Sample records for arctic sea ice

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Arctic sea ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic sea ice Sierra Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Begin Flights Over Arctic Sea Ice On July 25, 2013, in Climate, Customers & Partners, Global, Monitoring, News, News & Events,...

  2. Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    of fast ice formation and growth. Instead, the modeled fast ice is replaced with pack ice which driftsEvaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project with estimates of sea ice thickness derived from pan-Arctic satellite freeboard measurements (2004

  3. Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremen, Universität

    Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8 with 4.240 million km2 a new historic minimum (Figure 1). Physicists of the University of Bremen now confirm the apprehension existing since July 2011 that the ice melt in the Arctic

  4. NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu National Center of the net sea ice production and the sea ice exchanges between the Arctic and its adjacent seas are studied) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning ice cover

  5. NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study Aixue The variability of net sea ice production and sea ice exchange between the Arctic and its adjacent seas export) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning

  6. Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worster, M. Grae

    Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice Dirk Notz,1,4 Miles G. McPhee,2 M. Grae the simultaneous growth and ablation of a layer of ice between an under-ice melt pond and the underlying ocean. Such ``false bottoms'' are the only significant source of ice formation in the Arctic during summer. Analytical

  7. Age characteristics in a multidecadal Arctic sea ice simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitz, Cecllia M [UNIV. OF WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from adding a tracer for age of sea ice to a sophisticated sea ice model that is widely used for climate studies are presented. The consistent simulation of ice age, dynamics, and thermodynamics in the model shows explicitly that the loss of Arctic perennial ice has accelerated in the past three decades, as has been seen in satellite-derived observations. Our model shows that the September ice age average across the Northern Hemisphere varies from about 5 to 8 years, and the ice is much younger (about 2--3 years) in late winter because of the expansion of first-year ice. We find seasonal ice on average comprises about 5% of the total ice area in September, but as much as 1.34 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} survives in some years. Our simulated ice age in the late 1980s and early 1990s declined markedly in agreement with other studies. After this period of decline, the ice age began to recover, but in the final years of the simulation very little young ice remains after the melt season, a strong indication that the age of the pack will again decline in the future as older ice classes fail to be replenished. The Arctic ice pack has fluctuated between older and younger ice types over the past 30 years, while ice area, thickness, and volume all declined over the same period, with an apparent acceleration in the last decade.

  8. September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 warming above present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 C global warming above present Irina; published 24 March 2012. [1] The decline of Arctic sea ice is one of the most visible signs of climate change over the past several decades. Arctic sea ice area shows large interannual variability due

  9. Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations P. Rampal,1,2 J the Arctic sea ice velocity field as the superposition of a mean field and fluctuations. We study how subtracting the mean field, are analyzed in terms of diffusion properties. Although the Arctic sea ice cover

  10. Arctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec-edented low extents in the summer of 2007,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    Arctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec- edented low extents in the summer of 2007, raising concern that the Arctic may be on the verge of a fundamental transition toward a seasonal ice cover. Arctic sea ice extent typically attains a seasonal maximum in March and minimum in September. Over

  11. Relationships between Arctic Sea Ice and Clouds during Autumn AXEL J. SCHWEIGER AND RON W. LINDSAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jennifer

    , as the direct radiative effects of cloud cover changes are compensated for by changes in the temperature The connection between sea ice variability and cloud cover over the Arctic seas during autumn is investigated that cloud cover variability near the sea ice margins is strongly linked to sea ice variability. Sea ice

  12. Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

  13. NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu, Claes Rooth and Rainer Bleck February 18, 2003 Abstract The variability of the net sea ice production and the sea ice circulation model. The wind driven divergence (or ice flux export) is the major factor controlling the net sea

  14. Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Laura Marie

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

  15. Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    but occurs over a much broader area of the ice pack. Citation: Steele, M., J. Zhang, and W. Ermold (2010Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt Michael Steele,1 summertime upper ocean warming and sea ice melt during the 21st century in the Arctic Ocean. Our first

  16. Future abrupt reductions in the summer Arctic sea ice Marika M. Holland,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    years with considerable thinning of the ice pack [Rothrock et al., 1999; Wadhams and Davis, 2000Future abrupt reductions in the summer Arctic sea ice Marika M. Holland,1 Cecilia M. Bitz,2 12 December 2006. [1] We examine the trajectory of Arctic summer sea ice in seven projections from

  17. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  18. IGS 2000: RGPS Albedo June 15, 2001 1 Arctic sea ice albedo derived from RGPS-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    of Arctic pack ice ia a highly significant factor for establishing the energy balance of the ice. The netIGS 2000: RGPS Albedo June 15, 2001 1 Arctic sea ice albedo derived from RGPS-based ice thickness Geophysical Processor System (RGPS) uses sequential synthetic aperture radar images of Arctic sea ice taken

  19. Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4BE647 #12;Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery J. F. Scinocca,1. [1] We investigate the sensitivity of Northern Hemisphere polar ozone recovery to a scenario in which

  20. Conservative behavior of uranium vs. salinity in Arctic sea ice and brine Christelle Not a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Available online 23 December 2011 Keywords: Uranium Salinity Sea ice Brine Seawater Arctic UraniumConservative behavior of uranium vs. salinity in Arctic sea ice and brine Christelle Not a, ,1 disequilibrium The conservative behavior of uranium (U) with respect to salinity in open ocean waters is widely

  1. Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohling, Eelco

    Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current K. A. Cox,1 J. D cycle, Arctic sea ice decline, and increasing Greenland glacial melt. Here we use new d18 O data from the East Greenland Current system at Cape Farewell and Denmark Strait to determine the relative proportions

  2. Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice H. Eicken) program's field site in the northern Chukchi Sea, snow and ice meltwater flow was found to have a strong impact on the heat and mass balance of sea ice during the summer of 1998. Pathways and rates of meltwater

  3. SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS Yuliya Tarabalka Research Association, MD, USA. e-mail: yuliya.tarabalka@inria.fr ABSTRACT The melting of sea ice, it is important to investigate how rapidly sea ice floes melt. For this purpose, a new TempoSeg method

  4. Variations in the age of Arctic sea-ice and summer sea-ice extent Ignatius G. Rigor1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigor, Ignatius G.

    pack is determined by the effects of the atmosphere and ocean upon the sea-ice on various time scalesVariations in the age of Arctic sea-ice and summer sea-ice extent Ignatius G. Rigor1,2 and John M] Three of the past six summers have exhibited record low sea-ice extent on the Arctic Ocean. These minima

  5. The 2007 Bering Strait Oceanic Heat Flux and anomalous Arctic Sea-ice Retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate*, Tom Weingartner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    where heat carried by northward flowing PW weakens the ice-pack thereby promoting more sea-ice motionThe 2007 Bering Strait Oceanic Heat Flux and anomalous Arctic Sea-ice Retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate Abstract: To illuminate the role of Pacific Waters in the 2007 Arctic sea-ice retreat, we use observational

  6. Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario John C. Moore1 , Annette Rinke1,2 , Xiaoyong Yu1 , Duoying Ji1 , Xuefeng Cui1 , Yan Li3 , Kari Alterskjær4 , Jón Egill Centre, Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract We analyze simulated sea ice

  7. arctic sea ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 388 Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the...

  8. Critical mechanisms for the formation of extreme arctic sea-ice extent in the summers of 2007 and 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    deformation on top of the long-term thinning of an Arctic ice pack that had become more dominated by seasonalCritical mechanisms for the formation of extreme arctic sea-ice extent in the summers of 2007 system, the largest year-to-year variation in sea-ice extent (SIE) has occurred in the Laptev, East

  9. Arctic catastrophes in an idealized sea ice model Ian Eisenman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenman, Ian

    thermodynamics, varying open water fraction, an energy balance atmosphere, and scalable CO2. We find that summer.e., reflectiveness) between sea ice and the open water that is exposed when it melts. Bare or snow-covered sea ice reflects most sunlight back to space, while the dark ocean surface absorbs most incident light. Global

  10. The 2007 Bering Strait oceanic heat flux and anomalous Arctic sea-ice Rebecca A. Woodgate,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    flowing PW weakens the ice-pack thereby promoting more sea-ice motion in response to wind, which in turnThe 2007 Bering Strait oceanic heat flux and anomalous Arctic sea-ice retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate,1 sea-ice retreat, we use observational data to estimate Bering Strait volume and heat transports from

  11. Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    will indirectly alter energy transfer through the pelagic food web and ultimately impact apex predators. We-based observations of sea ice concentration from the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR, 1979 recession of high Arctic seasonal ice cover created a temporally predictable primary production bloom

  12. Variability of sea ice cover in the Chukchi Sea (western Arctic Ocean) during the Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, Dennis

    of the Arctic Ocean during the last decades suggest a decrease in areal extent and thickness of its pack ice [e be tentatively attributed to global warming and raises concerns about the stability and fate of the pack ice of Arctic pack ice, which cannot be fully assessed from short-term instrumental observations alone

  13. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  14. The impact of an intense summer cyclone on 2012 Arctic sea ice retreat Jinlun Zhang, Ron Lindsay, Axel Schweiger, and Michael Steele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Arctic ice volume had already declined ~40% from the 2007­2011 mean. The thin sea ice pack of the low-pressure system was well within the sea ice pack, with a minimum central pressure of 974.5 hThe impact of an intense summer cyclone on 2012 Arctic sea ice retreat Jinlun Zhang, Ron Lindsay

  15. Decline in ice thickness from sub data 1 10/16/07 The decline in arctic sea-ice thickness: separating the spatial, annual, and1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    Decline in ice thickness from sub data 1 10/16/07 The decline in arctic sea-ice thickness/14/07 & 10/16/079 10 11 #12;Decline in ice thickness from sub data 2 10/16/07 Abstract11 Naval submarines have collected operational data of sea-ice draft (90% of thickness) in the12 Arctic Ocean since 1958

  16. The area and volume of sea ice in the Arc-tic Ocean is decreasing, with some predict-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    , while loss of sea ice could cause stress for polar bears. Moreover, global climate may be affected ice forms in winter,which melts and/or gets exported out of the Arctic. The recent decrease in summer of this community is evi- dence that the sea ice cap has not disap- peared during the Quaternary. The remains

  17. The development of a signal processing network for a real-time Arctic sea ice classification system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordhaus, William D

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIGNAL PROCESSING NETWORK FOR A REAL-TIME ARCTIC SEA ICE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM A Thesis by WILLIAM DOUGLAS NORDHAUS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIGNAL PROCESSING NETWORK FOR A REAL-TIME ARCTIC SEA ICE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM A Thesis by William Douglas Nordhaus Approved as to style...

  18. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Age Characteristics in a Multidecadal Arctic Sea Ice1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    significant changes, the22 most threatening being a shift from a mostly perennial pack to an ice cover is of fundamental concern for native peoples and wildlife that depend on the pack ice for25 their livelihoods. We do brightness temperatures [Gloersen32 et al., 1992], substantive changes to the Arctic sea ice pack over

  19. Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types in Relation to Sea Ice RYAN EASTMAN AND STEPHEN G. WARREN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    longwave cloud radiative effect (CRE), sug- gesting that infrared radiation emitted toward the surface and cloud temperatures greater than 2318C. Cloud radiative effect over the Arctic likely varies seasonally of clouds have different effects on sea ice. Visual cloud reports from land and ocean regions of the Arctic

  20. An AeroCom Assessment of Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and Sea Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, Mian; De Luca, N.; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Liu, Xiaohong; Mann, G. W.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Yun, Yuxing; Zhang, Kai

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea-ice. Here, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea-ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004-2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng g?1 for an earlier Phase of AeroCom models (Phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng g?1 for a more recent Phase of AeroCom models (Phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng g?1. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model–measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60-90?N) atmospheric residence time for BC in Phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with the fact that most Arctic BC deposition originates from extra-Arctic emissions, these results suggest that aerosol removal processes are a leading source of variation in model performance. The multi-model mean (full range) of Arctic radiative effect from BC in snow is 0.15 (0.07-0.25) W m?2 and 0.18 (0.06-0.28) W m?2 in Phase I and Phase II models, respectively. After correcting for model biases relative to observed BC concentrations in different regions of the Arctic, we obtain a multi-model mean Arctic radiative effect of 0.17 W m?2 for the combined AeroCom ensembles. Finally, there is a high correlation between modeled BC concentrations sampled over the observational sites and the Arctic as a whole, indicating that the field campaign provided a reasonable sample of the Arctic.

  1. Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from the southeastern Canada Basin2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from (Arctic Ocean) to act as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions12 expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high13 pCO2sw (~290-320 atm

  2. Critical Mechanisms for the Formation of Extreme Arctic Sea-Ice Extent in the Summers of 2007 and 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan; Zib, Benjamin J.; Xi, Baike; Stanfield, Ryan; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Xiangdong; Lin, B.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A warming Arctic climate is undergoing significant e 21 nvironmental change, most evidenced by the reduction of Arctic sea-ice extent during the summer. In this study, we examine two extreme anomalies of September sea-ice extent in 2007 and 1996, and investigate the impacts of cloud fraction (CF), atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV), downwelling longwave flux (DLF), surface air temperature (SAT), pressure and winds on the sea-ice variation in 2007 and 1996 using both satellite-derived sea-ice products and MERRA reanalysis. The area of the Laptev, East Siberian and West Chukchi seas (70-90oN, 90-180oE) has experienced the largest variation in sea-ice extent from year-to-year and defined here as the Area Of Focus (AOF). The record low September sea-ice extent in 2007 was associated with positive anomalies 30 of CF, PWV, DLF, and SAT over the AOF. Persistent anti-cyclone positioned over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia induced easterly zonal and southerly meridional winds. In contrast, negative CF, PWV, DLF and SAT anomalies, as well as opposite wind patterns to those in 2007, characterized the 1996 high September sea-ice extent. Through this study, we hypothesize the following positive feedbacks of clouds, water vapor, radiation and atmospheric variables on the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007. The record low sea-ice extent during the summer 2007 is initially triggered by the atmospheric circulation anomaly. The southerly winds across the Chukchi and East Siberian seas transport warm, moist air from the north Pacific, which is not only enhancing sea-ice melt across the AOF, but also increasing clouds. The positive cloud feedback results in higher SAT and more sea-ice melt. Therefore, 40 more water vapor could be evaporated from open seas and higher SAT to form more clouds, which will enhance positive cloud feedback. This enhanced positive cloud feedback will then further increase SAT and accelerate the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007.

  3. arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Yi-Ping Ma,1, USA The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area

  4. Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend R. W. LINDSAY, J. ZHANG, A. SCHWEIGER, M. STEELE, AND H. STERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend R. W. LINDSAY, J. ZHANG, A. SCHWEIGER, M ice extent in the summer of 2007 was unprecedented in the historical record. A coupled ice­ocean model is used to determine the state of the ice and ocean over the past 29 yr to investigate the causes

  5. THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers... "Sea ice is projected] - a phenomenon sometimes referred to as "Arctic amplification". As Arctic temperatures rise, sea ice melts for the 20th century. The rate at which the modeled 21st century Arctic warming and sea ice melting occurs

  6. arctic ocean ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 320 The Thinning of Arctic Sea Ice, 19882003: Have...

  7. Sources of spread in simulations of Arctic sea ice loss over the twenty-first century: A letter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boé, Julien; Hall, Alex; Qu, Xin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the ultimate fate of the ice pack. 1 Introduction Over theof the entire year’s ice pack (Fig. 3b). The relationshipultimate fate of the Arctic ice pack. In Boé et al. (2009b)

  8. The Thinning of Arctic Sea Ice, 19882003: Have We Passed a Tipping Point? R. W. LINDSAY AND J. ZHANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    ­05. To determine the physical processes contributing to these changes in the Arctic pack ice, model results from ice pack is a key component of the Arctic Ocean physical and biological systems. It controls in the central pack is also thinning. Based on submarine measurements, the ice draft is reported by Rothrock et

  9. Sea Ice Enhancements to Polar WRF* Keith M. Hines1**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    of Arctic multi-year ice is30 decreasing with more of the ice pack represented by seasonal sea iceSea Ice Enhancements to Polar WRF* Keith M. Hines1** , David H. Bromwich,1,2 , Lesheng Bai1 to6 WRF Version 3.4 include modified Noah land surface model sea ice treatment, allowing7 specified

  10. Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Laurence C.

    Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series Laurence C. Smith,1 of melt onset can be observed over small ice caps, as well as the major ice sheets and multi-year sea ice for 14 small Arctic ice caps from 1992­2000. Interannual and regional variability in the timing of melt

  11. Sea-ice thickness measurement based on the dispersion of ice swell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -year pack ice, although other char- acteristics (Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson coefficientSea-ice thickness measurement based on the dispersion of ice swell David Marsana) ISTerre, CNRS propagating in the Arctic sea ice cover is exploited in order to locally measure the ice thickness

  12. Spatial scaling of Arctic sea ice deformation H. L. Stern1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    to a power law with exponent $À0.2, over a scale range from 10 to 1000 km (e.g., deformation rate doubles ice based on granular or fracture mechanics. The scaling exponent in the power law relationship tends in the deformation rate has already been documented (from buoy data). However, the net effect of several deformation

  13. RGPS/Model Ice Deformation July 3, 2003 1 Sea Ice Deformation Rates From Satellite Measurements and in a Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    of the Arctic geophysical environment. The deformation rate of pack ice, determined from the spatial gradientsRGPS/Model Ice Deformation July 3, 2003 1 Sea Ice Deformation Rates From Satellite Measurements The deformation of sea ice is an important element of the Arctic climate system because of its influence

  14. Quaternary Science Reviews 25 (2006) 28942936 Severnaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia: a nucleation area for Kara Sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Möller, Per

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Kara Sea ice sheets during the Middle to Late Quaternary Per Mo¨ llera,Ã, David J. Lubinskib , O´ lafur, 845 W. Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60607-7059, USA e Department of Earth Sciences, University of Aarhus as a basis for modelling by Siegert and Dowdeswell (2004), has led to reconstructions of a substantially

  15. Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    [2] It has long been known that upwelling takes place in the western Arctic Ocean along the edgesSeasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover Lena M to characterize differences in upwelling near the shelf break in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea due to varying sea ice

  16. GRAPH-BASED METHOD FOR MULTITEMPORAL SEGMENTATION OF SEA ICE FLOES FROM SATELLITE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the Arc- tic sea ice pack in December 2007, continuously moved with the Arctic ocean currents and meltedGRAPH-BASED METHOD FOR MULTITEMPORAL SEGMENTATION OF SEA ICE FLOES FROM SATELLITE DATA Claudio, MODIS, Sea Ice Floes. ABSTRACT: Automated segmentation of the sea ice evolution would allow scientists

  17. Further observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic Ocean) due to sea ice loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high pCO2sw (~290­320 matm), considering that surface waterFurther observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily

  18. Published in: Annals of Glaciology, vol. 33, pp. 194-200, 2001 Indirect measurements of the mass balance of summer Arctic sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    of summer ablation are of great importance in determining the overall mass balance of the Arctic ice pack in determining the state of the Arctic ice pack. Measurements of annual loss and gain of ice mass are required balance of summer Arctic sea ice with an electromagnetic induction technique H. EICKEN Geophysical

  19. arctic ice islands: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analogous to the effects of the Arctic region; KEYWORDS: Arctic Ocean, ice rafting, climate change Citation: Darby, D. A., and J. F. Bischof (2004), A Holocene record of...

  20. Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere S, such as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). This study examines relationships between changes in total sea ice extent north of 70. These results suggest that a decrease in seasonal ice cover influencing other mechanisms of DMS production could

  1. Reducing uncertainty in high-resolution sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system, reflecting a significant amount of solar radiation, insulating the ocean from the atmosphere and influencing ocean circulation by modifying the salinity of the upper ocean. The thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice have shown a significant decline in recent decades with implications for global climate as well as regional geopolitics. Increasing interest in exploration as well as climate feedback effects make predictive mathematical modeling of sea ice a task of tremendous practical import. Satellite data obtained over the last few decades have provided a wealth of information on sea ice motion and deformation. The data clearly show that ice deformation is focused along narrow linear features and this type of deformation is not well-represented in existing models. To improve sea ice dynamics we have incorporated an anisotropic rheology into the Los Alamos National Laboratory global sea ice model, CICE. Sensitivity analyses were performed using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA) to determine the impact of material parameters on sea ice response functions. Two material strength parameters that exhibited the most significant impact on responses were further analyzed to evaluate their influence on quantitative comparisons between model output and data. The sensitivity analysis along with ten year model runs indicate that while the anisotropic rheology provides some benefit in velocity predictions, additional improvements are required to make this material model a viable alternative for global sea ice simulations.

  2. Paper No. ICETECH10-XYZ-R0 Hutchings Page number: 1 On the Spatial and Temporal Characterization of Motion Induced Sea Ice Internal Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Cathleen

    Sea with one aim (among others) of examining the relationship between internal ice stress and ice pack to identify ice motion induced stress from stress measurements recorded at a point in the ice pack, we first induced stress, events impacting any given place in the Arctic ice pack. KEY WORDS: sea ice, Beaufort Sea

  3. Holocene sea ice history and climate variability along the main axis of the Northwest Passage, Canadian Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    secular variation records and the CALS7K.2 timevarying spherical harmonic model of the geomagnetic field. In addition to a largescale pattern, more local conditions such as coastal current, tidal effects, or ice cap and 40% lower than the 1979­2006 average based on satellite measurements [Schweiger et al., 2008

  4. SAR Motion Products: Tools for Monitoring Changes in Sea Ice Mass Balance and Thickness Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Cathleen

    decrease in a warming climate. For example, in a weakening ice pack, we could expect convergence storminess in the Arctic; (b) a seasonal ice pack of reduced thickness; and (c) large scale changes in driftSAR Motion Products: Tools for Monitoring Changes in Sea Ice Mass Balance and Thickness

  5. airborne arctic stratospheric: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  6. arctic cloudy boundary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  7. arctic ground squirrel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  8. alesund arctic base: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  9. arctic stratospheric expedition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  10. arctic ground squirrels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

  11. Mathematics of Sea Ice K. M. Golden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    , the sharp decline of the summer Arc- tic sea ice pack is probably the most dramatic. For example, the area and 1990's. While global climate models generally predict de- clines in the polar sea ice packs over the 21, such as the growth and decay of seasonal ice, the evolu- tion of ice pack reflectance, and biomass build

  12. 3, 9991020, 2007 Summer sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 3, 999­1020, 2007 Summer sea ice during the early Holocene H. Goosse et al. Title Page Abstract on the early Holocene climate constrains the summer sea ice projections for the 21st century H. Goosse, E #12;CPD 3, 999­1020, 2007 Summer sea ice during the early Holocene H. Goosse et al. Title Page

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 42, NO. 7, JULY 2004 1433 Automatic Detection and Validity of the Sea-Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    the main Arctic pack ice. Validation with RADARSAT 1 and with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer is strongest in open water areas, such as leads and polynyas, inside the pack ice and along the Marginal Ice Detection and Validity of the Sea-Ice Edge: An Application of Enhanced-Resolution QuikScat/SeaWinds Data

  14. Life Cycle of Sea-Ice Frazil, or grease ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    of Sea Ice away from surface, long crystals as congelation ice (frozen on from below) Brine Channels within the ice (~width of human hair) Brine rejected from ice (4-10psu), but concentrates in brine from AWI #12;Brine Volume and Salinity From Thomas and Dieckmann 2002, Science .... adapted from papers

  15. Surface Impedance Tomography for Antarctic Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Surface Impedance Tomography for Antarctic Sea Ice C. Sampsona , K. M. Goldena , A. Gullya , A. P, Australia Abstract During the 2007 SIPEX expedition in pack ice off the coast of East Antarctica, we measured the electrical conductivity of sea ice via surface impedance tomography. Resistance data from

  16. The convective desalination of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees Jones, David

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    containing both liquid brine and solid (pure water) ice. Frad is the flux of penetrating solar radiation. Thus the thermal properties of sea ice are composed of those of the solid and liquid phases that make up sea ice. Fixed-salinity models used in older...

  17. Lesson Summary Students will learn about the Arctic Beaufort Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Lesson Summary Students will learn about the Arctic Beaufort Sea and research the adaptations of people and animals in the arctic regions. They will also learn about how their actions can affect the Arctic and learn about the International Polar Year. Prior Knowledge & Skills · Research skills

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic ice-covered lake Jessica-cover extent and dynamics on this perennially ice-covered, High Arctic lake. These pellets are interpreted growth. The pellets remain frozen in the ice until a summer or series of summers with reduced ice cover

  19. 4, 107128, 2007 Sea-ice-drift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    OSD 4, 107­128, 2007 Sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack fracture A. Chmel et al. Title Page Abstract aspects of the sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack fracture A. Chmel 1 , V. N. Smirnov 2 , and L. V. Panov 2 1 to: A. Chmel (chmel@mail.ioffe.ru) 107 #12;OSD 4, 107­128, 2007 Sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack

  20. Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo H. Eicken,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo H. Eicken,1 T. C. Grenfell,2 D. K. Perovich,3 J. Perovich, J. A. Richter-Menge, and K. Frey (2004), Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo, J that feedback processes involving the input of solar energy and subsequent changes in Arctic pack-ice albedo

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Marginal Ice Zone Observations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Processes Experiment mission Sierra Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Begin Flights Over Arctic Sea Ice On July 25, 2013, in Climate, Customers &...

  2. Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long Brigham Young for mapping polar sea ice extent. In this study, a new al- gorithm for polar sea ice mapping is developed of Bayes detection to produce sea ice extent maps. Statistical models for sea ice and ocean are represented

  3. ARKTOS: An intelligent system for SAR sea ice image classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soh, L. K.; Tsatsoulis, Costas; Gineris, D.; Bertoia, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an intelligent system for satellite sea ice image analysis named Advanced Reasoning using Knowledge for T ping Of Sea ice (ARKTOS). ARKTOS performs fully automated analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sea ice images by mimicking...

  4. Unlocking a Sea Ice Secret

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Rachel Obbard

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Rachel Obbard and her research group from Dartmouth College traveled to the Antarctic to collect samples of sea ice. Next stop: the GeoSoilEnviroCARS x-ray beamline at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois. This U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science synchrotron x-ray research facility gave the Obbard team the frontier scientific tools they needed to study the path bromide takes as it travels from the ocean to the atmosphere.

  5. Network Modeling of Arctic Melt Ponds Meenakshi Barjatiaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    . In late spring and summer, the albedo of the ice pack is determined primarily by melt ponds that form­albedo feedback [7], and has played a significant role in the decline of the summer Arctic ice pack [8]. Sea ice precipitous losses of summer Arctic sea ice have outpaced the pro- jections of most climate models. Efforts

  6. Underwater ambient noise in the Alaskan Arctic from 20062009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    , a proxy for multiyear ice. Perennial pack ice is diminishing while thin seasonal pack ice is more The Arctic Ocean has experienced diminished ice cover as record lows have been measured for sea ice thickness prevalent. These changes in sea ice affect the acoustic field as well as the sources of sound, both natural

  7. UnderSea Solutions, Inc. Arctic AUV Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    the conceptual design and analysis of an AUV, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, for Arctic under-ice water sampling Electrical Design: ? Power Consumption ? Battery Requirements & Selection ? Thrust Motor Requirements for nose cone Lift points Hull Form The hydrodynamic form of the AUV determines the propulsion energy

  8. Arctic ice export events and their potential impact on global climate during the late Pleistocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, Dennis

    Arctic ice export events and their potential impact on global climate during the late Pleistocene export events are identified from the Laurentide and the Innuitian ice sheets, between 14 and 34 ka, the Arctic export events appear to occur prior to Heinrich events. INDEX TERMS: 4207 Oceanography: General

  9. Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment (AIDJEX) assumptions revisited and found inadequate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulsky, Deborah L.

    the Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment (AIDJEX) assumptions about pack ice behavior with an eye to modeling the behavior of pack ice. A model based on these assumptions is needed to represent the deformation and stress in pack ice on scales from 10 to 100 km, and would need to explicitly resolve discontinuities

  10. Introduction Microorganisms in sea ice function ecologically in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank

    of the pack via brine drainage, ice melting, or ice break-up (Garrison & Buck 1989 and references thereinIntroduction Microorganisms in sea ice function ecologically in the Antarctic marine ecosystem where pelagic and sea ice habitats are intrinsically coupled (Laws 1985, Garrison 1991, Eicken 1992

  11. ICE SHEET SOURCES OF SEA LEVEL RISE AND FRESHWATER DISCHARGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Anders

    ICE SHEET SOURCES OF SEA LEVEL RISE AND FRESHWATER DISCHARGE DURING THE LAST DEGLACIATION Anders E the sources of sea level rise and freshwater dis- charge to the global oceans associated with retreat of ice­10 m sea level rise at 19.0­19.5 ka, sourced largely from Northern Hemisphere ice sheet retreat

  12. Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS3 Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide oasis3 prism 2­2, June 2004 Sophie Valcke 1 to realize a coupled simulation with OASIS3. The aim of OASIS3 is to provide a flexible and user friendly. OASIS3 synchronizes the exchanges of coupling fields between the models being coupled, and performs 2D

  13. Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS3 Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide oasis3 prism 2­3, August 2004 Sophie Valcke 1 to realize a coupled simulation with OASIS3. The aim of OASIS3 is to provide a flexible and user friendly. OASIS3 synchronizes the exchanges of coupling fields between the models being coupled, and performs 2D

  14. Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS 2.0 Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide and Reference Manual November 1995 Laurent for the straightforward use of OASIS 2.0. As far as we know, it is the best way to use it! The aim of OASIS is to provide been particularly emphasized in the OASIS design. The use of OASIS does not change the way the models

  15. Modeling of Antarctic sea ice in a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xingren; Budd, W.F. [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia)] [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia); Simmonds, I. [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)] [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice model is developed and coupled with the Melbourne University general circulation model to simulate the seasonal cycle of the Antarctic sea ice distributions The model is efficient, rapid to compute, and useful for a range of climate studies. The thermodynamic part of the sea ice model is similar to that developed by Parkinson and Washington, the dynamics contain a simplified ice rheology that resists compression. The thermodynamics is based on energy conservation at the top surface of the ice/snow, the ice/water interface, and the open water area to determine the ice formation, accretion, and ablation. A lead parameterization is introduced with an effective partitioning scheme for freezing between and under the ice floes. The dynamic calculation determines the motion of ice, which is forced with the atmospheric wind, taking account of ice resistance and rafting. The simulated sea ice distribution compares reasonably well with observations. The seasonal cycle of ice extent is well simulated in phase as well as in magnitude. Simulated sea ice thickness and concentration are also in good agreement with observations over most regions and serve to indicate the importance of advection and ocean drift in the determination of the sea ice distribution. 64 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. INVESTIGATION OF SEASONAL SEA-ICE THICKNESS VARIABILITY IN THE ROSS SEA Beth A. Schellenberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Cathleen

    archive consists of over 20,000 records over the Antarc- tic pack ice between 1980 and the presentINVESTIGATION OF SEASONAL SEA-ICE THICKNESS VARIABILITY IN THE ROSS SEA Beth A. Schellenberg P1.23 1. INTRODUCTION A number of studies suggest a connections between sea-ice variability

  17. An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David. Understanding the Arctic Ocean energy balance is important because it can strengthen our understanding for Atmosphere-Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NYU, 200 Water

  18. Real-time processing of remote sensor data as applied to Arctic ice classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Permenter, James Austin

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by JAMES AUSTIN PERMENTER partial ! Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by James Austin Permenter Approved as to style and content by: ] ( rman of Commi...

  19. [1] S. F. Ackley, V. I. Lytle, K. M. Golden, M. N. Darling, and G. A. Kuehn. Sea ice measure-ments during ANZFLUX. Antarctic J. U. S., 30:133135, 1995.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    -Menge, and K. Frey. Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo. J. Geophys. Res. (Oceans), 109(C18):C] C. H. Fritsen, V. I. Lytle, S. F. Ackley, and C. W. Sullivan. Autumn bloom of Antarctic pack-ice. Sea ice measure- ments during ANZFLUX. Antarctic J. U. S., 30:133­135, 1995. [2] G. Allaire

  20. Modelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios of future climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). A consequence of climatic warming in the high Arctic will be an increase in surface melting of glaciers and ice component of the mass accumulation of many glaciers and ice caps in thModelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios

  1. antarctic sea ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 327 Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the...

  2. altimeter sea ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 218 Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the...

  3. artic sea ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 214 Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the...

  4. State estimation of the Labrador Sea with a coupled sea ice-ocean adjoint model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenty, Ian Gouverneur

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sea ice (SI) and ocean variability in marginal polar and subpolar seas are closely coupled. SI variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection/mode water formation, ...

  5. The dynamic response of high Arctic glaciers to global warming and their contribution to sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, J.K.W. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Scott Polar Research Inst.; Dowdeswell, J.A. [Univ. of Wales (United Kingdom)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations with General Circulation Models have indicated that global warming will be enhanced at high latitudes. Regions in the high Arctic are highly sensitive to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, with an amplified theoretical rise of 8--14 C predicted to take place in winter and a negligible rise of 2 C in summer. Wetter conditions in these regions are quite plausible with global warming due to warmer sea surface temperatures, melting of sea ice and a greater moisture holding capacity of the atmosphere. Recent observations show a marked increase in precipitation in the high Arctic regions during the past decades, particularly in the winters. The notion of whether the increased melting of snow due to global warming would be offset by increased snowfall is investigated in this study. To make reliable predictions of the response of high Arctic glaciers to global warming and hence their contribution to sea-level rise, a numerical model has been developed to investigate the interactions of the glaciers with climate change induced by global warming. The model is a one-dimensional numerical ice-flow model coupled with a surface balance model. Accumulation and ablation at the glacier surface are determined by the surface balance model using an energy balance approach.

  6. Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    Declining September sea-ice extent #12;Clouds & Changes in Arctic Climate What is the role of cloud cover in Arctic climate change? What is the Cloud Radiative Effect (CRE) in the Arctic? #12;CRE Defined CRE nighttime obs Total cloud cover and nine cloud types: - High cloud (cirriform) - Middle Clouds: Altocumulus

  7. Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Cathleen

    Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness Jacqueline A the Ice Mass Balance buoy (IMB) in response to the need for monitoring changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover. The IMB is an autonomous, ice-based system. IMB buoys provide a time series of ice

  8. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling

  9. / http://www.sciencemag.org/content/early/recent / 7 June 2012 / Page 1/ 10.1126/science.1215065 The seasonal sea ice and snow cover in the Arctic Ocean strongly reflect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benitez-Nelson, Claudia

    transects ex- tending from open water far into the ice pack (fig. S1). Depth-integrated phytoplankton. This massive under- ice bloom extended for >100 km into the ice pack. Peak particulate or- ganic carbon biomass (28.7 to 32.5 g C m-2 ) was located far within the pack in the vicinity of the shelf break where ice

  10. Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Amy

    Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

  11. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices of the following: US Geological Survey Arctic operating orders, 1979; Det Noske Vertas', rules for the design, construction and inspection of offshore technology, 1977; Alaska Oil and Gas Association, industry research projects, March 1980; Arctic Petroleum Operator's Association, industry research projects, January 1980; selected additional Arctic offshore bibliography on sea ice, icebreakers, Arctic seafloor conditions, ice-structures, frost heave and structure icing.

  12. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  13. Evidence for atmospheric control of sea-ice motion through Nares Strait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Arctic pack ice, a critical element of the global climate system. The general flow of seawater through be sufficient to halt ice drift, despite strong forcing. Pack ice often consolidates in winter behind an ice mobility of pack ice in Fram Strait and the more persistently static conditions in the western CAA. We

  14. SEA ICE MAPPING ALGORITHM FOR QUIKSCAT AND SEAWINDS Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    SEA ICE MAPPING ALGORITHM FOR QUIKSCAT AND SEAWINDS Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long Brigham Young@ee.byu.edu Abstruct- Polar sea ice extent is an important input to global climate models and is considered are sensitive to the pres- ence of sea ice. An algorithm has been developed for sea ice extent detection using

  15. Acceleration of the contribution of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to sea level rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rignot, E.; Velicogna, I.; van den Broeke, M. R; Monaghan, A.; Lenaerts, J. T. M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    make a large sea?level rise contribu- tion, Geophys. Res.and Antarctic ice sheets to sea level rise E. Rignot, 1,2 I.ice sheets to sea level rise, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 38,

  16. Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Jeroen Verspeek Anton Verhoef Ad Stoffelen Version 1.5 2011-03-16 #12;ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Contents 1 Introduction ....................................................................................................................3 2 NWP Ocean Calibration

  17. Sea ice floes dissipate the energy of steep ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toffoli, Alessandro; Meylan, Michael H; Cavaliere, Claudio; Alberello, Alberto; Elsnab, John; Monty, Jason P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave attenuation by ice floes is an important parameter for modelling the Arctic Oceans. At present, attenuation coefficients are extracted from linear models as a function of the incident wave period and floe thickness. Recent explorations in the Antarctic Mixed Ice Zone (MIZ) revealed a further dependence on wave amplitude, suggesting that nonlinear contributions are non-negligible. An experimental model for wave attenuation by a single ice floe in a wave flume is here presented. Observations are compared with linear predictions based on wave scattering. Results indicate that linear models perform well under the effect of gently sloping waves. For more energetic wave fields, however, transmitted wave height is normally over predicted. Deviations from linearity appear to be related to an enhancement of wave dissipation induced by unaccounted wave-ice interaction processes, including the floe over wash.

  18. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural p...

  19. Self-excited oscillations in sea ice and evaluation of the ice forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, V.N. [Arctic and Antarctic Research Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The processes of the dynamical interactions of the ice are described. Special attention is given to the self-excited oscillating processes when the ice goes through periodical deformations similar to these which appear in the structures in the sea ice. The range of the self-excited oscillations periods is from 0.1 s to 20 s. The jump-like processes transform themselves into the quasi-harmonical ones up to sound frequency range. For comparison purposes the spectra of the frictional self-excited oscillations in the glaciers are presented. An iceberg interacting with the drifting ice also forms self-excited oscillating system with period of up to 10 s. An example of numerical evaluation of the forces of interaction between a drifting ice island and the sea ice is given.

  20. arctic ice dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W. F. Vincent (2008), Seasonal dynamics of bacterial Vincent, Warwick F. 168 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

  1. Breaking the Ice: Navigation in the Arctic Grace Xingxin Gao, Liang Heng, Todd Walter, and Per Enge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    Breaking the Ice: Navigation in the Arctic Grace Xingxin Gao, Liang Heng, Todd Walter, and Per Enge (ION) Early Achievement Award. Liang Heng is a Ph.D. candidate under the guidance of Professor Per Enge

  2. Summertime Clouds over the Chukchi Sea Paquita Zuidema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    conditions (Persson et al. 2003)* : *"Pack ice surface energy changes at SHEBA initiated by late summer a combination of pack ice, meltponds and leads, with no snow cover. Albedo ~0.5, surface temp. ~ 0 C #12;NSIDC Sea ice concentration anomalies Much of recent Arctic sea ice thinning has occurred

  3. Physica B 338 (2003) 274283 Critical behavior of transport in sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    and bacterial communities living in sea ice, and remote sensing of the sea ice pack from space. Recently, we mediates the exchange of heat, moisture, gases, momentum, and solar radiation between the ocean

  4. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raj Saha

    2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural periodicity and produces burst patterns very similar to what is observed in temperature proxy data. Numerical experiments with the model also suggests that the characteristic period of 1,500 years is due to the geometry, or the effective heat capacity, of the ocean that comes under sea ice cover.

  5. Ocean Heat Transport, Sea Ice, and Multiple Climate States: Insights from Energy Balance Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Brian Edward James

    Several extensions of energy balance models (EBMs) are explored in which (i) sea ice acts to insulate the

  6. Ice-associated phytoplankton blooms in the southeastern Bering Sea Meibing Jin,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice-associated phytoplankton blooms in the southeastern Bering Sea Meibing Jin,1 Clara Deal,1 Jia 2007. [1] Ice-associated phytoplankton blooms in the south- eastern Bering Sea can critically impact ice algal components, our 1-D ecosystem model successfully reproduced the observed ice

  7. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Frazil Deposition Under Growing Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    Ice M.J. McGuinness,1,4 M.J.M. Williams,2 P.J. Langhorne,3 C. Purdie,3 J. Crook4 Abstract. Platelet ice may be an important component of Antarctic land-fast sea ice. Typically, it is found at depth in first-year landfast sea ice cover, near ice shelves. To explain why platelet ice is not commonly

  8. Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice M.J. McGuinness \\Lambda , H a programme recently set up to directly measure the thermal conductivity of young sea ice. An array of thermistors frozen into first­year Antarctic sea ice provides temperature against depth data, which is fitted

  9. Sea ice extent mapping using Ku band scatterometer data Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Sea ice extent mapping using Ku band scatterometer data Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long enhancement techniques can be used to increase the utility of scatterometer data in monitoring sea-ice extent is the incidence angle dependence of o . Dual-polarization A and B parameters are used to identify sea ice

  10. Sea Ice Mapping Using Enhanced Resolution Advanced Scatterometer Images Steven Reeves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Sea Ice Mapping Using Enhanced Resolution Advanced Scatterometer Images Steven Reeves A thesis Rights Reserved #12;ABSTRACT Sea Ice Mapping Using Enhanced Resolution Advanced Scatterometer Images Steven Reeves Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Master of Science Sea ice is of great

  11. Mid-Pliocene sea level and continental ice volume based on coupled benthic Mg/Ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by rising sea level caused by the melting of alpine glaciers and small ice caps and portionsMid-Pliocene sea level and continental ice volume based on coupled benthic Mg/Ca palaeotemperatures composition of seawater, and estimate continental ice volume and sea-level variability during the Mid

  12. Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    the shelfbreak.18 19 20 21 22 #12;2 INTRODUCTION23 It has long been known that upwelling takes place Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover Lena M deployed from August 2002 ­ September 2004 are used to2 characterize differences in upwelling near

  13. Deep-Sea Research II 52 (2005) 32813302 Sediment transport by sea ice in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigor, Ignatius G.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with entrainment of frazil ice into deformed, multiple layers of rafted nilas, indicative of a flaw-lead resuspension and subsequent ice entrainment (420 m for the Chukchi Sea). Sediment loads averaged at 128 t km­2 deep for resuspension and entrainment) is at minimum 4 Â 106 t in the sampling area and is estimated

  14. Holocene sea-ice variations in Greenland: onshore evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    Holocene sea-ice variations in Greenland: onshore evidence Ole Bennike* (Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark) Received 12 August 2002; revised manuscript accepted 2 April 2003 Abstract: The oldest dated driftwood log from northern Greenland is c. 9300

  15. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

  16. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

  17. Author's personal copy Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glaciation of Baffin Island, Arctic Canada: key

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    t Melting glaciers and ice caps on Baffin Island contribute roughly half of the sea-level rise from all ice future response of arctic glaciers and ice caps to climate change motivates the use of paleodata throughout the Holocene to its present margin (Barnes Ice Cap) except for two periods of rapid retreat

  18. 115 year ice-core data from Akademii Nauk ice cap, Severnaya Zemlya: high-resolution record of Eurasian Arctic climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    ice core has been drilled within the framework of the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica of Antarctica. Drilling reached bedrock during the last field season 2005/06 providing ice over a time span. Since Ca2+ is derived from terrestrial dust and marine sources, the non-sea-salt calcium concentrations

  19. Brine fluxes from growing sea ice A. J. Wells,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    Brine fluxes from growing sea ice A. J. Wells,1,2 J. S. Wettlaufer,1,2,3 and S. A. Orszag2] It is well known that brine drainage from growing sea ice has a controlling influence on its mechanical oceans. When the ice has exceeded a critical thickness the drainage process is dominated by brine

  20. Mapping of Large Magnitude Discontinuous Sea Ice Motion Ph.D. Student

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Cathleen

    available standard data products that estimate motion of pack ice at a resolution of 3 5km [8Mapping of Large Magnitude Discontinuous Sea Ice Motion M. Thomas Ph.D. Student Computer and Info on sea ice motion tracking in two specific directions. The first direction is the development

  1. Sea ice evolution over the 20th and 21st centuries as simulated by current AOGCMs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arzel, Olivier

    of the Northern Hemisphere (NH) ice pack over the last few decades (Rothrock et al., 2003). The increas- ingSea ice evolution over the 20th and 21st centuries as simulated by current AOGCMs Olivier Arzel of sea ice over the 20th and 21st centuries. We first use the results from the ``Climate of the 20th

  2. Effect of shear rupture on aggregate scale formation in sea ice Alexander V. Wilchinsky,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    is governed by Coulomb's criterion. The ice pack is a 400 km long square domain consisting of 4 km size floesEffect of shear rupture on aggregate scale formation in sea ice Alexander V. Wilchinsky,1 Daniel L; published 2 October 2010. [1] A discrete element model is used to study shear rupture of sea ice under

  3. Modelling the reorientation of sea-ice faults as the wind changes direction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    of their length by a particular fraction, the ice pack deformation is neglected and the wind stress is rotatedModelling the reorientation of sea-ice faults as the wind changes direction Alexander V. WILCHINSKY-1290, USA ABSTRACT. A discrete-element model of sea ice is used to study how a 908 change in wind direction

  4. Figure 1. Recurrent modular network architecture Recurrent modular network architecture for sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Marc

    Figure 1. Recurrent modular network architecture Recurrent modular network architecture for sea ice classification in the Marginal Ice Zone using ERS SAR images Andrey V. Bogdanov1a , Marc Toussaint1b , Stein of SAR images of sea ice. Additionally to the local image information the algorithm uses spatial context

  5. Sea Ice in the Global Climate System Kenneth M. Golden1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Sea Ice in the Global Climate System Kenneth M. Golden1 , Elizabeth Hunke2 , Cecilia Bitz3 Figure 2. The Antarctic sea ice pack with an open lead in the distance. (K. M. Golden) Figure 1. Pancake ice in the Southern Ocean off the coast of East Antarctica. (K. M. Golden

  6. Analysis of Antarctic Sea Ice Thickness: A Newly Created Database for 2000-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Benjamin Patrick

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of Antarctic sea ice thickness are sporadic in space and time, hindering knowledge of its variability. A proxy based on stage of development data from the National Ice Center (NIC) weekly operational charts is used to create a high...

  7. The Role of Oceans and Sea Ice in Abrupt Transitions between Multiple Climate States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Brian E. J.

    The coupled climate dynamics underlying large, rapid, and potentially irreversible changes in ice cover are studied. A global atmosphere–ocean–sea ice general circulation model with idealized aquaplanet geometry is forced ...

  8. Observations of unusual fast-ice conditions in the southwest Ross Sea, Antarctica: preliminary analysis of iceberg and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, C. Kevin

    ice (referred to as pack ice) which had several days earlier been part of the integrated AnnalsObservations of unusual fast-ice conditions in the southwest Ross Sea, Antarctica: preliminary of their presence, extensive landfast sea ice (fast ice) waxed and waned along the Victoria Land coast, with maximum

  9. arctic kara sea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 373 2003: Global analyses of sea...

  10. arctic seas assessment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 398 2003: Global analyses of sea...

  11. (Reduce uncertainty in projection of future sea-level change due to ice wastage)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, M.F.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three basic goals were stated in the original proposal. These were: (1) develop an understanding of the heat and mass flow into subfreezing snow and firn, in order to model the evolution of the temperature distribution and the infiltration rates through the firn; (2) relate changes in climate, as given by general circulation model predictions, to changes in the surface mass and energy balances of glaciers; and (3) use the above results to analyze the effects of changed surface mass and energy balances on the flow of meltwater through snow and firn, and on the runoff from these glaciers, in a CO{sub 2}-affected climate. This final report summarizes our progress toward these goals. The primary product of this research program has been the communication of this progress in the form of publications in the scientific literature and presentations at scientific meetings. Our research activities in the past three years have provided a new basis for modeling of multiphase flow in subfreezing snow, new field data on the structural properties of arctic firn pertinent to hydrological modeling, and estimates of sea level change in response to changing patterns of runoff from the Greenland Ice Sheet. We conclude that forecasts of future sea level changes from all glacier runoff sources may be in error by amounts on the order of +8 cm over the next 150 years, due to the lag in generating runoff to the sea. Our specific research products include two distributed-parameter models of water flow through snow with melting and freezing, a theoretical model of wetting-front advance into subfreezing snow for inclusion in a future model, and a simple large-scale model of the response of Greenland runoff in a changing climate which provides estimates of the effect of melt water refreezing phenomena on sea level changes in response to a range of possible future climates.

  12. ARM - Lesson Plans: When Floating Ice Melts in the Sea

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, AlaskaWhen Floating Ice Melts in the Sea

  13. This chapter describes observations of continuing change in the Arctic environmental system. It is or-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    for the longest period and largest area of ice sheet melt since at least 1978, and the highest melt rate since in the Canadian Arctic, where the rate of mass loss from small glaciers and ice caps continued to increase system. It is or- ganized into five broad sections: atmosphere, ocean, sea ice cover, land, and Greenland

  14. The influence of ocean flow on newly forming sea ice Daniel L. Feltham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    conditions. The mechanism relies on brine flows developing in the sea ice due to Bernoulli suction by flow models that parameter- ize the brine content [Maykut and Untersteiner, 1971], or treat, for example, melt. In this paper, we are interested in investigating the effect of brine flow within the sea ice, which

  15. Electromagnetic and physical properties of sea ice formed in the presence of wave action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onstott, R. G.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Gow, A. J.; Grenfell, T. C.; Jezek, K. C.; Perovich, D. K.; Swift, C. T.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating the magnitude of brine flux to the upper ocean requires an ability to assess the dynamics of the formation of sea ice in a region. Brine storage and rate of expulsion is determined by the environmental conditions under which the sea ice...

  16. The role of sea ice in the temperature-precipitation feedback of glacial cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tziperman, Eli

    91904, Israel e-mail: hezi.gildor@huji.ac.il Y. Ashkenazy Department of Solar Energy and Environmental climate history can shed some light. Sea ice is a key player in the climate system and in the hydrological, the various effects of sea ice in the hydrological cycle are isolated. It is demonstrated that for a cold LGM

  17. The role of sea ice in the temperature-precipitation feedback of glacial cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tziperman, Eli

    . It is demonstrated that for a cold LGM like state, a warmer climate (as a result of reduced sea-ice cover) leads, Jerusalem 91904, Israel e-mail: hezi.gildor@huji.ac.il Y. Ashkenazy Department of Solar Energy unsatisfactory, yet upon which past climate history can shed some light. Sea ice is a key player in the climate

  18. Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology , L.-S. Bai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland J. E. Box 1 , L.-S. Bai 1 , R across the southern half of Greenland led to substantially higher west coast sea ice thickness and concentration. Even so, record-setting summer temperatures around Greenland, combined with an intense melt

  19. A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adachi, Yosuke

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    melting is responsible for, 60% comes from glaciers and ice caps.and ice caps will continue to be the dominant contributor to sea-level rise from the land ice-melting

  20. Discrete-element model for the interaction between ocean waves and sea ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao

    2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the mechanical behavior of sea ice in response to ocean waves. The wave/ice interaction can potentially lead to the fracture and fragmentation of sea ice depending on the wave amplitude and period. The fracture behavior of sea ice is explicitly modeled by a DEM method, where sea ice is modeled by densely packed spherical particles with finite size. These particles are bonded together at their contact points through mechanical bonds that can sustain both tensile & compressive forces and moments. Fracturing can be naturally represented by the sequential breaking of mechanical bonds. For a given amplitude and period of incident ocean wave, the model provides information for the spatial distribution and time evolution of stress and micro-fractures and the fragment size distribution. We demonstrate that the fraction of broken bonds,, increases with increasing wave amplitude. In contrast, the ice fragment size decreases with increasing amplitude.

  1. Desalination processes of sea ice revisited Dirk Notz1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worster, M. Grae

    are the initial fractionation of salt at the ice-ocean interface, brine diffusion, brine expulsion, gravity in interstitial liquid brine. During all stages of its formation, growth and decay, sea ice remains a mixture of solid freshwater ice and liquid salty brine [e.g., Eicken, 2003, and references therein]. Since many

  2. Unusual narwhal sea ice entrapments and delayed autumn freeze-up trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    monoceros) occur when rapid changes in weather and wind conditions create a formation of fast ice in bays residence time. Keywords Climate change Á Narwhal Á Natural mortality Á Sassat Á Sea ice entrapment-Jørgensen 2005, 2011), ice entrapments are a source of natural mortality. These events occur when a sudden change

  3. ARKTOS: A Knowledge Engineering Software Package for Satellite Sea Ice Classification Leen-Kiat Soh and Costas Tsatsoulis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    ice experts as visual cues for sea ice features and classification rules and ultimately building system, and also address research issues in explicit encoding of domain expertise and capture of visual ice) research performs automated, intelligent SAR sea ice classification. Once it is deployed

  4. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  5. artificial sea water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ieft, thc area of formation, even a very small c...:ent, as well as naturally cccuring ice and water frcm the Arctic Ocean. An artificial sea-water was also used in the hope. "....

  6. Radioactive contamination of the Arctic Region, Baltic Sea, and the Sea of Japan from activities in the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of the Arctic regions of northern Europe and Russia, as well as the Sea of Japan, may become a potential major hazard to the ecosystem of these large areas. Widespread poor radioactive waste management practices from nuclear fuel cycle activities in the former Soviet Union have resulted in direct discharges to this area as well as multiple sources that may continue to release additional radioactivity. Information on the discharges of radioactive materials has become more commonplace in the last year, and a clearer picture is emerging of the scale of the contamination. Radioactivity in the Arctic oceans is now reported to be four times higher than would be derived from fallout from weapons tests. Although the characteristics and extent of the contamination are not well known, it has been stated that the contamination in the Arctic may range from 1 to 3.5 billion curies. As yet, no scientific sampling or measurement program has occurred that can verify the amount or extent of the contamination, or its potential impact on the ecosystem.

  7. Radionuclides in the Arctic seas from the former Soviet Union: Potential health and ecological risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, D W; Edson, R; Varela, M; Napier, B

    1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the assessment reported here is to evaluate the health and environmental threat to coastal Alaska posed by radioactive-waste dumping in the Arctic and Northwest Pacific Oceans by the FSU. In particular, the FSU discarded 16 nuclear reactors from submarines and an icebreaker in the Kara Sea near the island of Novaya Zemlya, of which 6 contained spent nuclear fuel (SNF); disposed of liquid and solid wastes in the Sea of Japan; lost a {sup 90}Sr-powered radioisotope thermoelectric generator at sea in the Sea of Okhotsk; and disposed of liquid wastes at several sites in the Pacific Ocean, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. In addition to these known sources in the oceans, the RAIG evaluated FSU waste-disposal practices at inland weapons-development sites that have contaminated major rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean. The RAIG evaluated these sources for the potential for release to the environment, transport, and impact to Alaskan ecosystems and peoples through a variety of scenarios, including a worst-case total instantaneous and simultaneous release of the sources under investigation. The risk-assessment process described in this report is applicable to and can be used by other circumpolar countries, with the addition of information about specific ecosystems and human life-styles. They can use the ANWAP risk-assessment framework and approach used by ONR to establish potential doses for Alaska, but add their own specific data sets about human and ecological factors. The ANWAP risk assessment addresses the following Russian wastes, media, and receptors: dumped nuclear submarines and icebreaker in Kara Sea--marine pathways; solid reactor parts in Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean--marine pathways; thermoelectric generator in Sea of Okhotsk--marine pathways; current known aqueous wastes in Mayak reservoirs and Asanov Marshes--riverine to marine pathways; and Alaska as receptor. For these waste and source terms addressed, other pathways, such as atmospheric transport, could be considered under future-funded research efforts for impacts to Alaska. The ANWAP risk assessment does not address the following wastes, media, and receptors: radioactive sources in Alaska (except to add perspective for Russian source term); radioactive wastes associated with Russian naval military operations and decommissioning; Russian production reactor and spent-fuel reprocessing facilities nonaqueous source terms; atmospheric, terrestrial and nonaqueous pathways; and dose calculations for any circumpolar locality other than Alaska. These other, potentially serious sources of radioactivity to the Arctic environment, while outside the scope of the current ANWAP mandate, should be considered for future funding research efforts.

  8. JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS surface. In 1997-1998, a large multi-agency effort made the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA with the ice pack in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas for one year. Surface-based remote sensors generated

  9. A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adachi, Yosuke

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to 21st-Century Sea-Level Rise. Science, 321, 1340; DOI:in the Face of Sea-Level Rise: A Hybrid Modeling Approachof ice sheets to sea-level rise. Bibliography Alcamo, J. et

  10. Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Received 7 December 2009; accepted 4Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked to Sea Ice Decline Uma S. Bhatt*,1 Donald A Institute, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

  11. Observed Feedback between Winter Sea Ice and the North Atlantic Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Courtenay; Magnusdottir, Gudrun; Stern, Hal

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variability and climate feedbacks in a global coupled model.Ocean JOURNAL OF CLIMATE feedback on the North Atlantic2009 STRONG ET AL. Observed Feedback between Winter Sea Ice

  12. A broad spectral, interdisciplinary investigation of the electromagnetic properties of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jezek, K. C.; Perovich, D. K.; Golden, K. M.; Luther, C.; Barber, D. G.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Grenfell, T. C.; Jordan, A. K.; Mobley, C. D.; Nghiem, S. V.; Onstott, R. G.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper highlights the interrelationship of research completed by a team of investigators and presented in the several individual papers comprising this Special Section on the Office of Naval Research (ONR), Arlington, VA, Sponsored Sea Ice...

  13. adjoint sea-ice export: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 296 Generated using version 3.0 of the official...

  14. Oceanic control of the sea ice edge and multiple equilibria in the climate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Brian E. J. (Brian Edward James)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I study fundamental mechanisms of atmosphere-ocean-sea ice interaction. Hierarchies of idealized models are invoked to argue that multiple equilibria and abrupt change are robust features of the climate system. The main ...

  15. Methods for biogeochemical studies of sea ice: The state of the art, caveats, and recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Lisa A.; Fripiat, Francois; Else, Brent G.T.; Bowman, Jeff S.; Brown, Kristina A.; Collins, R. Eric; Ewert, Marcela; Fransson, Agneta; Gosselin, Michel; Lannuzel, Delphine; Meiners, Klaus M.; Michel, Christine; Nishioka, Jun; Nomura, Daiki; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Russell, Lynn M.; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Thomas, David N.; Tison, Jean-Louis; van Leeuwe, Maria A.; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Wolf, Eric W.; Zhou, Jiayun

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    scales, the study of sea-ice biogeochemistry has expanded rapidly. Scientists have come to this field from a variety of disciplines, including glaciology, oceanography, sedimentology, and even tundra ecology; as we attempt to understand the complex...

  16. Modelling Sea Ice Growth Mark J. McGuinness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    salinity. The saltier the brine, the lower the freezing point. When salinity is above the critical value is rejected by growing ice as a dense brine, but the brine cannot escape as rapidly as heat at the ice, trapping brine in the ice-brine mixture. This constitutional supercooling causes the ice-ocean interface

  17. Discontinuous Non-Rigid Motion Analysis of Sea Ice using C-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellite Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Discontinuous Non-Rigid Motion Analysis of Sea Ice using C-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellite@cis.udel.edu Cathleen Geiger Snow and Ice Branch USACRREL 72 Lyme Rd, Hanover, NH 03755 cathleen@cis.udel.edu Abstract Sea-ice motion consists of complex non-rigid motions in- volving continuous, piece-wise continuous

  18. Multiple sea-ice states and abrupt MOC transitions in a general circulation ocean model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tziperman, Eli

    different land ice distributions represent present-day and cold-climate conditions. In each case the ocean is observed. The cold climate runs lead to meridional sea-ice extents that are different by up to four degrees. Y. Ashkenazy (&) Á D. Mirzayof Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, BIDR, Ben

  19. ANTARCTIC SEA ICE BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES, INTERACTIONS, AND VARIABILITY ANTARCTIC RESEARCH SERIES, VOLUME 73, PAGES 45-83

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moline, Mark

    conducted in pack ice communities that flowed into the vicin- ity of Palmer Station, Antarctica, between August and November, 1993. Pack ice provided incomplete protection to frazil ice algae from the damaging--../ ANTARCTIC SEA ICE BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES, INTERACTIONS, AND VARIABILITY ANTARCTIC RESEARCH

  20. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Contribution of Icelandic ice caps to sea level rise:1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Contribution of Icelandic ice caps - 2 BJ¨ORNSSON ET AL.: MASS LOSS FROM ICELANDIC ICE CAPS In total, Icelandic ice caps contain 3,600 km3 of ice, which if melted would3 raise sea level by 1 cm. Here, we present an overview of mass

  1. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Ian M.

    A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar properties. An initial warm, melt

  2. MFV Kerrie Marie BM172 (New Net MK 2) sea trials no11: ICES area VIIe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFV Kerrie Marie BM172 (New Net MK 2) sea trials no11: ICES area VIIe the results John, the Skipper fishing line and replaced it with a traditional 36mm rope fishing line in the new net" (see sea trials No4). "The new net didn't dig into the fishing grounds as much and discards were reduced much more

  3. 54 IEEE GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING LETTERS, VOL. 3, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 Microwave Observations of Daily Antarctic Sea-Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    of the sea-ice pack. To estimate the probability distribution of daily Antarctic sea-ice extent change, two is similar and is approxi- mately double-exponential. Daily ice-pack statistics are presented. Index Terms of Daily Antarctic Sea-Ice Edge Expansion and Contraction Rates Jeffrey R. Allen and David G. Long, Senior

  4. 255FEBRUARY 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | he Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    that determine the surface energy budget and the sea­ice mass balance in the Arctic (Moritz et al. 1993; Perovich of the vertical and horizontal energy exchanges within the ocean­ice­atmosphere system. The SHEBA pro- gram for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; TURENNE--Canadian Coast Guard, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; SERREZE

  5. Interannual variations of Arctic cloud types in relation to Ryan Eastman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    increasing cloud cover, which may promote ice loss by the longwave effect. The trends are positive in all in sea ice extent and thickness may be affected by cloud radiative effect (CRE), and seaice changes may in turn impart changes to cloud cover. Visual cloud reports from land and ocean regions of the Arctic

  6. Millennial-scale stable oscillations between sea ice and convective deep water formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last ice age there were several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events. The climatic effects of the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest and most abrupt temperature anomalies. Similar but weaker oscillations also took place during the interglacial period. This paper proposes an auto-oscillatory mechanism between sea ice and convective deep water formation in the north Atlantic as the source of the persistent cycles. A simple dynamical model is constructed by coupling and slightly modifying two existing models of ocean circulation and sea ice. The model exhibits mixed mode oscillations, consisting of decadal scale small amplitude oscillations, and a large amplitude relaxation fluctuation. The decadal oscillations occur due to the insulating effect of sea ice and leads to periodic ventilation of heat from the polar ocean. Gradually an instability builds up in the polar column and results in an abrupt initiation of convection an...

  7. Sea Ice Dynamics and Regional Meteorology for the Arctic Polynya Experiment (APEX) -Bering Sea 1985

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..-.'''~:..~t:.'~.;,..... ,'" 'J.~~l~ · ._. fiv· ~ .. ~ .·. I ' . . . .1. . ""V' ·· I' ~ _',~ " · A e · . ~. ,': ~:'P'." ,i' -.t ' "'ft.""~"~.I r,J, ...'~"'".~".. "'~..J. ~.·.".'l :..' ti.;~.I.... ,.. ,'t ·. " , .:~..~....·~ j':.. ',' /~.,..~'I":'F' r/tr. tIlL. [i'" " . 4 . . . , l. '.. .. ,~"" It~ . '~ 1"r ,. ~ ' .' .' .' '1'.:. ..-' ~ Vl7

  8. Molecular-dynamics simulation of clustering processes in sea-ice floes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In seasonally ice-covered seas and along the margins of perennial ice pack, i.e. in regions with medium ice concentrations, the ice cover typically consists of separate floes interacting with each other by inelastic collisions. In this paper, hitherto unexplored analogies between this type of ice cover and two-dimensional granular gases are used to formulate a model of ice dynamics at the floe level. The model consists of: (i) momentum equations for floe motion between collisions, formulated in the form of a Stokes-flow problem, with floe-size dependent time constant and equilibrium velocity, and (ii) hard-disk collision model. The numerical algorithm developed is suitable for simulating particle-laden flow of $N$ disk-shaped floes with arbitrary size distribution. The model is applied to study clustering phenomena in sea ice with power-law floe-size distribution. In particular, the influence of the average ice concentration $\\bar{A}$ on the formation and characteristics of clusters is analyzed in detail. The...

  9. Predicting Land-Ice Retreat and Sea-Level Rise with the Community Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscomb, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coastal stakeholders need defensible predictions of 21st century sea-level rise (SLR). IPCC assessments suggest 21st century SLR of {approx}0.5 m under aggressive emission scenarios. Semi-empirical models project SLR of {approx}1 m or more by 2100. Although some sea-level contributions are fairly well constrained by models, others are highly uncertain. Recent studies suggest a potential large contribution ({approx}0.5 m/century) from the marine-based West Antarctic Ice Sheet, linked to changes in Southern Ocean wind stress. To assess the likelihood of fast retreat of marine ice sheets, we need coupled ice-sheet/ocean models that do not yet exist (but are well under way). CESM is uniquely positioned to provide integrated, physics based sea-level predictions.

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 52, NO. 4, APRIL 2014 2149 Mitigation of Sea Ice Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 52, NO. 4, APRIL 2014 2149 Mitigation such as the Oceansat-2 scatterometer. Index Terms--QuikCSAT, remote sensing, scatterometry, sea ice, wind, wind, atmospheric heat flow, ocean currents, and possibly sea ice formation. Satellite scat- terometry enables daily

  11. Void bounds for fluid transport in sea ice K.M. Golden a,*, A.L. Heaton a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    ice is a porous composite of pure ice with brine, air and salt inclusions whose microstructure varies and biological processes. Yet little is known, for example, about bulk flow of brine or diffusive transport dynamics in sea ice: estimating the effective fluid permeability tensor k(/) and its dependence on brine

  12. A physically based parameterization of gravity drainage for sea-ice modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees Jones, David W.; Worster, M. Grae

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    an integral aspect of any cou- pled climate model [Gent , 2012]. Although only a few me- ters thick, sea ice plays a significant role in the coupling between ocean and atmosphere because it reflects a higher proportion of solar radiation than open water... suspect the latter is a result of our neglect of solar radiation, and brine expulsion, which would transport salt downwards within the ice, increasing the solid fraction in the upper ice and thereby reducing the permeabil- ity and local Rayleigh number. We...

  13. Reflections on a record minimum The numbers are in 2012 broke the record for minimum sea ice extent and is still heading down (see

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in climate models. The approach was to freeze an icebreaker into the pack ice and drift for a year makingReflections on a record minimum The numbers are in ­ 2012 broke the record for minimum sea ice extent and is still heading down (see Figure 1). The sea ice extent data tell an unequivocal story of ice

  14. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using AMSR-E 89 GHz Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremen, Universität

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using AMSR progress in sea ice concentration remote sensing by satellite microwave radiometers has been stimulated, a new algorithm enables to estimate sea ice concentration from the channels near 90 GHz, despite the en

  15. Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    , thinning and breakup of Jakobshavn Glacier's (SW Greenland) floating ice tongue and acceleration-to-year variability in GrIS mass turnover, e.g. sudden glacier accelerations (Rignot and Kanagartnam 2006). Since or 2005. Physical response mechanisms, such as hydraulic acceleration of the ice sheet from continued

  16. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sednev, I.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parameterization in BRM scheme accounts for two general mech- anisms distinguishable according to the involvement of liquid phase in the ice

  17. Pore space percolation in sea ice single crystals D. J. Pringle,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    from 2 to 12% and we found arrays of near-parallel intracrystalline brine layers whose connectivity threshold in the brine microstructure of sea ice. In previous works this critical behavior has been inferred at higher brine volumes by the formation of thin necks between the brine layers. We relate these results

  18. A network model for fluid transport through sea ice A. JABINI,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    randomly from distributions describing measured cross-sectional areas of brine inclusions in sea ice. At this stage, the model reflects only the most general features of brine microstructure and its evolution observed values. This finding provides evidence that the brine network becomes more disconnected with lower

  19. Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT-B NWP Ocean Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT-B NWP Ocean Calibration and Validation Technical Report SAF/OSI/CDOP2 #12;SAF/OSI/CDOP2/KNMI/TEC/RP/199 ASCAT-B NWP Ocean Calibration and Validation Summary On September 17 launched. For the ASCAT-B scatterometer, corrections are derived with the use of the NWP ocean calibration

  20. The Ross Sea Response to Evolving Ocean-Ice Interactions in a Changing Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiederwohl, Christina 1980-

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    decade (1994–2007) mostly (50%) from larger melt water inputs from the Pine Island (17.7 km^3 per decade) and Dotson (14.8 km^3 per decade) glaciers. Two decades of steady (1978-2000) strengthening of sea ice productivity (200 km^3 per decade) within...

  1. A model of melt pond evolution on sea ice P. D. Taylor and D. L. Feltham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    short-wave radiation. The difference in solar energy ab- sorption between pond-covered and bare sea ice Observation and Modelling, Department of Space and Climate Physics, University College London, London, UK ponds influence the summertime energy and mass balance through the albedo-feedback mechanism [Ebert

  2. Modeling Abrupt Change in Global Sea Level Arising from Ocean - Ice-Sheet Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David M Holland

    2011-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed to develop, validate, and apply a coupled ocean ice-sheet model to simulate possible, abrupt future change in global sea level. This research is to be carried out collaboratively between an academic institute and a Department of Energy Laboratory (DOE), namely, the PI and a graduate student at New York University (NYU) and climate model researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The NYU contribution is mainly in the area of incorporating new physical processes into the model, while the LANL efforts are focused on improved numerics and overall model development. NYU and LANL will work together on applying the model to a variety of modeling scenarios of recent past and possible near-future abrupt change to the configuration of the periphery of the major ice sheets. The project's ultimate goal is to provide a robust, accurate prediction of future global sea level change, a feat that no fully-coupled climate model is currently capable of producing. This proposal seeks to advance that ultimate goal by developing, validating, and applying a regional model that can simulate the detailed processes involved in sea-level change due to oceanÃ?Â? ice-sheet interaction. Directly modeling ocean ice-sheet processes in a fully-coupled global climate model is not a feasible activity at present given the near-complete absence of development of any such causal mechanism in these models to date.

  3. The effects of North Atlantic SST and sea-ice anomalies on the winter circulation in CCM3.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnusdottir, Gudrun

    1 The effects of North Atlantic SST and sea-ice anomalies on the winter circulation in CCM3. Part of experiments with an atmospheric general circulation model, Community Climate Model Version 3 (CCM3). As shown

  4. J1.15 PARAMETERIZING THE TURBULENT SURFACE FLUXES OVER SUMMER SEA ICE Edgar L Andreas1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Ola

    1 of 9 J1.15 PARAMETERIZING THE TURBULENT SURFACE FLUXES OVER SUMMER SEA ICE Edgar L Andreas1* , P- * Corresponding author address: Edgar L Andreas, U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72

  5. Connecting recruitment of Antarctic krill and sea ice John Wiedenmann,a,b* Katherine A. Cresswell,b and Marc Mangelb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangel, Marc

    Connecting recruitment of Antarctic krill and sea ice John Wiedenmann,a,b* Katherine A. Cresswell show a nonlinear relationship between recruitment and sea ice area in the combined Bellingshausen range of ice area, and minimal recruitment otherwise. This finding may allow for an adaptive approach

  6. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds rsted-DTU, Electromagnetic Systems, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    ablation. The model predictions are tested for sensitivity to the melt rate of unponded ice, enhanced melt with surface topographies derived from laser altimetry corresponding to first-year sea ice and multiyear sea ice are important in determining the total surface ablation and area covered by melt ponds. Citation

  7. Annual Progress Report Year 1 (3 June 2008-2 June 2009) Project Title: Antarctic sea ice thickness from space: validating estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    from space: validating estimates from the laser and radar satellite altimeters with ship remote sensing in polar or mountainous regions. (The GRL paper: Internal Melting in Antarctic sea ice, and Selected Publications in EOS) -Workshop sessions on satellite remote sensing of Antarctic Sea Ice and Ice

  8. Modeling Sea Ice-Ocean-Ecosystem Responses to Climate Changes in the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas with Data Assimilation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Marine Science and Technology, Haoguo Hu - CILER, University of Michigan Overview This project will useModeling Sea Ice-Ocean-Ecosystem Responses to Climate Changes in the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas-Investigators: Leo Oey - Princeton University, Tel Ezer - Old Dominion University, K. Mizobata - Tokyo University

  9. A View of Antarctic Ice-Sheet Evolution from Sea-Level and Deep-Sea Isotope Changes During the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, K. G.; Wright, J. D.; Katz, M. E.; Browning, J. V.; Cramer, B. S.; Wade, Bridget S.; Mizintseva, S. F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Proceedings of the 10th International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.3133/of2007-1047.kp06 A View of Antarctic Ice-Sheet Evolution from Sea-Level and Deep-Sea Isotope Changes During the Late...

  10. Non-nuclear submarine tankers could cost-effectively move Arctic oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumm, W.H.

    1984-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Before the advent of nuclear propulsion for U.S. Navy submarines, fuel cells were considered to be the next logical step forward from battery powered submarines which required recharging. But with the launching of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954, the development of fuel-cell propulsion was sidelined by the naval community. Nearly 30 years later fuel-cell propulsion on board submarines is actually more cost-effective than the use of nuclear propulsion. In the Artic Ocean, the use of the submarine tanker has long been considered commercially appropriate because of the presence of the polar ice cap, which inhibits surface ship transport. The technical difficulty and high operating cost of Arctic icebreaking tankers are strong arguments in favor of the cheaper, more efficient submarine tanker. Transiting under the polar ice cap, the submarine tanker is not an ''Arctic'' system, but merely a submerged system. It is a system usable in any ocean around the globe where sufficient depth exists (about 65% of the global surface). Ice breakers are another story; their design only makes them useful for transit through heavy sea ice in coastal environments. Used anywhere else, such as in the open ocean or at the Arctic ice cap, they are not a cost-effective means of transport. Arctic sea ice conditions require the Arctic peculiar icebreaking tanker system to do the job the hard way-on the surface. But on the other hand, Arctic sea ice conditions are neatly set aside by the submarine tanker, which does it the energy-efficient, elegant way submerged. The submarine tanker is less expensive to build, far less expensive to operate, and does not need to be nuclear propelled.

  11. Ice particle size matters | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice particle size matters Ice particle size matters Released: May 04, 2014 Fine-tuning cloud models for improved climate predictions The Science Arctic clouds are widespread and...

  12. Profiling Float Observations of the Upper Ocean Under Sea Ice off the Wilkes Land Coast of Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    the water column is weakly stratified due to brine rejection and is therefore only marginally stable brine rejection associated with sea ice formation results in dense shelf waters, which mix, the salt in seawater is excluded. The expelled salt remains as pockets of brine in the ice until it slowly

  13. Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Insights from a 3-D Cloud-Resolving Model with Size-Resolved Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Khain, Alexander

    2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The single-layer mixed-phase clouds observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) are simulated with a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) coupled with an explicit bin microphysics scheme and a radar-lidar simulator. Two possible ice enhancement mechanisms – activation of droplet evaporation residues by condensation-followed-by-freezing and droplet freezing by contact freezing inside-out, are scrutinized by extensive comparisons with aircraft and radar and lidar measurements. The locations of ice initiation associated with each mechanism and the role of ice nuclei (IN) in the evolution of mixed-phase clouds are mainly addressed. Simulations with either mechanism agree well with the in-situ and remote sensing measurements on ice microphysical properties but liquid water content is slightly underpredicted. These two mechanisms give very similar cloud microphysical, macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative properties, although the ice nucleation properties (rate, frequency and location) are completely different. Ice nucleation from activation of evaporation nuclei is most efficient near cloud top areas concentrated on the edges of updrafts, while ice initiation from the drop freezing process has no significant location preference (occurs anywhere that droplet evaporation is significant). Both enhanced nucleation mechanisms contribute dramatically to ice formation with ice particle concentration of 10-15 times higher relative to the simulation without either of them. The contribution of ice nuclei (IN) recycling from ice particle evaporation to IN and ice particle concentration is found to be very significant in this case. Cloud can be very sensitive to IN initially and form a nonquilibrium transition condition, but become much less sensitive as cloud evolves to a steady mixed-phase condition. The parameterization of Meyers et al. [1992] with the observed MPACE IN concentration is able to predict the observed mixed-phase clouds reasonably well. This validation may facilitate the application of this parameterization in the cloud and climate models to simulate Arctic clouds.

  14. 20 InsideGNSS SEP T EMBER /OC T OBER 2011 www.insidegnss.com he Arctic houses an estimated 90 billion barrels of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of global climate change. New summer sea lanes have already opened up, and projections of sea ice loss. The combination of undiscovered oil and climate change are driving a dramatic increase in the demand of the untapped oil in the world. Russia, Canada, and the United States plan to explore the Arctic for extensive

  15. Toward Under-Ice Operations with Hybrid Underwater Robotic Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcomb, Louis L.

    techniques commonly employed for blue-water oceanography are unsuit- able for operations in ice covered seas, present day blue-water oceanographic methods for survey and sampling are extensive--they include ship for blue-water (i.e. not Arctic) operations: WHOI's Nereus HROV [8], [9], [42], SAAB Underwater Systems

  16. Expected magnitude of the aerosol shortwave indirect effect in springtime Arctic liquid water clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reflection of photons between the snow or sea ice surface and cloud base, the shortwave first indirect effect of high quality longwave spectral radiation measurements in the Arctic from which the indirect effect can clouds both absorb and scatter radiation. We therefore do not yet have a comparable spectral capability

  17. 90 4,000 Meters under the Ice The Arctic is one of the habitats undergoing the most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PlanckResearch 89 RUSSIA Special RUSSIA Special #12;#12;TEXT MAREN EMMERICH The Arctic is one of the habitats

  18. Inter-annual sea-ice dynamics and micro-algal biomass in winter pack ice of Marguerite Bay, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank

    in this region (Stammerjohn et al., 2003; Stammerjohn and Smith, 1996). Changes in mesoscale ice dynamics

  19. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  20. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 38, NO. 4, JULY 2000 1843 An Iterative Approach to Multisensor Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 38, NO. 4, JULY 2000 1843 An Iterative play a critical role in the global climate, the remote sensing community has had a keen interest in the variability of polar sea ice characteris- tics. Sea ice influences heat transfer between the warmer ocean

  1. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo Springer-Verlag 2010 Abstract Snow surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during indicated four distinct tempera- ture regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar

  2. Mud volcanoes and ice-keel ploughmarks, Beaufort Sea shelf, Arctic Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowdeswell, J . A.; Todd, B . J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 2013). This has led to a warming of what was terrestrial permafrost by water incursion, and to the dissociation of subsurface gas hydrates which now vent into marine waters. Accompanying this change is the development of conical submarine landforms... of the linear and curvilinear features is lost where they intersect conical mounds and associated moats, implying subsequent burial. Interpretation The conical mounds are interpreted to be mud volcanoes associated with the release of methane from gas hydrates...

  3. The rapid disintegration of Arctic sea ice, like the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf in Canada, is a cause for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    Thomas Stocker, who co-chairs a working group of the prestigious Intergovernmental Panel on Climate, making them more efficient in terms of heating. Also, savings can be made in private mobility. swissinfo there are developments in the climate system that need to be studied very carefully, for example variations of solar

  4. Model-Data Fusion Studies of Pacific Arctic Climate and Ice-Ocean Processes Jia Wang1, Hajo Eicken2, Yanling Yu3, X. Bai4, Jinlun Zhang3, H. Hu4, Moto Ikeda5, Kohei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    and Ecosystems Research (CILER), School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, 4840 South1 Model-Data Fusion Studies of Pacific Arctic Climate and Ice-Ocean Processes Jia Wang1, Hajo. Tel: 734-741-2281; Email: Jia.Wang@noaa.gov 2. University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute

  5. Enhancing the resolution of sea ice in long-term global ocean general circulation model (gcm) integrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joong Tae

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Open water in sea ice, such as leads and polynyas, plays a crucial role in determining the formation of deep- and bottom-water, as well as their long-term global properties and circulation. Ocean general circulation models (GCMs) designed...

  6. Corrosion protection of Arctic offshore structures: Final report. [Effects of temperature and salinity on required cathodic protection current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Rogers, J.C.; Feyk, C.; Theuveny, B.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented for a research program on corrosion prevention for Arctic offshore structures which are in contact with sea ice for a significant portion of the year. The electrical method most adaptable for structure protection involves the injection of impressed current from several remote anodes buried just beneath the sea floor. The electrical resistivity of annual sea ice as a function of temperature and salinity is presented. Details of the interface layers formed between sea ice and steel in the presence of current injection are shown. A computer program was developed to enable the calculation of protective current density into the structure, in the presence of ice rubble and ridges around the structure. The program and the results of an example calculation are given for a caisson- retained island structure. 81 refs., 103 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. A New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part II: Single-Column Modeling of Arctic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    of the arctic bound- ary layer, the presence of leads (cracks) in the sea ice surface, the persistence of mixed-phaseA New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part- dicted cloud boundaries and total cloud fraction compare reasonably well with observations. Cloud phase

  8. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

  9. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  10. Arctic Ecologies: The Politics and Poetics of Northern Literary Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athens, Allison Katherine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which lives mainly on pack ice and is a powerful swimmerfor this change: “Arctic pack ice has formed progressivelychanges have resulted in pack ice that is a less stable

  11. Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheon, Woo Geunn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

  12. Effect of air-sea-ice interaction on winter 1996 Southern Ocean subpolar storm distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    is the baroclinic instability caused by the cold air blown from the ice pack to the warm open-ocean waters. Where with the entire pack ice/open-water region. The heat flux changes considerably in the area from continental ice to pack ice, resulting in strong baroclinicity that leads to the enhanced development of vortices. Streten

  13. Water vapor, cloud liquid water paths, and rain rates over northern high latitude open seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    longwave radiation caused by differences in cloud cover can produce an JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL-level stratus con- tribute the most to the total Arctic cloud cover of any cloud type according to surface presence during summertime but otherwise the Wentz internal sea-ice screening appears effective

  14. A unified approach to understanding permeability in sea ice Solving the mystery of booming sand dunes Entering into the "greenhouse century": A case study from Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    and associated ecosystems respond to climate change. However, studies of k and its dependence on brine porosity f and field data. X-ray computed tomography provides an unprecedented look at the brine phase and its and microstructural character- istics. Brine transport facilitates sea ice production from freezing of flooded ice

  15. Simulating Arctic Climate Warmth and Icefield Retreat in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    , Devon, and Meighen ice caps in the Canadian Arctic, and possibly in Camp Century (northwest Greenland the entire western Arctic from 57-N to 85-N, including Greenland and smaller scale ice caps in Iceland Project members In the future, Arctic warming and the melting of polar glaciers will be considerable

  16. Mathematical model for ice formation in the Arctic during Alain Pham Ngoc Dinh and Phan Thanh Nam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s in the ice and the ocean during a time dt is = -I T x F b,h0 + O T x Oc,h0 sdt, where I, O are thermal conductivities of the ice and the ocean. Finally, the law of conservation of energy, i.e. U = , leads pond and the underlying ocean, called false-bottoms. The simultaneous growth and ablation of false

  17. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol...

  18. Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

  19. Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    of radiometers at an ice station frozen into the drifting ice pack of the Arctic Ocean. The NASA/FIRE Arctic- dependent water contents and hydrometeor sizes for all-ice and all-liquid clouds. For the spring and early summer period, all-ice cloud retrievals showed a mean particle diameter of about 60 m and ice water

  20. Chinese Journal of Polar Science, Vol. 19, No.2, 168 -184, December 2008 Modeling seasonal variations of ocean and sea ice circulation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (CILER) , School of Natural Resources and Envi- ronment, University of Michigan, 4840 S State Road, Ann variations of ocean and sea ice circulation in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas: A model-data fusion study Wang, M148108 USA 2 Department of Ocean Sciences, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 4

  1. 65J.M. Grebmeier and W. Maslowski (eds.), The Pacific Arctic Region: Ecosystem Status and Trends in a Rapidly Changing Environment, DOI 10.1007/978-94-017-8863-2_4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    , Sapporo, Japan K. Mizobata Department of Ocean Sciences, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo, Japan J.E. Overland Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric mechanisms responsible for the diminishing sea ice cannot be explained by the leading Arctic Oscillation (AO

  2. Tide Model Accuracy in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, from InSAR Observations of Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    draining this region are out of balance; satellite records have documented glacier thinning, acceleration is currently losing ice mass at a rate comparable to that of the entire Greenland Ice Sheet. · Glaciers the flow of ice is removed using a prediction derived from tracking features in SAR backscatter intensity

  3. Economic feasibility of shipping containers through the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Russell (Russell Clayton)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Arctic ice cover continues to retreat, the possibility of regular transit through the Arctic becomes an increasing reality. Liner companies could take advantage of distance savings (up to 4000 nautical miles less ...

  4. A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Products for the Arctic Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in Air–Sea Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

    The uncertainties related to atmospheric fields in the Arctic Ocean from commonly used and recently available reanalysis products are investigated. Fields from the 1) ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) Common ...

  5. Mesoscale Modeling During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avramov, A.; Harringston, J.Y.; Verlinde, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic (Curry et al. 2000) and through various feedback mechanisms exert a strong influence on the Arctic climate. Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. It has been hypothesized that mixed-phase clouds are maintained through a balance between liquid water condensation resulting from the cloud-top radiative cooling and ice removal by precipitation (Pinto 1998; Harrington et al. 1999). In their modeling study Harrington et al. (1999) found that the maintenance of this balance depends strongly on the ambient concentration of ice forming nucleus (IFN). In a follow-up study, Jiang et al. (2002), using only 30% of IFN concentration predicted by Meyers et al. (1992) IFN parameterization were able to obtain results similar to the observations reported by Pinto (1998). The IFN concentration measurements collected during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004 over the North Slope of Alaska and the Beaufort Sea (Verlinde et al. 2005), also showed much lower values then those predicted (Prenne, pers. comm.) by currently accepted ice nucleation parameterizations (e.g. Meyers et al. 1992). The goal of this study is to use the extensive IFN data taken during M-PACE to examine what effects low IFN concentrations have on mesoscale cloud structure and coastal dynamics.

  6. Archimedean Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kari Eloranta

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The striking boundary dependency (the Arctic Circle phenomenon) exhibited in the ice model on the square lattice extends to other planar set-ups. We present these findings for the triangular and the Kagome lattices. Critical connectivity results guarantee that ice configurations can be generated using the simplest and most efficient local actions. Height functions are utilized throughout the analysis. At the end there is a surprise in store: on the remaining Archimedean lattice for which the ice model can be defined, the 3.4.6.4. lattice, the long range behavior is completely different from the other cases.

  7. Oceanic periglacial in the evolution of the Arctic marine ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matishov, G.G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Murmansk (Russian Federation). Murmansk Marine Biological Inst.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the Arctic marine and land environment and biota is connected with the analysis of the global climatic changes and the general history of Arctic and subarctic ecological systems. Ancient glaciation not only influenced the geomorphology of landscapes, physical and chemical properties of the ocean and its seas, but also caused the global change of the morphoclimatic zonality in the ocean as a whole. Submarine and subaqual hydrological, geomorphological and biological processes on the shelves of polar and temperate latitudes had intensified especially during the melting of continental glaciers. The study of the periglacial problem consists, as a whole, in the research of the geological and biological phenomena which take place in the pelagial and the benthal outside the ice sheets and are connected with them by causal, spatial and temporal relations.

  8. Sea Ice Ridging and Rafting Structures: Is the microstructural controlled transition from Ductile to Brittle Behavior on Earth also seen on Mars? S.F. Ackley, P. Wagner, H. Xie,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    , and liquid brine contained within lamellae of a pure ice matrix in a closely interlocked structure. The relative amount of brine, ice and solid salts is controlled by the thermodynamics of the phase equilibrium]. At higher brine volumes, sea ice behaves as a ductile material, meaning that it can undergo large strain

  9. Fractionation of Dissolved Solutes and Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter During Experimental Sea Ice Formation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephanie 1990-

    2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    (TN), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), fluorescence and absorption (optics), water isotopes (?18O and ?D), and lignin phenols. Results showed a clear fractionation effect for all parameters, where the ice samples contained much less of the dissolved...

  10. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL 104, NO C7, PAGES 15,66915,677, JULY 15, 1999 An energyconserving thermodynamic model of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    of internal brine­pocket melting on surface ablation. Sea ice models that parameterize latent heat storage in brine pockets often fail to reduce the energy required for surface ablation in proportion leads to reduced heat conduction, less internal brine­pocket melting, and more surface ablation. 1

  11. Ice-sheet model sensitivities to environmental forcing and their use in projecting future sea level (the SeaRISE project)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for shallow polythermal ice sheets. Philos. Trans. R. Soc.doi:10.3189/2013JoG12J125 Ice-sheet model sensitivities to1993) On the initiation of ice sheets. Ann. Glaciol. , 18,

  12. Leaching of radionuclides from furfural-based polymers used to solidify reactor compartments and components disposed of in the Arctic Kara Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEISER,J.H.; SIVINTSEV,Y.; ALEXANDROV,V.P.; DYER,R.S.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the course of operating its nuclear navy, the former Soviet Union (FSU) disposed of reactor vessels and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in three fjords on the east coast of Novaya Zemlya and in the open Kara Sea within the Novaya Zemlya Trough during the period 1965 to 1988. The dumping consisted of 16 reactors, six of which contained SNF and one special container that held ca. 60% of the damaged SNF and the screening assembly from the No. 2 reactor of the atomic icebreaker Lenin. At the time, the FSU considered dumping of decommissioned nuclear submarines with damaged cores in the bays of and near by the Novaya Zemlya archipelago in the Arctic Kara Sea to be acceptable. To provide an additional level of safety, a group of Russian scientists embarked upon a course of research to develop a solidification agent that would provide an ecologically safe barrier. The barrier material would prevent direct contact of seawater with the SNF and the resultant leaching and release of radionuclides. The solidification agent was to be introduced by flooding the reactors vessels and inner cavities. Once introduced the agent would harden and form an impermeable barrier. This report describes the sample preparation of several ``Furfurol'' compositions and their leach testing using cesium 137 as tracer.

  13. Unusual narwhal sea ice entrapments and delayed autumn freeze-up trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    entrapments of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) occur when rapid changes in weather and wind conditions create-up by prolonging their summer residence time. Keywords Climate change Á Narwhal Á Natural mortality Á Sassat Á Sea of natural mortality. These even

  14. Multiple sea-ice states and abrupt MOC transitions in a general circulation ocean model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    represent present-day and cold-climate conditions. In each case the ocean model is initiated with both ice of about three degrees in latitude between the different runs is observed. The cold climate runs lead. Mirzayof Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, BIDR, Ben-Gurion University, 84990 Midreshet

  15. Parameterization of the Extinction Coefficient in Ice and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds during the ISDAC Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korolev, A; Shashkov, A; Barker, H

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the history of attempts to directly measure cloud extinction, the current measurement device known as the Cloud Extinction Probe (CEP), specific problems with direct measurement of extinction coefficient, and the attempts made here to address these problems. Extinction coefficient is one of the fundamental microphysical parameters characterizing bulk properties of clouds. Knowledge of extinction coefficient is of crucial importance for radiative transfer calculations in weather prediction and climate models given that Earth's radiation budget (ERB) is modulated much by clouds. In order for a large-scale model to properly account for ERB and perturbations to it, it must ultimately be able to simulate cloud extinction coefficient well. In turn this requires adequate and simultaneous simulation of profiles of cloud water content and particle habit and size. Similarly, remote inference of cloud properties requires assumptions to be made about cloud phase and associated single-scattering properties, of which extinction coefficient is crucial. Hence, extinction coefficient plays an important role in both application and validation of methods for remote inference of cloud properties from data obtained from both satellite and surface sensors (e.g., Barker et al. 2008). While estimation of extinction coefficient within large-scale models is relatively straightforward for pure water droplets, thanks to Mie theory, mixed-phase and ice clouds still present problems. This is because of the myriad forms and sizes that crystals can achieve, each having their own unique extinction properties. For the foreseeable future, large-scale models will have to be content with diagnostic parametrization of crystal size and type. However, before they are able to provide satisfactory values needed for calculation of radiative transfer, they require the intermediate step of assigning single-scattering properties to particles. The most basic of these is extinction coefficient, yet it is rarely measured directly, and therefore verification of parametrizations is difficult. The obvious solution is to be able to measure microphysical properties and extinction at the same time and for the same volume. This is best done by in situ sampling by instruments mounted on either balloon or aircraft. The latter is the usual route and the one employed here. Yet the problem of actually measuring extinction coefficient directly for arbitrarily complicated particles still remains unsolved.

  16. Arctic sea ice trends and narwhal vulnerability Kristin L. Laidre a,*, Mads Peter Heide-Jrgensen b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    risk assess- ments as this may exceed the natural response capacity of the species. Ó 2004 Elsevier Ltd; Risk assessment; Vulnerability 1. Introduction Significant physical and biological shifts have recently climate change require that species vulnerability be incorporated into population risk models, especially

  17. A Climatology of the Arctic on Mid-Tropospheric Temperature Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony, Jeremy Patrick

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic is a unique and complex environment. Many factors play a role in determining the long-term climate of the Arctic, including mesoscale weather systems and many complex ice-albedo feedback mechanisms. Previous studies determined using real...

  18. Revised 1/11/05 BOWHEAD WHALE (Balaena mysticetus): Western Arctic Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the mobile polar pack ice. There is evidence of whales following each other, even when their route does+++++ +++++++ + +++++++++ Ice Front Revised 1/11/05 BOWHEAD WHALE (Balaena mysticetus): Western in seasonally ice-covered waters of the Arctic and near-Arctic, generally north of 60(N and south of 75(N

  19. A geospatial analysis of Arctic marine traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eucker, William

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    encounters with ice and often reported the location of the sea-ice edge, the boundary between open water and a threshold of sea-ice concentration (Scoresby, 1820; Ackley et al., 2003; Divine and Dick, 2006). Airships and aeroplanes of the 20th century...

  20. Glaciers, ice sheets, and sea level: effect of a CO/sub 2/-induced climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop examined the basic questions of how much water has been exchanged between land ice and ocean during the last century, what is happening now, and, given existing climate-modeling prediction, how much exchange can be expected in the next century. In addition, the evidence for exchange was examined and gaps in that evidence were identified. The report includes the 23 presentations made at the workshop, summarizes the workshop discussion, and presents the Committee's findings and recommendations. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 23 presentations.

  1. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

  2. Solar Radiative Heating in First Year Sea Ice M.J. McGuinness 1 , K.A. Landman 2 , H.J. Trodahl 3 , A.E. Pantoja 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Radiative Heating in First Year Sea Ice M.J. McGuinness 1 , K.A. Landman 2 , H.J. Trodahl 3 ice show daily oscillations consistent with heating by solar radiation. We present and solve a heat for solar power absorption based on Monte Carlo scatter­ ing simulations of penetrating photons. We observe

  3. Underwater radiated noise levels of a research icebreaker in the central Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , and search and rescue. The thinning Arctic ice pack and advances in ship design are allowing for longer of ice-breaking operations. Propulsion modes included transit in variable ice cover, breaking heavy iceHz when breaking ice. The highest noise levels resulted while the ship was engaged in backing

  4. bowhead whales. The Naval Arctic Re-search Laboratory at Barrow, Alaska,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Beaufort Sea (Braham et aI., 1980). These breaks in the ice, or leads, form when winds blow the moving pack breaks in the sea ice, migrating from their winter grounds in the Bering Sea to their sum- mer grounds ice away from landfast ice, creating a flaw zone of open water and broken ice generally parallel

  5. Reconstruction of the Past and Forecast of the Future European and British Ice Sheets and Associated Sea–Level Change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagdorn, Magnus K M

    The aim of this project is to improve our understanding of the past European and British ice sheets as a basis for forecasting their future. The behaviour of these ice sheets is investigated by simulating them using a ...

  6. Sampling Strategy for Enumerating the Western Arctic Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the pack ice (Bailey and Hendee, 1926) which oc- curs about April. Upon entering the Chukchi Sea themselves to open water areas in the pack ice. In their southern range the ice is thin and easily disturbed the seasonal distribution of ice. The northward spring migration from the Bering Sea is timed with the breakup

  7. Radiocarbon in particulate matter from the eastern sub-arctic Pacific Ocean; evidence of a source of terrestrial carbon to the deep sea.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druffel, Ellen R M; Honju, Susumu; Griffin, Sheila; Wong, C S

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EASTERN SUB-ARCTIC PACIFIC OCEAN: EVIDENCE OF A SOURCEfrom the deep Northeast Pacific Ocean. Due to the largeMap of the North Pacific Ocean (after Favorite, Dodimead &

  8. Amundsen Sea sea-ice variability, atmospheric circulation, and spatial variations in snow isotopic composition from new West Antarctic firn cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Criscitiello, Alison Sara

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work has documented dramatic changes in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) over the past 30 years (e.g., mass loss, glacier acceleration, surface warming) due largely to the influence of the marine environment. ...

  9. Arctic house

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkel, Joel A. (Joel Abram), 1969-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently available housing in the Arctic is limited to solutions that have been adapted from designs for less severe climates. This thesis has developed a new manner of residential construction designed specifically for ...

  10. On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Paquita Zuidema, Paul Lawson, Hugh Morrison U of Miami/SPEC, Inc. Boulder CO/NCAR #12;Arctic clouds are often: mixed-phase (ie. both ice + supercooled water) yet long-lasting (despite disequilibrium) #12;why? - are ice nuclei over

  11. Journal of Climate, 2005, Vol 18, p 2903-2921 Maintenance of the Sea-Ice Edge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    radiation is the largest component of the ocean energy budget, and the large seasonal range of insolation is known to expand in early winter roughly to the mean position of the ocean thermal front in the Greenland pole depends primarily on coastlines, ice motion, and the melt rate at the ice-ocean interface. At any

  12. The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

  13. Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric T. DeWeaver

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

  14. CO2 isotopes as tracers of firn air diffusion and age in an Arctic ice cap with summer melting, Devon Island, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    and the effects of summer melting. The 14 CO2 profile from the permeable firn includes the 1963 thermonuclear peak, and accumulation rates were calibrated with the depth of the 1963 thermonuclear 3 H peak. The average ages for CO2 and the ice matrix. Calibrated with the 1963 peak for thermonuclear 14 CO2, a 21.2-year reaction halftime

  15. Wind, sea ice, inertial oscillations and upper ocean mixing in Marguerite Bay, Western Antarctic Peninsula : observations and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyatt, Jason

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two years of moored oceanographic and automatic weather station data which span the winter ice seasons of 2001-2003 within Marguerite Bay on the western Antarctic Peninsula (wAP) shelf were collected as part of the Southern ...

  16. Characterization of the bi-directional reflectance (BRDF) of sea-ice in response to deposited aerosol for the inter-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    aerosol for the inter- calibration and validation of satellite remotes sensing products. Supervisors of large areas of the globe. Remote sensing observations performed in the visible and near infrared (e-ice will be measured in the UV-Vis part of the solar spectrum as a function of zenith and azimuthal angles. The BRDF

  17. Dynamics and energetics of the cloudy boundary layer in simulations of off-ice flow in the marginal ice zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Jerry Y.

    kinetic energy even in the present case where very strong surface heat fluxes occur. Ice-phase. Inclusion of the ice phase significantly affected the radiative budget as compared to purely liquid clouds, illustrating the importance of ice-phase­radiative couplings for accurate simulations of arctic clouds

  18. Diversity of the diatom genus Fragilariopsis in the Argentine Sea and Antarctic waters: morphology, distribution and abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cefarelli, Adrián O.; Ferrario, Martha E.; Almandoz, Gastón O.; Atencio, Adrián G.; Akselman, Rut; Vernet, María

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1989) The biota of Antarctic pack ice in the Weddell Sea andassemblages in Antarctic pack ice and in ice-edge plankton.

  19. Final Technical Report for Project "Improving the Simulation of Arctic Clouds in CCSM3"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen J. Vavrus

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has focused on the simulation of Arctic clouds in CCSM3 and how the modeled cloud amount (and climate) can be improved substantially by altering the parameterized low cloud fraction. The new formula, dubbed 'freeezedry', alleviates the bias of excessive low clouds during polar winter by reducing the cloud amount under very dry conditions. During winter, freezedry decreases the low cloud amount over the coldest regions in high latitudes by over 50% locally and more than 30% averaged across the Arctic (Fig. 1). The cloud reduction causes an Arctic-wide drop of 15 W m{sup -2} in surface cloud radiative forcing (CRF) during winter and about a 50% decrease in mean annual Arctic CRF. Consequently, wintertime surface temperatures fall by up to 4 K on land and 2-8 K over the Arctic Ocean, thus significantly reducing the model's pronounced warm bias (Fig. 1). While improving the polar climate simulation in CCSM3, freezedry has virtually no influence outside of very cold regions (Fig. 2) or during summer (Fig. 3), which are space and time domains that were not targeted. Furthermore, the simplicity of this parameterization allows it to be readily incorporated into other GCMs, many of which also suffer from excessive wintertime polar cloudiness, based on the results from the CMIP3 archive (Vavrus et al., 2008). Freezedry also affects CCSM3's sensitivity to greenhouse forcing. In a transient-CO{sub 2} experiment, the model version with freezedry warms up to 20% less in the North Polar and South Polar regions (1.5 K and 0.5 K smaller warming, respectively) (Fig. 4). Paradoxically, the muted high-latitude response occurs despite a much larger increase in cloud amount with freezedry during non-summer months (when clouds warm the surface), apparently because of the colder modern reference climate. These results of the freezedry parameterization have recently been published (Vavrus and D. Waliser, 2008: An improved parameterization for simulating Arctic cloud amount in the CCSM3 climate model. J. Climate, 21, 5673-5687.). The article also provides a novel synthesis of surface- and satellite-based Arctic cloud observations that show how much the new freezedry parameterization improves the simulated cloud amount in high latitudes (Fig. 3). Freezedry has been incorporated into the CCSM3.5 version, in which it successfully limits the excessive polar clouds, and may be used in CCSM4. Material from this work is also appearing in a synthesis article on future Arctic cloud changes (Vavrus, D. Waliser, J. Francis, and A. Schweiger, 'Simulations of 20th and 21st century Arctic cloud amount in the global climate models assessed in the IPCC AR4', accepted in Climate Dynamics) and was used in a collaborative paper on Arctic cloud-sea ice coupling (Schweiger, A., R. Lindsay, S. Vavrus, and J. Francis, 2008: Relationships between Arctic sea ice and clouds during autumn. J. Climate, 21, 4799-4810.). This research was presented at the 2007 CCSM Annual Workshop, as well as the CCSM's 2007 Atmospheric Model Working Group and Polar Working Group Meetings. The findings were also shown at the 2007 Climate Change Prediction Program's Science Team Meeting. In addition, I served as an instructor at the International Arctic Research Center's (IARC) Summer School on Arctic Climate Modeling in Fairbanks this summer, where I presented on the challenges and techniques used in simulating polar clouds. I also contributed to the development of a new Arctic System Model by attending a workshop in Colorado this summer on this fledgling project. Finally, an outreach activity for the general public has been the development of an interactive web site () that displays Arctic cloud amount in the CMIP3 climate model archive under present and future scenarios. This site allows users to make polar and global maps of a variety of climate variables to investigate the individual and ensemble-mean GCM response to greenhouse warming and the extent to which models adequately represent Arctic clouds in the modern clima

  20. Retrieval of Cloud Phase Using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Data during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, P.; Shupe, M.; Uttal, T.; Poellot, M.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving climate model predictions over Earth's polar regions requires a comprehensive knowledge of polar cloud microphysics. Over the Arctic, there is minimal contrast between the clouds and background snow surface, making it difficult to detect clouds and retrieve their phase from space. Snow and ice cover, temperature inversions, and the predominance of mixed-phase clouds make it even more difficult to determine cloud phase. Also, since determining cloud phase is the first step toward analyzing cloud optical depth, particle size, and water content, it is vital that the phase be correct in order to obtain accurate microphysical and bulk properties. Changes in these cloud properties will, in turn, affect the Arctic climate since clouds are expected to play a critical role in the sea ice albedo feedback. In this paper, the IR trispectral technique (IRTST) is used as a starting point for a WV and 11-{micro}m brightness temperature (T11) parameterization (WVT11P) of cloud phase using MODIS data. In addition to its ability to detect mixed-phase clouds, the WVT11P also has the capability to identify thin cirrus clouds overlying mixed or liquid phase clouds (multiphase ice). Results from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) MODIS phase model (AMPHM) are compared to the surface-based cloud phase retrievals over the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site and to in-situ data taken from University of North Dakota Citation (CIT) aircraft which flew during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE). It will be shown that the IRTST and WVT11P combined to form the AMPHM can achieve a relative high accuracy of phase discrimination compared to the surface-based retrievals. Since it only uses MODIS WV and IR channels, the AMPHM is robust in the sense that it can be applied to daytime, twilight, and nighttime scenes with no discontinuities in the output phase.

  1. Hydrological and biogeochemical cycling along the Greenland ice sheet margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Maya Pilar, 1979-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming has led to a significant increase in Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) melt and runoff since 1990, resulting in escalated export of fresh water and associated sediment to the surrounding North Atlantic and Arctic ...

  2. Moisture budget of the Arctic atmosphere from TOVS satellite data David G. Groves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jennifer

    and radiative heating of the atmosphere. These, in turn, affect surface temperature, ice growth and melt and hemispheric atmospheric processes affect the Arctic Ocean. The lack of humidity data over the Arctic Ocean. Our method yields an average annual net precipitation of 15.1 cm yrÀ1 over the polar cap (poleward

  3. U.S. Arctic Research Policy: What do we need to know now?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    ;11 September 2007 Arctic ice retreat ­ minimum coverage and thickness #12;Carbon dioxide climbs #12;Methane: mitigation, adaptation, Arctic feedbacks, alternative energy, sequestration, Black Carbon Task Force · Involve indigenous communities in decisions · Enhance scientific monitoring and research into local

  4. Ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentley, Charles G.; Thomas, Robert H.; Velicogna, Isabella

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is eroding West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Geophysical Researchand Yungel, J. (2000). Greenland Ice Sheet: High-Elevation2004). The west Antarctic ice sheet and long term climate

  5. State of the Earth's Cryosphere at the Beginning of the 21st Century: Glaciers, Global Snow Cover, Floating Ice, and Permafrost and Periglacial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    , Floating Ice, and Permafrost and Periglacial Environments-- FLOATING ICE: SEA ICE By CLAIRE L. PARKINSON., and JANE G. FERRIGNO U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PROFESSIONAL PAPER 1386­A­4­I Sea ice covers vast areas. The extensive cover of sea ice has major impacts on the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and marine

  6. Chinese Journal of Polar Science, Vol. 19, No.2, 218 -229, December 2008 A coupled ice-ocean ecosystem model for I-D and 3-D applica-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinese Journal of Polar Science, Vol. 19, No.2, 218 - 229, December 2008 A coupled ice and Chukchi Seas is strongly influenced by the annual cycle of sea ice. Here pelagic and sea ice algal ecosystems coexist and interact with each other. Ecosystem modeling of sea ice associated phytoplankton

  7. Using Radar, Lidar and Radiometer Data from NSA and SHEBA to Quantify Cloud Property Effects on the Surface Heat Budget in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet Intrieri; Mathhew Shupe

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud and radiation data from two distinctly different Arctic areas are analyzed to study the differences between coastal Alaskan and open Arctic Ocean region clouds and their respective influence on the surface radiation budget. The cloud and radiation datasets were obtained from (1) the DOE North Slope of Alaska (NSA) facility in the coastal town of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) the SHEBA field program, which was conducted from an icebreaker frozen in, and drifting with, the sea-ice for one year in the Western Arctic Ocean. Radar, lidar, radiometer, and sounding measurements from both locations were used to produce annual cycles of cloud occurrence and height, atmospheric temperature and humidity, surface longwave and shortwave broadband fluxes, surface albedo, and cloud radiative forcing. In general, both regions revealed a similar annual trend of cloud occurrence fraction with minimum values in winter (60-75%) and maximum values during spring, summer and fall (80-90%). However, the annual average cloud occurrence fraction for SHEBA (76%) was lower than the 6-year average cloud occurrence at NSA (92%). Both Arctic areas also showed similar annual cycle trends of cloud forcing with clouds warming the surface through most of the year and a period of surface cooling during the summer, when cloud shading effects overwhelm cloud greenhouse effects. The greatest difference between the two regions was observed in the magnitude of the cloud cooling effect (i.e., shortwave cloud forcing), which was significantly stronger at NSA and lasted for a longer period of time than at SHEBA. This is predominantly due to the longer and stronger melt season at NSA (i.e., albedo values that are much lower coupled with Sun angles that are somewhat higher) than the melt season observed over the ice pack at SHEBA. Longwave cloud forcing values were comparable between the two sites indicating a general similarity in cloudiness and atmospheric temperature and humidity structure between the two regions.

  8. Ice in the Environment: Proceedings of the 16th IAHR International Symposium on Ice Dunedin, New Zealand, 2nd6th December 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    Ice in the Environment: Proceedings of the 16th IAHR International Symposium on Ice Dunedin, New OF DETERMINING A GEOPHYSICAL-SCALE SEA ICE RHEOLOGY FROM LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS Daniel Feltham1 and Peter Sammonds2 and Daniel Hatton2 ABSTRACT We present a methodology that allows a sea ice rheology, suitable

  9. View of NY harbor from the JOIDES Resolution! in an ice-free world (73 m rise)!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caps:! Melting land ice adds to ocean volume, but not sea ice! IPCC2001! Alpine! #12;Why Is global sea level Is rising today?! .! Melting mountain glaciers/ice caps ("alpine" and! continental ice sheets error: 20-60 cm (does not include ice sheet melting)! http://www.realclimate.org/images/sealevel_1.jpg

  10. Global Simulations of Ice nucleation and Ice Supersaturation with an Improved Cloud Scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Morrison, H.; Park, Sungsu; Conley, Andrew; Klein, Stephen A.; Boyle, James; Mitchell, David; Li, J-L F.

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process-based treatment of ice supersaturation and ice-nucleation is implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The new scheme is designed to allow (1) supersaturation with respect to ice, (2) ice nucleation by aerosol particles and (3) ice cloud cover consistent with ice microphysics. The scheme is implemented with a 4-class 2 moment microphysics code and is used to evaluate ice cloud nucleation mechanisms and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloud occurrence better than previous versions of the model. Simulations indicate heterogeneous freezing and contact nucleation on dust are both potentially important over remote areas of the Arctic. Cloud forcing and hence climate is sensitive to different formulations of the ice microphysics. Arctic radiative fluxes are sensitive to the parameterization of ice clouds. These results indicate that ice clouds are potentially an important part of understanding cloud forcing and potential cloud feedbacks, particularly in the Arctic.

  11. The historical global sea-level budget J.C. MOORE,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    -level contributions from glaciers and small ice caps, the Greenland ice sheet and thermosteric sea level are available unsurveyed high-latitude small glaciers and ice caps. The sea-level budget from 1850 is estimated using because it takes $50 times more energy to raise sea level by ocean heating than by ice melting (Trenberth

  12. The Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    Carbon sequestration Biological pump a b s t r a c t We present observation based estimatesThe Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n , A.C. Naveira Garabato a , T. Tsubouchi b , S January 2014 Keywords: Arctic Ocean Dissolved inorganic carbon Carbon budget Air­sea carbon dioxide flux

  13. Field Report: Long-Baseline Acoustic Navigation for Under-Ice AUV Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Hanumant

    . The drifting pack ice made vehicle recovery more challenging and necessitated atypical adaptations relatively unexplored on account of its location beneath the permanent drifting Arctic ice pack. OurField Report: Long-Baseline Acoustic Navigation for Under-Ice AUV Operations Michael V. Jakuba

  14. Impact of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet interactions on climate sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goelzer, Heiko

    Impact of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet interactions on climate sensitivity H. Goelzer · P versions including interactive Greenland and Ant- arctic ice sheet models and model versions with fixed ice a few global climate models exist that include dynami- cally coupled models for the Greenland (e

  15. Carbon dynamics in arctic vegetation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Street, Lorna Elizabeth

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the Arctic land surface and the global climate system. A large amount of organic carbon (C) is currently stored in Arctic soils; if ...

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 40, NO. 7, JULY 2002 1605 Surface Roughness Characterizations of Sea Ice and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    , surface roughness data from airborne laser altimeter transects correlate well with MISR-derived estimates of surface roughness. In Antarctica, ablation-related blue-ice areas, which are difficult to distinguish from bare ice exposed by crevasses, are easily detected using multiangular data. These unusual ablation

  17. A reassessment of the dispersion properties of 99 North Sea and the Norwegian Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Helge

    northwards along the Norwegian coast heading towards the Arctic Ocean. Comparison with observational timeA reassessment of the dispersion properties of 99 Tc in the North Sea and the Norwegian Sea Steinar radionuclide Technetium-99 (99 Tc) in the North and Norwegian Seas have been simulated with a regional

  18. Sea Level Rise Media Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    Sea Level Rise Media Release Coverage Report 07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves 06/11/2009 Rising sea levels could see U.S. Atlantic coast cities make hard choices; Where to let Baltimore Chronicle & Sentinel, The 06/08/2009 Rapid rise in sea levels on East Coast predicted Pittsburgh

  19. Microwave emissivity of fresh water ice--Lake ice and Antarctic ice pack--Radiative transfer simulations versus satellite radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave emissivity models of sea ice are poorly validated empirically. Typical validation studies involve using averaged or stereotyped profiles of ice parameters against averaged radiance measurements. Measurement sites are rarely matched and even less often point-by-point. Because of saline content, complex permittivity of sea ice is highly variable and difficult to predict. Therefore, to check the validity of a typical, plane-parallel, radiative-transfer-based ice emissivity model, we apply it to fresh water ice instead of salt-water ice. Radiance simulations for lake ice are compared with measurements over Lake Superior from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on EOS (AMSR-E). AMSR-E measurements are also collected over Antarctic icepack. For each pixel, a thermodynamic model is driven by four years of European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data and the resulting temperature profiles used to drive the emissivity model. The results suggest that the relatively simple ...

  20. Bedmap2: improved ice bed, surface and thickness datasets for Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Potential Sea-Level Rise from a Col- lapse of theof floating ice and sea level rise, Geophys. Res. Lett. ,contribution to sea-level rise (58 m) are simi- lar to those

  1. Eddy-resolving simulations of the Fimbul Ice Shelf cavity circulation: Basal melting and exchange with open ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilly, Jonathan

    that govern the heat supply to ice shelves in the Eastern Weddell Sea. The simulations confirm the low melt

  2. Effects of simulated natural variability on Arctic temperature projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Helge

    - sea ice-ocean model is used to examine the effects of natural variability on climate projections starting from different strengths and phases of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and cryosphere give rise to a variety of climate feedbacks as such as ice- albedo and cloud feedbacks. The direct

  3. Ice Classification in the Southern Ocean Using ERS-1 Scatterometer David S.Early, David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Ice Classification in the Southern Ocean Using ERS-1 Scatterometer Data David S.Early, David G for classifying Southern Ocean sea ice from enhanced resolution ERS-1 scat- terometer images is presented of a measure of the anisotropy, is used to further help delineate sea ice types. Ice 'l'ype Backscatter feange

  4. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  5. 20th-Century Industrial Black Carbon Emissions Altered Arctic Climate Forcing Joseph R. McConnell,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Eric

    in ice cores indicate that sources and concentrations of BC in Greenland precipitation varied greatly, industrial emissions resulted in a seven-fold increase in ice core BC concentrations with most change to 1910, estimated surface climate forcing in early summer from BC in Arctic snow was about 3 W m­2

  6. Ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentley, Charles G.; Thomas, Robert H.; Velicogna, Isabella

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mitigates recent sea-level rise. Science, 308, 1898-1901J. (2004). Accelerated sea-level rise from West Antarctica.and contributions to sea-level rise: 1992-2002. Journal of

  7. Ice-Floe Simulation Viewer Tool Justin Adams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Ice-Floe Simulation Viewer Tool Justin Adams Computer Engineering Memorial University St. John's, Newfoundland dpeters@mun.ca Abstract--We are developing software to simulate the be- haviour of sea ice the ability to set up the initial conditions, run the simulation, and display the simulated ice- floe data

  8. THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO GLOBAL SEA-LEVEL CHANGE Conor Mc three major sources, the Greenland ice sheet, Antarctica, and other eustatic components. Each has its own predictable spatial signal, and particular attention was paid to the Greenland ice sheet, given

  9. Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

  10. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 1164711680, 2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/10/11647/2010/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Stephen

    , and the Arctic Ocean during 1998 and 2005­2009, on tun- dra, glaciers, ice caps, sea ice, frozen lakes for sampling. Sampling was carried out in summer on the Greenland Ice Sheet and on the Arctic Ocean, of melting Correspondence to: S. J. Doherty (sarahd@atmos.washington.edu) 7, melting sea ice 8, Arctic Canada 8, subarctic

  11. 6, 96559722, 2006 Arctic smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Discussions Arctic smoke ­ record high air pollution levels in the European Arctic due to agricultural fires into the European Arctic and caused the most severe air pollution episodes ever recorded there. This paper confirms that biomass burning (BB) was in-5 deed the source of the observed air pollution, studies the transport

  12. Conf. on Polar Meteorology and Oceanography, 9-13 Jan 2005, San Diego, CA 7.1 DETERMINING WINTERTIME HETEROGENEOUS PACK ICE CHARACTERISTICS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Ola

    WINTERTIME HETEROGENEOUS PACK ICE CHARACTERISTICS AND THEIR IMPACT ON THE AGGREGATE ATMOSPHERIC SURFACE) over the Arctic pack ice during clear-sky wintertime conditions. These histograms were remarkable) data and a simple one- dimensional snow and ice model. The SAR data show the time of the formation

  13. The ice flow behavior in the neighborhood of the grounding line. Non-Newtonian case.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontelos, Marco

    The ice flow behavior in the neighborhood of the grounding line. Non-Newtonian case. Marco A line dynamics. The grounding line is the line where tran- sition between ice attached to the solid ground and ice floating over the sea takes place. We analyze a mathematical model describing the ice flow

  14. aging north sea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 117 Usage of videomosaic for computed aided...

  15. The Role of Snow and Ice in the Climate System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry, Roger (NSIDC) [NSIDC

    2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Global snow and ice cover (the 'cryosphere') plays a major role in global climate and hydrology through a range of complex interactions and feedbacks, the best known of which is the ice - albedo feedback. Snow and ice cover undergo marked seasonal and long term changes in extent and thickness. The perennial elements - the major ice sheets and permafrost - play a role in present-day regional and local climate and hydrology, but the large seasonal variations in snow cover and sea ice are of importance on continental to hemispheric scales. The characteristics of these variations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, and evidence for recent trends in snow and ice extent are discussed.

  16. Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    /crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterizationIntercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud

  17. Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo Stephen Warren, University wavelengths: ice is nearly transparent. Absorptive impurities: Black carbon (soot) Brown carbon (organics broadband albedo: 83% 71% (2) by addition of black carbon (BC) (20 ppb): 0.5% for r = 100 µm 1.6% for r

  18. Interstellar Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boogert, A C A

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently ~36 different absorption bands have been detected in the infrared spectra of cold, dense interstellar and circumstellar environments. These are attributed to the vibrational transitions of ~17 different molecules frozen on dust grains. We review identification issues and summarize the techniques required to extract information on the physical and chemical evolution of these ices. Both laboratory simulations and line of sight studies are essential. Examples are given for ice bands observed toward high mass protostars, fields stars and recent work on ices in disks surrounding low mass protostars. A number of clear trends have emerged in recent years. One prominent ice component consists of an intimate mixture between H2O, CH3OH and CO2 molecules. Apparently a stable balance exists between low temperature hydrogenation and oxidation reactions on grain surfaces. In contrast, an equally prominent ice component, consisting almost entirely of CO, must have accreted directly from the gas phase. Thermal proc...

  19. Trends in the draft and extent of seasonal pack ice, Canadian Beaufort Humfrey Melling and David A. Riedel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gedalof, Ze'ev

    Trends in the draft and extent of seasonal pack ice, Canadian Beaufort Sea Humfrey Melling] Continuous observations by sub-sea sonar form a 12-year draft record for seasonal pack ice in the Beaufort of warming climate on seasonal pack ice. Citation: Melling, H., D. A. Riedel, and Z. Gedalof (2005), Trends

  20. Fundamental problems of modeling the dynamics of internal gravity waves with applications to the Arctic Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitaly V. Bulatov; Yuriy V. Vladimirov

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider fundamental problems of the dynamics of internal gravity waves. We present analytical and numerical algorithms for calculating the wave fields for a set of values of the parameters, as observed in the ocean. We show that our mathematical models can describe the wave dynamics of the Arctic Basin, taking into account the actual physical characteristics of sea water, topography of its floor, etc. The numerical and analytical results show that the internal gravity waves have a significant effect on underwater sea objects in the Arctic Basin.

  1. The Cryosphere, 6, 11571162, 2012 www.the-cryosphere.net/6/1157/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    , ice­albedo feedback has played a major role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack of the sea ice pack is a fundamental problem in climate mod- eling (Flocco et al., 2010), and a significant ponds play in understand- ing the decline of the summer Arctic sea ice pack, compre- hensive

  2. An update on land-ice modeling in the CESM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscomb, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass loss from land ice, including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets as well as smaller glacier and ice caps, is making a large and growing contribution to global sea-level rise. Land ice is only beginning to be incorporated in climate models. The goal of the Land Ice Working Group (LIWG) is to develop improved land-ice models and incorporate them in CESM, in order to provide useful, physically-based sea-level predictions. LJWG efforts to date have led to the inclusion of a dynamic ice-sheet model (the Glimmer Community Ice Sheet Model, or Glimmer-CISM) in the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which was released in June 2010. CESM also includes a new surface-mass-balance scheme for ice sheets in the Community Land Model. Initial modeling efforts are focused on the Greenland ice sheet. Preliminary results are promising. In particular, the simulated surface mass balance for Greenland is in good agreement with observations and regional model results. The current model, however, has significant limitations: The land-ice coupling is one-way; we are using a serial version of Glimmer-CISM with the shallow-ice approximation; and there is no ice-ocean coupling. During the next year we plan to implement two-way coupling (including ice-ocean coupling with a dynamic Antarctic ice sheet) with a parallel , higher-order version of Glimmer-CISM. We will also add parameterizations of small glaciers and ice caps. With these model improvements, CESM will be able to simulate all the major contributors to 21st century global sea-level rise. Results of the first round of simulations should be available in time to be included in the Fifth Assessment Report (ARS) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  3. Seasonal variability of water mass distribution in the southeastern Beaufort Sea determined by total alkalinity and d18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ]. Satellite and field observations have revealed a steadily decreasing minimum ice cover in the Arctic Ocean, greater light penetration and an increase in nutrients brought to the euphotic zone by vertical mixing] and the biological CO2 pump. Hence, under these conditions, the Arctic Ocean will play a more active role

  4. Ecological Implications of Changes in the Arctic Cryosphere Warwick F. Vincent, Terry V. Callaghan, Dorthe Dahl-Jensen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    ecosystems, from mountain glaciers and ice caps to tundra, inland waters, and icy seas. Many an overview of how climate-dependent alterations in snow, water, ice, and permafrost are affecting be compounded by a shift toward increasingly frequent episodes of winter rain and melting that cause surface ice

  5. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

  6. High-Resolution Monitoring of Internal Layers Over the Greenland Ice Sheet P. Kanagaratnam, S.P. Gogineni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    High-Resolution Monitoring of Internal Layers Over the Greenland Ice Sheet P. Kanagaratnam, S ice plays an important role in the rise of the Earth's sea level. A key variable in assessing the mass balance of an ice sheet is accumulation rate, which is currently determined from ice cores and pits

  7. View of NY harbor from the JOIDES Resolution in an ice-free world (73 m rise)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    less dense global 20th century warming ~0.6°C 1.6 mm/yr sea-level rise Melting Glaciers & Ice Caps? Melting Mountain Glaciers and Ice Caps: Alpine glaciers 0.6 mm/yr Greenland Ice Cap IPCC2001: near 0-80 cm IPPC 2007 error: 20-60 cm (does not include ice sheet melting) http

  8. Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

  9. 07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves of Climate Refugees Treehugger 06/30/2009 MELTING GREENLAND ICE SHEETS MAY THREATEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    /30/2009 MELTING GREENLAND ICE SHEETS MAY THREATEN NORTHEAST U.S., CANADA Federal News Service 06/30/2009 Sea raises spectre of displaced humanity peopleandplanet.net 06/16/2009 Melting Greenland Ice Sheets May Report - Online 06/02/2009 Melting Greenland Ice Sheets May Threaten Northeast, Canada usagnet 06

  10. Probabilistic calibration of a Greenland Ice Sheet model using spatially-resolved synthetic observations: toward projections of ice mass loss with uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haran, Murali

    1 Probabilistic calibration of a Greenland Ice Sheet model using spatially-resolved synthetic on how well the model reproduces the Greenland Ice Sheet profile. We improve on the previous state et al., 2012). Here, we focus on the Greenland Ice Sheet component of future sea level rise

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - albedo image improves Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of multiyear Arctic sea ice D. K. Perovich Engineer Research... 2002. 1 As part of ice albedo feedback studies during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean Source:...

  12. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 1. Overview of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Background The Arctic...

  13. Sea level change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, M.F. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) 1995 Scientific Assessment, Chapter 7. Sea Level Change, presents a modest revision of the similar chapter in the 1990 Assessment. Principal conclusions on observed sea-level change and the principal terms in the sea-level equation (ocean thermal expansion, glaciers, ice sheets, and land hydrology), including our knowledge of the present-day (defined as the 20th Century) components of sea-level rise, and projections of these for the future, are presented here. Some of the interesting glaciological problems which are involved in these studies are discussed in more detail. The emphasis here is on trends over decades to a century, not on shorter variations nor on those of the geologic past. Unfortunately, some of the IPCC projections had not been agreed at the time of writing of this paper, and these projections will not be given here. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Using Doppler spectra to separate hydrometeor populations and analyze ice precipitation in multilayered mixed-phase clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rambukkange, Mahlon P.; Verlinde, J.; Eloranta, E. W.; Flynn, Connor J.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Multimodality of cloud radar Doppler spectra is used to partition cloud particle phases and to separate distinct ice populations in the radar sample volume, thereby facilitating analysis of individual ice showers in multilayered mixed-phase clouds. A 35-GHz cloud radar located at Barrow, Alaska, during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment collected the Doppler spectra. Data from a pair of collocated depolarization lidars confirmed the presence of two liquid cloud layers reported in this study. Surprisingly, both of these cloud layers were embedded in ice precipitation yet maintained their liquid. Our spectral separation of the ice precipitation yielded two distinct ice populations: ice initiated within the two liquid cloud layers and ice precipitation formed in higher cloud layers. Comparisons of ice fall velocity versus radar reflectivity relationships derived for distinct showers reveal that a single relationship might not properly represent the ice showers during this period.

  15. Export of nutrients from the Arctic Ocean Sinhu Torres-Valds,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    Export of nutrients from the Arctic Ocean Sinhué Torres-Valdés,1 Takamasa Tsubouchi,2 Sheldon Bacon Strait, the Barents Sea Opening (BSO), and Bering Strait. We found that the major exports of all three budgets show that statistically robust net silicate and phosphate exports exist, while the net nitrate

  16. U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Gautier; Timothy Klett

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.

  17. Anthropogenic Impacts on Polar Bear Biology and the Arctic Ecosystem.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, John E.

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    decreasing in an easterly direction. In polar bears, mercury is known to damage internal organs, the neurological system, and the endocrine system. Climate change is already impacting polar bears due to changes in sea ice and other factors and these effects...

  18. Granular flow in the marginal ice zone BY DANIEL L. FELTHAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    and the balance equation of fluctuation kinetic energy. The steady solution of these equations is found to leading in determining the dynamics of the MIZ. Here, sea ice is treated as a granular material with a composite rheology. A simplified model of the MIZ is introduced consisting of the along and across momentum balance of the sea ice

  19. The Arctic Ocean--a Canadian perspective from IPY H. Melling & R. Francois & P. G. Myers & W. Perrie &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    ice, enhanced shelf-break upwelling and a maximum in freshwater retention in the Beaufort Gyre the Arctic Oscillation as a dominant cause of long- period climate variations during the Holocene. One a reliable affordable logistic framework, while a wave forecast model developed by another for the Beaufort

  20. Temperature and precipitation history of the Arctic G.H. Miller a,*, J. Brigham-Grette b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswich, NJ 08901, USA q Cooperative Institute. During the penultimate interglaciation, w130 to w120 ka ago, solar energy in summer in the Arctic ice sheets had melted by 6 ka ago. Solar energy reached a summer maximum (9% higher than at present) w

  1. Over-winter oceanographic profiles in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, November 1961 -June 1962: Temperature, salinity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, David W.

    1 Over-winter oceanographic profiles in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, November 1961 and silicate) were measured at five depths (2, 10, 25, 50 and 80 m) beneath the ice through the winter of 1961 the north side of the sound off Grise Fiord, Ellesmere Island, on 13 May 1962 and 12 May 1969. The over-winter

  2. A rate and state friction law for saline ice Ben Lishman,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    coefficient of friction. This law describes dry friction. Bowden and Hughes [1939] proposed that the lowA rate and state friction law for saline ice Ben Lishman,1 Peter Sammonds,1,2 and Danny Feltham2 ice friction models are necessary to predict the nature of interactions between sea ice floes

  3. CALCULATION OF WAVE-ICE INTERACTION USING THE WIENER-HOPF TECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Colin

    as many details of the formation of the pack ice, are believed to be determined by the interaction betweenCALCULATION OF WAVE-ICE INTERACTION USING THE WIENER-HOPF TECHNIQUE HYUCK CHUNG AND COLIN FOX the oblique reßection and penetration of ocean waves into semi-inÞnite sea ice. The solution is obtained

  4. Is the Relationship between Great Lakes Ice Cover and Climate Patterns Statistically Significant?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Is the Relationship between Great Lakes Ice Cover and Climate Patterns Statistically Significant) - NOAA GLERL Overview This work is based on previous projects titled "Great Lakes Ice Cycle" conducted and climate GCM products along with historical sea ice observations including recent satellite measurements

  5. Modelling West Antarctic ice sheet growth and collapse through the past five million years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , isolated ice caps on West Antarctic islands. Transitions between glacial, intermediate and collapsed states temperature and specified sea level. A new parameterization of sub- ice-shelf ocean melt based on modernLETTERS Modelling West Antarctic ice sheet growth and collapse through the past five million years

  6. Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea" Iced Yerba Mate Latte Iced Chai Tea Latte Original, Green Tea Canned Soda Xing Tea Bottled Water Arizona Teas Energy Drinks Red Bull, SF Red Bull & Bing Jones Sodas $0 Cafe au Lait Hot Tea Yerba Mate "Tea" Yerba Mate Latte Chai Tea Latte - Original, Green Tea, or Sugar

  7. Ion Partitioning at the liquid/vapor interface of a multi-component alkali halide solution: A model for aqueous sea salt aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosal, Sutapa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for aqueous sea salt aerosols Sutapa Ghosal, 1species associated with sea salt ice and aerosols has beena minor component in sea salt, which has a Br – /Cl – molar

  8. Faculty of Civil Engineering Master of Science Thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    and their subsequent lack of detecting several features in the ice pack, under which the existence of melt ponds on ice Workability "Development and innovative imaging of a probabilistic climatology regarding Arctic sea ice climatology regarding Arctic sea ice and air temperatures" Master of Science Thesis For obtaining the degree

  9. 6, 21612177, 2012 Transition in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    -albedo feedback has played a major role5 in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However albedo of the sea ice pack is a25 2162 #12;TCD 6, 2161­2177, 2012 Transition in the fractal geometry the Arctic melt season, the sea ice surface undergoes a remarkable transforma- tion from vast expanses

  10. West antarctic ice sheet collapse: Chimera or clear danger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alley, R.B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)); MacAyeal, D.R. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specter of a west antarctic collapse has been with us for 25 years. Recently, certain official assessments concerned primarily with the future response to projected global warming have concluded that Antarctica will not cause much sea-level rise within the planning horizon of a century or so. At the same time startling new results on ice sheet (in)stability have been emerging, pointing to less stability then previously believed. Some recent results are reviewed briefly: Heinrich layers in the North Atlantic show basally lubricated surges of the Laurentide ice sheet; the west antarctic ice sheet collapsed recently; the modern west antarctic ice sheet is changing rapidly locally; the bed of ice stream B is exceptionally well lubricated by water and water-saturated soft sediments; the modern ice sheet is thinning slowly on average; a model west antarctic ice sheet undergoes rapid collapses long after forcing and probably related to penetration of warmth to the bed. 23 refs.

  11. 2033Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society *The Lab Sea Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    of the Atlantic Ocean (the Labrador Sea sketched in Fig. 1) is a region of power- ful physical forces, extremes of wind and cold, incur- sions of icebergs and sea ice, great contrasts in buoy- ancy of air and seawater

  12. S e a i c e s t u d i e s i n t h e W e d d e l l S e a a b o a r d U S C G C Polar Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    of Weddell Sea pack ice that may affect the relative roles of dynamics and thermodynamics of pack ice devel opment in this region. The total pack ice production and the movement of pack ice from its source area properties of pack ice using core samples; (2) to deploy drifting buoys to obtain pack ice drift

  13. Effect of the potential melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the Meridional Overturning Circulation and global climate in the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Weiqing

    Effect of the potential melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the Meridional Overturning February 2011 Keywords: Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Sea level Greenland Ice Sheet Global of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the mid-1990s. This increased ice sheet mass loss might be an evidence of global

  14. "A Tour of the Cryosphere 2009" Though cold and often remote, the icy reaches of the Arctic, Antarctic, and other frozen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . These currents influence climate worldwide. Most ice exists in the cold polar regions, but we see glaciers like"A Tour of the Cryosphere 2009" Transcript Though cold and often remote, the icy reaches. Offshore, sea ice forms when the surface of the ocean freezes, pushing salt out of the ice. The cold salty

  15. Teaching dossier produced by the International Polar Foundation http://www.polarfoundation.org/ http://www.educapoles.org/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    by a permanent layer of sea ice, consisting of sea ice many years old. Driven by the wind, the pack drifts is reduced to permanent pack ice. At the start of winter, ice formation begins again with the cooling, known as the Arctic Ocean, most of which is covered by a permanent layer of sea ice. The most commonly

  16. Red Sea during the Last Glacial Maximum: Implications for sea level reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    . Gildor,1 and W. R. Peltier2 Received 13 February 2007; revised 29 July 2007; accepted 30 October 2007 based on the ICE-5G (VM2) model. Citation: Biton, E., H. Gildor, and W. R. Peltier (2008), Red Sea sea level reduction for the LGM interval range between approximately 120 m [Peltier, 2004, 2002

  17. PALeo-constraints on SEA-level rise (PALSEA) -a PAGES/IMAGES working group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddall, Mark

    PALeo-constraints on SEA-level rise (PALSEA) - a PAGES/IMAGES working group Coordinators: Mark for the reduction in ice sheets and subsequent rise in sea level over the next century are highly uncertain rise. Interglacial sea levels constrain the global sensitivity of sea-level to radiative forcing. Well

  18. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing: U.S.Climate ActionClimate, EarthOcean

  19. Canada's Arctic Gateway: Discussion Paper Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    Canada's Arctic Gateway: Discussion Paper Summary September 2010 The following summarizes key Canada's Arctic Gateway a reality in terms of both national public policy and international presence the Government of Canada's national gateway policy framework. This discussion paper's use of the term "Arctic

  20. Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    Sciences #12;Changes in Arctic Climate What is the role of cloud cover in Arctic climate change? What is the Cloud Radiative Effect (CRE) in the Arctic? #12;CRE depends on season, cloud type CRE ­ whether clouds specifically chosen to include nighttime obs Total cloud cover and nine cloud types: - High cloud (cirriform

  1. Prevalence of the Antarctic Circumpolar Wave over the last two millenia recorded in Dronning Maud Land ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    on sea salt aerosol deposition in the study area of the new EPICA (European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica) deep drilling in Dronning Maud Land (DML), Antarctica, has been investigated. Comparison of ice core records with reanalysis data showed that recent sea salt concentrations are strongly influenced

  2. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David D.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

  3. Deep-Sea Research I 52 (2005) 519542 Davis Strait volume, freshwater and heat fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cycle is a complex combination of land runoff, precipitation, ice freezing­melting and input of salty that the freshwater flux coming out of Baffin Bay asso- ciated with the sea ice melting in that area repre- sents 70 to the melting of ice drifting with the shelf Labrador Current (Khatiwala et al., 2002). Hud- son Bay runoff

  4. Estimating Migration Resistance: a Case Study of Greenlandic Arctic Terns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensz, Christopher

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    differences in environments along both paths Data ? Remote sensing: ? CCMP ocean winds ? AVHRR temperature ? AVHRR sea ice ? NPP layer 4 product ? Models: ? Linear exploration ? Circular-linear regression ? Non-linear regression m g C /m 2... d ay °C m /s Models ? Implemented in R ? Models: ? Linear exploration Southern Migration, 9 birds, n=929 Northern Migration, 9 birds, n=629 Future Directions 1: Finish non-linear model 2: Generalize procedure and include...

  5. How atmospheric ice forms | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric ice forms How atmospheric ice forms Released: September 08, 2014 New insights into atmospheric ice formation could improve climate models This study advances our...

  6. Arctic Ecologies: The Politics and Poetics of Northern Literary Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athens, Allison Katherine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts: Creating an Arctic Home. ” Coca-Cola Arctic Home.Coca-Cola and WWF. Web. 10 Apr. 2013. “Arctic NationalHarvard UP, 1997. Print. “Coca-Cola: Building Support for

  7. Dear Author: Your proofs are presented in a new design for all AGU journal articles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    ;Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario John C. Moore1 , Annette Rinke1

  8. avoid climate change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes 12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature 12; Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing...

  9. arctic vegetation amplify: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dynamics in arctic vegetation Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the...

  10. arctic shrub tundra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sites, Abandoned Dwellings, and Trampled Tundra in the Eastern Canadian Arctic: A Multivariate Analysis CiteSeer Summary: ABSTRACT. Arctic terrestrial ecosystems subjected...

  11. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

  12. arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

  13. Investigation of coastal dynamics of the Antarctic Ice Sheet using sequential Radarsat SAR images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Sheng-Jung

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing human activities have brought about a global warming trend, and cause global sea level rise. Investigations of variations in coastal margins of Antarctica and in the glacial dynamics of the Antarctic Ice Sheet provide useful diagnostic...

  14. A wavebased model for the marginal ice zone including a floe breaking parameterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,2 A. Kohout,3 and L. Bertino1 Received 1 October 2010; revised 10 December 2010; accepted 29 December implementation into twodimensional sea ice models in mind. Citation: Dumont, D., A. Kohout, and L. Bertino (2011

  15. Explorations of Atmosphere–Ocean–Ice Climates on an Aquaplanet and Their Meridional Energy Transports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John C.

    The degree to which total meridional heat transport is sensitive to the details of its atmospheric and oceanic components is explored. A coupled atmosphere, ocean, and sea ice model of an aquaplanet is employed to simulate ...

  16. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 75437557, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/7543/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Jeffrey

    sea-ice extent), and (2) the sea­pack-ice­albedo feed- back (albedo decrease associated with internal changes oc- curring in the multi-year pack ice). Between 1979 and 2007 the surface global radiative forc-7543-2014 © Author(s) 2014. CC Attribution 3.0 License. The complex response of Arctic aerosol to sea-ice retreat J

  17. 41JUNE 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | (not shown). This warm,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    season amplifies late summer sea ice retreat, especially in the western Arctic where the ice pack has snowmelt over Alaska and eastern Siberia, and ice melt in the Bering Sea and Sea of Okhotsk. By late May of the ice sheet, the years of 2003 and 2004 were among the warmest, and were possibly the warmest, years

  18. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 777787, 2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/10/777/2010/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    - appearance of the Arctic ice cap during the sunlit period of the year would radically reduce the local albedo absorbed solar flux on sea-ice extent and cloud amount was assessed. Although sea ice and cloud affect sea-ice melt occurring possibly earlier this century (Stroeve et al., 2008). September 2008 was marked

  19. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 74097430, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/7409/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Jeffrey

    at stations in the open ocean, in the marginal ice zone, and in the pack ice region. The largest fraction-spectrometric measurements in the marine boundary layer of the high-Arctic pack ice region. 1 Introduction The Arctic pack of the over-ice sea salt aerosol revealed tracer compounds that re- flect chemical aging of the particles

  20. STATE OF THE CLIMATE Jessica Blunden Derek S. Arndt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and ice caps (outside Greenland); Greenland Ice Sheet; Permafrost; Lake ice; Sea ice; Ocean; and Ocean. Conversely, penetration of Arctic air masses into northern and eastern Europe in autumn 2010 and spring 2011 sectors of the Arctic Basin, upper ocean temperatures in summer 2011 were generally warmer than

  1. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glenn, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harris, Taryl L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  2. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  3. Primary production of arctic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, D.V.S.; Platt, T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data that have become available during the last ten years they have reestimated the annual production by phytoplankton in the arctic marine ecosystem. The new figure is some sixteen times higher than an estimate made in 1975. This is of considerable significance regionally, but still does not, of itself, imply that global phytoplankton production is underestimated at present. 82 references, 3 figures, 9 tables.

  4. Information fusion for estimation of summer MIZ ice concentration from SAR imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haverkamp, Donna S.; Tsatsoulis, Costas

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we define the concept of information fusion and show how we used it to estimate summer sea ice concentration in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) from single-channel SAR satellite imagery, We used data about melt stage, wind speed...

  5. Lomonosovfonna and Holtedahlfonna ice cores reveal eastwest disparities of the Spitsbergen environment since AD 1700

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    and the northernmost Norwegian coast. The location of Svalbard, at the southern edge of the permanent sea-ice coverLomonosovfonna and Holtedahlfonna ice cores reveal east­west disparities of the Spitsbergen and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands 6 Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram

  6. Using ice cores from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, scientists have been able to study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using ice cores from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, scientists have been able to study ice's ice sheets. Ice sheets are huge areas of permanent ice. There are only three ice sheets on Earth: the Greenland Ice Sheet, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, and the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Greenland Ice Sheet

  7. Contribution of Alaskan glaciers to sea-level rise derived from satellite imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Contribution of Alaskan glaciers to sea-level rise derived from satellite imagery BERTHIER E.1: Berthier E., Schiefer E., Clarke G.K.C., Menounos B. & Remy, F. Contribution of Alaskan glaciers to sea.1038/ngeo737 #12;2 Over the past 50 years, retreating glaciers and ice caps contributed 0.5mm yr-1 to sea

  8. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to improve representation of the Arctic in Earth System Models Topography influences snow cover, thermal

  9. Morphology and distribution of the Acanthoecidae (Choanoflagellata) from the Weddell Sea during the austral summer, 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Kurt Randall

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and salinity of the stations occupied during the Weddell Sea Biocruise, Feb. -Mar. , 1977. ~ . . . ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ Page Table 2. Distribution of Acanthoecidae from the Weddell Sea Biocruise, Feb. -Mar. , 1977. (I) denotes ice. 12 LIST OF FIGURES I"igure 1.... Morphology of Acanthoecidae. ~Pa e 1'igure 2 Cruise track and pack ice limits of the Veddell Sea Biocruiset Feb. -Mar. , 1977. Dashed line represents the pack ice limit and the solid line represents the cruise track. Pig 3. D~th 1 1 1 t 14 Figure 4...

  10. Ice-ocean boundary conditions for coupled models Gavin A. Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    that must be simulated in any comprehensive earth system model incorporating ocean, atmosphere, sea ice different groups (a central fo- cus in the ongoing PRogramme for Integrated earth System Modelling (PRISM) and Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) projects). This paper addresses developments in coupling at sea

  11. LES Simulations of Roll Clouds Observed During Mixed- Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, S.D.; Harrington, J.Y.; Prenni, A.; DeMott, P.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Roll clouds, and associated roll convection, are fairly common features of the atmospheric boundary layer. While these organized cumuliform clouds are found over many regions of the planet, they are quite ubiquitous near the edge of the polar ice sheets. In particular, during periods of off-ice flow, when cold polar air flows from the ice pack over the relatively warm ocean water, strong boundary layer convection develops along with frequent rolls. According to Bruemmer and Pohlman (2000), most of the total cloud cover in the Arctic is due to roll clouds. In an effort to examine the influences of mixed-phase microphysics on the boundary layer evolution of roll clouds during off-ice flow, Olsson and Harrington (2000) used a 2D mesoscale model coupled to a bulk microphysical scheme (see Section 2). Their results showed that mixed-phase clouds produced more shallow boundary layers with weaker turbulence than liquid-phase cases. Furthermore, their results showed that because of th e reduced turbulent drag on the atmosphere in the mixed-phase case, regions of mesoscale divergence in the marginal ice-zone were significantly affected. A follow-up 2D study (Harrington and Olsson 2001) showed that the reduced turbulent intensity in mixed-phase cases was due to precipitation. Ice precipitation caused downdraft stabilization which fed back and caused a reduction in the surface heat fluxes. In this work, we extend the work of Olsson and Harrington (2000) and Harrington and Olsson (2001) by examining the impacts of ice microphysics on roll convection. We will present results that illustrate how microphysics alters roll cloud structure and dynamics.

  12. Springtime Arctic haze contributions of submicron organic particles from European and Asian combustion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Jesse

    The composition of Arctic aerosol, especially during the springtime Arctic haze, may play an important role in the radiative balance of the Arctic. The contribution of organic components to Arctic haze has only recently ...

  13. Source attributions of pollution to the Western Arctic during the NASA ARCTAS field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic,Oscillation controls air pollution transport to the Arctic,al. : Source attributions of pollution to the Western Arctic

  14. Transporting Dry Ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements for Shipping Dry Ice IATA PI 904 Source: Reg of the Day from ERCweb 2006 Environmental Resource Center | 919-469-1585 | webmaster@ercweb.com http:...

  15. Ice Drilling Gallonmilkjugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    Ice Drilling Materials · Gallonmilkjugs · Syringes,largeand small · Pitchers · Spraybottles · 13x9? ·Isitbettertosquirtthewaterslowlyorasquicklyaspossible? ·Doestherateatwhichyousquirtthewaterchangethediameteroftheholes? ·Doesthetypeof`drill

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: ICED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper Presented at American Society of Mechanical Engineers' (ASME) 2012 Internal Combustion Engine Division (ICED) Conference On August 28, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Energy...

  17. Mobile Ice Nucleus Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Kok, G. L.

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This first year report presents results from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to assess the flow and temperature profiles within the mobile ice nucleus spectrometer.

  18. JOURNAL OF QUATERNARY SCIENCE (2001) 16(8) 773777 Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakobsson, Martin

    and Baltic seas. A sudden outburst of the lakes' water to the Arctic Ocean when the ice sheet thinned to 110 m in the north, reflecting a larger glacio-isostatic depression near the ice margin than farther

  19. Reionization on ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. C. Dudley; M. Imanishi; P. R. Maloney

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The case for substantial far infrared ice emission in local ultraluminous infrared galaxies, expected based on the presence of mid-infrared ice absorption in their spectra and the known far infrared optical properties of ice, is still largely unsupported by direct observation owing to insufficient far infrared spectral coverage. Some marginal supportive evidence is presented here. A clear consequence of far infrared ice emission is the need to extend the range of redshifts considered for submillimeter sources. This is demonstrated via the example of HDF 850.1. The solid phase of the ISM during reionization may be dominated by ice, and this could lead to the presence of reionization sources in submillimeter source catalogs. Submillimeter sources not detected at 24 micron in the GOODS-N field are examined. Two candidate reionization sources are identified at 3.6 micron through possible Gunn-Peterson saturation in the Z band.

  20. Did changes in the Subpolar North Atlantic trigger the recent mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straneo, Fiamma

    Did changes in the Subpolar North Atlantic trigger the recent mass loss from the Greenland Ice) Leigh A. Stearns (University of Kansas) The Greenland Ice Sheet's (GIS) contribution to sea level rise and nearly-simultaneous acceleration of several outlet glaciers in Greenland's western and southeastern

  1. Very ice rich permafrost Moderately ice rich permafrost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruess, Roger W.

    TK lake Very ice rich permafrost Permafrost forest Moderately ice rich permafrost Open Bog Open Fen characteristics (mainly ice content) and burn severity determine trajectories of ecosystem succession post in the presence of moderately ice rich permafrost but have high resilience only under low burn severity in very

  2. Ice Cream with a Heart Create a new Clemson Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Ice Cream with a Heart Contest! Create a new Clemson Ice Cream flavor! Raise money for your favorite charity! Win a free Clemson Ice Cream party for your organization! Enter at www organizations. The contest is called Ice Cream with a Heart and its purpose is to help student organizations

  3. ARM - Lesson Plans: When Land Ice Melts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, AlaskaWhen Floating Ice Melts in the SeaWhen

  4. Reflection and transmission of ocean wave spectra by a band of randomly distributed ice floes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montiel, Fabien; Bennetts, Luke

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new ocean wave/sea-ice interaction model is proposed that simulates how a directional wave spectrum evolves as it travels through an arbitrary finite array of circular ice floes, where wave/ice dynamics are entirely governed by wave scattering effects. The model is applied to characterise the wave reflection and transmission properties of a strip of ice floes, such as an ice edge band. A method is devised to extract the reflected and transmitted directional wave spectra produced by the array. The method builds upon an integral mapping from polar to Cartesian coordinates of the scattered wave components. Sensitivity tests are conducted for a row of floes randomly perturbed from a regular arrangement. Results for random arrays are generated using ensemble averaging. A realistic ice edge band is then reconstructed from field experiments data. Simulations show a good qualitative agreement with the data in terms of transmitted wave energy and directional spreading. In particular, it is observed that short waves ...

  5. Pathways of inflow and dispersion of warm waters in the Nordic seas T. Rossby,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; these regions have a distinct east-west organization with cold Arctic waters all along the east coast and spreading of warm North Atlantic waters entering the Norwegian Sea between Iceland and the Faroes the Iceland-Faroe Front, but rather than continue north with the outer branch of the Norwegian Atlantic

  6. Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea Lena M. Schulze1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    ;2 INTRODUCTION23 It has long been known that upwelling takes place in the western Arctic Ocean along the edges-edge waves [e.g. Aagaard32 and Roach, 1990]. Recently, more attention has been paid to upwelling away from Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea Lena M. Schulze1 , Robert S

  7. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using EMEP measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic, showing a good agreement, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that during the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne LIDAR measurements. Evaluating the regional impacts in the Arctic of this event in terms of aerosol vertical structure, we find that during the 4 day presence of these aerosols in the lower European Arctic (< 75° N), biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface. The European plumes sampled during POLARCAT-France were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in Northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport event, the average modeled top of atmosphere (TOA) shortwave direct and semi-direct radiative effect (DSRE) north of 60° N over snow and ice-covered surfaces reaches +0.58 W m?², peaking at +3.3 W m?² at noon over Scandinavia and Finland.

  8. Tuktoyaktuk : responsive strategies for a new Arctic urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchot, Pamela (Pamela Rae)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canadian Arctic is facing a set of compounding crises that will drastically impact the future of its coastal frontier. At a time when climate change is having a detrimental impact on the Arctic landscape, Northern ...

  9. arctic ocean experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

  10. arctic environmental change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

  11. North and northeast Greenland ice discharge from satellite radar interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rignot, E.J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Gogineni, S.P. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)] [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Krabill, W.B. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Wallops Island, VA (United States)] [and others] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Wallops Island, VA (United States); and others

    1997-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice discharge from north and northeast Greenland calculated from satellite radar interferometry data of 14 outlet glaciers is 3.5 times that estimated from iceberg production. The satellite estimates, obtained at the grounding line of the outlet glaciers, differ from those obtained at the glacier front, because basal melting is extensive at the underside of the floating glacier sections. The results suggest that the north and northeast parts of the Greenland ice sheet may be thinning and contributing positively to sea-level rise. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. An ice shelf breakup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahnestock, M. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Glaciers and ice sheets are controlled by the climate and must change if the conditions that led to their current configurations are changing. These ice masses exist at the interface between the atmosphere, which provides sustaining snowfall and thermal regulation, and the land, which provides a stable base and in many cases the elevation required to reach suitably cold conditions. Ice sheets and glaciers are distributed around the globe and can serve as potential indicators of past climate variability and current climatic trends. 9 refs.

  13. Designing for effective stationkeeping in ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Designing for effective stationkeeping in ice CeSOS Highlights and AMOS Visions Conference DP Ice loads Ice #12;Effective stationkeeping in ice 1. Effective ship design. 2. An effective Ice Management system. 3. Effective strategies for the DP control system to compensate ice forces. #12;Ice

  14. Self-Organized Criticality as a Method of Procedural Modeling Computer Graphics Lab, David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science, University of Waterloo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    simulate the melting of the polar ice cap in a plausible way. I have used the following parameters in 1982. Simulation of ice cap melting. Polar ice cap in 2008. [1] H. Ahlenius. Arctic Sea Ice Minimum on the sampling density of the graph). POLAR ICE CAP The extended SOC-based procedural modeling method can

  15. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  16. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  17. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  18. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dursch, Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the University of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusionsub-freezing conditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusionstrategies exist to prevent ice formation, there is little

  19. Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, H.; Zuidema, Paquita; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Luo, Yali; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shipway, Ben

    2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN) concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel studies of the cloud phase parameter space. Large sensitivity to the IN/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterization in models.

  20. Arctic Energy Summit | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA NewslettersPartnership of theArctic Energy Summit Arctic Energy Summit

  1. Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Released: October 04, 2011 In a heated battle, ice crystals win the competition for cloud water vapor The mighty cloud ice...

  2. Coherent radar ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Braaten, David A.; Leuschen, C.; Legarsky, J.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Stiles, J.; Allen, C.; Jezek, K.; Akins, T.

    2001-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed two 150-MHz coherent radar depth sounders for ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet. We developed one of these using connectorized components and the other using radio frequency integrated circuits (RFICs). Both...

  3. Sources and Fate of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter in the Arctic Ocean and Surrounding Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Sally Annette

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    the time to share, Dr. Louchouarn and Dr. Duan Shwang for lignin analysis, Amanda Rinehart for her help collecting samples, Stephanie Smith for her work on DOM fractionation during sea ice formation, and Kerestin Goodman for her help with sample analysis...-mass spectrometry HTC High temperature combustion HWL Halocline water layer viii IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change LHW Lower halocline water layer LOP Lignin oxidation products OC Organic carbon PARAFAC Parallel Factor...

  4. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 24, NO.12, PAGES 1503-1506, JUNE 15, 1997 Spatial variations in the rate of sea level rise caused by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    in the rate of sea level rise caused by the present-day melting of glaciers and ice sheets Clinton P. Conrad. Becausemostlong duration tide gaugesarein.the northernhemisphere,if the sources of sea level rise are unbalanced between the two hemispheres,estimates of global sea level rise could be in error by 10 to 20%. Individual

  5. Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

  6. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic. Total PM2.5 agrees well with the measurements, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that duringmore »the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had undergone significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne lidar measurements. Model results show that the pollution event transported aerosols into the Arctic (> 66.6° N) for a 4-day period. During this 4-day period, biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~ 1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~ 4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface in anthropogenic plumes. The European plumes sampled during the POLARCAT-France campaign were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport event, the average modeled top-of-atmosphere (TOA) shortwave direct and semi-direct radiative effect (DSRE) north of 60° N over snow and ice-covered surfaces reaches +0.58 W m?2, peaking at +3.3 W m?2 at noon over Scandinavia and Finland.« less

  7. 3 Alpine and Arctic Soil Microbial Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    -free ecosystems is presently expanding rapidly as a result of glacier and ice cap melting due to global warming receiving recent atten- tion because they are in watersheds that are the source of water (from snow and ice melt) for a large proportion of the world's population, especially in areas downstream from the Andes

  8. APPLICATION OF CARBOHYDRATES AND PHENOLS AS BIOMARKERS TO STUDY DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER RESERVOIRS IN ARCTIC RIVERS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, Rachel

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic rivers are the dominant pathways for the transport of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon to the Arctic Ocean, but knowledge of sources, transformations and transfer of organic carbon and nitrogen in Arctic river watersheds is extremely...

  9. A meteorological experiment in the melting zone of the Greenland ice sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oerlemans, J. (Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)); Vugts, H.F. (Free Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results are described from a glaciometeorological experiment carried out in the margin (melting zone) of the Greenland ice sheet in the summers of 1990 and 1991. This work was initiated within the framework of a Dutch research program on land ice and sea level change. Seven meteostations were operated along a transect running from the tundra well onto the ice sheet. At the ice edge, humidity, temperature, and wind profiles were obtained with a tethered balloon. On the ice sheet, 90 km from the edge, a boundary-layer research unit, including a sound detecting and ranging system (SODAR) and a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), was established. Although focusing on the relation between surface energy balance, glacier mass balance, and ice flow, the experiment has also delivered a unique dataset on the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer around the warm tundra-cold ice sheet transition. Unexpected behavior was found for the surface albedo during the melt season. Lowest values are not found close to the ice edge, which is usual for glaciers, but higher on the ice sheet. Meltwater accumulation due to inefficient surface drainage was found to be the cause for this. The wind regime is dominated by katabatic flow from the ice sheet. The katabatic layer is typically 100-200 m thick. Close to the ice edge, the flow exhibits a very regular daily rhythm, with maximum wind speed in the afternoon. Farther on the ice sheet, the regime changes, and wind speed reaches maximum values in late night/early morning.

  10. Hail ice impact on composite structures at glancing angles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Funai, Sho

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    investigation of high velocity ice impacts on woven carbon/and ice sphere. .by trailing ice fragments. ..

  11. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 53055320, 2011 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/5305/2011/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    energy market model to construct emission invento- ries of Arctic shipping and petroleum activities ­ Published: 6 June 2011 Abstract. The Arctic sea-ice is retreating faster than pre- dicted by climate models" the Arctic Ocean to increased human activ- ities such as transit shipping and expanded oil and gas pro

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic cooling silentium Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12;Abstract The Arctic is melting ...fast. 12;IMPACTS OF A WARMING ARCTIC... 's Greenhouse Effect Thesur face cools by radiating heat energyupward. ... Source: Zender, Charles -...

  13. arctic endemic brown: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences Websites Summary: 12;4 C. Duguay, Interdisciplinary Centre on Climate Change & Department of Geography-Harte, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska...

  14. arctic populations differential: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 168 Arctic catastrophes in an idealized...

  15. arctic petroleum operators: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operations waste water injection and disposal wells, geothermal resource development, and EORCO2 Southern California, University of 66 A Holocene record of changing Arctic Ocean...

  16. arctic region baltic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    look at the higher trophic re-lationships of the crustacean zooplankton of arctic polygon depression ponds, hoping not only to discover which species were predaceous, but to...

  17. arctic study area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

  18. arctic polar vortex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

  19. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Slope ANWR: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BBbls: billion barrels Bbls: barrels Daily Petroleum Production Rate: The amount of petroleum extracted per day from a well, group of...

  20. arctic crude oil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water to form an emulsion that often looks like chocolate pudding. This emulsion 89 Lesson Plan Arctic Biome Geosciences Websites Summary: -class instruction and small group...

  1. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

  2. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent...

  3. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000,...

  4. arctic ocean sediments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

  5. arctic marine environment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Technology, Cambridge, MA Patrikalakis, Nicholas M. 4 UiT The Arctic University of Norway Fakultet for biovitenskap, fiskeri og konomi -Inst. for arktisk og marin biologi...

  6. arctic ocean sediment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

  7. arctic flora origins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    combustion of fossil fuels and biomass, may have a severe impact on the sensitive Arctic climate, possibly altering the temperature profile, cloud temperature and amount, the...

  8. arctic lake correlate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

  9. arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

  10. alaskan arctic tundra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

  11. arctic charr salvelinus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have raised concern over potential responses of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, a cold-adapted freshwateranadromous fish species in (more) Sinnatamby, Ramila Niloshini...

  12. arctic char salvelinus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have raised concern over potential responses of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, a cold-adapted freshwateranadromous fish species in (more) Sinnatamby, Ramila Niloshini...

  13. arctic research station: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Rocky Mountain Research Sta- tion is one of five 19 Z .Atmospheric Research 51 1999 4575 Cloud resolving simulations of Arctic stratus Geosciences Websites Summary: Z...

  14. arctic terns sterna: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    together. Amie L. Black; Antony W. Diamond 2 Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155159 (2013) Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  15. arctic climate system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

  16. alaskan arctic coastal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

  17. arctic tundra vegetation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of woody vegetation in arctic tundra? Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: 33124, USA. Global climate warming is projected to promote the increase of woody plants, especially of...

  18. arctas arctic research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic. It often serves as the measuring stick for global climate change. It is where warming has been strongest in the past century, Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  19. ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

  20. arctic marine food: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine Food Web: Trophic Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Perfluoroalkyl...

  1. Richard C. Lathrop WICCI Science Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Interfaith Community for the Earth (ICE) Aldo Leopold Audubon Society #12;Weather vs. Climate Weather of sea ice in the Arctic is one of many signs of warming #12;Source: J. Magnuson, UW-Madison Ice-on Day 2007 Photo: Peter W. Schmitz Lake Mendota Decrease in duration of ice cover on lakes One of many signs

  2. The effect of freezing on the sulfate-chloride and density-chloride ratios of sea-water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkhalter, Albert Charles

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the sulphate-chloride ratio would be expected to have a corresponi- ingly larger effect, on density than would one of the less abundant iona. CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW Evidence for Sulphate Enricl ment in Ice The sulphate-chloride ratio was studied... as early as 1907 vhen Ringer performed laboratory freezing experiments vith sea-vater in which he cooled sea-water until solid salts began to freeze out. of solution. l Portions of the ice and the brine below the ice vere collected and analyzed...

  3. Image Content Engine (ICE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brase, J M

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

  4. Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S. D EPARTMENT OF COMM ER CE Great Lakes Ice Cover facts since 1973 - 94.7% ice coverage in 1979 is the maximum on record - 9.5% ice coverage in 2002 is the lowest on record - 11.5% ice coverage in 1998, a strong El Nino

  5. Engineering Notes Ice Shape Characterization Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tino, Peter

    Engineering Notes Ice Shape Characterization Using Self-Organizing Maps Stephen T. McClain Baylor. Introduction DURING the validation and verification of ice accretion codes, predicted ice shapes must be compared with experimental measurements of wind-tunnel or atmospheric ice shapes. Current methods for ice

  6. Hidden force floating ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q. Sun

    2015-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the segmental specific-heat disparity of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) and the Coulomb repulsion between oxygen ions, cooling elongates the O:H-O bond at freezing by stretching its containing angle and shortening the H-O bond with an association of larger O:H elongation, which makes ice less dense than water, allowing it to float.

  7. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  8. Greenland Ice Sheet Retreat Since the Little Ice Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beitch, Marci Jillian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and I. Willis (2012), Greenland's shrinking ice cover: "fastfluctuations in southeast Greenland, Nat. Geosci. , 5(6),T. Decker (2011), Analysis of Greenland marine- terminating

  9. Relationships in Areal Variability: The Ross Sea Polynya and Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Jason Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind intensity, the offshore winds are better able to advectimpact offshore propagation of katabatic wind, and thereforeKatabatic winds normally reach 10 to 20 km offshore (Kurtz

  10. Monitoring Arc+c Sea Ice Data product development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    +ng, New Orleans, LA 22-27 Feb 2012 #12;Photo courtesy of J. Overland, from Overland Records from Environmental Satellites, 2004 ­ At least 30 years ­ Thorough inter-sensor

  11. Fiery Ice From the Seas The First Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Submitted by: Hawai`i Natural Energy Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy to support the event. Additional funds were

  12. ARM - What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments ManusAdministrationWhat

  13. NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meissner, Katrin Juliane

    NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled of ice shelves and their progenitor ice sheets. To explore the magnitude of surface melt occurring over modern ice shelves and ice sheets in a climate scenario forced by anthropogenic emissions of carbon

  14. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  15. NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    -2008) Arctic Fall Temperature Anomalies Greater Than +5° C 2. CAUSES for Reduced Sea Ice #12;[Woodgate et al to the Beaufort Sea Marbled eelpout Walleye pollock Salmon snailfishBigeye sculpin Pacific cod Bering flounder Baseline Observatory Barrow Arctic Haze Air Pollution (Decrease Since the Fall of the USSR) >50% Decrease

  16. ICE Pulse Oximeter Smart Alarm App Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huth, Michael

    ICE Pulse Oximeter Smart Alarm App Requirements 6 March 2012 Revision 0 for an Integrated Clinical Environment (ICE) pulse oximetry monitoring app that provides.2 References [Purpose: List all ICE standards, and other standards and references

  17. ICE Raids: Compounding Production, Contradiction, and Capitalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reas, Elizabeth I

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is just a cheap way of boosting ICE ‘criminal alien’ arrestRegardless of whether or not ICE is motivated by maintainingWorkers in America: Factories and ICE Raids Produce Citizens

  18. Modelling the viscoplastic behavior and the heterogeneous intracrystalline deformation of columnar ice polycrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebensohn, Ricardo A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montagnat, Maurine [LGGE (FRANCE); Mansuy, Philippe [MICHELIN (FRANCE); Duval, Paul [LGGE (FRANCE); Philip, A [LGGE (FRANCE)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-field formulation based on Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) has been adapted and used to predict the micromechanical fields that develop in columnar Ih ice polycrystals deforming in compression by dislocation creep. The predicted intragranular mechanical fields are in qualitative good agreement with experimental observations, in particular those involving the formation of shear and kink bands. These localization bands are associated with the large internal stresses that develop during creep in such anisotropic material, and their location, intensity, morphology and extension are found to depend strongly on the crystallographic orientation of the grains and on their interaction with neighbor crystals. The predictions of the model are also discussed in relation with the deformation of columnar sea and lake ice, and with the mechanical behavior of granular ice of glaciers and polar ice sheets, as well.

  19. A parallel high-order accurate finite element nonlinear Stokes ice sheet model and benchmark experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Wei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ju, Lili [University of South Carolina; Gunzburger, Max [Florida State University; Price, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ringler, Todd [Los Alamos National Laboratory,

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The numerical modeling of glacier and ice sheet evolution is a subject of growing interest, in part because of the potential for models to inform estimates of global sea level change. This paper focuses on the development of a numerical model that determines the velocity and pressure fields within an ice sheet. Our numerical model features a high-fidelity mathematical model involving the nonlinear Stokes system and combinations of no-sliding and sliding basal boundary conditions, high-order accurate finite element discretizations based on variable resolution grids, and highly scalable parallel solution strategies, all of which contribute to a numerical model that can achieve accurate velocity and pressure approximations in a highly efficient manner. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our model by analytical solution tests, established ice sheet benchmark experiments, and comparisons with other well-established ice sheet models.

  20. The ice sheet model The polythermal ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calov, Reinhard

    with a temperature at the pressure melting point, the latter being considered as a bi- nary mixture of ice and small a year. Sediment Sliding The sliding velocity over sediment reads which applies if the basal ice Hudson Bay and Hudson Strait has become temperate (see Figure 4d,e), fast basal sliding appears leading

  1. 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 17 -Woodgate Global models in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    ;2 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E - Lecture 17 - Woodgate Deep waters of the Atlantic from http://sam://iodp.tamu.edu/publications/PR/303PR/images/Fig01.jpg Dickson et al, refs Denmark Strait ~ 650m deep Iceland Scotland Ridge ~ 400

  2. Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories,Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie') and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katie's dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpson's Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

  3. Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice Slurry Technology available for licensing: Proprietary method and equipment for making an ice slurry coolant to induce...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: critical marginal ice zone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marginal ice zone NASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Process Experiment (MIZOPEX) On February 24, 2015, in Analysis, Climate, Modeling & Analysis, Monitoring, News,...

  5. ARM - Ice Cores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, FeatureListGeneralPastIce Cores Outreach Home Room

  6. ARM - Measurement - Ice nuclei

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,ice particleSize Distributiontypes ARMnuclei

  7. Dynamics of ice shelf rift propagation and iceberg calving inferred from geodetic and seismic observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassis, Jeremy N.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2. Ice Shelves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Ice Rheology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.vi Calving Glaciers and Ice

  8. MEAT, POULTRY, Still contains ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    MEAT, POULTRY, SEAFOOD Still contains ice crystals and feels as cold, and ground meats Refreeze Discard Poultry and ground poultry Refreeze Discard Variety meats may safely re-freeze foods that s:ll contain ice crystals or that have been

  9. Rapid dynamic activation of a marine-based Arctic ice cap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Malcolm; Shepherd, Andrew; Gourmelen, Noel; Dehecq, Amaury; Leeson, Amber; Ridout, Andrew; Flament, Thomas; Hogg, Anna; Gilbert, Lin; Benham, Toby; van den Broeke, Michiel; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Fettweis, Xavier; Noël, Brice; Strozzi, Tazio

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    and Atmospheric Research, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands, 7Department of Geography, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium, 8GAMMA Remote Sensing Research and Consulting AG, Gümligen, Switzerland Abstract We use satellite observations to document rapid...

  10. Sandia Energy - The Rush to Exploit an Increasingly Ice-Free Arctic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757KelleyEffectsonSandia's Stan Atcitty winnerRush to

  11. Global simulations of ice nucleation and ice supersaturation with an improved cloud scheme in the Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gettelman, Andrew

    and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloud are sensitive to the parameterization of ice clouds. These results indicate that ice clouds are potentiallyGlobal simulations of ice nucleation and ice supersaturation with an improved cloud scheme

  12. Assimilation of Ice Concentration in an IceOcean Model R. W. LINDSAY AND J. ZHANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    are now available to determine the ice drift velocity. In addition, the drift of the pack ice can CoAssimilation of Ice Concentration in an Ice­Ocean Model R. W. LINDSAY AND J. ZHANG Polar Science October 2004, in final form 27 June 2005) ABSTRACT Ice concentration is a critical parameter of the polar

  13. Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical and astrobiological consequences (Invited)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    MR22A-05 Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical) electrical-properties measurements of laboratory- produced saline ice, salt hydrates, and ice-silicate cutoff. In ice-silicate mixtures, brine channels are evident above the eutectic temperature only when

  14. 2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEYWESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devoto, Stephen H.

    - ponents in its inaugural season. Former bench boss Dave Snyder, in whose honor the Wesleyan ice rink2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEYWESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEY #12....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

  15. 4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    OSD 4, 709­732, 2007 Ice-shelf ­ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf M. R. Price Title Page published in Ocean Science Discussions are under open-access review for the journal Ocean Science Ice-shelf ­ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements M. R. Price 1

  16. Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes and Water Levels John J. Magnuson Center to everything else." #12;The Invisible Present The Invisible Place Magnuson 2006 #12;Ice-on Day 2007 Peter W. Schmitz Photo Local Lake Mendota #12;Ice Breakup 2010 Lake Mendota March 20 #12;March 21 Ice Breakup 2010

  17. The Rising Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ryder W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the thick of a sea level rise. After reading the evidencepredictive figure for ocean level rise by the turn of thethat a 7-foot (2 m) sea level rise by the year 2100 should

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - area washington volume Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    perfect model59 studies with the Community Climate System Model version 4... -Arctic sea ice area or volume (henceforth refered to as just area93 or volume) and the indexes j...

  19. Prominent bacterial heterotrophy and sources of [superscript 13]C-depleted fatty acids to the interior Canada Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, S. R.

    In recent decades, the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean has experienced rapidly decreasing summer sea ice coverage and freshening of surface waters. It is unclear how these changes translate to deeper waters, particularly ...

  20. Improvements in Representations of Cloud Microphysics for BBHRP and Models using Data Collected during M-PACE and TWP-ICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg M. McFarquhar

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In our research we proposed to use data collected during the 2004 Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) and the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) to improve retrievals of ice and mixed-phase clouds, to improve our understanding of how cloud and radiative processes affect cloud life cycles, and to develop and test methods for using ARM data more effectively in model. In particular, we proposed to: 1) use MPACE in-situ data to determine how liquid water fraction and cloud ice and liquid effective radius (r{sub ei} and r{sub ew}) vary with temperature, normalized cloud altitude and other variables for Arctic mixed-phase clouds, and to use these data to evaluate the performance of model parameterization schemes and remote sensing retrieval algorithms; 2) calculate rei and size/shape distributions using TWP-ICE in-situ data, investigate their dependence on cirrus type (oceanic or continental anvils or cirrus not directly traced to convection), and develop and test representations for MICROBASE; 3) conduct fundamental research enhancing our understanding of cloud/radiative interactions, concentrating on effects of small crystals and particle shapes and sizes on radiation; and 4) improve representations of microphysical processes for models (fall-out, effective density, mean scattering properties, rei and rew) and provide them to ARM PIs. In the course of our research, we made substantial progress on all four goals.