"W 151°35'0"W 150°45'0"W 70°25'0"N 70°25'0"N 70°20'0"N 70°20'0"N 70°15'0"N 142°0'W 142°0'W 142°40'W 142°40'W 143°20'W 143°20'W 144°0'W 144°0'W 144°40'W 144°40'W 145°20'W 145°20'W 146°0'W 146°0'W 146°40'W 70°20'N 70°0'N 70°0'N 69°40'N 69°40'N

36

North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Reserve Class Gas Reserve Class ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , ! ! ! ! ! £ , £ , £ , £ , £ , COLVILLE RIVER COLVILLE RIVER 150°50'0"W 150°50'0"W 150°55'0"W 150°55'0"W 151°0'0"W 151°0'0"W 151°5'0"W 151°5'0"W 151°10'0"W 151°10'0"W 151°15'0"W 151°15'0"W 151°20'0"W 151°20'0"W 151°25'0"W 151°25'0"W 151°30'0"W 151°30'0"W 151°35'0"W 150°45'0"W 70°25'0"N 70°25'0"N 70°20'0"N 70°20'0"N 70°15'0"N 142°0'W 142°0'W 142°40'W 142°40'W 143°20'W 143°20'W 144°0'W 144°0'W 144°40'W 144°40'W 145°20'W 145°20'W 146°0'W 146°0'W 146°40'W 70°20'N 70°0'N 70°0'N 69°40'N 69°40'N

37

Arctic energy resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is a vulnerable region with immense resources. These range from the replenishable (tidal energy, hydroelectricity, wood, biomass, fish, game, and geothermal energy) to the non-replenishable (coal, minerals, natural gas, hydrocarbon deposits). But the problems of exploiting such resources without damaging the environment of the Arctic are formidable. In this book all aspects are considered: occurrence of energy resources; the technological and economic aspects of exploration and exploitation; the environmental and social impact of technological development.

Rey, L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS: Alaskan North Slope ANWR: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BBbls: billion barrels Bbls: barrels Daily Petroleum Production Rate: The amount of petroleum extracted per day from a well, group of wells, region, etc. (usually expressed in barrels per day) EIA: Energy Information Administration MBbls: thousand barrels MMBbls: million barrels NPR-A: National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Petroleum Play: A set of known or postulated petroleum accumulations sharing similar geologic, geographic, and temporal properties such as source rock, migration, pathway, timing, trapping mechanism, and hydrocarbon type

39

FINAL REPORT CANYON AND SLOPE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the influence of canyons on slope cur- rents ; f) identification of communities which may be affected by oil#12;FINAL REPORT CANYON AND SLOPE PROCESSES STUDY VOLUME I EXECUTIVE S(2@lARY Prepared for United and provides diverse habi- tats for biological communities. In the Mid- and North Atlantic Region, canyons have

Mathis, Wayne N.

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine oil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mammals... the Arctic (Figure 3). The loss of sea ice affects marine access, regional weather, ecosystem changes... spill response and damage assessment. As the Arctic Ocean...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic vegetation types Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Dynamic vegetation Figure 3: Evolution of regional arctic models. Geophysical ocean-sea ice... that can be adapted to focus resolution on the Arctic. Stand alone ASM...

42

Recent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of regional and global climate through the ice albedo feed- back, insulating effect, deep water formationRecent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO Jiping Liu; accepted 20 April 2004; published 13 May 2004. [1] Trends in the satellite-derived Arctic sea ice

43

Compressional and shear-wave velocities from gas hydrate bearing sediments: Examples from the India and Cascadia margins as well as Arctic permafrost regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shear wave velocity data have been acquired at several marine gas hydrate drilling expeditions, including the India National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 1 (NGHP-01), the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 (X311). In this study we use data from these marine drilling expeditions to develop an understanding of general grain-size control on the P- and S-wave properties of sediments. A clear difference in the downhole trends of P-wave (Vp) and S-wave (Vs) velocity and the Vp/Vs ratio from all three marine regions was observed: the northern Cascadia margin (IODP X311) shows the highest P-wave and S-wave velocity values overall and those from the India margin (Expedition NGHP-01) are the lowest. The southern Cascadia margin (ODP Leg 204) appears to have similar low P-wave and S-wave velocity values as seen off India. S-wave velocity values increase relative to the sites off India, but they are not as high as those seen on the northern Cascadia margin. Such regional differences can be explained by the amount of silt/sand (or lack thereof) occurring at these sites, with northern Cascadia being the region of the highest silt/sand occurrences. This grain-size control on P-wave and S-wave velocity and associated mineral composition differences is amplified when compared to the Arctic permafrost environments, where gas hydrate predominantly occurs in sand- and silt-dominated formations. Using a cross-plot of gamma ray values versus the Vp/Vs ratio, we compare the marine gas hydrate occurrences in these regions: offshore eastern India margin, offshore Cascadia margin, the Ignik-Sikumi site in Alaska, and the Mallik 5L-38 site in the Mackenzie Delta. The log-data from the Arctic permafrost regions show a strongly linear VpVs relationship, similar to the previously defined empirical relationships by Greenberg and Castagna (1992). P- and S-wave velocity data from the India margin and ODP Leg 204 deviate strongly from these linear trends, whereas data from IODP X311 plot closer to the trend of the Arctic data sets and previously published relationships. Three new linear relationships for different grain size marine sediment hosts are suggested:a) mud-dominated (Mahanadi Basin, ODP Leg 204 & NGHP-01-17): Vs=1.5854נVp?2.1649 b) silty-mud (KG Basin): Vs=0.8105נVp?1.0223 c) silty-sand (IODP X311): Vs=0.5316נVp?0.4916 We investigate the relationship of gas hydrate saturation determined from electrical resistivity on the Vp/Vs ratio and found that the sand-dominated Arctic hosts show a clearly decreasing trend of Vp/Vs ratio with gas hydrate saturation. Though limited due to lower overall GH saturations, a similar trend is seen for sites from IODP X311 and at the ash-dominated NGHP-01-17 sediment in the Andaman Sea. Gas hydrate that occurs predominantly in fractured clay hosts show a different trend where the Vp/Vs ratio is much higher than at sand-dominated sites and remains constant or increases slightly with increasing gas hydrate saturation. This trend may be the result of anisotropy in fracture-dominated systems, where P- and S-wave velocities appear higher and Archie-based saturations of gas hydrate are overestimated. Gas hydrate concentrations were also estimated in these three marine settings and at Arctic sites using an effective medium model, combining P- and S-wave velocities as equally weighted constraints on the calculation. The effective medium approach generally overestimates S-wave velocity in high-porosity, clay-dominated sediments, but can be accurately used in sand-rich formations.

M. Riedel; D. Goldberg; G. Guerin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Crustal insights from gravity and aeromagnetic analysis: Central North Slope, Alaska  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the Arctic coastal plain, complete Bouguer gravity...the east, the coastal plain is spanned by a 1981 survey (Cunningham et al., 1987; Donovan et al., 1988...Slope, including the ANWR 1002 (coastal plain) area and west into eastern...

Richard W. Saltus; Christopher J. Potter; Jeffrey D. Phillips

45

Arctic Stratigraphy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... made in many parts of the Arctic from the previous reconnaissance level of geological knowledge (Norsk Polarinstitutt. Skrifter Nr. 135. By S. H. Buchan, A. Challiner, W ... , W. B. Harland and J. R. Parker. Pp. 92. Oslo : Norsk Polarinstitutt, 1965. 15 kr.). It is the result of work carried out ...

1966-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

46

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Plankton blooms, ocean circulation and the European slope current: Response to weather and climate in the Bay of Biscay and W English Channel (NE Atlantic)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The flow of upper-layer surface water and circulation for the Bay of Biscay, continental slope and in the wider region of the NE Atlantic is presented, as well as the seasonality of flow and internal tides. The marine plankton environments of Biscay Ocean, Biscay Eddies, Biscay Slope and Biscay Shelf are defined. The Shelf region (Armorican and Celtic) is further divided into Stratified Shelf, Frontal and Tidally Mixed. Seasonal distributions of chlorophyll a are given for all environment from in situ measurements and remote sensing data. Mixing and stabilisation of surface water in the euphotic layer for the start of the spring bloom using in situ profiling measurements is examined. Some regional responses for the slope current, dinoflagellate blooms and interannual variations in spring diatom numbers with respect to weather and climate in the Bay of Biscay and around the British Isles are suggested and discussed. An example of the Eastern European Ocean Margin continental slope response to winter weather (sea level atmospheric pressure forcing) resulting in warm winter water in the southern Bay of Biscay (Navidad, with eddy production) and off the Shetland continental slopes (the warm-water supply route to the Arctic) is given from the slope climate observation series.

Robin D. Pingree; Carlos Garcia-Soto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Mendeleev Ridge The Arctic Crossroads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

halocline" waters, which insulate the ice from the underlying warm Atlantic waters, come from the Arctic, wind, currents and ice motion in the region of the Chukchi Borderland 4. Some of the boundary current heat. Its fate can influence ice thickness. 2. The Pacific waters carry nutrients. The fate

Washington at Seattle, University of

49

Moored observations of shelfbreak processes at the inflow to and outflow from the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two high-resolution mooring arrays extending from the outer shelf to the mid continental slope are used to elucidate shelf-basin exchange at the inflow to and the outflow from the Arctic Ocean. Pacific Water entering the ...

Von Appen, Wilken-Jon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

North Slope of Alaska  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govSitesNorth Slope of Alaska govSitesNorth Slope of Alaska NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts North Slope of Alaska Barrow: 71° 19' 23.73" N, 156° 36' 56.70" W Atqasuk: 70° 28' 19.11" N, 157° 24' 28.99" W The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. The principal instrumented facility was installed near Barrow in 1997,

51

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment is a product of the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Reserves and Production Division. EIA, under various programs, has assessed foreign and domestic oil and gas resources, reserves, and production potential. As a policy-neutral agency, EIA’s standard analysis of the potential of the Alaska North Slope (ANS) has focused on the areas without exploration and development restrictions. EIA received a letter (dated March 10, 2000) from Senator Frank H. Murkowski as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requesting an EIA Service Report "with plausible scenarios for ANWR supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey resource assessments." This service report is prepared in response to the request of Senator Murkowski. It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currently restricted from exploration and development, and updates EIA’s 1987 ANWR assessment.

52

ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF PRINCIPAL STRESSES IN THE CHARLEVOIX, LOWER ST. LAWRENCE, NORTHERN APPALACHIAN, LAURENTIAN SLOPE AND GRAND BANKS REGIONS ON FAULTS IN NOVA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brunswick. Point Lepreau is home to a nuclear power plant and seismic risk information in the Northern. Lawrence, offshore Nova Scotia and the Grand Banks. Earthquake and focal mechanism data were obtained from. In the Grand Banks region, stress orientations seem random and the cause of earthquakes is unknown. Offshore

Beaumont, Christopher

53

Floating Glacial Ice Caps in the Arctic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...obtained from isotopic studies of the Camp Century ice core. The second is based...obtained from isotopic studies of the Camp Century ice core. The second is based...Arctic Ocean Arctic region benthonic Camp Century Cenozoic cores deep-sea evidence...

Wallace S. Broecker

1975-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

Arctic Energy Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

S Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil CONTACTS Joel Lindstrom Arctic Energy Office National Energy Technology Laboratory 420 L Street, Suite 305 Anchorage, Alaska 99501...

55

Steep Slope Calculator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Steep Slope Calculator Steep Slope Calculator Estimates Cooling and Heating Savings for Residential Roofs with Non-Black Surfaces Enter A State: Select a state Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Pacific Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City: Select a city Click to see Data for All 243 Locations Roof Inputs: R-value(Btu-in/(hr ft2 oF):

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine food Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mammals... the Arctic (Figure 3). The loss of sea ice affects marine access, regional weather, ecosystem changes... . Such a system also includes a marine Distributed...

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine sediments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mammals... the Arctic (Figure 3). The loss of sea ice affects marine access, regional weather, ecosystem changes... . Such a system also includes a marine Distributed...

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine ecosystem Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: the Arctic (Figure 3). The loss of sea ice affects marine access, regional weather, ecosystem changes... to provide reliable predictions of the changes coming to...

59

Transatlantic Policy Options to Address the Rapidly Changing Arctic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impacts from rapidly occurring climate change in the Arctic region are creating shifts in economic priorities, especially in the energy, transport, fisheries and tourism sectors. Economic expansion combined with ...

Sandra Cavalieri; R. Andreas Kraemer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development of Exhibit on Arctic Climate Change Called The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely Exhibition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The exhibition, The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely, was developed at the Smithsonian Institutions National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) as a part of the museums Forces of Change exhibit series on global change. It opened to the public in Spring 2006, in conjunction with another Forces of Change exhibit on the Earths atmosphere called Change Is in the Air. The exhibit was a 2000 square-foot presentation that explored the forces and consequences of the changing Arctic as documented by scientists and native residents alike. Native peoples of the Arctic have always lived with year-to-year fluctuations in weather and ice conditions. In recent decades, they have witnessed that the climate has become unpredictable, the land and sea unfamiliar. An elder in Arctic Canada recently described the weather as uggianaqtuq an Inuit word that can suggest strange, unexpected behavior, sometimes described as that of a friend acting strangely. Scientists too have been documenting dramatic changes in the Arctic. Air temperatures have warmed over mostthough not allof the Arctic since the 1950s; Arctic precipitation may have increased by as much as 8%; seasonal melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet has increased on average by 16% since 1979; polar-orbiting satellites have measured a 1520% decline in sea ice extent since the 1970s; aircraft reconnaissance and ship observations show a steady decrease in sea ice since the 1950s. In response to this warming, plant distributions have begun to shift and animals are changing their migration routes. Some of these changes may have beneficial effects while others may bring hardship or have costly implications. And, many scientists consider arctic change to be a bell-weather for large-scale changes in other regions of the world. The exhibition included text, photos artifacts, hands-on interactives and other exhibitry that illustrated the changes being documented by indigenous people and scientists alike.

Stauffer, Barbara W.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Shupe, Matthew CIRES/NOAA/ETL Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Mixed-phase clouds play a unique role in the Arctic, where the delicate balance of phases in these clouds can have a profound impact on the surface radiation balance and various cloud-atmosphere-radiation-surface feedback processes. A better understanding of these clouds is clearly important and has been a recent objective of the ARM program. To this end, multiple sensors including radar, lidar, and temperature soundings, have been utilized in an automated cloud type classification scheme for clouds observed at the North Slope of Alaska site. The performance of this new algorithm at identifying mixed-phase cloud conditions is compared with an

63

Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential Philip Budzik U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential Philip Budzik U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Oil and Gas Division October, 2009 Introduction The Arctic is defined as the Northern hemisphere region located north of the Arctic Circle, the circle of latitude where sunlight is uniquely present or absent for 24 continuous hours on the summer and winter solstices, respectively. The Arctic Circle spans the globe at 66.56° (66°34') north latitude (Figure 1). 1 The Arctic could hold about 22 percent of the world's undiscovered conventional oil and natural gas resources. The prospects for Arctic oil and natural gas production are discussed taking into consideration the nature of the resources, the cost of developing them, and the

64

MITAS-2009 Expedition, U.S. Beaufort Shelf and SlopeLithostratigraphy Data Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The volume of methane released through the Arctic Ocean to the atmosphere and its potential role in the global climate cycle have increasingly become the focus of studies seeking to understand the source and origin of this methane. In 2009, an international, multi-disciplinary science party aboard the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Sea successfully completed a trans-U.S. Beaufort Shelf expedition aimed at understanding the sources and volumes of methane across this region. Following more than a year of preliminary cruise planning and a thorough site evaluation, the Methane in the Arctic Shelf/Slope (MITAS) expedition departed from the waters off the coast of Barrow, Alaska in September 2009. The expedition was organized with an international shipboard science team consisting of 33 scientists with the breadth of expertise necessary to meet the expedition goals. NETL researchers led the expeditions initial core processing and lithostratigraphic evaluations, which are the focus of this report. This data report is focused on the lithostratigraphic datasets from the recovered vibra cores and piston cores. Operational information about the piston and vibra cores such as date acquired, core name, total length, water depth, and geographic location is provided. Once recovered, gas samples were immediately collected from cores. In addition, each core was run through the Geotek multi-sensor core logger for magnetic susceptibility, P-wave velocity, resistivity, and gamma-density measurements (Rose et al., 2010). After the samples and measurements were completed, the cores were split into working and archive halves. Visual core descriptions of the archive half was completed for each core. Samples for shipboard smear slides, coarse fractions, and XRD analyses were collected, as well as corresponding samples for post-cruise grain size analysis from the working half of each core. Line scan images of the split core surfaces were collected post-expedition. The methods used to characterize the lithostratigraphy of the recovered cores are described.

Rose, K.; Johnson, J.E.; Phillips, S.C.; Smith, J.; Reed, A.; Disenhof, C.; Presley, J.

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

65

Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD participants believe that the platform concept could have far-reaching applications in the Arctic as a drilling and production platform, as originally intended, and as a possible staging area. The overall objective of this project was to document various potential applications, locations, and conceptual designs for the inland platform serving oil and gas operations on the Alaska North Slope. The University of Alaska Fairbanks assisted the HARC/TerraPlatforms team with the characterization of potential resource areas, geotechnical conditions associated with continuous permafrost terrain, and the potential end-user evaluation process. The team discussed the various potential applications with industry, governmental agencies, and environmental organizations. The benefits and concerns associated with industry's use of the technology were identified. In this discussion process, meetings were held with five operating companies (22 people), including asset team leaders, drilling managers, HSE managers, and production and completion managers. Three other operating companies and two service companies were contacted by phone to discuss the project. A questionnaire was distributed and responses were provided, which will be included in the report. Meetings were also held with State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources officials and U.S. Bureau of Land Management regulators. The companies met with included ConcoPhillips, Chevron, Pioneer Natural Resources, Fairweather E&P, BP America, and the Alaska Oil and Gas Association.

Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

6, 96559722, 2006 Arctic smoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussions Arctic smoke ­ record high air pollution levels in the European Arctic due to agricultural fires into the European Arctic and caused the most severe air pollution episodes ever recorded there. This paper confirms that biomass burning (BB) was in-5 deed the source of the observed air pollution, studies the transport

Boyer, Edmond

67

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Alaska North Slope Oil and Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaska North Slope Oil and Gas Transportation Support System Last Reviewed 12/23/2013 Alaska North Slope Oil and Gas Transportation Support System Last Reviewed 12/23/2013 DE-FE0001240 Goal The primary objectives of this project are to develop analysis and management tools related to Arctic transportation networks (e.g., ice and snow road networks) that are critical to North Slope, Alaska oil and gas development. Performers Geo-Watersheds Scientific, Fairbanks, AK 99708 University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 Background Oil and gas development on the North Slope is critical for maintaining U.S. energy supplies and is facing a period of new growth to meet the increasing energy needs of the nation. A majority of all exploration and development activities, pipeline maintenance, and other field support projects take

68

Political risks of hydrocarbon deposit development in the Arctic seas of the Russian Federation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nowadays the process of Arctic development has a long-term international cooperation character. Economic and geopolitical interests of both arctic and non-arctic countries meet in the region. Apart from resource development issues, there are problems concerning security, sustainable development and some others issues conditioned by climate and geographical characteristics of the region. Strategic analysis of political risks for the Russian Federation is carried out. The analysis reveals that political risks of hydrocarbon deposits development in the RF arctic seas appear as lack of coordination with arctic countries in solving key regional problems, failure to follow international agreements. Such inconsistency may lead to political risks, which results in strained situation in the region.

Y A Bolsunovskaya; G Yu Boyarko; L M Bolsunovskaya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

ShoreZone in the Arctic 8,000 km of Coastal Habitat Mapping Cathy Coon, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, catherine.coon@boem.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deadhorse Kotzebue Sound BOEM North Slope Imagery - 1,900 km BOEM North Slope Shore Stations National Park a continental-scale characterization of the arctic shoreline and support planning efforts related to oils spills Krusenstern, north of Kotzebue #12;Point Lay Wales Kotzebue Wainwright Cape Lisburne Kaktovik BARROW Point

70

CONTENTS Developing Alaskan Arctic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Developing Alaskan Arctic Developing Alaskan Arctic Potential ...........................................1 Commentary ...................................2 NETL Develops Strategic Partnership with the Alaska Center for Energy and Power ...8 Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater Produced Water Discharge ....10 Intelligent Production System for Ultra Deepwater with Short Hop Wireless Power and Wireless Data Transfer .........................................16 Snapshots ......................................19 CONTACTS Roy Long Technology Manager Ultra-Deepwater/Offshore 304-285-4479 roy.long@netl.doe.gov Ray Boswell Technology Manager Natural Gas Technology R&D 412-386-7614 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov Eric Smistad Technology Manager Oil Technology R&D 281-494-2619 eric.smistad@netl.doe.gov

71

Arctic & Antarctic Activity Book  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hundred animals scattered around Antarctica. 6 #12;Seals are mammals, and they have to breathe air to live seal Lemmings Orca King crab Walrus Arctic tern Ptarmigan Musk Ox Sculpin Cod Brittle star Black fly. Can you help this seal find her breathing hole in the ice sheet? 7 #12;Color Me! Male walruses have

72

North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Seasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service and the U. S. National Ice Center) produces summer outlooks of ice conditions for specific regionsSeasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1 J. Zhang,1 A. J. Schweiger,1 29 February 2008. [1] How well can the extent of arctic sea ice be predicted for lead periods of up

Zhang, Jinlun

74

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

Moore, John

75

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

NETL: Arctic Energy Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facts/Issues Facts/Issues Average South-Central natural gas consumption in 2005 was: 13.9% gas utility 20.0% power generation 54.3% industrial-LNG sales, oil refining, and fertilizer manufacturing 7.2% field operations 4.6% other Due to a lack of natural gas deliverability, the Cook Inlet fertilizer plant terminated operations in May 2008. LNG sales are increasingly curtailed during cold weather due to peak demand shortages. The LNG export license is up for renewal in 2011. Exploration must find new reserves on the order of 500 Bcf, and that will only solve the natural gas shortage until approximately 2019. Challenges Natural gas in the Arctic, until recently, has been largely overlooked. Little is known about the possible breadth of the Arctic storehouse of natural gas apart from the resource associated with the currently producing

77

Arctic Energy Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

O O G R A M FAC T S Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil CONTACTS Joel Lindstrom Arctic Energy Office National Energy Technology Laboratory 420 L Street, Suite 305 Anchorage, Alaska 99501 907-271-3618 joel.lindstrom@contr.netl.doe.gov Albert B. Yost II Sr. Management Technical Advisor Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4479 albert.yost@netl.doe.gov

78

Slope failures in Hong Kong  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the large catchment area. Summary The most abundant failures during multiple events are the Type 1 and 2 slips, or combina- Iions such as in Fig. 1 lb, and these have the most disastrous consequences. Isolated events SLOPE FAILURES IN HONG KONG 59 and...

Peter Lumb

79

Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Simulated Response of the Arctic Freshwater Budget to Extreme NAO Wind Forcing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors investigate the response of the Arctic Ocean freshwater budget to changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) using a regional-ocean configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology GCM (MITgcm) and carry out several ...

Alan Condron; Peter Winsor; Chris Hill; Dimitris Menemenlis

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Relationship between System Slope and Updraft Intensity in Squall Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years there has been debate about whether squall lines have an optimal state. It has been repeatedly demonstrated that the slope of a squall lines convective region is related to the comparative magnitudes of the squall lines cold ...

Matthew D. Parker

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A 22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes in the Arctic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes 22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes in the Arctic J. Francis and J. Secora Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey Abstract Downwelling longwave fluxes (DLFs) over the Arctic surface have been generated from 22.5 years of radiances and retrievals from the TIROS (television and infrared observation satellite) operational vertical sounder (TOVS). The flux retrieval algorithm has been validated and improved using surface- based radiation and cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, and from the Surface Heat Balance of the Arctic (SHEBA) field program (1997-98) in the Beaufort Sea. The DLF product is presented on a 100 x

83

1 Copyright 2014 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2014 33rd International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Offshore and Arctic Engineering OMAE2014 June 8-13, 2014, San Francisco, California, USA OMAE2014 and icebergs present significant challenges for the development of arctic and subarctic oil and gas resources in northern regions. Offshore structures and vessels must be designed to withstand interaction with such ice

Bruneau, Steve

84

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Resource Characterization and Quantification of Natural Gas-Hydrate and Associated Free-Gas Accumulations in the Prudhoe Bay - Kuparuk River Area on the North Slope of Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas hydrates have long been considered a nuisance by the petroleum industry. Hydrates have been hazards to drilling crews, with blowouts a common occurrence if not properly accounted for in drilling plans. In gas pipelines, hydrates have formed plugs if gas was not properly dehydrated. Removing these plugs has been an expensive and time-consuming process. Recently, however, due to the geologic evidence indicating that in situ hydrates could potentially be a vast energy resource of the future, research efforts have been undertaken to explore how natural gas from hydrates might be produced. This study investigates the relative permeability of methane and brine in hydrate-bearing Alaska North Slope core samples. In February 2007, core samples were taken from the Mt. Elbert site situated between the Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk oil fields on the Alaska North Slope. Core plugs from those core samples have been used as a platform to form hydrates and perform unsteady-steady-state displacement relative permeability experiments. The absolute permeability of Mt. Elbert core samples determined by Omni Labs was also validated as part of this study. Data taken with experimental apparatuses at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, ConocoPhillips laboratories at the Bartlesville Technology Center, and at the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation's facilities in Anchorage, Alaska, provided the basis for this study. This study finds that many difficulties inhibit the ability to obtain relative permeability data in porous media-containing hydrates. Difficulties include handling unconsolidated cores during initial core preparation work, forming hydrates in the core in such a way that promotes flow of both brine and methane, and obtaining simultaneous two-phase flow of brine and methane necessary to quantify relative permeability using unsteady-steady-state displacement methods.

Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Seoul, South Korea -classification deteriorating slope stability -Robert Hack 1 SLOPE STABILITY CLASSIFICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seoul, South Korea - classification deteriorating slope stability - Robert Hack 1 SLOPE STABILITY CLASSIFICATION OF TIME DEPENDENT DETERIORATING SLOPES Seoul, Korea, 29 February 2008 Robert Hack Engineering) The Netherlands #12;Seoul, South Korea - classification deteriorating slope stability - Robert Hack 2 Jan van

Hack, Robert

87

Time varying arctic climate change amplification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Microfluidics: On the Slope of Enlightenment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microfluidics: On the Slope of Enlightenment ... Now that the hype has blown over, will microfluidics live up to its promise of providing marketable applications? ... Does microfluidics sell? ...

Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

89

Arctic Change 2009 Woodgate Wk 4 -Mon Typical Arctic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a cold (halocline) layer, which insulates the ice from the warm Atlantic water beneath (Shimada et al -divided into 2 channels by the Diomede Islands - split by the US- Russian border -ice covered from in the Arctic Implicated in the seasonal melt-back of ice In summer, Pacific waters are a source of near

Washington at Seattle, University of

90

Enumerative and Algebraic Aspects of Slope Varieties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.4 Grassmannians and algebraic geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.4.1 Grassmannians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2.4.2 Schubert cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.5 Graph varieties... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 2.5.1 Picture space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 2.5.2 Defining ideal for the slope variety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.5.3 Grobner bases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3 Slope...

Enkosky, Thomas

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

91

Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Evaluation of Polar WRF forecasts on the Arctic System Reanalysis domain: Surface and upper air analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyses of regional mod- eling with Polar WRF have been performed with results compared to selected localEvaluation of Polar WRF forecasts on the Arctic System Reanalysis domain: Surface and upper air.1.1 of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), a highresolution regional scale model, is used to simulate

Howat, Ian M.

93

North Slope export ban in repealed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Senate and House both approve a bill lifting the 20-year-old ban on exports from the North Slope. The importance of this action is described.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

March 13, 1968: Oil discovered on Alaska's North Slope | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

13, 1968: Oil discovered on Alaska's North Slope March 13, 1968: Oil discovered on Alaska's North Slope March 13, 1968: Oil discovered on Alaska's North Slope March 13, 1968 The...

95

Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry L. Swinney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry wave generation in a laboratory model of oscillating tidal flow on a continental margin. Waves are found to be generated only in a near-critical region where the slope of the bottom topography matches

Texas at Austin. University of

96

Air monitoring in the Arctic: Results for selected persistent organic pollutants for 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is generally considered to be a pristine environment and has few direct inputs of organochlorine compounds (OCs), including pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In spite of this, airborne concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are comparable to those in more populated and industrialized regions of North America and Europe. Atmospheric transport and condensation of compounds at low temperature conditions are important factors contributing to the presence of contaminants in the Arctic. A long-term program has been established to measure the airborne concentrations of POPs in the Arctic. The first station at Alert was established in January 1992. The concentrations measured in the first year of monitoring for 18 compounds that are representative of different compound classes are presented. Seasonal variations for PAHs are similar to those for Arctic haze and peak during winter. For example, in the coldest period, october to April, benzo[a]pyrene concentrations were found to average 20 pg/m{sup 3}, whereas, in contrast, during the relatively warm May to September period, average levels were 1.0 pg/m{sup 3}. For OCs, the seasonal cycle was not as pronounced as that for PAH compounds. For example, {alpha}-hexachlorocyclohexane was found at Alert at average concentrations of 62 and 57 pg/m{sup 3}, respectively, during cold and warm periods. It is postulated that air concentrations are influenced by advection from distant source regions as well as exchange with local (Arctic Ocean) surfaces.

Fellin, P.; Dougherty, D. [BOVAR Environmental, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Barrie, L.A.; Toom, D. [Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Muir, D.; Grift, N.; Lockhart, L.; Billeck, B. [Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the response of Arctic gas and aerosol concentrations to perturbations in pollutant emissions from Europe, East and South Asia, and North America using results from a coordinated model intercomparison. These sensitivities to regional emissions (mixing ratio change per unit emission) vary widely across models and species. Intermodel differences are systematic, however, so that the relative importance of different regions is robust. North America contributes the most to Arctic ozone pollution. For aerosols and CO, European emissions dominate at the Arctic surface but East Asian emissions become progressively more important with altitude, and are dominant in the upper troposphere. Sensitivities show strong seasonality: surface sensitivities typically maximize during boreal winter for European and during spring for East Asian and North American emissions. Mid-tropospheric sensitivities, however, nearly always maximize during spring or summer for all regions. Deposition of black carbon (BC) onto Greenland is most sensitive to North American emissions. North America and Europe each contribute {approx}40% of total BC deposition to Greenland, with {approx}20% from East Asia. Elsewhere in the Arctic, both sensitivity and total BC deposition are dominated by European emissions. Model diversity for aerosols is especially large, resulting primarily from differences in aerosol physical and chemical processing (including removal). Comparison of modeled aerosol concentrations with observations indicates problems in the models, and perhaps, interpretation of the measurements. For gas phase pollutants such as CO and O{sub 3}, which are relatively well-simulated, the processes contributing most to uncertainties depend on the source region and altitude examined. Uncertainties in the Arctic surface CO response to emissions perturbations are dominated by emissions for East Asian sources, while uncertainties in transport, emissions, and oxidation are comparable for European and North American sources. At higher levels, model-to-model variations in transport and oxidation are most important. Differences in photochemistry appear to play the largest role in the intermodel variations in Arctic ozone sensitivity, though transport also contributes substantially in the mid-troposphere.

Shindell, D T; Chin, M; Dentener, F; Doherty, R M; Faluvegi, G; Fiore, A M; Hess, P; Koch, D M; MacKenzie, I A; Sanderson, M G; Schultz, M G; Schulz, M; Stevenson, D S; Teich, H; Textor, C; Wild, O; Bergmann, D J; Bey, I; Bian, H; Cuvelier, C; Duncan, B N; Folberth, G; Horowitz, L W; Jonson, J; Kaminski, J W; Marmer, E; Park, R; Pringle, K J; Schroeder, S; Szopa, S; Takemura, T; Zeng, G; Keating, T J; Zuber, A

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

98

Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to improve representation of the Arctic in Earth System Models Topography influences snow cover, thermal

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic sediments svalbard Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: for transporting lead into the Arctic. We collected a large selection of sediment cores from around the Arctic... enters the Arctic Ocean from the Fram Strait, between...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic european russia Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;NOAA Arctic Tiger Team Laura K. Furgione Deputy Assistant Administrator National Weather Service... Evidence of a Changing Arctic NOAA's Evolving Role in the Arctic...

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic energy technology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;NOAA Arctic Tiger Team Laura K. Furgione Deputy Assistant Administrator National Weather Service... Evidence of a Changing Arctic NOAA's Evolving Role in the Arctic...

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic spring site Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;NOAA Arctic Tiger Team Laura K. Furgione Deputy Assistant Administrator National Weather Service... Evidence of a Changing Arctic NOAA's Evolving Role in the Arctic...

104

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic animals-a review Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ROTHROCK... and the intensification of the cyclonic circulation in the eastern Arctic Ocean. The response of Arctic sea ice... into the eastern Arctic from the Canada Basin,...

105

Goal: Stem N. Slope output decline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alaska North Slope production peaked at 2 million b/d in 1988 and since then has declined to a present 1.4 million b/d. For the next few years, ARCO`s net production will decline as North Slope oil production continues to fall. With a five-year Alaska budget of $1.15 billion, the company has ambitious plans to continue the large role is has played in Alaskan oil development. The paper discusses the infilling of Prudhoe Bay, exploring satellite fields, production at Colville River delta, and BP`s strategy.

NONE

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

106

STUDY OF TRANSPORTATION OF GTL PRODUCTS FROM ALASKAN NORTH SLOPE (ANS) TO MARKETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alaskan North Slope is one of the largest hydrocarbon reserves in the US where Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology can be successfully implemented. The proven and recoverable reserves of conventional natural gas in the developed and undeveloped fields in the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) are estimated to be 38 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF) and estimates of additional undiscovered gas reserves in the Arctic field range from 64 TCF to 142 TCF. Transportation of the natural gas from the remote ANS is the key issue in effective utilization of this valuable and abundance resource. The throughput of oil through the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) has been on decline and is expected to continue to decline in future. It is projected that by the year 2015, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level that there will be a critical need for pumping additional liquid from GTL process to provide an adequate volume for economic operation of TAPS. The pumping of GTL products through TAPS will significantly increase its economic life. Transporting GTL products from the North Slope of Alaska down to the Marine terminal at Valdez is no doubt the great challenge facing the Gas to Liquids options of utilizing the abundant natural gas resource of the North Slope. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate and assess the economic feasibility of transporting GTL products through the TAPS. Material testing program for GTL and GTL/Crude oil blends was designed and implemented for measurement of physical properties of GTL products. The measurement and evaluation of the properties of these materials were necessary so as to access the feasibility of transporting such materials through TAPS under cold arctic conditions. Results of the tests indicated a trend of increasing yield strength with increasing wax content. GTL samples exhibited high gel strengths at temperatures as high as 20 F, which makes it difficult for cold restart following winter shutdowns. Simplified analytical models were developed to study the flow of GTL and GTL/crude oil blends through TAPS in both commingled and batch flow models. The economics of GTL transportations by either commingled or batching mode were evaluated. The choice of mode of transportation of GTL products through TAPS would depend on the expected purity of the product and a trade-off between loss in product value due to contamination and cost of keeping the product pure at the discharge terminal.

Godwin A. Chukwu, Ph.D., P.E.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Springtime Arctic haze contributions of submicron organic particles from European and Asian combustion sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The composition of Arctic aerosol, especially during the springtime Arctic haze, may play an important role in the radiative balance of the Arctic. The contribution of organic components to Arctic haze has only recently ...

Kroll, Jesse

108

Dangerous climate change and the importance of adaptation for the Arctic's Inuit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Arctic's climate is changing rapidly, to the extent that 'dangerous' climate change as defined by the United Nations Framework on Climate Change might already be occurring. These changes are having implications for the Arctic's Inuit population and are being exacerbated by the dependence of Inuit on biophysical resources for livelihoods and the low socio-economichealth status of many northern communities. Given the nature of current climate change and projections of a rapidly warming Arctic, climate policy assumes a particular importance for Inuit regions. This paper argues that efforts to stabilize and reduce greenhouse gas emissions are urgent if we are to avoid runaway climate change in the Arctic, but unlikely to prevent changes which will be dangerous for Inuit. In this context, a new policy discourse on climate change is required for Arctic regionsone that focuses on adaptation. The paper demonstrates that states with Inuit populations and the international community in general has obligations to assist Inuit to adapt to climate change through international human rights and climate change treaties. However, the adaptation deficit, in terms of what we know and what we need to know to facilitate successful adaptation, is particularly large in an Arctic context and limiting the ability to develop response options. Moreover, adaptation as an option of response to climate change is still marginal in policy negotiations and Inuit political actors have been slow to argue the need for adaptation assistance. A new focus on adaptation in both policy negotiations and scientific research is needed to enhance Inuit resilience and reduce vulnerability in a rapidly changing climate.

James D Ford

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Dr. William J. Gutowski will be hosting a science-team meeting of a DOE-sponsored project, "Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Arctic Climate System Model". This is a collaborative project to: (i) develop a stateDr. William J. Gutowski will be hosting a science-team meeting of a DOE-sponsored project, "Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High- Resolution

Debinski, Diane M.

110

File:EIA-AK-NorthSlope-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

File File Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:EIA-AK-NorthSlope-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Alaskan North Slope By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 2.16 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Alaskan North Slope By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alaska File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment

111

File:EIA-AK-NorthSlope-liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alaskan North Slope By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Alaskan North Slope By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 2.17 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Alaskan North Slope By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alaska File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:57, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 16:57, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (2.17 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

112

File:EIA-AK-NorthSlope-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alaskan North Slope By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Alaskan North Slope By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 2.16 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Alaskan North Slope By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alaska File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:57, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 16:57, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (2.16 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

113

Climate science: Vast costs of Arctic change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... As the amount of Arctic sea ice declines at an unprecedented rate, the thawing of offshore permafrost releases methane. A 50-gigatonne (Gt) reservoir of methane, stored in the ...

Gail Whiteman; Chris Hope; Peter Wadhams

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

114

BLM Arctic Field Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

vast area covered by the Arctic Field Office includes the 23-million-acre National Petroleum Reserve - Alaska, the largest block of federal land managed by a single agency. The...

115

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is a permanent site providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. These data are being used to refine models and parameterizations as they relate to the Arctic. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. Approximately 300,000 NSA data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

116

TRANSPORTATION ISSUES IN THE DELIVERY OF GTL PRODUCTS FROM ALASKAN NORTH SLOPE TO MARKET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alaskan North Slope (ANS) is one of the largest hydrocarbon reserves in the United States where Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology can be successfully implemented. The proven and recoverable reserves of conventional natural gas in the developed and undeveloped fields in the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) are estimated to be 38 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF) and estimates of additional undiscovered gas reserves in the Arctic field range from 64 TCF to 142 TCF. Because the domestic gas market in the continental United States is located thousands of miles from the ANS, transportation of the natural gas from the remote ANS to the market is the key issue in effective utilization of this valuable and abundant resource. The focus of this project is to study the operational challenges involved in transporting the gas in converted liquid (GTL) form through the existing Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS). A three-year, comprehensive research program was undertaken by the Petroleum Development Laboratory, University of Alaska Fairbanks, under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40016 to study the feasibility of transporting GTL products through TAPS. Cold restart of TAPS following an extended winter shutdown and solids deposition in the pipeline were identified as the main transportation issues in moving GTL products through the pipeline. The scope of work in the current project (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41248) included preparation of fluid samples for the experiments to be conducted to augment the comprehensive research program.

Godwin Chukwu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Determination of the Tafel slope for oxygen evolution on boron-doped diamond electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been reported that the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes appears at high overpotential and results in unusually high Tafel slope. In this work, we have studied the OER in 1M \\{HClO4\\} on BDD macroelectrode and microelectrodes-array (MEA). The correction of the anodic polarization curve for ohmic drop has been performed on BDD macroelectrode taking into account the total uncompensated resistance of the studied system. On BDD MEA, no correction of the polarization curve was necessary due to the small contribution of ohmic drop to the measured potential. At low overpotential (Tafel slopes (340 and 680mVdec?1 on BDD MEA and BDD, respectively) have been observed. Such high slopes may result from the presence of surface redox couples/functional groups which act as a barrier for OER on BDD. In this potential region, the Tafel slope depends strongly on the state of the electrode surface. In the high overpotential region (>1.2V), the Tafel slope has been found equal to 120mVdec?1, which is the theoretical value considering a first or a second electron transfer step as the rate determining step.

Agnieszka Kapa?ka; Gyrgy Fti; Christos Comninellis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Woodgate, Arctic Ocean Circulation Page 1:13 February 2012 ARCTIC OCEAN CIRCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deep) Bering Strait, through which about 0.8Sv (1Sv=106 m3 s-1 ) of water enters the Arctic. Properties: 206-221-3268 Accepted for Nature Education Knowledge Project, May 2012 Welcome to the Arctic Ocean Circle, contains deep (~ 4500m) basins, the slowest spreading ridges in the world, and about 15

Washington at Seattle, University of

119

Tuktoyaktuk : responsive strategies for a new Arctic urbanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Canadian Arctic is facing a set of compounding crises that will drastically impact the future of its coastal frontier. At a time when climate change is having a detrimental impact on the Arctic landscape, Northern ...

Ritchot, Pamela (Pamela Rae)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING GEOSYTNTHETICS Virginia L. Wilson.L. Soderman and G.P. Raymond November 12, 1998 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING slopes at waste containment facilities. The Geneva Landfill is located near Geneva, Ohio which

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Carbon fixation by phytoplankton in high Arctic lakes: Implications of ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Photosynthesis vs. irradiance relationships were determined for phytoplankton communities from seven lakes in the Canadian high Arctic, including...

122

Potential causes for slope instabilities of under-consolidated marine sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offshore studies have been completed in the Gulf of Guinea, off West Africa. An area has been selected over the Gabon continental slope. A morpho-sedimentological zonation is made regarding acoustic data and geotechnical characteristics of sampled sediments. An old slide has been considered as a criteria for estimating realistic slope failure conditions. Both drained and undrained formulations tend to prove that fluid escape is the most realistic explanation for slides occurrence. Regional hazard charts also allow them to present unstable zones and build up criteria for structures implantation.

Quemeneur, P.; Tisot, J.P. [ENSG, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France). Laboratoire de Geomecanique; Cochonat, P.; Bourillet, J.F.; d`Oultremont, V. [IFREMER, Plouzane (France); Colliat, J.L.; Tofani, R. [Elf Aquitaine Production, Pau (France)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Solar radiation on variously oriented sloping surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monthly average daily irradiation on surfaces tilted towards the equator and also inclined at various azimuth angles are estimated for two locations in Lesotho and the results are presented. The isotropic model suggested by Liu and Jordan (Trans. of Ashrae, 526, 1962) along with the modified equation of Klein (Solar Energy, 19, 4, 1977) are employed for the estimation purposes. Surface orientations are selected at three inclinations for six different azimuth angles. Conclusions are reached for optimum tilt and orientation for summer, winter and annual collection. Total annual radiation values are computed for all the slopes and orientations.

Gopinathan, K.K. (National Univ. of Lesotho, Roma (South Africa))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

125

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Speaker(s): Matthew T. Reagan Date: March 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane may have had a significant role in regulating past climate. However, the behavior of contemporary permafrost deposits and oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. A recent expedition to the west coast of Spitsbergen discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor at depths that correspond to the upper limit of the receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the

126

Dendrogeomorphic approach to estimating slope retreat, Maxey Flats, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dendrogeomorphic study of slope retreat was conducted at the Maxey Flats nuclear-waste disposal site in northeastern Kentucky. Tree roots exposed by surface lowering were used as an indicator of ground surface at the time of germination. The amount of lowering was measured and divided by tree-ring-determined tree age. Surface lowering and slope degradation rates were estimated for three slopes below waste-burial trenches and compared with data obtained from sediment troughs and erosion frames at the site. Mean rates of slope retreat ranged from 1.92 to 3.16 mm/yr. Sediment-trough results are two to three orders of magnitude less than dendrogeomorphic and erosion-frame estimates of slope degradation, which suggests that piping and solution-weathering processes may be important in slope degradation. Slope aspect and declivity may be important factors affecting retreat of slopes with a uniform lithology. Dendrogeomorphic techniques provide results comparable to those in the literature and offer a rapid method for estimating slope retreat that integrates slope processes over many years.

Hupp, C.R. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA)); Carey, W.P. (Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

ALASKA NORTH SLOPE OIL AND GAS RESOURCES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FFf Task 222.01.01 FFf Task 222.01.01 ADDENDUM REPORT Alaska North Slope Oil and Gas A Promising Future or an Area in Decline? DOE/NETL-2009/1385 April 2009 ii Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe probably owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

128

A Sensitivity Study on Modeling Black Carbon in Snow and its Radiative Forcing over the Arctic and Northern China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black carbon in snow (BCS) simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) is evaluated against measurements over Northern China and the Arctic, and its sensitivity to atmospheric deposition and two parameters that affect post-depositional enrichment is explored. The BCS concentration is overestimated (underestimated) by a factor of two in Northern China (Arctic) in the default model, but agreement with observations is good over both regions in the simulation with improvements in BC transport and deposition. Sensitivity studies indicate that uncertainty in the melt-water scavenging efficiency (MSE) parameter substantially affects BCS and its radiative forcing (by a factor of 2-7) in the Arctic through post-depositional enrichment. The MSE parameter has a relatively small effect on the magnitude of BCS seasonal cycle but can alter its phase in Northern China. The impact of the snow aging scaling factor (SAF) on BCS, partly through the post-depositional enrichment effect, shows more complex latitudinal and seasonal dependence. Similar to MSE, SAF affects more significantly the magnitude (phase) of BCS season cycle over the Arctic (Northern China). While uncertainty associated with the representation of BC transport and deposition processes in CAM5 is more important than that associated with the two snow model parameters in Northern China, the two uncertainties have comparable effect in the Arctic.

Qian, Yun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Rudong; Flanner, M. G.; Rasch, Philip J.

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

129

Oil exploration ramps up in US Arctic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... run in US Arctic waters since 2000, and could mark the start of the first offshore commercial drilling in the American north, although it would take another decade to establish ... although it would take another decade to establish production wells. However, many fear that offshore drilling in the challenging conditions of the north, and around sensitive and understudied ecological ...

Nicola Jones

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

130

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Outreach Meeting: Anchorage October 24, 2014 10:00AM to 12:00PM AKDT Anchorage, Alaska U.S. Fish and Wild Service Office, Gordon Watson Room 1011 E. Tudor Rd. Anchorage, AK 9950...

131

Sustainable Slope Stabilization Using Recycled Plastic Pin In Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Hossain, Md. Sahadat Shallow slope failures are predominant in the North Texas area and pose significant maintenance problems for the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). (more)

Khan, Mohammad Sadik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean expedition Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic will lead to a better understanding of how the Summary: between the U.S. and Russia began with the expedition of the Bering and Chukchi Seas ( Arctic Ocean... . Arctic...

133

Sedimentological control on saturation distribution in Arctic gas-hydrate-bearing sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mechanistic model is proposed to predict/explain hydrate saturation distribution in converted free gas hydrate reservoirs in sub-permafrost formations in the Arctic. This 1-D model assumes that a gas column accumulates and subsequently is converted to hydrate. The processes considered are the volume change during hydrate formation and consequent fluid phase transport within the column, the descent of the base of gas hydrate stability zone through the column, and sedimentological variations with depth. Crucially, the latter enable disconnection of the gas column during hydrate formation, which leads to substantial variation in hydrate saturation distribution. One form of variation observed in Arctic hydrate reservoirs is that zones of very low hydrate saturations are interspersed abruptly between zones of large hydrate saturations. The model was applied to data from Mount Elbert well, a gas hydrate stratigraphic test well drilled in the Milne Point area of the Alaska North Slope. The model is consistent with observations from the well log and interpretations of seismic anomalies in the area. The model also predicts that a considerable amount of fluid (of order one pore volume of gaseous and/or aqueous phases) must migrate within or into the gas column during hydrate formation. This paper offers the first explanatory model of its kind that addresses converted free gas reservoirs from a new angle: the effect of volume change during hydrate formation combined with capillary entry pressure variation versus depth.

Javad Behseresht; Steven L. Bryant

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Arctic Microclimate Activity.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in a particular region. Materials Large white piece of paper Pencils and erasers 1 thermometer per student or group Important Points to Understand Have you ever noticed how much...

135

The Effect of Slope in the Casimir Rack Gear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of slope for the rack gear in the massless scalar field model is considered. It appears, that the slope of profile surfaces can essentially change the value of normal Casimir force, whereas average value of tangential force remains almost unchanged. At the same time we observe essential shift of maximum and minimum tangential force positions.

Yuliya Voronina; Petr Silaev

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

136

Suspended sediment and hydrodynamics above mildly sloped long wave ripples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Suspended sediment and hydrodynamics above mildly sloped long wave ripples Yeon S. Chang of suspended sediment and the associated hydrodynamics over mildly sloped long wave ripples on the inner shelf m. The vertical and temporal structures of the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) are consistent

Kirby, James T.

137

Appendix II. Calculation of Slope Factors for Naturally Occurring Radionuclides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix II. Calculation of Slope Factors for Naturally Occurring Radionuclides In developing calculates the slope factors for the naturally occurring radionuclides under consideration. The Radionuclide products with half-lives of less than 6 months). As explained below, naturally occurring radionuclides

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic pond ecosystems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ecosystem final Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean freshwater Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8. Forecasting Environmental Resilience of Arctic Freshwater Resources... and persistent ocean currents to feed energy ... Source: Wagner, Diane - Institute of Arctic Biology,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Abstract: A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic...

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - alesund arctic base Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at these locations. The Arctic, in particular, has seen concentrated aircraft- and ship-based... and Radiation The Arctic Study of Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR)...

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic climate change Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- 2 THE NEW ARCTIC Climate change being observed most dramatically... Spill Arctic weather or ice conditions can suddenly change - The inexperienced will certainly...

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic valley findings Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

measurements Summary: : The results of this research will find use in improving models of weather and climate in the Arctic... PROJECT SUMMARY Cloud properties across the Arctic...

145

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic climate system Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of ecosystems around... and Detect Arctic Climate and Ecosystem Changes 3) Improve Weather and Water Forecasts and Warnings 4... ice conditions. These changes in Arctic ......

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic springtail megaphorura Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Fish Resources of the Arctic Management Area... (Arctic FMP) and Amendment 29 to the Fishery Management Plan for Bering Sea Aleutian Islands King Source: NOAA Marine...

147

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic cooling silentium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;Abstract The Arctic is melting ...fast. 12;IMPACTS OF A WARMING ARCTIC... 's Greenhouse Effect Thesur face cools by radiating heat energyupward. ... Source: Zender, Charles -...

148

Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope October 18, 2013 - 11:52am Addthis Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska’s North Slope Quick Facts The National Petroleum Reserve was created by President Warren G, Harding in 1923 when the U.S. Navy was converting from coal to oil. The reserve spans 22 million acres across the western North Slope of Alaska-the largest single unit of public lands in the nation. The 800-mile-long trans-Alaska pipeline carries oil from Prudhoe Bay, on Alaska's North Slope, to Valdez, Alaska, the nearest ice-free port. More than 16 million barrels of oil have traveled through the pipeline since the first barrel flowed in 1977.

149

Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope October 18, 2013 - 11:52am Addthis Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska’s North Slope Quick Facts The National Petroleum Reserve was created by President Warren G, Harding in 1923 when the U.S. Navy was converting from coal to oil. The reserve spans 22 million acres across the western North Slope of Alaska-the largest single unit of public lands in the nation. The 800-mile-long trans-Alaska pipeline carries oil from Prudhoe Bay, on Alaska's North Slope, to Valdez, Alaska, the nearest ice-free port. More than 16 million barrels of oil have traveled through the pipeline since the first barrel flowed in 1977.

150

The influence of climate change and the timing of stratospheric warmings on Arctic ozone depletion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-dimensional model is presented to evaluate the influence of climatic change and increased carbon dioxide concentrations on ozone depletion in the Arctic region. Satellite data showing the time of stratospheric warmings during the winters of 1979-1992 is used in a series of idealized experiments where the timing of the warmings is varied by using different geopotential wave amplitudes. Results of the experiments indicate that for doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, an ozone hole in the Arctic is more likely to develop during years where late stratospheric warming has occurred after a relatively quiescent winter. The validity of this model is dependent on the future composition and temperature of the stratosphere. 43 refs., 21 figs.

Austin, J. [Meteorological Office, Bracknell (United Kingdom)] [Meteorological Office, Bracknell (United Kingdom); Butchart, N. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell (United Kingdom)

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

Luther, Douglas S.

152

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent...

153

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

154

Development and Demonstration of Mobile, Small Footprint Exploration and Development Well System for Arctic Unconventional Gas Resources (ARCGAS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, oil and gas field technology development in Alaska has focused on the high-cost, high-productivity oil and gas fields of the North Slope and Cook Inlet, with little or no attention given to Alaska's numerous shallow, unconventional gas reservoirs (carbonaceous shales, coalbeds, tight gas sands). This is because the high costs associated with utilizing the existing conventional oil and gas infrastructure, combined with the typical remoteness and environmental sensitivity of many of Alaska's unconventional gas plays, renders the cost of exploring for and producing unconventional gas resources prohibitive. To address these operational challenges and promote the development of Alaska's large unconventional gas resource base, new low-cost methods of obtaining critical reservoir parameters prior to drilling and completing more costly production wells are required. Encouragingly, low-cost coring, logging, and in-situ testing technologies have already been developed by the hard rock mining industry in Alaska and worldwide, where an extensive service industry employs highly portable diamond-drilling rigs. From 1998 to 2000, Teck Cominco Alaska employed some of these technologies at their Red Dog Mine site in an effort to quantify a large unconventional gas resource in the vicinity of the mine. However, some of the methods employed were not fully developed and required additional refinement in order to be used in a cost effective manner for rural arctic exploration. In an effort to offset the high cost of developing a new, low-cost exploration methods, the US Department of Energy, National Petroleum Technology Office (DOE-NPTO), partnered with the Nana Regional Corporation and Teck Cominco on a technology development program beginning in 2001. Under this DOE-NPTO project, a team comprised of the NANA Regional Corporation (NANA), Teck Cominco Alaska and Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) have been able to adapt drilling technology developed for the mineral industry for use in the exploration of unconventional gas in rural Alaska. These techniques have included the use of diamond drilling rigs that core small diameter (< 3.0-inch) holes coupled with wireline geophysical logging tools and pressure transient testing units capable of testing in these slimholes.

Paul Glavinovich

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ALASKA NORTH SLOPE OIL AND GAS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nome Region Energy Assessment Nome Region Energy Assessment DOE/NETL-2007/1284 Final Report March 2008 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government in partnership with the Alaska Energy Authority. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United

156

Expansion of Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska in Time for the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Expansion of Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska in Time for the Expansion of Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska in Time for the International Polar Year Zak, Bernard Sandia National Laboratories Ivey, Mark Sandia National Laboratories Zirzow, Jeffrey Sandia National Laboratories Brower, Walter UIC Science Division ARM/NSA Ivanoff, James NSA Whiteman, Doug NSA/AAO Sassen, Kenneth University of Alaska Fairbanks Truffer-Moudra, Dana University of Alaska Fairbanks Category: Infrastructure & Outreach The International Polar Year (IPY; 2007-2008) will stimulate research in both polar regions, primarily focusing on the rapid climate-related changes occurring at high latitudes. In part in preparation for the IPY, facilities at the NSA ACRF are undergoing expansion. In addition, with funding through NOAA, Phase 1 of the planned $60M Barrow Global Climate Change Research

157

Two- and three-dimensional numerical models of internal tide generation at a continental slope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some numerical models of internal tide generation at a continental slope are two-dimensional where the along-slope variation is neglected. The energy flux carried by internal tides computed using such two-dimensional models is often underestimated, compared with three-dimensional simulations of the same region, by a factor of 10 or more. The reason for this difference is investigated using both numerical and analytical models. It is shown that in numerical models, it is not the lack of the along-shelf forcing but the use of sponge or radiating conditions at the cross-shelf boundaries that leads to the severe underestimate of the offshore flux. To obtain realistic estimates of energy flux a three-dimensional model with an along-shelf scale of at least 5 internal tide wave lengths at the depth of maximum forcing is necessary.

K. Katsumata

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Global warming triggers the loss of a key Arctic refugium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research articles 1001 69 60 Global warming triggers the loss of a key Arctic...change that is being driven by global warming. In stark contrast to the amplified...planet's last Arctic refugia from global warming, largely because of the moderating...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate Production Technologies Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate Production Technologies May 17, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A fully instrumented well that will test innovative technologies for producing methane gas from hydrate deposits has been safely installed on the North Slope of Alaska. As a result, the "Iġnik Sikumi" (Iñupiaq for "fire in the ice") gas hydrate field trial well will be available for field experiments as early as winter 2011-12. The well, the result of a partnership between ConocoPhillips and the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory, will test a technology that involves injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) into sandstone

160

Hadronic cross sections, elastic slope and physical bounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An almost model-independent parametrization for the ratio of the total hadronic cross section to elastic slope is discussed. Its applicability in studies of asymptotia and analyses of extensive air shower in cosmic-ray physics is also outlined.

Fagundes, D. A.; Menon, M. J. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas SP (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fjord sediments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediments Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic fjord sediments...

162

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean sediments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediments Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic ocean sediments...

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic gas pipeline Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pipeline Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic gas pipeline...

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fjord sediment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic fjord sediment...

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean sediment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic ocean sediment...

166

Pt/Carbon Catalyst Layer Microstructural Effects on Measured and Predicted Tafel Slopes for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A plot of log(i) vs ? (Tafel plot) allows io to be determined from the intercept, while the Tafel slope (d?/dlog(i), eq 3) gives the ? value. ... The situation when concentration overpotentials (diffusion) within pores are present was studied in depth by Perry et al.,(16) showing that two distinct Tafel regions can then be obtained. ... Koutecky?Levich plots(21) (log(I IL)/(IL ? I) vs E, where IL is the limiting current) were used to correct for mass transport limitations and more accurately obtain the Tafel slope. ...

Dustin W. Banham; Jeff N. Soderberg; Viola I. Birss

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

167

Net radiation balance for two forested slopes on opposite sides of a valley  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Measurements of the net radiation balance of two forested sites on the opposite slopes of a valley in south-western Germany, made over 3 ... -slope than on the NE-slope. For long-wave radiation only small diff...

T. Holst; J. Rost; H. Mayer

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

GIS-based kinematic slope instability and slope mass rating (SMR) maps: application to a railway route in Sivas (Turkey)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper discusses the use of kinematic stability and slope mass rating (SMR) maps in GIS based on field studies recording the relationships ... it is recommended that the construction of the maps by kinematic s...

I??k Yilmaz; Marian Marschalko

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) will raise and lower a heavily instrumented tethered balloon system at regular intervals in the lower 2 kilometers of the atmosphere at Oliktok Point. Data obtained during the ALTOS campaign will provide a statistically significant set of observed in situ cloud properties for validating retrieval algorithms and help scientists reduce the uncertainty in the radiative forcing and heating rates on hourly time scales. The data will also help researchers gain a better understanding of the driving processes that control climate changes and determine the state of the Arctic climate system. Collaborators Science Team: The Pennsylvania State University, Stratton

170

Area utilization efficiency of a sloping heliostat system for solar concentration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Area utilization efficiency (AUE) is formulated for a sloping heliostat system facing any direction. The effects of slope shading, incidence factor, sun shading, and tower blocking by...

Wei, Ling Y

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Slope processes and strength of material in silt rich ravines in Sterdalen, Sweden.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Slope processes are important to understand if we are to protect fragile environments. Every year slope development in weak soils put nearby infrastructure in (more)

Westrin, Pontus

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

New Ulm field: an example of Cretaceous shelf-slope instability in east Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Ulm field in Austin County, Texas, is an example of the structural and stratigraphic complexity above the Cretaceous Edwards shelf margin of east Texas. Deep wells and improved seismic data provide documentation of structural patterns and deepwater facies not previously considered in the Gulf Coast reservoir play modeling. Study of the data implies the Late Cretaceous to Eocene section was deposited along a shelf-slope break. Late Cretaceous, pre-Midway sedimentation was affected by structurally induced slope instability, and consequent gravity faulting and slumping resulted in an irregular sea-floor surface. Paleocene Midway sands were carried onto this surface by storm-generated density currents where the uneven topography caused deposition in constructional channels. Continued deposition of the fluvio-deltaic Wilcox on this surface caused faulting and folding by differential compaction. The folds are minor and the faults small and steep, not like the typical large growth faults of the Gulf Coast. Upper Wilcox sediments were progressively less disturbed as the region stabilized. New Ulm field production includes gas from the Midway Formation and oil and gas from the Wilcox Group. Midway reservoirs are stratigraphic, consisting of fluvio-deltaic sandstones within faulted anticlines. This study adds evidence to data describing shelf-slope geology along the Edwards margin. The setting can be a new type of hydrocarbon play in the Gulf Coast.

Pinero, E.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

North Slope Borough Power & Light | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slope Borough Power & Light Slope Borough Power & Light Jump to: navigation, search Name North Slope Borough Power & Light Place Alaska Utility Id 26616 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Aged or Handicapped(seniors over 60) Residential Aged or Handicapped(seniors over 60) for Nuiqsut only Residential Commercial(Including Heat Trace) Commercial Commercial(Including Heat Trace) for Nuiqsut Commercial Residential Residential Residential (For Nuiqsut) Residential

174

Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo $\\alpha$. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snow melt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freeze up. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at $\\alpha \\gtrsim $ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the $\\alpha$ distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained pro...

Agarwal, S; Wettlaufer, J S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Sensitivity of soil loss equations to slope classifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watershed 0. 42 0 0. 42 Miles Figure 2. Contour map of Big Branch watershed in central Arkansas Digitized Contour Lines CREATETIN TINLATTICE DEM Figure 3. Procedures involved in creating DEM 15 Grid, ceU and cell size A grid is an ARC/INFO data.... 2 % ? 4 % 4%- 5% [ffii 5 % ? 6 % ~ 6%- 8% 111 s % - 10 % ~ Wehvehed 0. 43 0 0. 43 Miles N Figure 17. Slope cover of Big Branch watershed in central Arkansas based on slope scheme C 48 After the overlay operation, the attribute data...

Chen, Hong-Wen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Nighttime Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Using AVHRR Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Using AVHRR Data D. A. Spangenberg, D. R. Doelling, and V. Chakrapani Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Hampton, Virginia T. Uttal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado Introduction Clouds play an important role in the Arctic energy budget. The magnitude and significance of the radiative impact of polar clouds, however, are not well known. Polar nocturnal clouds are often warmer or at the same temperature as the background snow surface, complicating cloud detection. Also, these clouds tend to be thin, with lower emittances than clouds occurring during the summer. Using only the infrared (IR) channels of satellite data to characterize cloud amount and distribution in the Arctic is

177

Simulating Arctic Climate Warmth and Icefield Retreat in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Devon, and Meighen ice caps in the Canadian Arctic, and possibly in Camp Century (northwest Greenland- atures markedly warmer than those in the 20th century and the late Holocene, and it also featured

Ingólfsson, ?lafur

178

A New Look at the Summer Arctic Frontal Zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A notable characteristic of the summertime Arctic is the existence of a narrow band of strong horizontal temperature gradients spanning the coastlines of Siberia, Alaska, and western Canada that extends through a considerable depth of the ...

Alex Crawford; Mark Serreze

179

Intensification of Geostrophic Currents in the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous sampling of upper-ocean hydrographic data in the Canada Basin from various sources spanning from 2003 through 2011 provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe changes occurring in a major feature of the Arctic Ocean. In a 112-km-...

Miles G. McPhee

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Mitigation Possibilities in the Energy Sector An Arctic Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are vast utilisable wind energy resources in the Arctic frequently located in ... example in the Mountain areas in Sweden and Norway, and in the Northwest of Russia. Large wind resources are also found in t...

Maria Pettersson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

182

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

183

Placement of Traffic Barriers on Roadside and Median Slopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the findings obtained from crash tests performed on flat terrain. For barriers placed on roadside and median slopes, vehicle impact height varies depending on the trajectory of the vehicle along the ditch section and lateral offset of the barrier. Thus...

Ferdous, Md Rubiat

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

The joint statistics of mildly non-linear cosmological densities and slopes in count-in-cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of count-in-cells statistics, the joint probability distribution of the density in two concentric spherical shells is predicted from first first principle for sigmas of the order of one. The agreement with simulation is found to be excellent. This statistics allows us to deduce the conditional one dimensional probability distribution function of the slope within under dense (resp. overdense) regions, or of the density for positive or negative slopes. The former conditional distribution is likely to be more robust in constraining the cosmological parameters as the underlying dynamics is less evolved in such regions. A fiducial dark energy experiment is implemented on such counts derived from Lambda-CDM simulations.

Bernardeau, Francis; Pichon, Christophe

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic alaska r4d Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: arctic alaska r4d Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 revised 122010 Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Summary: . 1966. The recreational potential of the Arctic...

186

UPb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U­Pb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia-0349 Oslo, Norway Introduction The High Arctic of Scandinavia and Russia consists of a collage

Svensen, Henrik

187

An analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study used several model-based tools to analyse the dynamics of the Arctic Basin between 1997 and 2006 as a linked system of land-ocean-atmosphere C exchange. The analysis estimates that terrestrial areas of the Arctic ...

McGUIRE, A. D.

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic freshwater sediments Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;2 Holocene sedimentation in the deep Arctic Ocean... prominently in the overall sediment budget of the Arctic Ocean. While a detailed analysis of the processes... with these...

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic tundra vegetation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in arctic tundra reduced by long-term nutrient fertilization Michelle C. Mack1... in soil compared with temperate and tropical ecosystems14 . In arctic tundra, as much as 90%...

190

Mechanisms of Decadal Arctic Climate Variability in the Community Climate System Model, Version 2 (CCSM2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain natural climate variability in the Arctic. These include processes related to the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation/Arctic Oscillation (NAO/AO), anticyclonic/cyclonic regimes, changes in ...

Hugues Goosse; Marika M. Holland

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic mars analog Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

seal Pup Arctic Barrow Beck et al confirmed... 1 Ringed seal CBD Arctic Deadhorse ARCO; Rugh, D.:NMML; Confirmed-low Fdead pos. shot towed see Source: NOAA Marine Fisheries Review...

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic food web Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

food web Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic food web Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Lesson Plan Arctic Biome Summary: in the...

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic petroleum operators Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conferences Covered Petroleum Abstracts, HH 101 Summary: PETROLEUM PRODUCTION & EXPLORATION ASSOCIATION LTD. (APPEA) ARCTIC AND MARINE OILSPILL PROGRAM (AMOP... GEOLOGICAL...

194

West Slope, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slope, Oregon: Energy Resources Slope, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.496985°, -122.76938° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.496985,"lon":-122.76938,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

195

Heat Transfer in Projecting and Sloped Fenestration Products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heat Transfer in Projecting and Sloped Fenestration Products Heat Transfer in Projecting and Sloped Fenestration Products Speaker(s): Dragan Charlie Curcija Date: May 26, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The heat transfer performance of fenestration products is routinely determined using computer simulations combined with physical testing. Initial efforts to develop simulation and test procedures for the fenestration products in the 1980's focused on simple planar windows since they are the dominant share of the market. However, once these procedures were developed (with resulting ISO standards and national rating and labeling requirements), manufacturers of more physically complex fenestration products (skylights, green house windows, tubular skylights) demanded procedures for simulating and testing their products. Dr Curcija

196

Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situ visible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

Yuan Sheng; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Celestre, Rich; Church, Matthew; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Greg; Warwick, Tony [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Goldberg, Kenneth A. [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines for neglected northern Siberia (Russia), Arctic Alaska (USA), and the Canadian Arctic, extends over seven coastal Large.e., 770,000, 89,000, and 94,000 t by Russia, USA, and Canada, respectively for the same time period

Pauly, Daniel

198

Estimating sea ice area flux across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago using enhanced AMSR-E  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This produced a net loss of sea ice area of about 122 ? 103 km2 or roughly 174 km3 a?1 which is presumedEstimating sea ice area flux across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago using enhanced AMSR-E T. Agnew is used to estimate daily sea ice area fluxes between the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and the Arctic Ocean

Long, David G.

199

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to enhance the water resource decision-making process with respect to oil and gas exploration/production activities on Alaskas North Slope. To this end, a web-based software tool was developed to allow stakeholders to assemble, evaluate, and communicate relevant information between and amongst themselves. The software, termed North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS), is a visually-referenced database that provides a platform for running complex natural system, planning, and optimization models. The NSDSS design was based upon community input garnered during a series of stakeholder workshops, and the end product software is freely available to all stakeholders via the project website. The tool now resides on servers hosted by the UAF Water and Environmental Research Center, and will remain accessible and free-of-charge for all interested stakeholders. The development of the tool fostered new advances in the area of data evaluation and decision support technologies, and the finished product is envisioned to enhance water resource planning activities on Alaskas North Slope.

Schnabel, William; Brumbelow, Kelly

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we added numerical solution along streamline subroutines to our streamline compositional simulator. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We studied the wettability of the reservoir oil and formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The effect of new relative permeability formulations on a five-spot pattern WAG recovery was evaluated. Effect of horizontal wells on pattern sweep has been initiated. A model quarter five-spot experiment is being designed. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, evaluation of complex well-architecture and design of model quarter five-spot experiment.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we have developed streamline generation and convection subroutines for miscible gas injection. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The new relative permeability formulations are being incorporated into the simulator. Wettabilities and relative permeabilities are being measured. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, relative permeability studies with cores, incorporation of complex well-architecture.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Monday September 19, 2011 10:00 AM Chem. Sci. 215  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arctic marine microorganisms to biodegrade Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude oil in the presence or absenceD Candidate Department of Biology and Wildlife, University of Alaska Fairbanks Biodegradation of Dispersed Oil in Arctic Marine Environments As oil exploration expands in offshore Arctic regions, it is imperative

204

Stability assessment of a slope under a transformer substation using numerical modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of the deformation mechanism and stability assessment of a slope in Yunnan Province, China. Field investigations indicated that the deformation of the slope was caused by the co...

H. J. Li; F. C. Dai; W. C. Li; L. Xu; H. Min

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Natural gas hydrates on the continental slope off Pakistan: constraints from seismic techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2000 research-article Articles Natural gas hydrates on the continental slope...J. Int. (2000) 140, 295310 Natural gas hydrates on the continental slope...adequate gas supplies for hydrate Natural gas hydrates (clathrates) are a crystalline......

Ingo Grevemeyer; Andreas Rosenberger; Heinrich Villinger

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP 2004.03.09 - 2004.04.09 Lead Scientist : Ed Westwater Data Availability http://www.etl.noaa.gov/programs/2004/wviop/data will contain quicklooks of all of the data. For data sets, see below. Summary During the IOP, the Ground-based Scanning Radiometer of NOAA/ETL, and the ARM MicroWave Radiometer and Microwave Profiler, yielded excellent data over a range of conditions. In all, angular-scanned and calibrated radiometric data from 22.345 to 380 GHz were taken. The Precipitable Water Vapor varied about an order of magnitude from 1 to 10 mm, and surface temperatures varied from about -10 to -40 deg. Celcius. Vaisala RS90

207

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: An Arctic Springtime  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Arctic Springtime Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layer observed during An Arctic Springtime Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layer observed during SHEBA Zuidema, Paquita RSMAS/MPO University of Miami Han, Yong NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Intrieri, Janet NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Key, Jeffrey Boston University Lawson, Paul SPEC Inc. Matrosov, Sergey NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Shupe, Matthew CIRES/NOAA/ETL Uttal, Taneil NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory The microphysical characteristics, radiative impact, and lifecycle of a long-lived, surface-based mixed-layer, mixed-phase cloud with an average temperature of approximately -20 C are presented and discussed. The cloud was observed during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic experiment from May 1 through May 10, 1998. Vertically-resolved properties of the liquid

208

U-shaped slope gully systems and sediment waves on the passive margin of Gabon (West Africa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract 3-D seismic reflection data has enabled the documentation of a system of remarkable modern and buried u-shaped gullies which intimately co-exist with upslope migrating sediment waves along 80km of the Gabon continental slope. The modern gullies occur on a silty mud-dominated slope in water depths of 1501500m on an ~50km wide slope with a gradient of 4.5 decreasing to 1.5. The gully sets persist laterally for distances of at least 40km and extend downslope for distances of up to 60km. The gullies are u-shaped in cross-section, with a relief of 530m, and widths of 50400m. Intriguingly, the gullies become narrower and shallower with distance down the slope, as well as increasing in number down slope. The majority of the gullies appear to be erosional but some appear to have resulted from simultaneous aggradation along inter-gully ridges and non-deposition along the adjacent gully floor. Hence, these gullies are interpreted to have formed mainly in response to spatially-variable deposition, rather than erosion. Upslope migrating sediment waves occur in close proximity to the gullies. Gullies cross fields of sediment waves and waves are observed to migrate up-slope locally within both the erosional and aggradational gullies. Evidence is lacking for any slumping or headward erosion in the headwall region of the gullies, which discounts formation by very local sediment gravity flows originating from shelf-edge collapse, as has been observed in other v-shaped gully systems. Based on our new data, and supported by theoretical studies on the mechanics of turbidity currents, we propose that the gullies and related sediment waves were formed by diffuse, sheet-like, mud-rich turbidity currents that presumably originated on the shelf. Instabilities in the turbidity currents generated a wave-shaped perturbation in a cross-flow direction leading to regularly spaced regions of faster and slower flow. For the non-aggradational and erosional gullies it is inferred that gully axes experienced flow velocities that mainly exceeded the settling velocity of the sediment in suspension, and thus no deposition occurred. In contrast, the aggradational gullies indicate lower flow velocities with sediment deposition both within the gully axes and on the gully flanks. Mixed mode gullies are also found which indicate that successive flows can experience variations in flow properties leading to interspersed erosional and depositional events.

Lidia Lonergan; Nur Huda Jamin; Christopher A.-L. Jackson; Howard D. Johnson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Namur, Belgium -weathering deteriorating slope stability future -Robert Hack 1 WEATHERING DETERIORATING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Namur, Belgium - weathering deteriorating slope stability future - Robert Hack 1 WEATHERING DETERIORATING AND SLOPE STABILITY CLASSIFICATION FOR THE FUTURE Namur, Belgium, 12 June 2008 Robert Hack Geo #12;Namur, Belgium - weathering deteriorating slope stability future - Robert Hack 2 Jan van Goyen

Hack, Robert

210

The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

Verlinde, J

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaskan north slope Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences 7 U.S. Law of the Sea Mapping James V. Gardner, Larry A. Mayer and Andrew Armstrong Summary: , portions of the U.S. Atlantic margin and an area of the Alaskan Arctic...

212

Uranium - thorium series study on Yucatan slope cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

substance and a corresponding enrichment in another. Soils, on being eroded, 14 adhorb dissolved uranium from runoff and ocean water and show a progressive change in U "/U activity ratios from 0. 9 in soils to 0, 95 in river muds to 1. 15 in recently... URANIUM ? THORIUM SERIES STUDY ON YUCATAN SLOPE CORES A Thesis by Mary Elizabeth Exner Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1972...

Exner, Mary Elizabeth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

A Review of Sloped Solar Updraft Power Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Solar Updraft Power Plant (SUPP) concept was successfully proven in the last few decades through many experimental and analytical approaches. However, the high investment cost compared to the plant efficiency and the limited height of the chimney due to the technological constraints are considered the main disadvantages of the SUPP. In order to overcome these problems, many novel concepts were proposed; One being the Sloped Solar Updraft Power Plant (SSUPP). This paper provides a comprehensive overall review for all SSUPP researches up-to-date including the principle with a description of the plant, physical process, theoretical and experimental studies.

Shadi Kalash; Wajih Naimeh; Salman Ajib

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Updown numbers and the initial monomials of the slope variety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topeka, KS 66621, USA jennifer.wagner1@washburn.edu Submitted: May 28, 2009; Accepted: Jun 28, 2009; Published: Jul 9, 2009 Mathematics Subject Classifications: 05A15, 14N20 Abstract Let In be the ideal of all algebraic relations on the slopes.... For integers m ? n, we put [n] = {1,2,...,n} and [m,n] = {m,m + 1,...,n}. The set of all permutations of an integer set P will be denoted SP, and the nth symmetric group is Sn (= S[n]). We will write each permutation w ? SP as a word with n = |P| digits, w = w1...

Martin, Jeremy L.; Wagner, Jennifer D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

TDX North Slope Generating Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Co Generating Co Jump to: navigation, search Name TDX North Slope Generating Co Place Alaska Utility Id 19277 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Commercial: $0.1310/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for TDX North Slope Generating Co (Alaska). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

216

Scaling StudieS in arctic SyStem Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science (jgrebmei@umces.edu) *Lawrence Hamilton, university of new hampshire (lawrence during the april 2006 u.S. fish and Wildlife Service (uSfWS) Walrus Survey (photo by uSfWS/brad benter in 1984 by the arctic research and Policy act (Public law 98-373, July 31, 1984; amended as Public law 101

Wagner, Diane

217

Characteristics of Arctic Sea-Ice Thickness Variability in GCMs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Skillful Arctic sea ice forecasts may be possible for lead times of months or even years owing to the persistence of thickness anomalies. In this study sea ice thickness variability is characterized in fully coupled GCMs and sea iceocean-only ...

Edward Blanchard-Wrigglesworth; Cecilia M. Bitz

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

Hubbard, Susan

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Good morning, everyone. I'm Martin Jeffries, Principal Editor of the Arctic Report Card and a science advisor to the U.S. Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the University of Virginia, and Dr. Don Perovich of Dartmouth College. They will talk about vegetation and sea to independent peer-review organized by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) of the Arctic Council. Key highlights from the essays are presented on the front page of the Web site, where you'll also

220

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Barrow Gas Fields - North Slope Borough, Alaska  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Phase 2- Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Last Reviewed 04/06/2010 Phase 2- Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Last Reviewed 04/06/2010 DE-FC26-06NT42962 Goal The goal of this project is to evaluate, design, drill, log, core and production test methane hydrate resources in the Barrow Gas Fields near Barrow, Alaska to determine its impact on future free gas production and its viability as an energy source. Photo of Barrow welcome sign Performers North Slope Borough, Barrow, Alaska 99723 Petrotechnical Resources Alaska (PRA), Fairbanks, AK 99775 University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 Background Phase 1 of the Barrow Gas Fields Hydrate Study provided very strong evidence for the existence of hydrates updip of the East Barrow and Walakpa Gas Fields. Full-field history matched reservoir modeling supported the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DOE/EA-1193: Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Artic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site (February 1997)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the ARM/CART program is to collect and analyze atmospheric data for the development and validation of global climate change models. The program involves construction of several small facilities and operation of sensing equipment. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultura.l resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Separate studies (summarized in the EA) were also conducted to ensure that the operation of the facilities would not

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctas arctic research Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and climate. The spring portion of ARCTAS... , and radiative heating in the Arctic. The NASA Langley ... Source: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Environmental Chemistry Division,...

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic microbial ecosystems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

microbial ecosystems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Microbial ecosystem responses to rapid climate change in the Arctic Summary: COMMENTARY Microbial ecosystem responses to rapid...

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic offshore oil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage assessment. As the Arctic Ocean becomes seasonally passable and tourism, oil and gas... forecasting of ocean storms which have serious potential to threaten marine ......

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic russia sedimentology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

russia sedimentology Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic russia sedimentology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CURRICULUM VITAE Julie...

226

Biodiversity and phylogeography of Arctic marine fauna: insights from molecular tools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Incorporation of molecular tools into biodiversity and biogeographic studies can help to address ... among extant populations. Novel discoveries in Arctic marine biodiversity and biogeography are increasing due t...

Sarah Mincks Hardy; Christina M. Carr; Michael Hardman; Dirk Steinke

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean archaeal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Switchyard. This is Ellesmere Island, here, next to Summary: to better understand the ocean currents that are moving in the Arctic Ocean towards the North Atlantic Ocean......

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic pilot project Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the world." Mike Steele: "The Switchyard Project is designed... to better understand the ocean currents that are moving in the Arctic Ocean towards the North ... Source:...

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic cloudy boundary Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Wisconsin at Madison Collection: Geosciences 11 Daytime Arctic Cloud Detection Based on Multi-Angle Satellite Data With Case Studies Summary: near cloud...

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic oil spill Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have to be prevented in advance ." (FI) "Cruise ships are so large... Spill Arctic weather or ice conditions can suddenly change - The inexperienced will certainly...

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic stratospheric expedition Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Geosciences 2 STRATOSPHERIC OZONE DEPLETION: A REVIEW OF CONCEPTS AND HISTORY Summary: satellite observations of high-altitude clouds in the Antarctic and Arctic stratospheres....

233

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine mammals Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K. FURGIONE Summary: resources. Arctic populations rely heavily on aviation and marine weather for safe transportation and access... outlets from internet to high frequency...

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic research station Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Ecology 3 PROJECT SUMMARY Cloud properties across the Arctic Basin from surface and satellite measurements Summary: . This project will integrate and synthesize data from...

235

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic national wildlife Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;NOAA Arctic Tiger Team Laura K. Furgione Deputy Assistant Administrator National Weather Service... goals and establishes, enhances, or leverages partnerships with other...

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic boundary layer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;NOAA Arctic Tiger Team Laura K. Furgione Deputy Assistant Administrator National Weather ... Source: Kuligowski, Bob - Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division,...

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic vegetation damage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;NOAA Arctic Tiger Team Laura K. Furgione Deputy Assistant Administrator National Weather ... Source: Kuligowski, Bob - Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division,...

238

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic sponge haliclona Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: arctic sponge haliclona Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Summary: ). The sponges Clathrina canariensis,...

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ecosystems dominated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 4 Microbial ecosystem responses to rapid climate change in the Arctic Summary: COMMENTARY Microbial...

240

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic populations affects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

prohibit, commercial fishing for Arctic fish and to ensure subsistence fishing is not affected... and uncertain population dynamics and abundance. Under the ... Source: NOAA Marine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic east siberia Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sources in East Asia and Europe, with added... to Arctic sulfate from the Norilsk industrial site in ... Source: Jimenez, Jose-Luis - Department of Chemistry and...

242

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic levels sources Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... rule that implements the Fishery Management Plan for Fish Resources of the Arctic ... Source: NOAA Marine Fisheries...

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fox pups Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Mortality of arctic ... Source: Hayssen, Virginia - Department of Biological Sciences, Smith College Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Leashing the AlphaWolves:...

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic troposphere northeast Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the arctic front then produced an incipient surface low. Next a jet streak in the middle troposphere crossed... January-February 1991 Published by Sigma Xi ... Source:...

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic mammalian carnivore Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: locality Arctic Ocean, Si- Ur.w polaris Shaw, 1792:7. Renaming of marinus Pallas. Thallassnrctos... (Manning, 1971). Presumably the cline is similar across the Soviet...

246

Arctic daily temperature and precipitation extremes: Observed and simulated physical behavior.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ARCTIC DAILY TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: OBSERVED AND SIMULATED PHYSICAL BEHAVIOR Justin M. Glisan Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa (more)

Glisan, Justin Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Migration and oil industry employment of north slope Alaska natives. Technical report (Final)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study has two purposes: To find out why people migrate to and within the North Slope; To find out if working for the oil industry at Prudhoe Bay or Kuparuk makes North Slope Natives more likely to migrate. This is the first study of Alaska Native migration based on interviews of Alaska North Slope Native migrants, of non-Native migrants, and of Alaska North Slope Natives who are oil industry employees. It has two major chapters: one on household migration and the other on oil industry employment. The report is based on interviews conducted in March 1992.

Marshall, D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A note on the stability theory of buoyancy-driven ocean currents over a sloping bottom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a previous paper, a new model was derived describing the baroclinic dynamics of buoyancy-driven ocean currents over a sloping bottom. In particular,...

Richard H. Karsten; Gordon E. Swaters

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Genome Sequence of the Arctic Methanotroph Methylobacter tundripaludum SV96  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methylobacter tundripaludum SV96(T) (ATCC BAA-1195) is a psychrotolerant aerobic methane-oxidizing gammaproteobacterium (Methylococcales, Methylococcaceae) living in High Arctic wetland soil. The strain was isolated from soil harvested in July 1996 close to the settlement Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway (78 degrees 56'N, 11 degrees 53'E), and described as a novel species in 2006. The genome includes pmo and pxm operons encoding copper membrane monooxygenases (Cu-MMOs), genes required for nitrogen fixation, and the nirS gene implicated in dissimilatory nitrite reduction to NO but no identifiable inventory for further processing of nitrogen oxides. These genome data provide the basis to investigate M. tundripaludum SV96, identified as a major player in the biogeochemistry of Arctic environments.

Svenning, Mette M [University of Tromso, Norway; Hestnes, Anne Grethe [University of Tromso, Norway; Wartiainen, Ingvild [University of Tromso, Norway; Stein, Lisa Y. [University of Alberta, Edmondton, Canada; Klotz, Martin G [University of Louisville, Louisville; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G. [University of Washington, Seattle; Spang, Anja [University of Vienna, Austria; Bringel, Francoise O. [University of Strasbourg; Vuilleumier, Stephane [University of Strasbourg; Lajus, Aurelie [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Medigue, Claudine [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Arctic sea ice modeling with the material-point method.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic sea ice plays an important role in global climate by reflecting solar radiation and insulating the ocean from the atmosphere. Due to feedback effects, the Arctic sea ice cover is changing rapidly. To accurately model this change, high-resolution calculations must incorporate: (1) annual cycle of growth and melt due to radiative forcing; (2) mechanical deformation due to surface winds, ocean currents and Coriolis forces; and (3) localized effects of leads and ridges. We have demonstrated a new mathematical algorithm for solving the sea ice governing equations using the material-point method with an elastic-decohesive constitutive model. An initial comparison with the LANL CICE code indicates that the ice edge is sharper using Materials-Point Method (MPM), but that many of the overall features are similar.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Framing and Identity in the Gwichin Campaign against Oil Development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1995). Time to permit oil drilling in the Arctic Refuge (campaignagainstoildrillingintheArcticNationalcase. Althoughoilexplorationanddrillinghas,tothis

Graybeal, Pam M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Sloped-collector solar updraft tower power plant performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A mathematical model describing fluid flow, heat transfer and pressure distribution inside a sloped-collector solar updraft tower power plant (SCSUTPP) is presented by assuming a steady compressible flow. Compared to conventional horizontal-collector solar updraft tower power plants (HCSUTPPs), the performance of SCSUTPP is comprehensively studied based on the mathematical model. The power outputs for SCSUTPP and HCSUTPP using the essential expression of driving force are respectively compared with those using the driving force expressions containing no integral, as proposed in literature. Results show that the expression containing no integral is accurate for HCSUCPP based on a compressible fluid model. The expression containing no integral is not accurate for predicting the driving force of SCSUTPP based on an incompressible fluid model when no variation of the atmospheric density with heights and no variation of difference of the atmospheric density and the density of the current inside the short SUT with heights are assumed. The gravitational effect has to be considered for predicting the SCSUTPP performance. The results show that the pressure potential and the power production of an SCSUCPP with a collector of 848m height and a vertical SUT 123m high lies between those for two \\{HCSUCPPs\\} respectively with vertical \\{SUTs\\} 547m and 971m high. This work lays a good foundation for accurate predication of potential power produced from SCSUTPP.

Xinping Zhou; Shuo Yuan; Marco Aurlio dos Santos Bernardes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Changes in Food Web Structure Alter Trends of Mercury Uptake at Two Seabird Colonies in the Canadian Arctic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Changes in Food Web Structure Alter Trends of Mercury Uptake at Two Seabird Colonies in the Canadian Arctic ... Publication Date (Web): November 4, 2014 ... Arctic ecosystems are changing in response to climate change and some Arctic food web structures are being affected in ways which may have potential consequences for the biomagnification of environmental contaminants. ...

Birgit M. Braune; Anthony J. Gaston; Keith A. Hobson; H. Grant Gilchrist; Mark L. Mallory

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

254

Draft Genome Sequence of Moritella dasanensis Strain ArB 0140, a Psychrophilic Bacterium Isolated from the Arctic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...isolated from the Arctic Ocean, exhibited ice-pitting...organism in the Arctic Ocean. Nucleotide sequence...described in this paper is the first version, AKXQ01000000...Delcher AL , KA Bratke, EC Powers, and SL Salzberg. 2007...isolated from the Arctic ocean. Int. J. Syst. Evol...

Sung Gu Lee; Hye Yeon Koh; Jun Hyuck Lee; Sung-Ho Kang; Hak Jun Kim

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

On the use of the Boussinesq equation for interpreting recession hydrographs from sloping aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the use of the Boussinesq equation for interpreting recession hydrographs from sloping aquifers solutions to the one-dimensional Boussinesq equation for unconfined flow in a homogeneous and horizontal compare analytical solutions to the linearized one-dimensional Boussinesq equation for a sloping aquifer

Tullos, Desiree

256

Overview of NCHRP Design Guideline for EPS-Block Geofoam in Slope Stabilization and Repair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Overview of NCHRP Design Guideline for EPS-Block Geofoam in Slope Stabilization and Repair David in Construction Applications (EPS 2011 Norway) June 6-8, 2011 #12;2 ABSTRACT This paper presents an overview of the design guideline for the use of expanded polystyrene (EPS)-block geofoam for slope stabilization

Horvath, John S.

257

BACK-ANALYSES OF LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURES Nejan Huvaj-Sarihan Timothy D. Stark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BACK-ANALYSES OF LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURES Nejan Huvaj-Sarihan Timothy D. Stark University strength of MSW. The back-analysis of failed waste slopes in the Gnojna Grora landfill in Poland, Istanbul Landfill in Turkey, Hiriya Landfill in Israel, and Payatas Landfill in Philippines are presented

258

Two and three dimensional analysis of a slope failure in a lignite mine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With about 9.3 billion tons of reserve, lignite is a major source for energy production in Turkey. The Afsin-Elbistan lignite basin, containing 47% of the overall lignite reserve in Turkey, lies in the Afsin and Elbistan districts as a part of Kahramanmaras. ... Keywords: Lignite mine, Numerical modeling, Slope failures, Slope stability analysis

Levent Tutluoglu; Ibrahim Ferid Ge; Celal Karpuz

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Error reduction in slope stability assessment Jean-Alain Fleurisson and Roger Cojean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tech, Centre de Géosciences, Fontainebleau, France 1. Introduction Slopes in quarries and open pit mines on every continent or failure in open pit mines and quarries) in which safety and profitability to environmental issues, long-term stability of slopes in quarries, open pit mines and mainly embankments must

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

260

Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical Jean-Alain FLEURISSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stability, slope design, engineering geology, fault, open pit mines, SOMAIR uranium mine, OCP phosphate mine1 GHGT-9 Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical approach all natural geological and geomechanical features and the geological structures as well

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Arctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec-edented low extents in the summer of 2007,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling, ice extent remains far below normal. Understanding Sea Ice Loss Key factors behind this recordArctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec- edented low extents in the summer of 2007, raising concern that the Arctic may be on the verge of a fundamental transition toward a seasonal ice cover

Clements, Craig

262

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database. INTRODUCTION................................................................................. 33 2. HISTORY

263

The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the continued ice melt [Polyakov et al., 2005], and recent work shows that heat from the Atlantic layer can91 The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies Uma S. Bhatt,1 and Robert A. Tomas3 The impact of reduced Arctic summer sea ice on the atmosphere is investigated by forcing

Bhatt, Uma

264

A continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the atmosphere and ocean. In particular, sea ice affects the polar climate by insulating the ocean fromA continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1 and Daniel L. Feltham1 the Northern Hemisphere summer, absorbed solar radiation melts snow and the upper surface of Arctic sea ice

Feltham, Daniel

265

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David are estimated based on results from six different coupled ice- ocean models. The components of the kinetic of potential and kinetic energies. The models produce arctic boundary undercurrents controlled by the non

Zhang, Jinlun

266

A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice. In the summer the upper layers of sea ice and snow melts producing meltwater that accumulatesA model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface

Feltham, Daniel

267

Scale Dependence and Localization of the Deformation of Arctic Sea Ice David Marsan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and internal stress gradients, producing spatial gradients in the ice velocity that we refer to as deformationScale Dependence and Localization of the Deformation of Arctic Sea Ice David Marsan Laboratoire de of Arctic sea ice over a 3-day time period is performed for scales of 10 to 1000 km. The deformation field

268

Multiple equilibria and abrupt transitions in Arctic summer sea ice extent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, version 3 (CCSM3). The resulting nonlinear equations produce abrupt sea ice transitions resembling thoseMultiple equilibria and abrupt transitions in Arctic summer sea ice extent William J. Merryfield monograph "Arctic Sea Ice Decline", 19 October 2007 Corresponding author address: Dr. William Merryfield

Monahan, Adam Hugh

269

Water balance of the Arctic drainage system using GRACE1 gravimetry products2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Arctic basins (0.49 to 0.8). Then32 changes in land waters storage have been compared to precipitation volume of seawater, it receives 11% of the world's44 freshwater input (Lammers et al., 2001). The Arctic and magnitude of northern river streamflow are51 mostly influenced by winter snow mass storage and its

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

270

Paleoecological evidence for abrupt cold reversals during peak Holocene warmth on Baffin Island, Arctic Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Arctic Canada Yarrow Axford a, , Jason P. Briner b , Gifford H. Miller a , Donna R. Francis c a Institute sediments is used to infer temperature changes at a small lake in Arctic Canada through the Holocene. Early). Superimposed over known changes in solar insolation through the Holocene are a number of less understood

Briner, Jason P.

271

Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= 1000 µm Typical values of BC in Arctic snow (ppb): Greenland 2-3 Canada 10 Siberia 20-25 #12 = 1000 µm Typical values of BC in Arctic snow (ppb): Greenland 2-3 Canada 10 Siberia 20-25 Snow grain large areas of snow are exposed to significant solar energy (snow albedo is less important in winter

272

Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

Stuefer, Svetlana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds that develop on the surface of sea ice floes during the late spring and summer largely determine their albedo $-$ a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a simple sea ice climate model passing through a bifurcation point $-$ an irreversible critical threshold as the system warms, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a nonlinear phase transition model for melt ponds, and bifurcation analysis of a simple climate model with ice - albedo feedback as the key mechanism driving the system to a potential bifurcation point.

Sudakov, Ivan; Golden, Kenneth M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Remote sensing analysis of natural oil and gas seeps on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico is an economically important hydrocarbon basin. As oil-drilling technologies improve and reservoirs on the continental shelf are depleted, more companies are leasing drilling areas on the slope. The number.... The continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico is an economically important hydrocarbon basin. As oil-drilling technologies improve and reservoirs on the continental shelf are depleted, more companies are leasing drilling areas on the slope. The number...

De Beukelaer, Sophie Magdalena

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Data from Innovative Methane Hydrate Test on Alaska's North Slope Now  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Data from Innovative Methane Hydrate Test on Alaska's North Slope Data from Innovative Methane Hydrate Test on Alaska's North Slope Now Available on NETL Website Data from Innovative Methane Hydrate Test on Alaska's North Slope Now Available on NETL Website March 11, 2013 - 10:07am Addthis DOE participated in gas hydrate field production trials in early 2012 in partnership with ConocoPhillips and the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp at the IÄ¡nik Sikumi (Inupiat for “Fire in the Ice”) test well, shown here, on the north slope of Alaska. Datasets from that field trial are now available to the public. DOE participated in gas hydrate field production trials in early 2012 in partnership with ConocoPhillips and the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp at the Iġnik Sikumi (Inupiat for "Fire in the Ice") test well,

277

THE FIRST SLOPE CASE OF WAN'S CONJECTURE JASPER SCHOLTEN AND HUI JUNE ZHU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE FIRST SLOPE CASE OF WAN'S CONJECTURE JASPER SCHOLTEN AND HUI JUNE ZHU Abstract. Let d 2 and p, Hodge polygon, zeta and L functions over finite fields, Wan's Conjecture. 1 #12;2 JASPER SCHOLTEN

Zhu, Hui June

278

SLOPE ESTIMATES OF ARTIN-SCHREIER CURVES JASPER SCHOLTEN AND HUI JUNE ZHU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SLOPE ESTIMATES OF ARTIN-SCHREIER CURVES JASPER SCHOLTEN AND HUI JUNE ZHU Abstract. Let X polygon, zeta and L functions over finite fields. 1 #12;2 JASPER SCHOLTEN AND HUI JUNE ZHU b) If p > 2d

Zhu, Hui June

279

Acid precipitation and surface-water vulnerability on the western slope of the high colorado rockies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Precipitation and surface waters in a high-elevation watershed on the western slope of the Colorado Rockies were studied over a three-year...?1 in the former and 100 to 900 ?eq L?1 in the latter.

John Harts; Greg P. Lockett; Richard A. Schneider

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

ARMs Climate Change Educational Outreach on the North Slope...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM's Climate Change Educational Outreach on the North Slope of Alaska C. E. Talus, F. J. Barnes, and M. H. Springer Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico R. H....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Processes Coupling the Upper and Deep Ocean on the Continental Slope D. Randolph Watts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processes Coupling the Upper and Deep Ocean on the Continental Slope D. Randolph Watts Graduate-pronged approach has required a combination of expertise from R. Watts, G. Sutyrin, and I. Ginis (who have

Rhode Island, University of

282

Processes Coupling the Upper and Deep Ocean on the Continental Slope D. Randolph Watts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processes Coupling the Upper and Deep Ocean on the Continental Slope D. Randolph Watts Graduate of expertise from R. Watts, G. Sutyrin, and I. Ginis (who have a coordinated ONR-supported study at URI

Rhode Island, University of

283

Subinertial Slope-Trapped Waves in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current velocity from moored arrays of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) deployed on the outer shelf and slope, south of Mobile Bay in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, shows evidence of alongslope, generally westward-propagating ...

Z. R. Hallock; W. J. Teague; E. Jarosz

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Soil solution chemistry at different positions on slope in a conifer plantation forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is known that soil property varies along the slope. It suggests that soil solution chemistry also differs topographically. To determine the variation in soil solution chemistry within one watershed, soil so...

Naoko Tokuchi; Goro Iwatsubo

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic slope waters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the southern South Atlantic the high... long as the pressure does not vary. If a water parcel moves to a different depth, the slope and value... Atlantic. The continuity of this...

286

Parametric Numerical Study of Seismic Slope Stability and Verification of the Newmark Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2D dynamic modelling of seismic slope stability is applied to a landslide-prone area in Central Asia, the Mailuu-Suu Valley, situated in the south of Kyrgyzstan...

Almaz Torgoev; Hans-Balder Havenith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Slope Dynamic Geomorphology of the Mailuu-Suu Area, Aspects of Long-Term Prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Long-term monitoring and the analysis of stability of the slopes subject to landslides on the territory of southwest Tien Shan where loessial soils are common, show almost a constant speed of deformation (seconda...

Yuri Aleshin; Isakbek Torgoev

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Multiplexed fiber-optic sensors using a dual-slope frequency-modulated source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose and demonstrate a multiplexed fiber-optic sensor system using a dual-slope (triangular) frequency-modulated laser source. The restrictions in the selection of beat...

Chien, Pie-Yau; Pan, Ci-Ling

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Tidally Forced Internal Waves and Overturns Observed on a Slope: Results from HOME  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tidal mixing over a slope was explored using moored time series observations on Kaena Ridge extending northwest from Oahu, Hawaii, during the Survey component of the Hawaii Ocean Mixing Experiment (HOME). A mooring was instrumented to sample the ...

Murray D. Levine; Timothy J. Boyd

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Nonlinear infragravity-wave interactions on a gently sloping laboratory beach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high-resolution data set of three irregular wave conditions collected on a gently sloping, laboratory beach is analyzed to study nonlinear energy transfers involving infragravity frequencies. We use bispectral analysis to identify the dominant ...

A. T. M. de Bakker; T. H. C. Herbers; P. B. Smit; M. F. S. Tissier; B. G. Ruessink

291

A Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Gijs de Boer, Edwin W. Eloranta, Tempei Hashino, and Gregory J. Tripoli The University of Wisconsin - Madison (1) Introduction Ice formation appears to a dominant factor controlling the lifecycle of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. To date, our understanding of ice formation in these long-lasting cloud structures does not explain the formation of observed ice amounts. Particularly puzzling are observa-

292

EVIDENCE FOR GENTLY SLOPING PLASMA DENSITY PROFILES IN THE DEEP CORONA: TYPE III OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency f{sub p} and near its harmonic 2f{sub p} by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. The coronal bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time, the typical duration being about 1-3 s. In the present paper, 37 well-defined coronal type III radio bursts (25-450 MHz) are analyzed. The results obtained substantiate an earlier statement that the dependence of the central frequency of the emission on time can be fitted to a power-law model, f(t) {proportional_to} (t - t{sub 0}){sup -{alpha}}, where {alpha} can be as low as 1. In the case of negligible plasma acceleration and conical flow, it means that the electron number density within about 1 solar radius above the photosphere will decrease as r {sup -2}, like in the solar wind. For the data set chosen, the index {alpha} varies in the range from 0.2 to 7 or bigger, with mean and median values of 1.2 and 0.5, respectively. A surprisingly large fraction of events, 84%, have {alpha} {<=} 1.2. These results provide strong evidence that in the type III source regions the electron number density scales as n(r) {proportional_to} (r - r{sub 0}){sup -{beta}}, with minimum, mean, and median {beta} = 2{alpha} of 0.4, 2.4, and 1.0, respectively. Hence, the typical density profiles are more gently sloping than those given by existing empirical coronal models. Several events are found with a wind-like dependence of burst frequency on time. Smaller power-law indices could result from the effects of non-conical geometry of the plasma flow tubes, deceleration of coronal plasma, and/or the curvature of the magnetic field lines. The last effect is shown to be too weak to explain such low power-law indices. A strong tendency is found for bursts from the same group to have similar power-law indices, thereby favoring the hypothesis that they are usually produced by the same source region.

Lobzin, V. V.; Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, P. A. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Warmuth, A.; Mann, G. [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, D 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Gorgutsa, R. V.; Fomichev, V. V. [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation, 142190, Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Friendly Arctic: The Story of Five Years in Polar Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... who were new hands on this occasion, broke down from scurvy, due to their surreptitious diet of tinned foods during the previous winter, and the most promising of all ...

HUGH ROBERT MILL

1922-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic-arctic region present Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sources for the radionuclides in the ... Source: Drange, Helge - Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center Collection: Geosciences 3 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Syringeal anatomy and...

295

Contrasting the regional Arctic System Reanalysis with the global ERA-Interim Reanalysis+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development and localized wind phenomena, a cyclone case study and data from the Greenland Flow Distortion for near-surface temperature, dewpoint, pressure, and wind speed, but RMSE and correlations significantly, and wind speed are very small compared to radiosonde data. ASR demonstrates lower RMSEs and higher

Howat, Ian M.

296

Evolution of stocks and massifs from burial of salt sheets, continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt structures in a 4000-km{sup 2} region of the continental slope, the northeast Green Canyon area, include stocks, massifs, remnant structures, and an allochthonous sheet. Salt-withdrawal basins include typical semicircular basins and an extensive linear trough that is largely salt-free. Counterregional growth faults truncate the landward margin of salt sheets that extend 30-50 km to the Sigsbee Escarpment. The withdrawal basins, stocks, and massifs occur within a large graben between an east-northeast-trending landward zone of shelf-margin growth faults and a parallel trend of counterregional growth faults located 48-64 km basinward. The graben formed by extension and subsidence as burial of the updip portion of a thick salt sheet produced massifs and stocks by downbuilding. Differential loading segmented the updip margin of the salt sheet into stocks and massifs separated by salt-withdrawal basins. Initially, low-relief structures evolved by trap-door growth as half-graben basins buried the salt sheet. Remnant-salt structures and a turtle-structure anticline overlay a salt-weld disconformity in sediments formerly separated by a salt sheet. Age of sediments below the weld is inferred to be be late Miocene to early Pliocene (4.6-5.3 Ma); age of sediments above the weld is late Pliocene (2.8-3.5 Ma). The missing interval of time (1-2.5 Ma) is the duration between emplacement of the salt sheet and burial of the sheet. Sheet extrusion began in the late Miocene to early Pliocene, and sheet burial began in the late Pliocene in the area of the submarine trough to early Pleistocene in the area of the massifs.

Seni, S.J. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Geohydrology and groundwater geochemistry at a sub-arctic landfill, Fairbanks, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fairbanks-North Star Borough, Alaska, landfill is located on silt, sand, and gravel deposits of the Tanana River flood plain, about 3 miles south of the city of Fairbanks water supply wells. The landfill has been in operation for about 25 years in this sub-arctic region of discontinuous permafrost. The cold climate limits biological activity within the landfill with corresponding low gas and leachate production. Chloride concentrations, specific conductance, water temperature, and earth conductivity measurements indicate a small plume of leachate flowing to the northwest from the landfill. The leachate remains near the water table as it flows northwestward toward a drainage ditch. Results of computer modeling of this local hydrologic system indicate that some of the leachate may be discharging to the ditch. Chemical data show that higher-than-background concentrations of several ions are present in the plume. However, the concentrations appear to be reduced to background levels within a short distance along the path of groundwater flow from the landfill, and thus the leachate is not expected to affect the water supply wells. 11 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

Downey, J.S.; Sinton, P.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, DOE/EIA-0383(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999), Table A11. Energy Information Administration, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, SR/RNGD/87-01 (Washington, DC, September 1987). U.S. Department of Interior, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, Coastal Plain Resource Assessment, (Washington, DC, November, 1986). U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Minerals Management Service. Northeast National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Final Integrated Activity Plan / Environmental Impact Statement, (Anchorage , Alaska, August, 1998).

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ozone hole Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The discovery of the ozone hole in the Southern Hemi- sphere... (Chubachi, 1984; Farman et al., 1985), winter ozone losses over the Arctic (e.g. Brune et al., 1991... .,...

300

The Detection of Large HNO3-Containing Particles in the Winter Arctic Stratosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the same atmospheric conditions...most current atmospheric model simulations...HNO 3 and water removal...this case, recovery of Arctic...Center for Atmospheric Research...the co-condensation of water and HNO3...

D. W. Fahey; R. S. Gao; K. S. Carslaw; J. Kettleborough; P. J. Popp; M. J. Northway; J. C. Holecek; S. C. Ciciora; R. J. McLaughlin; T. L. Thompson; R. H. Winkler; D. G. Baumgardner; B. Gandrud; P. O. Wennberg; S. Dhaniyala; K. McKinney; Th. Peter; R. J. Salawitch; T. P. Bui; J. W. Elkins; C. R. Webster; E. L. Atlas; H. Jost; J. C. Wilson; R. L. Herman; A. Kleinbhl; M. von Knig

2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Proceedings of OMAE07 26th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of OMAE07 26th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering to quantify induced loads on sub- merged engineering constructions (such as oil platforms and rail and road

Kalisch, Henrik

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic lake sediments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALEXANDER P. WOLFE (awolfe@ualberta.ca) Summary: cover and low productivity is that sediment accumulation rates in non-glacial arctic lakes and ponds... from the sediment record....

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic science conference Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

science conference Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic science conference Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 RECIEL 17 (1) 2008. ISSN...

304

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic weather conditions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

weather conditions Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic weather conditions Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A Concept from a Concern:...

305

Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

Quirk, Laura Marie

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

306

Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 2 Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model with a combination of satellite observations (Fig. 2.1) and field mea- surements, as projected by simulation modeling

Bhatt, Uma

307

A Characterization of the Present-Day Arctic Atmosphere in CCSM4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation of key features of the Arctic atmosphere in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) is evaluated against observational and reanalysis datasets for the present-day (19812005). Surface air temperature, sea level pressure, ...

Gijs de Boer; William Chapman; Jennifer E. Kay; Brian Medeiros; Matthew D. Shupe; Steve Vavrus; John Walsh

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Real-time processing of remote sensor data as applied to Arctic ice classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an earth observations system [4]; remote sensor measurements (radar measurements) from an environmental situation (the Arctic surface) are processed and analyzed at a real-time rate to yield a usable output data product (ice statistics) which in turn...REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by JAMES AUSTIN PERMENTER partial ! Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

Permenter, James Austin

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow (Preliminary analysis of 2008-2009 data) Outline * Receptor modeling overview * Results from 2007 data set * New goals arising from analysis of 2007 data * New data for 2008 * New data for 2009 * Tentative conclusions * Future analysis i Factor profiles from 2007 analysis Source attribution of Black Carbon from 2007 analysis Goals/Issues suggested by the analysis of the 2007 data set * Are there seasonal differences in the source strengths? * Are there other LAA chemical components besides black carbon. What are their sources? * Can the various data sets available (e.g., 2007, 2008, 2009) be combined in a single large PMF analysis 2008 Data Set For Receptor Analysis * 42 samples from Eastern Siberia including 4 depth profiles

311

Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The repeated failure of a cut-slope despite continuous reassessment and remedial works  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The failure of slopes and the subsequent costs of remedial works are often the result of insufficient geological investigation and inadequate interpretation of ground conditions prior to design. This is compounded by poor investigations into the causes of failures and systemic problems associated with poorly defined responsibilities for the stability of cut-slopes. This paper reviews such problems in detail with reference to the repeated failure of one large slope in Korea. It is demonstrated that the original ground investigation and design were deficient particularly considering the predictable complexity of the geological conditions. Subsequent investigations were similarly deficient. As a consequence the slope failed six times despite nine reassessments by various professional engineers and the implementation of several different remedial schemes over a period of 7 years up to a disastrous failure in 2002. Further reviews, redesign, construction and litigation have continued since then up to the present. During the history of design, failure and reassessment the height of the cut-slope increased from 45m to 155m and the cost increased from 3.3million to 26million US dollars.

Su-Gon Lee; Stephen R. Hencher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. The examination of present-day climate also includes diagnostic intercomparison of model simulations and observed mean climate and climate variability using reanalysis and satellite datasets. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A further objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

314

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

315

The slope parameter approach to marine cathodic protection design and its application to impressed current systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recently developed slope parameter approach to design of galvanic anode cathodic protection (cp) systems for marine structures constitutes an advancement in this technology compared to current practice, primarily because the former is first principles based and the latter is an empirical algorithm. In this paper, the slope parameter approach is reviewed; and related applications for which it can be utilized, including (1) design of new and retrofit cp systems, (2) evaluation of potential survey data, and (3) cp system design for complex geometries, are mentioned. The design current density is identified as the single remaining parameter for which values must be projected solely by experience or experimentation. In addition, the slope parameter approach is applied to the results of impressed current cp experiments, and it is shown how parameters for this can be interrelated with those of galvanic anode cp. Advantages of this capability are identified and discussed.

Hartt, W.H.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Influence of deep-seated gravitational slope deformations on landslide distributions: A statistical approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The influence of deep-seated gravitational slope deformations (DSGSDs) on the distribution of translational landslides was analyzed in the Milia basin, Tuscany, Italy. Detailed geomorphological mapping, combined with the analysis of aerial photography, enabled us to build two landslide inventories. One inventory including landslides before 1975 was used to create statistical models, whereas the other inventory including landslides after 1975 was used to validate the models. Geology, slope angle, slope aspect, distance to hydrographic elements, and distance to tectonic lineaments were considered as landslide-predisposing factors. To quantify the importance of \\{DSGSDs\\} as another landslide-predisposing factor, the DSGSD presence/absence map was introduced in the stepwise statistical analysis. The landslide inventory maps and factor maps were processed using a conditional analysis on all possible factor combinations to produce landslide susceptibility maps with five susceptibility classes. The results indicate that the \\{DSGSDs\\} significantly affect landslide distribution.

M. Capitani; A. Ribolini; P.R. Federici

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Process of Equiaxed Grains of RE-Al Alloy under Slope Vibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new technique using slope vibration casting process during heating and isothermal holding period to prepare Al-7Si-2RE alloy has been studied. The small, near-spherical and non-dendritic microstructure with the semi-solid processing requirements has been obtained. Experiments show that the cooling method, pouring process and the convection of melt caused by slope vibration had significant effects on the formation of near-spherical primary gains. The water-cooled copper mold casting with slope vibration at the temperature near liquidus can obtain Al-7Si-2RE alloy with small homogeneous equiaxed grains, the average grain diameter is 48.3 mum, and the average grain roundness is 1.92.

Xie Shikun; Yi Rongxi; Pan Xiaoliang; Zheng Xiaoqiu; Guo Xiuyan [School of Engineering, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an, 343009 (China)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Energy dependence of slope parameter in elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of slope parameter is presented for elastic proton-proton and antiproton-proton scattering with taking into account the resent experimental data at high energies. The expanded logarithmic approximations allow the description of the experimental slopes in all available energy range reasonably. Accounting for the LHC results leads to the dramatic change of behavior of the quadratic in logarithm approximation at high energies and to the closer trends for all fitting functions under study in comparison with the analysis at collision energies up to the 200 GeV. The estimations of the asymptotic shrinkage parameter $\\alpha'_{\\cal{P}}$ are discussed. Predictions for diffraction slope parameter are obtained for some proton-proton and antiproton-proton facilities.

Okorokov, V A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Two and three dimensional analysis of a slope failure in a lignite mine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With about 9.3 billion tons of reserve, lignite is a major source for energy production in Turkey. The Af?inElbistan lignite basin, containing 47% of the overall lignite reserve in Turkey, lies in the Af?in and Elbistan districts as a part of Kahramanmara?. The new llolar opencast mine is in the AfsinElbistan lignite basin, and this mine will be the second mining activity in the basin after the active K??laky opencast mine. The new mine will meet the coal consumption of the Elbistan B power plant. Input parameters for slope stability analysis are essential, and so they must be determined accurately and precisely. Field investigations, laboratory testing and back analyses are vital instruments for the input parameters. This study presents the results of slope stability analysis via finite difference code and a limit equilibrium software for the soil slopes of the Elbistanllolar lignite mine. The basic input parameters, cohesion and friction angle, were determined in the soil mechanics laboratory. By back analyses of a large scale slope failure, mobilized friction angles for a critical weak clay layer under the lignite seam were determined accurately by using the 2D limit equilibrium method and 3D finite difference models. Results of the friction angles were compared in order to check the effectiveness of commonly used 2D approaches in handling the slope problems. Differences in the results of the mobilized friction angles for the weak clay layer were more than 30%. The 3D models indicated that the mobilized friction angle during the major slope failure was substantially lower than the friction angle generated by the 2D limit equilibrium method.

Levent Tutluoglu; Ibrahim Ferid ge; Celal Karpuz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Bringing Alaska North Slope Natural Gas to Market (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

At least three alternatives have been proposed over the years for bringing sizable volumes of natural gas from Alaska's remote North Slope to market in the lower 48 states: a pipeline interconnecting with the existing pipeline system in central Alberta, Canada; a gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant on the North Slope; and a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at Valdez, Alaska. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) explicitly models the pipeline and GTL options. The what if LNG option is not modeled in NEMS.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHALLOW GEOLCGIC FEATURES OF THE UPPER CONTI~wAL SLOPE, NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by TOK~ EDWIN TATUM, JR. Submitted to the Graduate ColleSe of Texas A&N University in partial fulfill . ent of the requirement fo= the deenee cf i...%STER F SCIENCE December. 1977 Najoz Subject: 3c ano~phy SHALLOW GEOLOGIC FEATURES OF THE UPPER CONTINENTAL SLOPE, NORTHWESTERN GUIZ OF ?EXICO A Thesis by TOMMY EDWIN TATUM, JR. Approved as to sty'e and content by: (Chairman of Committee Head...

Tatum, Tommy Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

322

Extraordinarily small Tafel slope for oxide formation reaction on Pt (111) surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxide formation reaction current density on Pt (111) was estimated by time-differentiating oxide growth curves during a potential hold as a function of the potential and the coverage with the oxide below 0.35 ML (monolayer). The Tafel slope was 1824mVdecade?1 in the condition where the Tafel plot is on a straight line. The reaction mechanism accounting for this small slope was proposed, in which the oxide formation process is assumed as a combination of a fast electron transfer step and a following slow step.

Kensaku Kodama; Ryosuke Jinnouchi; Takahisa Suzuki; Tatsuya Hatanaka; Yu Morimoto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Regional Purchasing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Pursuant to Appendix M of Prime Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396 between DOE/NNSA and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), LANS is committed to building a strong supplier base with Northern New Mexico businesses and the local Native American pueblos in the purchases of goods and services. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email We seek out and utilize known Northern New Mexico business as suppliers The Northern New Mexico counties included are Los Alamos Santa Fe Rio Arriba Taos Mora San Miguel Sandoval The eight regional pueblos included are Nambe Ohkay Owingeh (formerly known as San Juan) Picuris Pojoaque San Ildefonso Santa Clara Taos Tesuque When the Laboratory cannot identify regional firms, it will expand its

324

A Seven-Year Water Balance Study of an Evapotranspiration Landfill Cover Varying in Slope for Semiarid Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...determinations of saturated hydraulic conductivity and pressure...tanks housed in instrument trailers. This involved hourly measurements...landfill covers containing hydraulic barriers to limit seepage...of hydrating liquid on the hydraulic properties of geosynthetic...

J. W. Nyhan

325

ArcticN O A A ' s A r c t i c A c t i O N P l A N Supporting the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service Kate Clark National Ocean Service Pablo Clemente-Colon National Environmental Satellite directly supports the National Strategy. Advancing U.s. security interests in the Arctic requires improvedArcticN O A A ' s A r c t i c A c t i O N P l A N Supporting the national Strategy for the arctic

326

Regional Inventories  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: This year has not started well for gasoline inventories, with inventories being low across regions of the country. The Midwest region (PADD II) had been running lower than most regions, but began to catch up during the last week in April. Gasoline inventories ran about 9% below their 5-year average for this time of year and about 4% below where they were last year. The recent refinery problems in the Midwest, though, could erase some of that recovery. The impacts of Tosco's Wood River refinery and Marathon's St Paul refinery are not fully realized. But inventories were also precariously low along the East Coast (PADD I) and are extremely low in the Rocky Mountain region (PADD IV), although the size of this market mitigates any national impact. While the

327

FURTHER STUDIES ON FISHWAY SLOPE AND ITS EFFECT ON RATE OF . PASSAGE OF SALMONIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0-foot rise between pools was as fast as, or faster than, in the 1:16-slope fishway with a 1.0-foot of water resource development on the Col- umbia River for irrigation, power, arid flood con- trol have

328

The hillslope-storage Boussinesq model for non-constant bedrock slope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hillslope-storage Boussinesq model for non-constant bedrock slope A.G.J. Hilbertsa,*, E.E. van hillslope-storage Boussinesq (hsB) model is cast in a generalized formulation enabling the model to handle flow; Boussinesq equation; Richards equation; Kinematic wave equation 1. Introduction Landscape

Loon, E. Emiel van

329

Evaluation of Development Options for Alaska North Slope Viscous and Heavy Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current estimates of discovered viscous and heavy oil in Alaskas North Slope are 12 billion barrels of oil-in-place and 1218 billion barrels of oil-in-place, respectively (see Appendix1 for conversion to SI un...

Emil D. Attanasi; Philip A. Freeman

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE"?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE on the global warming that can be tolerated without risking dangerous anthropogenic interference with climate. I" mainly as a metaphor for the danger posed by global warming. So I changed "Hell" to "disaster." What

Hansen, James E.

331

Processes Coupling the Upper and Deep Ocean on the Continental Slope D. Randolph Watts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processes Coupling the Upper and Deep Ocean on the Continental Slope D. Randolph Watts Graduate / modeling) approach requires a combination of expertise from R. Watts, G. Sutyrin, and I. Ginis (who have in a published journal article (Logoutov, Sutyrin and Watts, 2001). These results are being used by Ginis

Rhode Island, University of

332

Effects of Saturation on Slope Stability: Laboratory Experiments Utilizing External Load  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inclination were measured. The maximum sustainable load or failure load, q f, ranged...damage to both human health and real estate properties. The conditions "necessary...fluctuation of pore water pressure in a real slope may give an indication of...

Kai Germer; Juergen Braun

333

Slope instabilities in Dolomieu crater, Runion Island: From seismic signals to rockfall characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characteristics C. Hibert,1,2 A. Mangeney,1,3 G. Grandjean,2 and N. M. Shapiro1 Received 29 March 2011; revised 23 . Citation: Hibert, C., A. Mangeney, G. Grandjean, and N. M. Shapiro (2011), Slope instabilities in Dolomieu

Shapiro, Nikolai

334

Cryogenic focal plane flatness measurement with optical zone slope Jerry Edelstein1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cryogenic focal plane flatness measurement with optical zone slope tracking Jerry Edelstein1 to determine the surface flatness of a cryogenic sensor array developed for the JDEM mission. Large focal such as JDEM, WFIRST, or EUCLID must operate at cryogenic temperatures while maintaining focal plane flatness

California at Berkeley, University of

335

PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 25, 086604 (2013) Gravity currents shoaling on a slope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water rivers into the saline ocean form surface gravity currents. The study of gravity currents is also spills in the ocean.6 Gravity currents in a channel have been well studied through lockPHYSICS OF FLUIDS 25, 086604 (2013) Gravity currents shoaling on a slope Bruce R. Sutherland,1,2,a

Sutherland, Bruce

336

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Three soil types, plus rock, determine the slope or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always · Three soil types, plus rock, determine the slope or safety to be at least 2 feet from the edge. Excavation Requirements Safety Tip #10 If you see a mistake and don't fix it on the reverse side of this safety tip sheet. Please refrain from reading the information verbatim

Minnesota, University of

337

ARTICLE IN PRESS Gulf of Guinea continental slope and Congo (Zaire) deep-sea fan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gabon, Congo and Angola, presents large depocenters where sediments have been accumulating since Early is shifted northward and reaches the Congo­Gabon boundary on the shelf. Sedimentation on the slope directed long- shore drifts that build extensive sand bars along the Congo and Gabon shoreline. The low

Demouchy, Sylvie

338

MODELLING SURFACE HOAR FORMATION AND EVOLUTION ON MOUNTAIN SLOPES Simon Horton1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Weather station data and forecasted data from the GEM15 numerical weather prediction model were used evaluates surface hoar size predictions made with empirical weather based models and discusses how buried and south facing slopes in the Columbia Mountains. Two models were developed to predict crystal size, one

Jamieson, Bruce

339

The epibenthic megafauna of the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The epibenthic megafauna of the continental slope and abyssal plain of the northern Gulf of Mexico have been investigated using multi-shot bottom photography. A total of 10,388 photographs were analyzed from 100 sites encompassing a total area...

Ziegler, Matthew Peek

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

A chronostratigraphic framework for the northwestern slope of the gulf of mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediments from two cores, JPC31 and JPC46, were analyzed to better understand the relationship between climate and sediment deposition on the continental slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. These two cores were selected from a suite of cores...

Elston, Kristen Eileen

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Atmospheric Circulation and Its Effect on Arctic Sea Ice in CCSM3 Simulations at Medium and High Resolution*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Canadian archipelago, where the T85 winds produce thicker ice than their T42 counterparts. Seasonal forcingAtmospheric Circulation and Its Effect on Arctic Sea Ice in CCSM3 Simulations at Medium and High) ABSTRACT The simulation of Arctic sea ice and surface winds changes significantly when Community Climate

Bitz, Cecilia

342

Ice Mass Balance Buoys: A tool for measuring and attributing changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Mass Balance Buoys: A tool for measuring and attributing changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover Jacqueline A. Richter-Menge1 , Donald K. Perovich1 , Bruce C. Elder1 , Keran Claffey1 Abstract Recent observational and modeling studies indicate that the Arctic sea ice cover is undergoing

Rigor, Ignatius G.

343

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 50, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2012 3317 Multiyear Arctic Sea Ice Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, QuikSCAT, sea ice. I. INTRODUCTION THE HIGH albedo and insulating properties of sea ice make Arctic Sea Ice Classification Using QuikSCAT Aaron M. Swan and David G. Long, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Long-term trends in Arctic sea ice are of particular interest in studies of global temperature, climate change

Long, David G.

344

Effects of Changes in Arctic Lake and River Ice Terry Prowse, Knut Alfredsen, Spyros Beltaos, Barrie R. Bonsal,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice in the Arctic are projected to produce a variety of effects on hydrologic, ecological, and socio impacts that are directly produced by changes in freshwater ice. The details and diversityEffects of Changes in Arctic Lake and River Ice Terry Prowse, Knut Alfredsen, Spyros Beltaos

Vincent, Warwick F.

345

High-latitude ionospheric response to co-rotating interaction region- and coronal mass ejection-driven geomagnetic storms revealed by GPS tomography and ionosondes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...New Brunswick, Canada E3B 5A3 2 Department...ionosonde data with solar wind measurements...Arctic region of Canada. 2. Geomagnetic...et al. (2007). Solar wind parameters including...Research Council of Canada. The UK authors...for providing the solar wind data and geomagnetic...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

What economic support is needed for Arctic offshore wind power?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wind power is increasingly being installed in cold climates and in offshore locations. It is generally recognised that installing wind power to offshore locations is more expensive than onshore. The additional challenges from Arctic conditions with annual sea icing are still poorly known. We reviewed the existing knowledge of offshore wind power costs and developed a calculation model for the economics of offshore wind turbines in Finland, including taxes and sea base rent, to obtain a base case for determining the required tariff support. The model was tested with different production and cost rates to obtain a tariff price, which would make offshore wind power on Finnish territory economically viable for the producer. The main developers of planned offshore projects in Finland were interviewed to obtain a comparison between the created model and industry expectations. The cost of erected turbines was estimated to be 2750/kW. With this cost of capacity, it was clear that a higher than the current tariff price (83.5/MWh) will be required for offshore developments. Our analysis indicated a price level of about 115/MWh to be required. We found that even rather small changes in cost or production rates may lead to excess profits or economic losses and further research and pilot projects are required to define a more reliable tariff level.

Olli Salo; Sanna Syri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A 20-Year Dataset of Downwelling Longwave Flux at the Arctic Surface from TOVS Satellite Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20-Year Dataset of Downwelling Longwave Flux 20-Year Dataset of Downwelling Longwave Flux at the Arctic Surface from TOVS Satellite Data J. Francis Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey A. Schweiger Polar Science Center University of Washington Seattle, Washington J. Key National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service Madison, Wisconsin Introduction This paper summarizes the progress of a study under way to generate a 20-year dataset of surface downwelling longwave flux (DLF) retrievals from satellite data over the Arctic Ocean. We will produce daily fields between late 1979 and late 1998 on a grid with a spatial resolution of 100 km x 100 km 2 north of 60°N. Surface measurements from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) and the

348

A guidebook for insulated low-slope roof systems. IEA Annex 19, Low-slope roof systems: International Energy Agency Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-slope roof systems are common on commercial and industrial buildings and, to a lesser extent, on residential buildings. Although insulating materials have nearly always been a component of low-slope roofs, the amount of insulation used has increased in the past two decades because of escalation of heating and cooling costs and increased awareness of the need for energy conservation. As the amount of insulation has increased, the demand has intensified for design, installation, and maintenance information specifically for well-insulated roofs. Existing practices for design, installation, and maintenance of insulated roofs have evolved from experience. Typically, these practices feature compromises due to the different properties of materials making up a given roof system. Therefore, they should be examined from time to time to ensure that they are appropriate as new materials continue to enter the market and as the data base on existing systems expands. A primary purpose of this International Energy Agency (IEA) study is to assess current roofing insulation practices in the context of an accumulating data base on performance.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Arellano, Tatum, Stark, Horvath, Leshchinsky 1 Interim Design Guideline for EPS-Block Geofoam in Slope Stabilization and Repair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arellano, Tatum, Stark, Horvath, Leshchinsky 1 Interim Design Guideline for EPS-Block Geofoam of expanded polystyrene (EPS)-block geofoam3 for slope stabilization and repair based on the National for the use of EPS-block geofoam6 for the function of lightweight fill in slope stability applications

350

RRDE and Voltammetric Study of ORR on Pyrolyzed Fe/Polyaniline Catalyst. On the Origins of Variable Tafel Slopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the Origins of Variable Tafel Slopes ... The Tafel plots for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) exhibit variable slopes ranging from 60 mV dec?1 at the lowest overpotentials to more than 240 mV dec?1 at high overpotentials. ...

Jerzy Chlistunoff

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evaluation of Wax Deposition and its Control during Production of Alaska North Slope Oils  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-01NT41248 Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils Petroleum Development Laboratory Institute of Northern Engineering University of Alaska Fairbanks P.O. Box 755880 Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-5880 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory December 2008 Office of Fossil Energy Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaskan North Slope Oils Final Report Reporting Period: October 1, 2005-September 30, 2008 Principal Investigator: Tao Zhu University of Alaska Fairbanks P.O. Box 755880 Fairbanks, AK 99775-5880 fftz@uaf.edu, 907-474-5141 External Principal Investigator: Jack A. Walker

352

Infrared Cloud Imager Deployment at the North Slope of Alaska During Early 2002  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrared Cloud Imager Deployment Infrared Cloud Imager Deployment at the North Slope of Alaska During Early 2002 J. A. Shaw and B. Thurairajah Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University Bozeman, Montana E. Edqvist National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. Mizutani Communications Research Laboratory Koganei, Tokyo, Japan Introduction Starting in February 2002, we deployed a new cloud-radiation sensor called the infrared cloud imager (ICI) at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site near Barrow, Alaska (71.32 N, 156.62 W). ICI records radiometrically calibrated images of the thermal infrared sky radiance in the 8µm to 14 µm wavelength band, from which spatial cloud statistics and spatially resolved cloud radiance can be determined.

353

Sidewinding with minimal slip: Snake and robot ascent of sandy slopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limbless organisms such as snakes can navigate nearly all terrain. In particular, desert-dwelling sidewinder rattlesnakes (Crotalus cerastes) operate effectively on inclined granular media (such as sand dunes) that induce failure in field-tested limbless robots through slipping and pitching. Our laboratory experiments reveal that as granular incline angle increases, sidewinder rattlesnakes increase the length of their body in contact with the sand. Implementing this strategy in a physical robot model of the snake enables the device to ascend sandy slopes close to the angle of maximum slope stability. Plate drag experiments demonstrate that granular yield stresses decrease with increasing incline angle. Together, these three approaches demonstrate how sidewinding with contact-length control mitigates failure on granular media.

Marvi, Hamidreza; Gravish, Nick; Astley, Henry; Travers, Matthew; Hatton, Ross L; Mendelson, Joseph R; Choset, Howie; Hu, David L; Goldman, Daniel I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.Sc. Research Scientist VTT, Espoo, Finland Andre Desjarlais. B.Sc.E Program Manager, Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge TN, 37831-6070 ABSTRACT Liquid water in low sloped roofs almost always causes problems... roofs in Finland (area varying from 200 m2 up to 5 000 m2). A laboratory hot box apparatus (Kouhia and Nieminen, 1999) was also used to further quantify the performance of the grooved roof ventilation system and to show the thermal consequences...

Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Slope stability analysis by nite elements D. V. GRIFFITHS and P. A. LANE{  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methods, including the in¯uence of a free surface on slope and dam stability. Graphical output is included'une surface libre sur la stabilite? d'une pente et d'une digue. Nous joignons une repre?sentation graphique bene®t from a FE treatment and which would not. In general, linear problems such as the predic- tion

356

Is the friction angle the maximum slope of a free surface of a non cohesive material?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting from a symmetric triangular pile with a horizontal basis and rotating the basis in the vertical plane, we have determined the evolution of the stress distribution as a function of the basis inclination using Finite Elements method with an elastic-perfectly plastic constitutive model, defined by its friction angle, without cohesion. It is found that when the yield function is the Drucker-Prager one, stress distribution satisfying equilibrium can be found even when one of the free-surface slopes is larger than the friction angle. This means that piles with a slope larger than the friction angle can be (at least) marginally stable and that slope rotation is not always a destabilising perturbation direction. On the contrary, it is found that the slope cannot overpass the friction angle when a Mohr-Coulomb yield function is used. Theoretical explanation of these facts is given which enlightens the role plaid by the intermediate principal stress in both cases of the Mohr-Coulomb criterion and of the Drucker-Prager one. It is then argued that the Mohr-Coulomb criterion assumes a spontaneous symmetry breaking, as soon as the two smallest principal stresses are different ; this is not physical most likely; so this criterion shall be replaced by a Drucker-Prager criterion in the vicinity of the equality, which leads to the previous anomalous behaviour ; so these numerical computations enlighten the avalanche process: they show that no dynamical angle larger than the static one is needed to understand avalanching. It is in agreement with previous experimental results. Furthermore, these results show that the maximum angle of repose can be modified using cyclic rotations; we propose a procedure that allows to achieve a maximum angle of repose to be equal to the friction angle .

A. Modaressi; P. Evesque

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

Site effects modelling applied to the slope affected by the Suusamyr earthquake (Kyrgyzstan, 1992)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1992, a large magnitude earthquake (Ms=7.3) hit the northern part of the Kyrgyz Tien Shan range where it triggered rockslides and many debris slides or flows. One of these mass movements occurred on the ChetKorumdy ridge located in the Suusamyr Basin. It consists of a multi-rotational debris slump in its upper part that turned into a debris flow in its lower part. Involving arenitic material overlying silty clays, it has a volume of about 0.5 to 1.106m3, a maximum thickness of 40m and a run-out of 200m. The field observations and measurements carried out on this slope suggest that local amplification effects could have contributed to the initiation of the seismic failure. To test this hypothesis in the lack of instrumental evidence of local ground-motion recordings, we conducted a sensitivity study of site effects based on a numerical analysis in the visco-elastic domain with a two-dimensional finite difference code. Varying the topography and the geology of the investigated slope, topographic site effects are found to be less important than geological site effects which are controlled by the contrast of impedance between the surface materials and the bedrock. The geometry of the low-velocity surface layer has also an influence on site effects, which is often difficult to be distinguished from pure topographic effects. Considering all modelling results, we conclude that site amplifications alone cannot have triggered the Suusamyr landslide during the 1992 earthquake. The static slope stability analyses done in previous studies revealed that the Suusamyr failure neither can have a purely static origin. Even if the water table is very high within the arenite layer, only a minor failure develops in the lower part of the slope. Therefore, we believe that the triggering of the Suusamyr landslide is a consequence of pore pressure build up in areas characterized by significant ground-motion amplifications.

C. Bourdeau; H.-B. Havenith

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A METHOD FOR MEASURING (SLOPES OF) THE MASS PROFILES OF DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a method for measuring the slopes of mass profiles within dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies directly from stellar spectroscopic data and without adopting a dark matter halo model. Our method combines two recent results: (1) spherically symmetric, equilibrium Jeans models imply that the product of half-light radius and (squared) stellar velocity dispersion provides an estimate of the mass enclosed within the half-light radius of a dSph stellar component, and (2) some dSphs have chemodynamically distinct stellar subcomponents that independently trace the same gravitational potential. We devise a statistical method that uses measurements of stellar positions, velocities, and spectral indices to distinguish two dSph stellar subcomponents and to estimate their individual half-light radii and velocity dispersions. For a dSph with two detected stellar subcomponents, we obtain estimates of masses enclosed at two discrete points in the same mass profile, immediately defining a slope. Applied to published spectroscopic data, our method distinguishes stellar subcomponents in the Fornax and Sculptor dSphs, for which we measure slopes {Gamma} {identical_to} {Delta}log M/{Delta}log r = 2.61{sup +0.43}{sub -0.37} and {Gamma} = 2.95{sup +0.51}{sub -0.39}, respectively. These values are consistent with 'cores' of constant density within the central few hundred parsecs of each galaxy and rule out 'cuspy' Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profiles (dlog M/dlog r {<=} 2 at all radii) with a significance {approx}> 96% and {approx}> 99%, respectively. Tests with synthetic data indicate that our method tends systematically to overestimate the mass of the inner stellar subcomponent to a greater degree than that of the outer stellar subcomponent, and therefore to underestimate the slope {Gamma} (implying that the stated NFW exclusion levels are conservative).

Walker, Matthew G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Penarrubia, Jorge, E-mail: mwalker@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB30HA (United Kingdom)

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

Cold Weather Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 Cold Weather Hazards June 2010 NSA_cwh_Rev10.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Cold Weather Hazards Winter Conditions at the North Slope of Alaska The North Slope of Alaska is north of the Arctic Circle at latitudes ranging from 69 to 72 degrees. Barrow, the largest town on the North Slope (pop. 4500), is the site of a National Weather Service Station, which has been active for several decades, so the climatology of the Alaska arctic coastal region as represented by Barrow is relatively well known. The North Slope is covered with ice and snow typically eight months of the year (October-May). During part of November, all of December, and most of January, the sun does not come above the horizon; this

360

Simulating Arctic Climate Warmth and Icefield Retreat in the Last Interglaciation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Meighen ice caps in the Canadian Arctic, and possibly in Camp Century (northwest Greenland), suggest that these drill sites were...marked S; 72.5N, 37.3W), and possibly Camp Century (marked C; 77.2N, 61.1W), but...

Bette L. Otto-Bliesner; Shawn J. Marshall; Jonathan T. Overpeck; Gifford H. Miller; Aixue Hu; CAPE Last Interglacial Project members

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.

Donald Gautier; Timothy Klett

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field campaign in Barrow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on snow albedo and arctic atmospheric chemistry. During the OASIS field campaign, in March and April 2009, Elemental Carbon (EC), Water insoluble Organic Carbon (WinOC) and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) were hoar layers due to specific wind related formation mechanisms in the early season. Apart from

Sheldon, Nathan D.

363

SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for automatic ice floe tracking from Synthetic Aperture Radar or optical remote sensing imagery employ adaptiveSHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS Yuliya Tarabalka Research Association, MD, USA. e-mail: yuliya.tarabalka@inria.fr ABSTRACT The melting of sea ice

Boyer, Edmond

364

REGULAR ARTICLE Soil nitrogen cycling rates in low arctic shrub tundra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Betula Introduction Arctic research has detected climate warming impacts over the past 20­30 years and plot-level inves- tigations have linked this biomass change to an increase in abundance and density cover results in enhanced absorption of solar radiation and therefore localized atmospheric heating

Grogan, Paul

365

Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean W. R. Peltier,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean freshening W. R. Peltier,1 G to the response to North Atlantic freshening. Citation: Peltier, W. R., G. Vettoretti, and M. Stastna (2006 of the Atlantic by Heinrich Event 1 [Peltier, 2005]. Simi- larly, the onset of the Younger Dryas (Y-D) cold

Peltier, W. Richard

366

Megatides in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions Stephen D. Griffiths,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Megatides in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions Stephen D. Griffiths,1 and W. R. Peltier1's climate and ocean circulation. Citation: Griffiths, S. D., and W. R. Peltier (2008), Megatides occurred approx- imately 26,000 years ago, since the bathymetric changes are now well constrained [Peltier

Peltier, W. Richard

367

Radiative Impacts on the Growth of a Population of Drops within Simulated Summertime Arctic Stratus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of solar heating and infrared cooling on the growth of a population of drops is studied with two numerical modeling frameworks. An eddy-resolving model (ERM) simulation of Arctic stratus clouds is used to generate a dataset of 500 ...

Jerry Y. Harrington; Graham Feingold; William R. Cotton

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara, and Information Service #12;World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver Spring International Ocean Atlas and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 2004: I

369

Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Instrumentation, Bergen, Norway An autonomous buoy which collects seismic reflection data and transmits to shore of the seismic buoy (thick red, green and black lines). - we have successfully developed an autonomous buoy

Kristoffersen, Yngve

370

Distant origins of Arctic black carbon: A Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

profile, cloud temperature and amount, the seasonal cycle, and the tropopause level and accelerating polar ice melting. We use the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model to investigate is generally assumed. Citation: Koch, D., and J. Hansen (2005), Distant origins of Arctic black carbon

371

U.S. Arctic Research Policy: What do we need to know now?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Involve indigenous communities in decisions · Enhance scientific monitoring and research into local: mitigation, adaptation, Arctic feedbacks, alternative energy, sequestration, Black Carbon Task Force cooperation: ratify Law of the Sea; "safe, secure, reliable" shipping: IMO code/SAR · Involve indigenous

Kuligowski, Bob

372

Although both the Arctic and Antarctic are subject to a similar annual cycle of solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although both the Arctic and Antarctic are subject to a similar annual cycle of solar radiation influence is emerging. Model simulations provided to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC. In the Antarctic, the attribution story is different. A poleward contraction and increase in circumpolar westerly

Francis, Jennifer

373

Although both the Arctic and Antarctic are subject to a similar annual cycle of solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

177 Although both the Arctic and Antarctic are subject to a similar annual cycle of solar radiation influence is emerging. Model sim- ulations provided to the Intergovernmen- tal Panel on Climate Change (IPCC. In the Antarctic, the attribution story is different. A poleward contraction and increase in circumpolar westerly

374

On the Relationship between Thermodynamic Structure and Cloud Top, and Its Climate Significance in the Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inside inversion (CII)] was frequently observed at central Arctic Ocean sites, while observations from- nitudes of surface cloud warming and cooling are de- pendent upon the solar zenith angle, surface albedo-D-11-00186.1 ? 2012 American Meteor

Shupe, Matthew

375

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment, was prepared for the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources at the request of Chairman Frank H. Murkowski in a letter dated March 10, 2000. The request asked the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to develop plausible scenarios for Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessments. This report contains EIA projections of future daily production rates using recent USGS resource estimates. The Coastal Plain study area includes 1.5 million acres in the ANWR 1002 Area, 92,000 acres of Native Inupiat lands and State of Alaska offshore lands out to the 3-mile limit which are expected to be explored and developed if and when ANWR is developed. (Figure ES1) About 26 percent of the technically recoverable oil resources are in the Native and State lands.

376

Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Geohydrology and ground-water geochemistry at a sub-Arctic Landfill, Fairbanks, Alaska. Water resources investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fairbanks-North Star Borough landfill is located on silt, sand, and gravel deposits of the Tanana River flood plain, about 3 miles south of the city of Fairbanks water-supply wells. The landfill has been in operation for about 25 years in this sub-arctic region of discontinuous permafrost. The cold climate limits biological activity within the landfill with corresponding low gas and leachate production. Chloride concentrations, specific conductance, water temperatures, and earth conductivity measurements indicate a small plume of leachate flowing to the northwest from the landfill. The leachate remains near the water table as it flows northwestward toward a drainage ditch. Results of computer modeling of this local hydrologic system indicate that some of the leachate may be discharging to the ditch. Chemical data show that higher-than-background concentrations of several ions are present in the plume. However, the concentrations appear to be reduced to background levels within a short distance along the path of ground-water flow from the landfill, and thus the leachate is not expected to affect the water-supply wells.

Downey, J.S.; Sinton, P.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

CAPITAL REGION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 0 j002 SDOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (0790) Energy United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE. September 18, 2007 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-07-23 REPLY TO: IG-34 (A07TG036) SUBJECT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program-2007" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results o Four evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) cyber security program. The evaluation was initiated in May 2007, and our fieldwork was conducted through September 2007. Our methodology is described in the attachment to this report. . INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Commission reports that it is constantly improving thl stability, reliability, and

379

Calculating the wave runup on a low-sloping beach using a high-order Boussinesq model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The runup of long gravity waves on the surface of a low-sloping beach has been studied within the framework of a shallow-water approximation. An analytical solution for the free liquid surface elevation is obtain...

M. A. Shermeneva; I. V. Shugan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Vegetation patterns of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas, in relation to elevation and slope aspect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and richness, and stem density are also analyzed. Communities encountered on the south-facing slope, from low to high elevation, are: Chihuahuan Desert shrubland, sotol grassland, open oak shrubland, mixed shrubland, and oak-pinyon-juniper woodland. Communities...

Harris, Bryan Joseph

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The pan-Arctic biodiversity of marine pelagic and sea-ice unicellular eukaryotes: a first-attempt assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arctic marine unicellular eukaryotes are composed of microalgae and ... . There are approximately 5,000 recognized legitimate marine phytoplankton species and an unknown number of ... . We report a total of 2,106...

Michel Poulin; Niels Daugbjerg; Rolf Gradinger; Ludmila Ilyash

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Products for the Arctic Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in AirSea Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The uncertainties related to atmospheric fields in the Arctic Ocean from commonly used and recently available reanalysis products are investigated. Fields from the 1) ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) Common ...

Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

383

Chlorophyll a biomass and growth of sea-ice microalgae along a salinity gradient (southeastern Hudson Bay, Canadian Arctic)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The biomass of microalgae at the bottom of first-year sea ice, in southeastern Hudson Bay (Canadian Arctic), parallels an inshore-offshore salinity gradient caused by the under-ice plume of ... ice-algal biomass ...

Louis Legendre; Marie-Jose Martineau; Jean-Claude Therriault

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Constraints on Tundra Productivity: Photosynthetic Capacity in Relation to Solar Radiation Utilization and Water Stress in Arctic and Alpine Tundras  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Short growing seasons and low temperatures are the primary constraints on productivity in both arctic and alpine tundra environments. This is reflected in the similar life form and the taxonomic affinities of ...

M. M. Caldwell; D. A. Johnson; M. Fareed

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Precipitation Shifts over Western North America as a Result of Declining Arctic Sea Ice Cover: The Coupled System Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Changes in Arctic sea ice cover have the potential to impact midlatitude climate. A previous sensitivity study utilizing the National Center for Atmospheric Researchs (NCAR) atmospheric general circulation model [AGCM; Community Climate Model, ...

Jacob O. Sewall

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Slump dominated upper slope reservoir facies, Intra Qua Iboe (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integration of sedimentologic and 3D seismic data provides a basis for unraveling complex depositional processes and sand distribution of the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Nearly 3,000 feet of conventional core was examined in interpreting slump/slide/debris flow, bottom current, turbidity current, pelagic/hemipelagic, wave and tide dominated facies. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated seaward, deposition began with a turbidite channel dominated slope system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated slope system (IQI 3, the principal reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated, collapsed shelf-edge deltaic system (IQI 4). Using seismic time slices and corresponding depositional facies in the core, a sandy {open_quotes}fairway{open_quotes} has been delineated in the IQI 3. Because of differences in stacking patterns of sandy and muddy slump intervals, seismic facies show: (1) both sheet-like and mounded external forms (geometries), and (2) parallel/continuous as well as chaotic/hummocky internal reflections. In wireline logs, slump facies exhibits blocky, coarsening-up, fining-up, and serrated motifs. In the absence of conventional core, slump facies may be misinterpreted and even miscorrelated because seismic facies and log motifs of slumps and debris flows tend to mimic properties of turbidite fan deposits. The slump dominated reservoir facies is composed of unconsolidated fine-grained sand. Thickness of individual units varies from 1 to 34 feet, but amalgamated intervals reach a thickness of up to 70 feet and apparently form connected sand bodies. Porosity commonly ranges from 20 to 35%. Horizontal permeability commonly ranges from 1,000 to 3,000 md.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

DOE/EA-1596: Finding of No Significant Impact for Belfield to Rhame Transmission Line Project Stark, Slope, and Bowman Counties, North Dakota (02/18/09)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION UPPER GREAT PLAINS CUSTOMER SERVICE REGION FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT Belfield to Rhame Transmission Line Project Stark, Slope, and Bowman Counties, North Dakota DOEIEA-1596 AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin) has requested to interconnect their proposed new Belfield to Rhame 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line and new Rhame Substation (Project) to the Western Area Power Administration's (Western) transmission system at Western's existing Belfield Substation. Under its Open Access Transmission Service Tariff (Tariff), Western is required to respond to Basin's interconnection requests. Western's Tariff

388

Cooling slope casting to produce EN AW 6082 forging stock for manufacture of suspension components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The potential of cooling slope casting process to produce EN AW 6082 forging stock for the manufacture of EN AW 6082 suspension components was investigated. EN AW 6082 billets cast over a cooling plate offer a fine uniform structure that can be forged even without a separate homogenization treatment. This is made it possible by the limited superheat of the melt at the start of casting and the fractional solidification that occurs already on the cooling plate. Suspension parts forged from cast and homogenized billets with or without Cr all showed a uniform structure, and the hardness reached HV 110 after the standard artificial ageing treatment.

Yucel BIROL; Seracettin AKDI

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Coal quality and estimated coal resources in the proposed Colville Mining District, central North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed Colville Mining District (CMD) encompasses 27,340 mi{sup 2} (70,800 km{sup 2}) in the central part of the North Slope. Known coal deposits within the proposed district range from Mississippian to Tertiary in age. Available information indicates that neither Mississippian and Tertiary coals in the CMD constitute a significant resource because they are excessively deep, thin, or high in ash content; however, considerable amount of low-sulfur Cretaceous coal is present. The paper briefly describes the geology and quality of these coal reserves. Difficult conditions will restrict mining of these coals in the near future.

Stricker, G.D. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Clough, J.G. [Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

The development of a signal processing network for a real-time Arctic sea ice classification system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIGNAL PROCESSING NETWORK FOR A REAL-TIME ARCTIC SEA ICE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM A Thesis by WILLIAM DOUGLAS NORDHAUS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIGNAL PROCESSING NETWORK FOR A REAL-TIME ARCTIC SEA ICE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM A Thesis by William Douglas Nordhaus Approved as to style...

Nordhaus, William D

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Slump and debris-flow dominated upper slope facies in the Cretaceous of the Norwegian and northern North Seas (61-67{degrees}N): Implications for sand distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A regional sedimentological study of Cretaceous sequences in the Mid-Norway region (Norwegian Sea) and in the Agat region (Agat field area, northern North Sea) reveals that these sequences were predominantly deposited in an upper continental slope environment by slumps and debris flows. Examination of nearly 500 m of core from 14 wells shows eight distinct lithofacies: facies 1 (contorted conglomerate and pebbly sandstone) represents deposits of sandy slumps and debris flows, possibly in a channel setting; facies 2 (contorted sandstone) is the most widespread and is the product of sandy slumps and debris flows; facies 3 (contorted mudstone) indicates deposition from muddy slumps and debris flow; facies 4 (rippled sandstone) suggests bottom-current reworking; facies 5 (graded sandstone) represents turbidity-current deposits and is very rare; facies 6 (laminated mudstone) is a product of pelagic or hemipelagic deposition; facies 7 (cross-bedded sandstone) is indicative of tidal processes, and facies 8 (laminated sandstone) represents delta-front and shelf deposits. These facies and their association suggest a shelf-edge delta to upper slope environment of deposition. Existing core data document deltaic facies only in the Mid-Norway region. The proposed shelf-edge delta and upper slope model has important implications for sand distribution. (1) This model provides and alternative to the conventional submarine-fan model previously applied to these sequences. (2) Although slump and debris-flow emplaced sands are usually discontinuous and unpredictable, highly amalgamated slump and debris-flow sands may develop thick reservoirs. (3) By using the Eocene Frigg Formation as an analog, it is predicted that externally mounded seismic facies in the study area may be composed of sandy slumps and debris flows.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Lehtonen, L.R. [Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S.Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States); Straume, T.; Syvertsen, S.E.; Hodgkinson, R.J.; Skibeli, M. [Mobil Exploration Norway Inc., Stavanger (Norway)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

NETL: News Release - Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18, 2011 18, 2011 Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate Production Technologies Project Goals Include Injecting and Storing CO2 While Producing Methane Gas from Hydrate Washington, D.C. - A fully instrumented well that will test innovative technologies for producing methane gas from hydrate deposits has been safely installed on the North Slope of Alaska. As a result, the "Iġnik Sikumi" (Iñupiaq for "fire in the ice") gas hydrate field trial well will be available for field experiments as early as winter 2011-12. The well, the result of a partnership between ConocoPhillips and the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory, will test a technology that involves injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) into sandstone reservoirs containing methane hydrate. Laboratory studies indicate that the CO2 molecules will replace the methane molecules within the solid hydrate lattice, resulting in the simultaneous sequestration of CO2 in a solid hydrate structure and production of methane gas.

393

Determination of marine migratory behavior and its relationship to selected physical traits for least cisco (Coregonus sardinella) of the western Arctic coastal plain, Alaska.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With increased resource development on the western Arctic coastal plain of Alaska (especially within the oil extraction industry) it is important to understand the basic (more)

Seigle, John C.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Detection and Attribution of Regional Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a high resolution global coupled modeling capability to perform breakthrough studies of the regional climate change. The atmospheric component in our simulation uses a 1{sup o} latitude x 1.25{sup o} longitude grid which is the finest resolution ever used for the NCAR coupled climate model CCSM3. Substantial testing and slight retuning was required to get an acceptable control simulation. The major accomplishment is the validation of this new high resolution configuration of CCSM3. There are major improvements in our simulation of the surface wind stress and sea ice thickness distribution in the Arctic. Surface wind stress and ocean circulation in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current are also improved. Our results demonstrate that the FV version of the CCSM coupled model is a state of the art climate model whose simulation capabilities are in the class of those used for IPCC assessments. We have also provided 1000 years of model data to Scripps Institution of Oceanography to estimate the natural variability of stream flow in California. In the future, our global model simulations will provide boundary data to high-resolution mesoscale model that will be used at LLNL. The mesoscale model would dynamically downscale the GCM climate to regional scale on climate time scales.

Bala, G; Mirin, A

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest unexplored, potentially productive geologic onshore basin in the United States. The primary area of the coastal plain is the 1002 Area of ANWR established when ANWR was created. A decision on permitting the exploration and development of the 1002 Area is up to Congress and has not been approved to date. Also included in the Coastal Plain are State lands to the 3-mile offshore limit and Native Inupiat land near the village of Kaktovik. The USGS estimated: a 95 percent probability that at least 5.7 billion barrels of technically recoverable undiscovered oil are in the ANWR coastal plain,

396

Aircraft Emissions Deposited in the Stratosphere and Within the Arctic Polar Vortex. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an analysis of the quantity of emissions (water vapor, NO(x)) projected to be deposited directly within the Arctic polar vortex by projected fleets of Mach 2.4 high speed civil transports (HSCT`s). It also evaluates the amount of emissions from subsonic aircraft which are emitted into the lower stratosphere using aircraft emission inventories developed earlier for May 1990 as representative of the annual average.

Baughcum, S.L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Region 9: Pacific Rim Region, Regional Sustainability Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REGION 9: PACIFIC RIM REGION REGION 9: PACIFIC RIM REGION Regional Sustainability Plan Presented by Ruth Cox Region 9 Regional Administrator Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) May 22 nd , 2013 REGION 9 INFORMATION MANAGE Federal space  36 million RSF in Region Nine * 173 owned buildings, 955 leased buildings * 100,000 Federal workers housed DESIGN & CONSTRUCT new Federal buildings $1.4 billion in FY12 capital construction projects $318 million in FY13 - Los Angeles Courthouse project PROVIDE PROCUREMENT LEADERSHIP across the Federal government  $1.24 billion in total GSA Schedule sales in FY12  $468 million to small businesses  34,000 fleet vehicles, 53% of which are Alternative Fuel Vehicles Pacific Rim Profile - CA, AZ, NV, HI

398

Arctic Research Program Summary for FY2009 Program Goals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and radiation and their impacts on climate variability and change. We have established an observatory in Eureka of sea ice, and impacts of physical change on the marine ecosystem. This work is done through peer future evolution of the marine system in the study region. The modeling effort is lead by NOAA GLERL

399

Data/model integration for vertical mixing in the stable Arctic boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a short Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Data on atmospheric trace constituents and the vertical structure of stratus clouds from a 1996 expedition to the central Arctic reveal mechanisms of vertical mixing that have not been observed in mid-latitudes. Time series of the altitude and thickness of summer arctic stratus have been observed using an elastic backscatter lidar aboard an icebreaker. With the ship moored to the pack ice during 14 data collection stations and the lidar staring vertically, the time series represent advected cloud fields. The lidar data reveal a significant amount of vertical undulation in the clouds, strongly suggestive of traveling waves in the buoyantly damped atmosphere that predominates in the high Arctic. Concurrent observations of trace gases associated with the natural sulfur cycle (dimethyl sulfide, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and aerosols show evidence of vertical mixing events that coincide with a characteristic signature in the cloud field that may be called dropout or lift out. A segment of a cloud deck appears to be relocated from the otherwise quasicontinuous layer to another altitude a few hundred meters lower or higher. Atmospheric models have been applied to identify the mechanism that cause the dropout phenomenon and connect it dynamically to the surface layer mixing.

Barr, S.; ReVelle, D.O.; Kao, C.Y.J.; Bigg, E.K.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

State & Regional Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bioenergy Technologies Office partners with the National Biomass State and Regional Partnerships' five regional organizations that provide leadership in their regions with regard to policies...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Porosity enhancement from chert dissolution beneath Neocomian unconformity: Ivishak Formation, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secondary porosity caused by chert dissolution is common in the hydrocarbon-producing fluvial facies of the Ivishak Formation (Triassic), North Slope, Alaska. Petrographic observations suggest that macroporosity caused by chert dissolution tends to increase toward the Neocomian unconformity. In the Prudhoe Bay field, a lateral increase in core porosity (from 15% at about 30 km from the unconformity to 30% near the unconformity) and in permeability (from 50 md at about 30 km from the unconformity to 800 md near the unconformity) is evident toward the unconformity. This increase occurs within the fluvial facies (zone 4) of nearly uniform grain size and framework composition (chert litharenite). Major chert dissolution probably took place during the Neocomian uplift when the Ivishak Formation was exposed to acidic meteoric waters in the near-surface environment. 16 figures, 3 tables.

Shanmugam, G.; Higgins, J.B.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Carbon credits earned from a double slope active solar still under forced circulation mode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human life on land is vitally dependent on fresh water along with food and air. Many areas in the world do not have access to fresh water. Growing demands of freshwater resources are creating an urgent need to develop self sustained system to meet the demand. At present, many distillation methods are available like reverse osmosis, thin film distillation multi-effect fresh evaporation but they are energy intensive or contribute to environmental degradation. Distillation is one technique used for treating available brackish water into fresh water. However, solar energy can be used as an alternative source of energy for water distillation. In this paper, carbon dioxide emission, mitigation and carbon credit earned from a double slope active solar still under forced circulation mode has been carried out. It has been observed that carbon dioxide emission and carbon credit earned over the life time of 15 years are 2.55 tons and ?220 respectively.

A.K. Sethi; Vijay Kumar Dwivedi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Physical and Chemical Implications of Mid-Winter Pumping of Trunda Lakes - North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tundra lakes on the North Slope, Alaska, are an important resource for energy development and petroleum field operations. A majority of exploration activities, pipeline maintenance, and restoration activities take place on winter ice roads that depend on water availability at key times of the winter operating season. These same lakes provide important fisheries and ecosystem functions. In particular, overwintering habitat for fish is one important management concern. This study focused on the evaluation of winter water use in the current field operating areas to provide a better understanding of the current water use practices. It found that under the current water use practices, there were no measurable negative effects of winter pumping on the lakes studied and current water use management practices were appropriately conservative. The study did find many areas where improvements in the understanding of tundra lake hydrology and water usage would benefit industry, management agencies, and the protection of fisheries and ecosystems.

Hinzman, Larry D. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Lilly, Michael R. (Geo-Watersheds Scientific); Kane, Douglas L. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Miller, D. Dan (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Galloway, Braden K. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Hilton, Kristie M. (Geo-Watersheds Scientific); White, Daniel M. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center)

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Determination of Tafel slopes from coulostatically induced transients using an integral algorithm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis of coulostatically induced transients (CITs) has been used as a tool to evaluate the corrosion rate of metallic materials, and a new algorithm has been developed to calculate the Tafel slopes (ba and bc). This new algorithm is based on the coulostatic strong polarization integration (CSPI) method. Experimental results for carbon steels exposed to 0.5M H2SO and 1M \\{HCl\\} show excellent agreement between the proposed method and the Tafel line extrapolation method with IR drop correction. Furthermore, the calculated average corrosion currents over 8h tests are in good agreement with solution analysis data from atomic absorption spectroscopy. The improved CSPI algorithm shows superior performance over the differential algorithm and the conventional algorithm due to its simplicity and higher signal/noise ratio.

Yong-Tao Zhao; Xing-Peng Guo; Hai-Hong Li; Ze-Hua Dong

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

C sup 13 depleted authigenic carbonate buildups from hydrocarbon seeps, Louisiana Continental Slope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geohazard and geochemical survey data consisting of high-resolution profiles, side-scan sonographs, drop cores, dredge samples, and borings have substantiated the consistent association between carbonate buildups and hydrocarbon seeps on the Louisiana continental slope. Analyses of lithified bottom samples indicate a range of carbonate mineralogies including aragonite, Mg-calcite, and dolomite that are extremely depleted in the C{sup 13} isotope ({delta}C{sup 13} values to {minus} 48 {per thousand} PDB). Microbial oxidation of methane (biogenic and thermogenic) and crude oil creates a source of pore-water CO{sub 2} containing isotopically light carbon which triggers carbonate precipitation. Geophysical and geochemical evidence suggests that both surface and subsurface lithification is taking place. Recent observations and samples collected using a Pisces class research submersible confirm the abundance of C{sup 13} depleted sedimentary carbonates and massive authigenic buildups associated with the tops and flanks of shallow salt diapirs and gas hydrate hills.

Roberts, H.H.; Sassen, R.; Carney, R.; Aharon, P. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Phase Behavior, Solid Organic Precipitation, and Mobility Characterization Studies in Support of Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery on the Alaska North Slope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The medium-heavy oil (viscous oil) resources in the Alaska North Slope are estimated at 20 to 25 billion barrels. These oils are viscous, flow sluggishly in the formations, and are difficult to recover. Recovery of this viscous oil requires carefully designed enhanced oil recovery processes. Success of these recovery processes is critically dependent on accurate knowledge of the phase behavior and fluid properties, especially viscosity, of these oils under variety of pressure and temperature conditions. This project focused on predicting phase behavior and viscosity of viscous oils using equations of state and semi-empirical correlations. An experimental study was conducted to quantify the phase behavior and physical properties of viscous oils from the Alaska North Slope oil field. The oil samples were compositionally characterized by the simulated distillation technique. Constant composition expansion and differential liberation tests were conducted on viscous oil samples. Experiment results for phase behavior and reservoir fluid properties were used to tune the Peng-Robinson equation of state and predict the phase behavior accurately. A comprehensive literature search was carried out to compile available compositional viscosity models and their modifications, for application to heavy or viscous oils. With the help of meticulously amassed new medium-heavy oil viscosity data from experiments, a comparative study was conducted to evaluate the potential of various models. The widely used corresponding state viscosity model predictions deteriorate when applied to heavy oil systems. Hence, a semi-empirical approach (the Lindeloff model) was adopted for modeling the viscosity behavior. Based on the analysis, appropriate adjustments have been suggested: the major one is the division of the pressure-viscosity profile into three distinct regions. New modifications have improved the overall fit, including the saturated viscosities at low pressures. However, with the limited amount of geographically diverse data, it is not possible to develop a comprehensive predictive model. Based on the comprehensive phase behavior analysis of Alaska North Slope crude oil, a reservoir simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performance of a gas injection enhanced oil recovery technique for the West Sak reservoir. It was found that a definite increase in viscous oil production can be obtained by selecting the proper injectant gas and by optimizing reservoir operating parameters. A comparative analysis is provided, which helps in the decision-making process.

Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Santanu Khataniar

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Slope failure on the Jordan River Delta in the Dead Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dead Sea is a longitudinal (80 km {times} 20 km) terminal lake that was formed by the active Syrian-African transform fault. Considerably saline inflow from the Jordan River and a very high evaporation rate have led to the excessive salinity (360 g/L) and water density (1.226-1.232 g/cc) of the lake. The rate of evaporite precipitation is 630-2,000 mg/cm{sup 2}/yr. Clastic sediments from the Jordan River have formed a very moderately sloping (about 2{degree}) delta that covers the northern lake to a distance of 8 km offshore and to a depth of 300 m. Many irregularly shaped mounds of sediment that are acoustically transparent and that contain numerous discontinuous reflectors cover the delta slope. They extend over several hundred square meters each and rise 2-5 m above their surroundings. These sediments indicate active downslope slumping processes. The small-scale sedimentary pattern and the engineering properties of the sediments were examined by testing 6 core samples collected at various depths along the Jordan delta. Lengths range from 0.90 to 3.20 m. Depth of coring was restricted by an extremely hard, impenetrable layer of halite, and the topmost 10-25 cm consists of unconsolidated, recently deposited grainy halite. Euhedral crystals of halite are disseminated throughout the entire length of the core samples, especially in the deep-water cores. The high salinity of the pore water and the presence of large amounts of disseminated halite within the cores required modifications of the standard soil mechanics laboratory testing procedures. The sediments are predominantly dark brown, layered kaolinitic silty clays. They contain numerous conspicuous black organic-matter and sulfide-bearing layers and white aragonite and gypsum layers. Occasionally, slump structures are encountered.

Almagor, G. (Geological Survey of Israel, Jerusalem (Israel))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Alaska North Slope National Energy Strategy initiative: Analysis of five undeveloped fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy was directed in the National Energy Strategy to establish a federal interagency task force to identify specific technical and regulatory barriers to the development of five undeveloped North Slope Alaska fields and make recommendations for their resolution. The five fields are West Sak, Point Thomson, Gwydyr Bay, Seal Island/Northstar, and Sandpiper Island. Analysis of environmental, regulatory, technical, and economic information, and data relating to the development potential of the five fields leads to the following conclusions: Development of the five fields would result in an estimated total of 1,055 million barrels of oil and 4.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and total investment of $9.4 billion in 1992 dollars. It appears that all five of the fields will remain economically marginal developments unless there is significant improvement in world oil prices. Costs of regulatory compliance and mitigation, and costs to reduce or maintain environmental impacts at acceptable levels influence project investments and operating costs and must be considered in the development decision making process. The development of three of the fields (West Sak, Point Thomson, and Gwydyr Bay) that are marginally feasible would have an impact on North Slope production over the period from about 2000 to 2014 but cannot replace the decline in Prudhoe Bay Unit production or maintain the operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) beyond about 2014 with the assumption that the TAPS will shut down when production declines to the range of 400 to 200 thousand barrels of oil/day. Recoverable reserves left in the ground in the currently producing fields and soon to be developed fields, Niakuk and Point McIntyre, would range from 1 billion to 500 million barrels of oil corresponding to the time period of 2008 to 2014 based on the TAPS shutdown assumption.

Thomas, C.P.; Allaire, R.B.; Doughty, T.C.; Faulder, D.D.; Irving, J.S.; Jamison, H.C.; White, G.J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and the Western and Central Pacific Fishery Commission, for the Western PacificRegional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

410

On Stellar Coronae and Solar Active Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) observations of the Sun near peak activity level obtained on 1992 January 6, we search for coronal structures that have emission measure distributions EM(T) that match the observed stellar coronal emission measure distributions derived for the intermediate-activity stars Eri (K2 V) and ?BooA (G8 V) from Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer spectroscopic observations. We find that the temperatures of the peaks of the observed stellar distributions EM(T), as well as their slopes in the temperature range 6.0 log T 6.5, are very similar to those obtained for the brightest of the solar active regions in the 1992 January 6 SXT images. The observed slopes correspond approximately to EM ? T? with ? ~ 4, which is much steeper than predicted by static, uniformly heated loop models. Plasma densities in the coronae of Eri and ?BooA are also observed to be essentially the same as the plasma densities typical of solar active regions. These data provide the best observational support yet obtained for the hypothesis that solar-like stars up to the activity levels of Eri (K2 V) and ?BooA are dominated by active regions similar to, though possibly considerably larger than, those observed on the Sun. The surface filling factor of bright active regions needed to explain the observed stellar emission measures is approximately unity. We speculate on the scenario in which small-scale "nanoflares" dominate the heating of active regions up to activity levels similar to those of Eri (K2 V) and ?BooA. At higher activity levels still, the interactions of the active regions themselves may lead to increasing flaring on larger scales that is responsible for heating plasma to the observed coronal temperatures of T 107K on very active stars. Observations of X-ray and EUV light curves using more sensitive instruments than are currently available, together with determinations of plasma densities over the full range of coronal temperatures (106-107K and higher), will be important to confirm flare heating hypotheses and to elicit further details concerning coronal structures at solar-like active region temperatures (T 5 ? 106K) and the temperatures that characterize the most active stars (T 107K).

Jeremy J. Drake; Giovanni Peres; Salvatore Orlando; J. Martin Laming; Antonio Maggio

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Understanding theUnderstanding the Polar RegionsPolar Regions in Climate Changein Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the oceans and the atmosphere? #12;4 68 100 Gulf Stream Two ways to move heat : Ocean currents Atlantic Current provides about 60% of the inflow to the Arctic Ocean bringing warmer water from the Arctic Ocean through the passage between Greenland and Spitsbergen. http://www.aquatic.uoguelph.ca/oceans/ArticOceanWeb/Currents

Mountziaris, T. J.

412

An analysis of cattle-farming in the coffee producing area of the Pacific Slope in Guatemala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ANALYSIS OF CATTLE-FARMING IN THE COFFEE PRODUCING AREA OF THE PACIFIC SLOPE IN GUATEMALA A Thesis By OSCAR HUMBERTO CORDON Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Ma]or Sub]ect: Animal Science AN ANALYSIS OF CATTLE-FARMING IN THE COFFEE PRODUCING AREA OF THE PACIFIC SLOPE IN GUATEMALA A Thesis By OSCAR HUMBERTO CORDON Approved as to style and content by: airman...

Cordon, Oscar Humberto

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

An Analysis of Past and Future Changes in the Ice Cover of Two High-Arctic Lakes Based on Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Landsat Imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and heat energy between a lake and its surroundings (Adams, 1981). In high-arctic lakes, changes in ice climate data are limited, remote sensing of lake-ice conditions can provide valuable insight into climaticAn Analysis of Past and Future Changes in the Ice Cover of Two High-Arctic Lakes Based on Synthetic

Bradley, Raymond S.

414

Liquid layers were observed in the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) at temperatures down to 30C.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

down to ­30°C. S ignificant and interrelated atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial changes have been to be related to complex feedback processes unique to the Arctic. Arctic clouds have been identified | #12;playing a central role in several hypothesized feed- back processes (Curry et al. 1996; Vavrus

Eloranta, Edwin W.

415

Estimating Relative Abundance of White-tailed and Red Brocket Deer on the Western Slope of the Panama Canal Based on Photo Analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In 2004, the government of Panama created Ecoparque Panama with the aim of conserving unique habitat and curbing urbanization on the western slope of the (more)

Ashmore, Joshua Ross

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Distribution and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Validation of Cloud Cover and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia D. A. Spangenberg and V. Chakrapani Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia Introduction Determination of cloud radiation interactions over large areas of the Arctic is possible only with the use of data from polar orbiting satellites. Cloud detection using satellite data is difficult in the Arctic due to the minimal contrast between clouds and the underlying snow surface in visible and infrared wavelengths. Polar clouds are frequently warmer or at the same brightness temperature as the background surface, complicating cloud detection. The brightness temperature differences between the

417

Transverse slope of bed and turbid-clear water interface of channelized turbidity currents flowing around bends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Transverse slope of bed and turbid-clear water interface of channelized turbidity currents is assumed to be Froude-subcritical, and in the case of a turbidity current a relatively sharp interface between turbid water and clear water above is assumed. The analysis focuses on the processes that maintain

Parker, Gary

418

Downslope Flows on a Low-Angle Slope and Their Interactions with Valley Inversions. Part I: Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermally driven downslope flows were investigated on a low-angle (1.6) slope on the west side of the floor of Utahs Salt Lake Valley below the Oquirrh Mountains using data from a line of four tethered balloons running down the topographic ...

C. David Whiteman; Shiyuan Zhong

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A new laser-based system for obstacle detection including step, hole and slope for Personal Mobility Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new laser-based system for obstacle detection including step, hole and slope for Personal, and with standard chair wheels difficult. In this paper, we present a step and curb detection system based on laser sensors. This system is dedicated to vehicles able to cross over steps, for transportation systems

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

420

The nature and location of gassy sediment sections in the continental shelf and slope in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf and upper slope gassy sediments are a pervasive phenomena and an important consideration relative to engineering and acoustic activities on the sea floor. An examination of seismic data from over a thousand M.M.S. geohazard reports and core logs of 1 670 foundation boreholes drilled to an average subbottom depth of 125 m on the continental shelf and upper slope in the northwestern Gulf has revealed that gassy sediment sections are most abundant near the Mississippi River Delta in the sediment fill of buried stream channels that were eroded during the early and late Wisconsinan and in Miocene and PlioPleistocene depocenters on the continental shelf and upper slope. Out of the 1 670 bore holes examined 1 158 (68%) contained indications of gassy sediments most of which is of biogenic origin. Large patches of gassy sediments exist some exceeding 10 km in size but most are less than 500 m. The examination of 500 piston cores up to 40 meters in length taken on the mid and lower continental slope areas were almost void of gassy sediments as the result of the halokeiesis of allocthonous salt.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Assessment of structurally-controlled slope failure mechanisms and remedial design considerations at a feldspar open pit mine, Western Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A variety of structural discontinuities crossing the slopes of Alipasa feldspar open pit mine, in western Turkey, caused different types of slope failures which led to interruptions in ore production. Thereupon, extensive geotechnical investigations, including geological characterization, in-situ and laboratory geotechnical testing, long-term movement monitoring, back-analyses and possible remedial measures, were conducted. Field observations and subsequent analyses suggested that the failures were limited to benches and the movement developed down-slope along discontinuities due to the following reasons: (i) unfavorable orientations of the foliation planes and joints, (ii) low shear strength along discontinuities and (iii) exceptionally heavy rains filling the tension cracks prior to failure. Comparisons between movement vectors and orientation of discontinuities showed a good agreement that indicates two types of instability, namely, planar and wedge failures. A back analysis procedure for the assessment of failures along the rough discontinuities, with non-linear failure envelopes, was successfully applied to the unstable slopes in the pit. The results of the 2-D limit equilibrium back-analyses and movement monitoring data suggested that the wedges and/or planar blocks formed at the uppermost benches tended to move down to fill the gap which resulted from the previous movement of the blocks in the benches. Remedial measures such as dewatering and reduction of height of the benches were suggested. Results of stability analyses conducted for possible remedial measures were presented and discussed.

Hakan Tanyas; Resat Ulusay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E. Sherry'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE 1 ~) ~ ~ By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E solid waste landfill in which lateral displacements of up to 900 ft (275 m) and vertical settlements municipal solid waste landfill occupies 135 acres (546 km 2 ) approximately 9 miles (15.3 km) n

423

Evolving Adjustments to External (Gamma) Slope Factors for CERCLA Risk and Dose Assessments - 12290  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To model the external exposure pathway in risk and dose assessments of radioactive contamination at Superfund sites, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses slope factors (SFs), also known as risk coefficients, and dose conversion factors (DCFs). Without any adjustment these external radiation exposure pathways effectively assumes that an individual is exposed to a source geometry that is effectively an infinite slab. The concept of an 'infinite slab' means that the thickness of the contaminated zone and its aerial extent are so large that it behaves as if it were infinite in its physical dimensions. EPA has been making increasingly complex adjustments to account for the extent of the contamination and its corresponding radiation field to provide more accurate risk and dose assessment modeling when using its calculators. In most instances, the more accurate modeling results derived from these gamma adjustments are less conservative. The notable exception are for some radionuclides in rooms with contaminated walls, ceiling, and floors, and the receptor is in location of the room with the highest amount of radiation exposure, usually the corner of small rooms and the center of large conference rooms. (authors)

Walker, Stuart [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Economic monitoring of a contour surface mine in steep slope Appalachian topography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate estimates of the costs of various surface mining unit operations in steep Appalachian topography are seldom encountered, but are essential to assessment of the feasibility of improving mined land reclamation via Controlled Overburden Placement (COP) procedures. The purposes and methods of monitoring economic costs and overburden movement at a steeply sloping Appalachian contour surface mine in Wise County, Virginia, are discussed. The monitoring program consists of three phases: daily records of machinery operation, monthly site visits to record mining progress, and studies of unit operations at the Amos Ridge site and at other sites in the area. The monitoring program is designed to allow precise estimates to be made of the machine hours required to move and place defined amounts of overburden under specified conditions. Limitations to the accuracy of such estimates are detailed. Accurate economic information on various mining procedures will facilitate the evaluation of tradeoffs between costs and environmental effects, as is necessary to make effective public policy decisions which affect mine reclamation practice.

Zipper, C.E.; Daniels, W.L.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Temperature dependence of the Tafel slope and electrochemical barrier symmetry factor,. beta. , in electrode kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The significance of the new-established situation that the Tafel slopes, b, ( = d{eta}/d In i) for simple charge-transfer processes at electrodes are usually not represented with respect to variation with temperature, T, by the conventional relation b = RT/{beta} cpF, where {beta} is a constant-valued electrochemical charge-transfer barrier-symmetry coefficient, is examined in the light of recent comments on the problem. Clear evidence is given that b has the form b = RT({beta}sub H + T{beta}{sub s})F for proton transfer at Hg in water and various other solvents, where {beta}{sub H} and T{beta}{sub s} are enthalpic components of the overall {beta}, corresponding to experimentally observable potential-dependence of both the enthalpy and the entropy of activation, respectively. The frequent deviation from conventional behavior thus arises because the entropy of activation, as well as the energy of activation, can be potential-dependent, a situation that, until recently, has been neglected in inter-pretations of electrode-kinetic experiments. The origin of the conventional effect of potential on electrode reaction rates, through the change of electrode work function,{Phi}, with overpotential or electrode potential, V, ({Phi}{sub v} = {Phi}{sub v = O}{plus minus} eV), is examined critically in relation to the potential-dependent surface-potential component, {chi}{sub d}, in {Phi}, which can also be T-dependent.

Conway, B.E. (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (CA)); Tessier, D.F. (Alcan International, Research Labs. Kingston, Ontario (CA)); Wilkinson, D.P. (Moli Energy Limited, Burnaby, Vancouver, British Columbia (CA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge May 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Contacts

428

A Climatology of the Arctic on Mid-Tropospheric Temperature Regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A CLIMATOLOGY OF THE ARCTIC ON MID-TROPOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE REGULATION A Thesis by JEREMY PATRICK ANTHONY Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... Thermodynamics course in the spring of 2007. A trip to Dr. Norths office was always met with countless stories of things hes encountered along the way, and guidance for my journey. Dr. North is a big reason for my interest in climatology. Similarly, Dr...

Anthony, Jeremy Patrick

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

429

Surficial sediments of the continental rise and slope, Niger Delta, West Africa: properties and geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies, it also attempted to shed some light on the effects of the ongoing gravity tectonics, and the region's unique littoral circulation pattern, on surface sedimentation in deep water. To achieve its goals this study employed select geotechnical tests...

Kobilka, David William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Human estimation of slope, distance, and height of terrain in simulated lunar conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As NASA's Vision for Space Exploration seeks to explore mountainous regions near the southern pole through frequent, long excursions, astronauts will require accurate navigational assistance. Current and future technology, ...

Oravetz, Christopher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Tectonostratigraphic reconstruction and lithofacies distribution of tertiary slope sedimentary rocks in the Western Mississippi Canyon area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The distribution of upper Tertiary, sandstone-prone, deep-water sedimentary rocks from the vicinity of Cognac field, Mississippi Canyon (MC) 194, south of Mars field (MC763) is presented based on an integrated sequence stratigraphic analysis of seismic, well log, and biostratigraphic data. Paleo-salt distributions were reconstructed by plotting the changing positions of depocenters on five isopach maps generated from six key sequence boundaries. Depositional trends, projected under allochthonous salt sheets, indicated subsalt prospectivity. Sixteen sequences were interpreted and subdivided into three lowstand depositional units (basin-floor fan, slope fan, and prograding wedge). Thirty isochron/seismic facies maps were made to reveal the stratigraphic pattern through the late Tertiary. During the early Miocene, a salt-rimmed syncline centered north of Mars field in MC455 accumulated sediments. The salt rim collapsed, creating a middle Miocene turtle structure. Middle-late Miocene sand-rich turbidites bypassed this structure and were deposited to the south around Mars field and beyond. At the same time, another depotrough 30 mi east of Mars field channeled deep-water sands to the MC730 area. A late Miocene-early Pliocene counterregional fault striking parallel to the shelf edge formed as salt evacuated the area on the south side of the Cognac (MC194) and Lena (MC280) fields. This fault trapped the Pliocene reservoir sandstones that produce in these fields. Sedimentation during the late Pliocene-early Pleistocene was very slow (0.2m/1,000 yr) and characterized by thin, stacked, condensed sections of hemipelagic shale. Since the mid-Pleistocene, the Mississippi River has supplied sediments to the Mississippi Canyon area that have induced salt deformation that has in turn affected recent sedimentation.

Hannan, A.E.; Risch, D.L.; Chowdhury, A.N. [Geco-Prakla, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of using a polymer-based coating, Polibrid 705, to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment has been successfully demonstrated using a combination of field and laboratory testing. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Northern Navy and deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading dock. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors, exposed to the full annual Arctic weather cycle. The 12 months of field testing gave rise to little degradation of the sealant coating, except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at a research laboratory in St. Petersburg. The laboratory tests examined a variety of properties, including bond strength between the coating and the substrate, thermal cycling resistance, wear resistance, flammability, and ease of decontamination. The Polibrid 705 coating met all the Russian Navy qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities.

MOSKOWITZ,P.; COWGILL,M.; GRIFFITH,A.; CHERNAENKO,L.; DIASHEV,A.; NAZARIAN,A.

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

433

PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of using a polymer-based coating, Polibrid 705, to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment has been successfully demonstrated using a combination of field and laboratory testing. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Northern Navy and deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading dock. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors, exposed to the full annual Arctic weather cycle. The 12 months of field testing gave rise to little degradation of the sealant coating, except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at a research laboratory in St. Petersburg. The laboratory tests examined a variety of properties, including bond strength between the coating and the substrate, thermal cycling resistance, wear resistance, flammability, and ease of decontamination. The Polibrid 705 coating met all the Russian Navy qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities.

MOSKOWITZ,P.; COWGILL,M.; GRIFFITH,A.; CHERNAENKO,L.; DIASHEV,A.; NAZARIAN,A.

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

434

Remote arctic drilling operations in Russia, case history of Ardalin field operations, Timan Pechora Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In developing the Ardalin field, the Polar Lights Company merged Russian and western expertise to conduct drilling operations in a hostile and ecologically sensitive arctic tundra environment. The field is located above the Arctic Circle in northern Russia. The nearest Russian road system is over 60km away and the nearest railhead is 240 km from the field. Three Russian rigs were constructed with selected western upgrades, twelve development wells were drilled, and three existing Russian wells were worked over within a 24 month period. Operations were supported with a snow road in the winter season and Russian helicopter in the summer season. All materials for one year`s worth of drilling had to be transported to the field prior to break-up (end of trucking activities on the snow roads). Services and equipment were sourced from both inside and outside of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). Temperatures in winter reached -45{degrees}C. The field is located in one of the most ecologically sensitive areas in the world, and numerous precautions were taken for the protection of the environment. Russian operating philosophies were successfully merged with western practices. This paper will focus on the operational criteria initiated and infrastructure system that evolved to support this project.

Reyna, E.M.; Nicholson, S.; Brady, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cadmium in arctic Alaska wildlife: Kidney and liver residues and potential exposure in indigenous people  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In arctic Alaska, cadmium (Cd) levels are of concern in kidney and liver of terrestrial and marine mammals including: bowhead whale, beluga whale, walrus, caribou, and ringed seal. Cd levels in some animals exceed threshold criteria in kidney for renal dysfunction and other effects, tolerance levels for human consumption (liver = 1 ppm, kidney = 3 ppm), and WHO weekly intake limits (500 ug Cd/week). An assessment of risk to indigenous people and to wildlife populations, will be presented. Cigarette smoking is another major source of Cd to be considered. Reports from Greenland have concluded a health risk from Cd exposure from marine dietary sources and smoking exist for these residents. Bowhead whale kidney and walrus kidney and liver represent major dietary sources of Cd (blubber and meat have very little Cd). Followed by: ringed seal liver (kidney data not available), beluga whale liver and kidney, and caribou kidney. Small portions of bowhead and walrus kidney (< 10g/week) exceed weekly intake levels. Age positively correlates with Cd levels in kidney indicating that avoiding older (larger) animals would reduce exposure. Adverse effects of Cd in wildlife were not grossly evident, however, with no historic data, it is difficult to determine if tissue concentrations are elevated. Harvest of wildlife is important to many arctic people for nutritional and cultural survival. Assessing risks associated with contaminants is essential for the wellbeing of indigenous people and wildlife. The nutritional value of the local resources and the potential inadequate alternatives must be considered.

O`Hara, T. [Department of Wildlife Management, Barrow, AK (United States); Fairbrother, A. [e, p, and t, inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Becker, P. [Army Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Tarpley, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). College of Veterinary Medicine

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Eos, Vol. 89, No. 9, 26 February 2008 Arctic system model and to develop a suite of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for future conditions in the Arctic. 20­22 May 2008N Seventh Annual Environmen- tal Protection Agency (EPA, participants will learn about the role of technology in environmental protection as well as in the United) are located in this area. Preliminary geophysical stud- ies suggest that the mantle transition between

Gao, Stephen Shangxing

437

The Impact of Global Warming on the Carbon Cycle of Arctic Permafrost: An Experimental and Field Based Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our results to date indicate that CO2 and CH4 fluxes from organic poor, Arctic cryosols on Axel Heiberg Island are net CH4 sinks and CO2 emitters in contrast to organic-rich peat deposits at sub-Arctic latitudes. This is based upon field observations and a 1.5 year long thawing experiment performed upon one meter long intact cores. The results of the core thawing experiments are in good agreement with field measurements. Metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic analyses indicate that high affinity aerobic methanotrophs belong to the uncultivated USCalpha are present in <1% abundance in these cryosols are are active in the field during the summer and in the core thawing experiments. The methanotrophs are 100 times more abundant than the methanogens. As a result mineral cryosols, which comprise 87% of Arctic tundra, are net methane sinks. Their presence and activity may account for the discrepancies observed between the atmospheric methane concentrations observed in the Arctic predicted by climate models and the observed seasonal fluctuations and decadal trends. This has not been done yet.

Onstott, Tullis C [Princeton University; Pffifner, Susan M; Chourey, Karuna [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

438

Multiple Effects of Changes in Arctic Snow Cover Terry V. Callaghan, Margareta Johansson, Ross D. Brown, Pavel Ya. Groisman,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. water storage and release), thermal regimes (e.g. insulation), vegetation and trace gas fluxes and river ice surfaces for 8­10 months each year. Arctic climate has entered a unique period relative), thermal regimes (e.g. insulation), vegetation and trace gas fluxes (Figure 1). The livelihoods and well

Bradley, Raymond S.

439

2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 5 -Woodgate The Bering Sea/Bering Strait Relationship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlantic waters) form a cold (halocline) layer, which insulates the ice from the warm Atlantic water waters) form a cold (halocline) layer, which insulates the ice from the warm Atlantic water beneath 20% 50% The role of Pacific waters in the Arctic Implicated in the seasonal melt-back of ice

Washington at Seattle, University of

440

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Projected decline in spring snow depth on Arctic sea ice caused  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be a factor in sea ice loss but also with competing effects. Snow accumulation on top of sea ice insulates on Arctic sea ice caused by progressively later autumn open ocean freeze-up this century P.J. Hezel1 , X- tic sea ice in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) because of its importance for sea

Bitz, Cecilia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Optimization of a Sea Ice Model Using Basinwide Observations of Arctic Sea Ice Thickness, Extent, and Velocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

datasets. 1. Introduction Sea ice is important to the climate system because it insulates the cold polarOptimization of a Sea Ice Model Using Basinwide Observations of Arctic Sea Ice Thickness, Extent 2004, in final form 27 June 2005) ABSTRACT A stand-alone sea ice model is tuned and validated using

Feltham, Daniel

442

Apparent Contradiction: Psychrotolerant Bacteria from Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Arctic Tundra Soils That Degrade Diterpenoids Synthesized by Trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...important in the global carbon cycle and may have applications in...were contaminated with arctic diesel fuel, which contains about...degraders on hydrocarbons. In general, the 11 previously isolated...important in the global carbon cycle and may have applications in...

Zhongtang Yu; Gordon R. Stewart; William W. Mohn

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Analysis of two independent methods for retrieving liquid water profiles in spring and summer Arctic boundary clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based remote sensing, optimal estimation, LES model with explicit microphysics, cloud liquid water algorithms Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project. An algorithm developed by Frisch et al. [1995, 1998 matrix of the LWC profile is calculated, an optimal estimation method is applied to the SHEBA data

Shupe, Matthew

444

Paleoclimate History of the Arctic G H Miller, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA; University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paleoclimate History of the Arctic G H Miller, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA; University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland J Brigham-Grette, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA R B Alley, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA L Anderson, US Geological Survey, Denver, CO, USA H

Wolfe, Alexander P.

445

2014 REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK #12;2014 REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK 2014 Overview The Cincinnati USA Partnership for Economic Development and the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce are pleased to present the 2014 Regional Economic Outlook. This report was prepared by the Cincinnati USA Partnership's Regional

Boyce, Richard L.

446

Geologic interrelations relative to gas hydrates within the North Slope of Alaska: Task No. 6, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The five primary objectives of the US Geological Survey North Slope Gas Hydrate Project were to: (1) Determine possible geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate; (2) locate and evaluate possible gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs; (3) estimate the volume of gas within the hydrates; (4) develop a model for gas-hydrate formation; and (5) select a coring site for gas-hydrate sampling and analysis. Our studies of the North Slope of Alaska suggest that the zone in which gas hydrates are stable is controlled primarily by subsurface temperatures and gas chemistry. Other factors, such as pore-pressure variations, pore-fluid salinity, and reservior-rock grain size, appear to have little effect on gas hydrate stability on the North Slope. Data necessary to determine the limits of gas hydrate stability field are difficult to obtain. On the basis of mud-log gas chromatography, core data, and cuttings data, methane is the dominant species of gas in the near-surface (0--1500 m) sediment. Gas hydrates were identified in 34 wells utilizing well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were actually recovered in a core by an oil company. A possible scenario describing the origin of the interred gas hydrates on the North Slope involves the migration of thermogenic solution- and free-gas from deeper reservoirs upward along faults into the overlying sedimentary rocks. We have identified two (dedicated) core-hole sites, the Eileen and the South-End core-holes, at which there is a high probability of recovering a sample of gas hydrate. At the Eileen core-hole site, at least three stratigraphic units may contain gas hydrate. The South-End core-hole site provides an opportunity to study one specific rock unit that appears to contain both gas hydrate and oil. 100 refs., 72 figs., 24 tabs.

Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Magoon, L.B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

Mark B. Murphy

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Design of field test plots for a sloped waste rock surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westmin Resources Limited is a Western Canadian mining company with producing interests in base and precious metals and coals. Westmin`s Myra Falls Operations produce copper, zinc, and gold concentrates. The Myra Falls Operations are located in the central interior of Vancouver Island in a hanging glacial valley. Mean annual precipitation is approximately 3,000 mm with more than 75% occurring during the months of October to April. Historic surface deposition of waste rock has resulted in acid rock drainage (ARD). An applied research program was initiated to develop a cover system for the waste rock material at the Myra Falls site. The objective is to develop a cover system which controls the ingress of oxygen and infiltration of water, while providing a medium for sustainable vegetation that is consistent with the end land use of the area. Progress to date suggests that modified local till materials (amended with either fly ash or bentonite) can be used in soil cover construction. Four test plots were designed using two-dimensional saturated-unsaturated modelling tools to ensure that the performance of each test plot was representative of a full scale ARD cover system. This paper summarizes the design philosophy and principles of the cover system as well as the methodology for the two-dimensional numerical modelling program. Conclusions and results from the numerical modelling program are presented with a focus on implications for construction of the field test plots and installation of the performance monitoring instruments. The numerical modelling demonstrated that the hydraulic performance of a soil cover system placed on a sloped waste rock surface will be much different than that predicted by idealized one-dimensional numerical models, and in general current design methodologies. The modelling clearly demonstrated that the design of small scale field test plots was not a simple task. The physical dimensions of the field test plots had a significant impact on the ideal location for monitoring instruments and incorrect placement of instruments would lead to an erroneous measure of test plot performance.

O`Kane, M. [O`Kane Consultants, Inc., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Stoicescu, J.; Haug, M. [M.D. Haug and Associates Ltd., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Januszewski, S. [Westmin Resources Ltd., Campbell River, British Columbia (Canada). Myra Falls Operations; Mchaina, D.M. [Westmin Resources Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climatology of the North Slope of Alaska Climatology of the North Slope of Alaska and the Adjacent Arctic Ocean C. Marty, R. Storvold, and X. Xiong Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska K. H. Stamnes Stevens Institute of Technology Hoboken, New Jersey B. D. Zak Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Introduction Recent climate modeling results point to the Arctic as a region that is particularly sensitive to global climate change (e.g., IPCC 1997). The North Slope of Alaska-Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA-AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are designed to collect data on temperature-ice-albedo and water vapor-cloud-radiation feedbacks are believed to be important to the predicted global warming (Stamnes et al. 1999). The main goals of the

450

NOWCAST WITH A FORESCAST SNOW COVER SIMULATIONS ON SLOPES Sascha Bellaire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

weather stations. Recently, SNOWPACK was also forced with data from numerical weather prediction models, avalanche warning, numerical weather prediction models, snow cover stratigraphy, model output statistics 1 forecasting regions is often limited, especially in North America. Numerical Weather Prediction models (NWP

Jamieson, Bruce

451

Cryogenic Formations of Passive Margins, Ice Shelves and Continental Slopes Cryogenic Formations of Active Margins and the Regions Composed of Oceanic Crust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main types of sedimentogenesis appearing under different combinations of environmental factors, composition and properties of sedimentary matter along with sedimentary rock basins, cryogenic facies and the ma...

Prof. Alexander P. Lisitzin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Spatial distribution of canopy and subcanopy species along a sloping topography in a cool-temperate conifer-hardwood forest in the snowy region of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The spatial distributions of canopy and subcanopy species (?50?cm stem length) were investigated within a plot extending from the top of a ridge to the valley bottom in a cool-temperate old-growth mixed forest...

Kimiko Hirayama; Michinori Sakimoto

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Macrofaunal community structure on the gulf of mexico continental slope: the role of disturbance and habitat heterogeneity at local and regional scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2007 Major Subject: Zoology... Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Mary Wicksten Gilbert Rowe Committee...

Ammons, Archie Wood

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

454

Web: http://dust.ess.uci.edu/prp/prp_ans/prp_ans.pdf NSF Arctic Natural Sciences (ANS) Proposal ARC-0714088 Submitted: December 8, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Web: http://dust.ess.uci.edu/prp/prp_ans/prp_ans.pdf NSF Arctic Natural Sciences (ANS) Proposal ARC dissemination of LGGE snow measurements as http://dust.ess.uci.edu/snw. Identified IPY sub-disciplines as Snow

Zender, Charles

455

Pan-Arctic landatmospheric fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide in response to climate change over the 21st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future changes of pan-Arctic landatmospheric methane (CH[subscript 4]) and carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) depend on how terrestrial ecosystems respond to warming climate. Here, we used a coupled hydrologybiogeochemistry ...

Zhu, Xudong

456

"The Lord Will Provide": The History and Role of Episcopalian Christianity in Nets'aii Gwich'in Social Development--Arctic Village, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Christianity. The paper concludes with a discussion of Gwich'in Episcopalianism in the twenty-first century, and its role in the battle against oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge....

Dinero, Steven C.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

On the Link between Arctic Sea Ice Decline and the Freshwater Content of the Beaufort Gyre: Insights from a Simple Process Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent satellite and hydrographic observations have shown that the rate of freshwater accumulation in the Beaufort Gyre of the Arctic Ocean has accelerated over the past decade. This acceleration has coincided with the dramatic decline observed in ...

Peter E. D. Davis; Camille Lique; Helen L. Johnson

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

An interdecadal change in the relationship between boreal spring Arctic Oscillation and the East Asian Summer Monsoon around the early 1970s  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous studies suggested that the boreal spring Arctic Oscillation (AO) exerts a pronounced influence on the following East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) variability. This study reveals that the relationship of spring AO with the following EASM ...

Shangfeng Chen; Wen Chen; Renguang Wu

459

A Synergistic Analysis of Cloud Cover and Vertical Distribution from A-Train and Ground-Based Sensors over the High Arctic Station Eureka from 2006 to 2010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Active remote sensing instruments such as lidar and radar allow one to accurately detect the presence of clouds and give information on their vertical structure and phase. To better address cloud radiative impact over the Arctic area, a combined ...

Yann Blanchard; Jacques Pelon; Edwin W. Eloranta; Kenneth P. Moran; Julien Delano; Genevive Sze

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Radiocarbon in particulate matter from the eastern sub-arctic Pacific Ocean; evidence of a source of terrestrial carbon to the deep sea.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EASTERN SUB-ARCTIC PACIFIC OCEAN: EVIDENCE OF A SOURCEfrom the deep Northeast Pacific Ocean. Due to the largeMap of the North Pacific Ocean (after Favorite, Dodimead &

Druffel, Ellen R M; Honju, Susumu; Griffin, Sheila; Wong, C S

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Radionuclides in the Arctic seas from the former Soviet Union: Potential health and ecological risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the assessment reported here is to evaluate the health and environmental threat to coastal Alaska posed by radioactive-waste dumping in the Arctic and Northwest Pacific Oceans by the FSU. In particular, the FSU discarded 16 nuclear reactors from submarines and an icebreaker in the Kara Sea near the island of Novaya Zemlya, of which 6 contained spent nuclear fuel (SNF); disposed of liquid and solid wastes in the Sea of Japan; lost a {sup 90}Sr-powered radioisotope thermoelectric generator at sea in the Sea of Okhotsk; and disposed of liquid wastes at several sites in the Pacific Ocean, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. In addition to these known sources in the oceans, the RAIG evaluated FSU waste-disposal practices at inland weapons-development sites that have contaminated major rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean. The RAIG evaluated these sources for the potential for release to the environment, transport, and impact to Alaskan ecosystems and peoples through a variety of scenarios, including a worst-case total instantaneous and simultaneous release of the sources under investigation. The risk-assessment process described in this report is applicable to and can be used by other circumpolar countries, with the addition of information about specific ecosystems and human life-styles. They can use the ANWAP risk-assessment framework and approach used by ONR to establish potential doses for Alaska, but add their own specific data sets about human and ecological factors. The ANWAP risk assessment addresses the following Russian wastes, media, and receptors: dumped nuclear submarines and icebreaker in Kara Sea--marine pathways; solid reactor parts in Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean--marine pathways; thermoelectric generator in Sea of Okhotsk--marine pathways; current known aqueous wastes in Mayak reservoirs and Asanov Marshes--riverine to marine pathways; and Alaska as receptor. For these waste and source terms addressed, other pathways, such as atmospheric transport, could be considered under future-funded research efforts for impacts to Alaska. The ANWAP risk assessment does not address the following wastes, media, and receptors: radioactive sources in Alaska (except to add perspective for Russian source term); radioactive wastes associated with Russian naval military operations and decommissioning; Russian production reactor and spent-fuel reprocessing facilities nonaqueous source terms; atmospheric, terrestrial and nonaqueous pathways; and dose calculations for any circumpolar locality other than Alaska. These other, potentially serious sources of radioactivity to the Arctic environment, while outside the scope of the current ANWAP mandate, should be considered for future funding research efforts.

Layton, D W; Edson, R; Varela, M; Napier, B

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Variations in the age of Arctic sea-ice and summer sea-ice extent Ignatius G. Rigor1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. On time scales of days to weeks, wind stresses from storms produce ridges of sea-ice and areas of openVariations in the age of Arctic sea-ice and summer sea-ice extent Ignatius G. Rigor1,2 and John M] Three of the past six summers have exhibited record low sea-ice extent on the Arctic Ocean. These minima

Rigor, Ignatius G.

464

WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership is one of seven partnerships which have been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon dioxide capture, transport and sequestration (CT&S) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and the North Slope of Alaska. Led by the California Energy Commission, the West Coast Partnership is a consortium of over thirty five organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national labs and universities; private companies working on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. In an eighteen month Phase I project, the Partnership will evaluate both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options. Work will focus on five major objectives: (1) Collect data to characterize major CO{sub 2} point sources, the transportation options, and the terrestrial and geologic sinks in the region, and compile and organize this data via a geographic information system (GIS) database; (2) Address key issues affecting deployment of CT&S technologies, including storage site permitting and monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks (3) Conduct public outreach and maintain an open dialogue with stakeholders in CT&S technologies through public meetings, joint research, and education work (4) Integrate and analyze data and information from the above tasks in order to develop supply curves and cost effective, environmentally acceptable sequestration options, both near- and long-term (5) Identify appropriate terrestrial and geologic demonstration projects consistent with the options defined above, and create action plans for their safe and effective implementation A kickoff meeting for the West Coast Partnership was held on Sept 30-Oct.1. Contracts were then put into place with twelve organizations which will carry out the technical work required to meet Partnership objectives.

Larry Myer; Terry Surles; Kelly Birkinshaw

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4-04 4-04 Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requestor.

466

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska, Open File Report 98-34, 1999) provided basic information used in this study. A prior assessment was completed in 1987 by the USGS. Information from recent offset drilling, offsetting discoveries, and new geologic and geophysical data were used to update the oil and gas resource potential. An evaluation was made of each of 10 petroleum plays (similar geologic settings). For each play, USGS constructed statistical distributions of the number and size of potential accumulations based on a probabilistic range of geologic attributes. Minimum accumulation size was 500 million barrels. The resulting distributions were subjected to three risk parameters. Risk was assigned for the occurrence of adequate generation and migration of petroleum to meet the minimum size requirements, for the occurrence of reservoir rock to contain the minimum volume, and for the occurrence of a trapping mechanism to seal the petroleum in the reservoir. USGS analysts applied an appropriate recovery factor to the estimated oil in place that was calculated for each play to obtain an estimate of technically recoverable petroleum resources. The combined recovery factor for the entire study area averages approximately 37 percent of the initial oil in place. It is likely that the actual recovery factor of potential large fields would exceed 37 percent, because the nearby giant Prudhoe Bay field recovery factor will exceed 50 percent.

467

Topographical differences in soil N transformation using15N dilution method along a slope in a conifer plantation forest in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil N transformation was investigated using15N dilution method along a slope on a conifer plantation forest. Although there was no significant difference in...15N dilution method showed a distinct difference not...

Naoko Tokuchi; Muneto Hirobe; Keisuke Koba

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

469

Western Regional Partnership Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regional Partnership Overview Regional Partnership Overview June 2013 Briefing Overview  WRP Background  Importance of Region  WRP Tribal Relations Committee  WRP Energy Committee WRP Region's Uniqueness  5 states stretching from the Great Plains to the Pacific Ocean  Diverse terrain ranging from desert valleys to forested mountains  Significant State Trust Landholdings  Approximately 188 Federally recognized Tribes  Significant amounts of Federally managed land  According to GSA 2004 study, WRP states range from 41.8% - 84.5% of total state land WRP Region's Importance to DoD  Extensive Training Ranges  Interconnected ground/air ranges provide unmatched warfighter training opportunities

470

Effect of cropland management and slope position on soil organic carbon pool at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil organic matter is strongly related to soil type, landscape morphology, and soil and crop management practices. Therefore, long-term (1536-years) effects of six cropland management systems on soil organic carbon (SOC) pool in 030cm depth were studied for the period of 19391999 at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds (pool ranged from 24.5Mgha?1 in the 32-years moldboard tillage corn (Zea mays L.)wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)meadowmeadow rotation with straight row farming and annual application of fertilizer (N:P:K=5:9:17) of 56112kgha?1 and cattle (Bos taurus) manure of 9Mgha?1 as the prevalent system (MTR-P) to 65.5Mgha?1 in the 36-years no tillage continuous corn with contour row farming and annual application of 170225kgNha?1 and appropriate amounts of P and K, and 611Mgha?1 of cattle manure as the improved system (NTC-M). The difference in SOC pool among management systems ranged from 2.4 to 41Mgha?1 and was greater than 25Mgha?1 between NTC-M and the other five management systems. The difference in the SOC pool of NTC-M and that of no tillage continuous corn (NTC) were 1621Mgha?1 higher at the lower slope position than at the middle and upper slope positions. The effect of slope positions on SOC pools of the other management systems was significantly less (water conservation farming on SOC pool were accumulative. The NTC-M treatment with application of NPK fertilizer, lime, and cattle manure is an effective cropland management system for SOC sequestration.

Y Hao; R Lal; L.B Owens; R.C Izaurralde; W.M Post; D.L Hothem

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Improving single slope ADC and an example implemented in FPGA with 16.7 GHz equivalent counter clook frequency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single slope ADC is a common building block in many ASCI or FPGA based front-end systems due to its simplicity, small silicon footprint, low noise interference and low power consumption. In single slope ADC, using a Gray code counter is a popular scheme for time digitization, in which the comparator output drives the clock (CK) port of a register to latch the bits from the Gray code counter. Unfortunately, feeding the comparator output into the CK-port causes unnecessary complexities and artificial challenges. In this case, the propagation delays of all bits from the counter to the register inputs must be matched and the counter must be a Gray code one. A simple improvement on the circuit topology, i.e., feeding the comparator output into the D-port of a register, will avoid these unnecessary challenges, eliminating the requirement of the propagation delay match of the counter bits and allowing the use of regular binary counters. This scheme not only simplifies current designs for low speeds and resolutions, but also opens possibilities for applications requiring higher speeds and resolutions. A multi-channel single slope ADC based on a low-cost FPGA device has been implemented and tested. The timing measurement bin width in this work is 60 ps, which would need a 16.7 GHz counter clock had it implemented with the conventional Gray code counter scheme. A 12-bit performance is achieved using a fully differential circuit making comparison between the input and the ramping reference, both in differential format.

Wu, Jinyuan; /Fermilab; Odeghe, John; /South Carolina State U.; Stackley, Scott; /Boston U.; Zha, Charles; /Rice U.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Regional Comparisons, Spatial Aggregation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Regional Comparisons, Spatial Aggregation, and Asymmetry of Price Pass-Through in U.S. Gasoline Markets MICHAEL YE*, JOHN ZYREN**, JOANNE SHORE**, AND MICHAEL BURDETTE** Abstract Spot to retail price pass-through behavior of the U.S. gasoline market was investigated at the national and regional levels, using weekly wholesale and retail motor gasoline prices from January 2000 to the present. Asymmetric pass-through was found across all regions, with faster pass-through when prices are rising. Pass-through patterns, in terms of speed and time for completion, were found to vary from region to region. Spatial aggregation was investigated at the national level and the East Coast with the aggregated cumulative pass-through being greater than the volume-weighted regional pass-through when spot prices increase. These results are useful to the petroleum industry, consumers,

473

Arctic Exploration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... whalers proceed to their fishing-ground, and is known as "the whale-fisher's bight. In the spring the Polar pack begins to drift to the southward and westward ... the north. "All experience seems to prove, adds Nordenskiold, "that the polar basin, when not covered with compact, unbroken ice, is filled with closely-packed, unnavigable ...

C. R. MARKHAM

1871-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

474

Distribution of high molecular weight hydrocarbons in northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

odd- carbon preference in the n-C23 to n-C33 region. Marine inputs are often distinguishable by the presence of odd-chain normal alkanes with 15, 17, and 19 carbon 8'toms . 3- In petroleum, pristane and phytane are present at similar... in the upper 15 cm of marine sand ranged from 0. 2 to 19. 9 pg/g. No strong evidence for oil pollution was found in the study area. However, one sample with a relatively high hydrocarbon/organic carbon ratio may have been contaminated with petroleum...

Sericano, Jose Luis

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Climate Variability and Temporal Trends of Persistent Organic Pollutants in the Arctic: A Study of Glaucous Gulls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study thus suggests that predicted climate change should be considered in assessments of future temporal trends of POPs in Arctic wildlife. ... Climate variation may be measured in a multiude of ways (temperature, wind, precipitation, snowfall, sea ice distribution, glacier melting, etc.). ... The asymmetries in the pressure pattern mean that cool winds sweep east-southeast across eastern Canada, and southwesterly North Atlantic storm tracks bring rain and mild temperatures to northern Europe. ...

Jan O. Bustnes; Geir W. Gabrielsen; Jonathan Verreault

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

476

PCW/PHEOS-WCA: QUASI-GEOSTATIONARY VIEWING OF THE ARCTIC AND ENVIRONS FOR WEATHER, CLIMATE AND AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND AIR QUALITY J. C. McConnell(1) , C. T.McElroy(1) , C. Sioris(1) , N. O'Neill(2) , R. Nassar(3) , H and UVS science instruments with an imaging capacity for Arctic and mid-latitude weather, climate and air quality science. We report on the outcome of a Phase A study completed in March 2012 conducted by ABB, COM

Chance, Kelly

477

DIAGNOSING THE TIME-DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. I. LOW-FREQUENCY NANOFLARES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observational measurements of active region emission measures contain clues to the time dependence of the underlying heating mechanism. A strongly nonlinear scaling of the emission measure with temperature indicates a large amount of hot plasma relative to warm plasma. A weakly nonlinear (or linear) scaling of the emission measure indicates a relatively large amount of warm plasma, suggesting that the hot active region plasma is allowed to cool and so the heating is impulsive with a long repeat time. This case is called low-frequency nanoflare heating, and we investigate its feasibility as an active region heating scenario here. We explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. For each model run, we calculate the slope {alpha} of the emission measure distribution EM(T){proportional_to}T {sup {alpha}}. Our conclusions are: (1) low-frequency nanoflare heating is consistent with about 36% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are not accounted for; (2) proper consideration of uncertainties yields a range in which as many as 77% of observed active regions are consistent with low-frequency nanoflare heating and as few as zero; (3) low-frequency nanoflare heating cannot explain observed slopes greater than 3; (4) the upper limit to the volumetric energy release is in the region of 50 erg cm{sup -3} to avoid unphysical magnetic field strengths; (5) the heating timescale may be short for loops of total length less than 40 Mm to be consistent with the observed range of slopes; (6) predicted slopes are consistently steeper for longer loops.

Bradshaw, S. J.; Reep, J. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

478

SOLVENT-BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY PROCESSES TO DEVELOP WEST SAK ALASKA NORTH SLOPE HEAVY OIL RESOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-year research program is conducted to evaluate the feasibility of applying solvent-based enhanced oil recovery processes to develop West Sak and Ugnu heavy oil resources found on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The project objective is to conduct research to develop technology to produce and market the 300-3000 cp oil in the West Sak and Ugnu sands. During the first phase of the research, background information was collected, and experimental and numerical studies of vapor extraction process (VAPEX) in West Sak and Ugnu are conducted. The experimental study is designed to foster understanding of the processes governing vapor chamber formation and growth, and to optimize oil recovery. A specially designed core-holder and a computed tomography (CT) scanner was used to measure the in-situ distribution of phases. Numerical simulation study of VAPEX was initiated during the first year. The numerical work completed during this period includes setting up a numerical model and using the analog data to simulate lab experiments of the VAPEX process. The goal was to understand the mechanisms governing the VAPEX process. Additional work is recommended to expand the VAPEX numerical study using actual field data obtained from Alaska North Slope.

David O. Ogbe; Tao Zhu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

A comparison of the ingredients of stellar population models on the inference of the slope of the initial mass function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a direct comparison between two new single stellar population (SSP) models constructed specifically for the purpose of studying old, metal-rich stellar populations. We examine the effect of the underlying model assumptions and ingredients, such as stellar libraries or isochrones, on the inference of the Initial Mass Function (IMF) slope down to 0.1 solar masses in massive early-type galaxies (ETGs). For both models, we study equivalent widths of stellar features with varying ages, metallicity and elemental abundances, as a function of the IMF slope. We show that the use of optical indices, mainly from TiO and CaH molecular absorption lines, permits us to eliminate the uncertainty caused by the different stellar libraries used in the synthesis process. Neither of the two SSP models are able to simultaneously reproduce all the optical stellar features in SDSS ETGs with \\sigma > 250km/s if we restrict the analysis to solar abundance patterns and to line-index measurements.We also find that predictions...

Spiniello, Chiara; Koopmans, Lon V E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

About Rocky Mountain Region  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rates About the Rocky Mountain Region RM Office The Platte River Power Authority in Colorado, Nebraska Public Power District, Kansas Electric Power Cooperative and Wyoming...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic slope regional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to serve as "go-to" organization to catalyze PA Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Economy development #12;FundingHYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA Melissa Klingenberg, PhDMelissa Klingenberg, PhD #12;Hydrogen ProgramHydrogen Program Air Products

482

Regional Analysis Briefs  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

2028-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Regional Competitions - EERE Commercialization Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Competitions Six Regional Clean Energy Business Plan Competitions are taking place across the country- representing all of the United States' distinct regions. The...

484

Spoil handling and reclamation costs at a contour surface mine in steep slope Appalachian topography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate overburden handling cost estimation methods are essential to effective pre-mining planning for post-mining landforms and land uses. With the aim of developing such methods, the authors have been monitoring costs at a contour surface mine in Wise County, Virginia since January 1, 1984. Early in the monitoring period, the land was being returned to its Approximate Original Contour (AOC) in a manner common to the Appalachian region since implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA). More recently, mining has been conducted under an experimental variance from the AOC provisions of SMCRA which allowed a near-level bench to be constructed across the upper surface of two mined points and an intervening filled hollow. All mining operations are being recorded by location. The cost of spoil movement is calculated for each block of coal mined between January 1, 1984, and August 1, 1985. Per cubic yard spoil handling and reclamation costs are compared by mining block. The average cost of spoil handling was $1.90 per bank cubic yard; however, these costs varied widely between blocks. The reasons for those variations included the landscape positions of the mining blocks and spoil handling practices. The average reclamation cost was $0.08 per bank cubic yard of spoil placed in the near level bench on the mined point to $0.20 for spoil placed in the hollow fill. 2 references, 4 figures.

Zipper, C.E.; Hall, A.T.; Daniels, W.L.

1985-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

485

Seismic geomorphological analysis of deepwater gravity-driven deposits on a slope system of the southern Colombian Caribbean margin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gravity-driven processes are important agents for transporting sediments downslope into deep-marine environments. The Pliocene to Holocene offshore succession of the Colombian Caribbean margin and its stratigraphic distribution, have been affected by faulting and mud diapirism, and have been characterized using 3D seismic data. Nine stratigraphic intervals were characterized within the study, and are interpreted to consist of a range of seismic geomorphologies, including slumps and debrites. Nine gravity-driven deposits were defined within the study area, interpreted to have been transported to the north and northwest. Slumps display high-amplitude, high continuity, elongated, stratified, lobate and confined morphologies, while debrites have a reflection-free pattern or show discontinuous, low-amplitude and chaotic reflections. Mixed slumps-turbidites-debrites deposits are composed by a succession of laterally and vertically interfingered slumps, debrites and turbidites. These deposits are morphologically lobate and broadly scattered. In addition, erosional features such as basal small scours, megascours, linear scours and rafted blocks were used as kinematic indicators within the gravity-driven deposits. There are several candidates triggering mechanism, including over-steepening of slope (related to high sediment supply or slope tectonism). In the study area, confined slumps and debrites with a main transport direction from south to north have been observed, while transport direction of the mixed slumps-turbidites-debrites was toward northwest. Additionally, the fact that slumps and debrites are found in depocenters between periclines suggests a confined environment of deposition. Finally, mixed slumps-turbidites-debrites are unconfined without evident structural control. We suggest that local intraslope sub-basin margin become over-steepened as a result of mud diapirism in the subsurface. In this situation, the paleobathymetry was sufficient to trap the resultant gravity-driven deposits within the sub-basins, suggesting a local origin. Seismic evidence of BSR (Bottom Simulating Reflector) suggests the presence of gas hydrate in the study area, and is taken as an additional potential mechanism to provide instability of slope and generate gravity-driven deposits.

Esteban Alfaro; Michael Holz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Evaluation of corrosion rate from polarisation curves not exhibiting a Tafel region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evaluation of corrosion rate by Tafel extrapolation is often impossible, simply because an experimental polarisation curve does not exhibit linear Tafel regions. This paper shows how such curves for the Fe/H2O/H+/O2 corrosion system can be accurately deconstructed to furnish both kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the anodic and cathodic reactions. The curved anodic branch (due to film formation) is then amenable to correction for IR voltage drop and the resulting Tafel slope and other parameters are then substituted in the Tafel equation to accurately determine icorr. An alternative method to obtain the anodic Tafel slope has been used to validate the above approach. Polarisation curves describing the inhibition of mild steel in industrial cooling water were scanned/digitised from the literature.

Harvey J. Flitt; D. Paul Schweinsberg

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Regional Planning | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Regional Planning Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Alias (field_alias) Apply California, Oregon, Washington Regional Ocean Partnership West Coast Governors' Alliance Regional Data Portal In Development U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico Regional Ocean Partnership U.S. Caribbean Regional Ocean Partnership-currently being formally established Regional Data Portal To be developed Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina Regional Ocean Partnership Governors' South Atlantic Alliance Regional Data Portal Currently in development American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Marshall Islands, Palau

488

the Regional Development Corporation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carry out this work, CPO partners carry out this work, CPO partners with the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation for education, the Regional Development Corporation for economic development, and the regional United Way organizations for community giving. Education Los Alamos National Security (LANS) invests more than $1 million each year to enhance regional educational opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. Education Focus Areas Our education commitments address four focus areas: * Workforce Development * Student Internships * Teacher and Faculty Professional Development * Public Understanding of Science In 2011, more than 1,100 students

489

Gas Production From a Cold, Stratigraphically Bounded Hydrate Deposit at the Mount Elbert Site, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an effort to identify suitable targets for a planned long-term field test, we investigate by means of numerical simulation the gas production potential from unit D, a stratigraphically bounded (Class 3) permafrost-associated hydrate occurrence penetrated in the ount Elbert well on North Slope, Alaska. This shallow, low-pressure deposit has high porosities, high intrinsic permeabilities and high hydrate saturations. It has a low temperature because of its proximity to the overlying permafrost. The simulation results indicate that vertical ells operating at a constant bottomhole pressure would produce at very low rates for a very long period. Horizontal wells increase gas production by almost two orders of magnitude, but production remains low. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the initial deposit temperature is y the far the most important factor determining production performance (and the most effective criterion for target selection) because it controls the sensible heat available to fuel dissociation.

Moridis, G.J.; Silpngarmlert, S.; Reagan, M. T.; Collett, T.S.; Zhang, K.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Comparison of conventional solar chimney power plants and sloped solar chimney power plants using second law analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the present paper the performance of solar chimney power plants based on second law analysis is investigated for various configurations. A comparison is made between the conventional solar chimney power plant (CSCPP) and the sloped solar chimney power plant (SSCPP). The appropriate entropy generation number and second-law efficiency for solar chimney power plants are proposed in this study. Results show that there is the optimum collector size that provides the minimum entropy generation and the maximum second-law efficiency. The second-law efficiency of both systems increases with the increasing of the system height. The study reveals the influence of various effects that change pressure and temperature of the systems. It was found that SSCPP is thermodynamically better than CSCPP for some configurations. The results obtained here are expected to provide information that will assist in improving the overall efficiency of the solar chimney power plant.

Atit Koonsrisuk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

GPS-based slope monitoring systems and their applications in transition mining from open-pit to underground  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combining methods of open-pit and underground mining can yield maximum economic outcomes, while they may also cause large-scaled geological hazards, such as landslides. Failure to prevent landslides in mining areas could result in losses and damages to equipment, surrounding environments, and even human lives. In this paper, we report the application of global positioning system (GPS) for monitoring the Anjialing Coal Mine, the first mine in China that employs the combining methods of open-pit and underground mining. Mine slopes with different inclined angles were monitored and precise data of ground movements were obtained. Mathematic modelling of the subsidence rate over time has successfully detected the occurrence of terminal subsidence rate and a corresponding a landslide. The equipment and persons involved were evacuated and kept safe before the medium landslide occurred. In conclusion, the GPS monitoring system is proved to be effective in mitigating the geological hazards in mining areas.

Gang Chen; Xingwen Cheng; Weitao Chen; Xianju Li; Liangbiao Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Multiangle Observations of Arctic Clouds from FIRE ACE: June 3, 1998 Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May and June 1998 the Airborne Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (AirMISR) participated in the FIRE Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE). AirMISR is an airborne instrument for obtaining multiangle imagery similar to that of the satellite-borne MISR instrument. This paper presents a detailed analysis of the data collected on June 3, 1998. In particular, AirMISR radiance measurements are compared with measurements made by two other instruments, the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and the MODIS airborne simulator (MAS), as well as to plane-parallel radiative transfer simulations. It is found that the AirMISR radiance measurements and albedo estimates compare favorably both with the other instruments and with the radiative transfer simulations. In addition to radiance and albedo, the multiangle AirMISR data can be used to obtain estimates of cloud top height using stereoimaging techniques. Comparison of AirMISR retrieved cloud top height (using the complete MISR-based stereoimaging approach) shows excellent agreement with the measurements from the airborne Cloud Lidar System (CLS) and ground-based millimeter-wave cloud radar.

Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; King, M. D.; Moroney, C.; Davies, R.; Muller, J.-P. A. L.; Gerber, H.

2001-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

493

Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

494

Regional and Global Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

495

Regional Districts (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Adjacent Water Control and Improvement Districts and Municipal Utility Districts can opt to form a Regional District to oversee water issues. Such districts may be created:(1) to purchase, own,...

496

Spectral analysis of the efficiency of vertical mixing in the deep ocean due to interaction of tidal currents with a ridge running down a continental slope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficiency of mixing, resulting from the reflection of an internal wave field imposed on the oscillatory background flow with a three-dimensional bottom topography, is investigated using a linear approximation. The radiating wave field is associated with the spectrum of the linear model, which consists of those mode numbers n and slope values ?, for which the solution represents the internal waves of frequencies ? = n?0 radiating upwrad of the topography, where ?0 is the fundamental frequency at which internal waves are generated at the topography. The effects of the bottom topography and the earths rotation on the spectrum is analyzed analytically and numerically in the vicinity of the critical slope, which is a slope with the same angle to the horizontal as the internal wave characteristic. In this notation, ? is latitude, f is the Coriolis parameter and N is the buoyancy frequency, which is assumed to be a constant, which corresponds to the uniform stratification.

Ibragimov, Ranis N.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

497

ARM Climate Research Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska: Field Campaigns in 2007, New Facilities, and the International Polar Year  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate Research Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska: Climate Research Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska: Field Campaigns in 2007, New Facilities, and the International Polar Year Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC): Feb 26 - Mar 14 2007 Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Contributors: Mark Ivey, Bernie Zak, Jeff Zirzow, Sandia National Labs Dana Truffer-Moudra, University of Alaska Fairbanks Hans Verlinde, Chad Bahrmann, Scott Richardson, Penn State University Winter

498

A Structural Analysis of Star-Forming Region AFGL 490  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the star-forming region containing intermediate-mass young stellar object (YSO) AFGL 490. We supplement these data with near-IR 2MASS photometry and with deep SQIID observations off the central high extinction region. We have more than doubled the known membership of this region to 57 Class I and 303 Class II YSOs via the combined 1-24 um photometric catalog derived from these data. We construct and analyze the minimum spanning tree of their projected positions, isolating one locally over-dense cluster core containing 219 YSOs (60.8% of the region's members). We find this cluster core to be larger yet less dense than similarly analyzed clusters. Although the structure of this cluster core appears irregular, we demonstrate that the parsec-scale surface densities of both YSOs and gas are correlated with a power law slope of 2.8, as found for other similarly analyzed nearby molecular clouds. We also explore the mass segregation implications of AFGL 490's offset fr...

Masiunas, L C; Pipher, J L; Megeath, S T; Myers, P C; Allen, L E; Kirk, H M; Fazio, G G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

The Association of the North Atlantic and the Arctic Oscillation on Wind Energy Resource over Europe and its Intermittency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study focuses on a better understanding of the influences of the North Atlantic and the Arctic Oscillation on wind power resource over Europe. In the case of a change in phase of the oscillations, wind power density can vary by a factor of three in northern Europe, and a similar effect (but opposite in sign) is seen for southern Europe. Similar results are obtained by calculating the energy output of hypothetical wind turbines. In this way, we have identified an interconnection potential between wind farms in northern and southern Europe in order to reduce intermittency at an aggregate scale.

Pascal Kriesche; C. Adam Schlosser

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Regional Retail Gasoline Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Retail gasoline prices, like those for distillate fuels, have hit record prices nationally and in several regions this year. The national average regular gasoline price peaked at $1.68 per gallon in mid-June, but quickly declined, and now stands at $1.45, 17 cents higher than a year ago. Two regions, in particular, experienced sharp gasoline price runups this year. California, which often has some of the highest prices in the nation, saw prices peak near $1.85 in mid-September, while the Midwest had average prices over $1.87 in mid-June. Local prices at some stations in both areas hit levels well over $2.00 per gallon. The reasons for the regional price runups differed significantly. In the Midwest, the introduction of Phase 2 RFG was hampered by low stocks,