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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Recent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nin~o- Southern Oscillation (ENSO) produce similar ice changes in the western Arctic, but opposite iceRecent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO Jiping Liu; accepted 20 April 2004; published 13 May 2004. [1] Trends in the satellite-derived Arctic sea ice

2

Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8 with 4.240 million km2 a new historic minimum (Figure 1). Physicists of the University of Bremen now confirm the apprehension existing since July 2011 that the ice melt in the Arctic

Bremen, Universitšt

3

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu National Center of the net sea ice production and the sea ice exchanges between the Arctic and its adjacent seas are studied) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning ice cover

Hu, Aixue

4

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study Aixue The variability of net sea ice production and sea ice exchange between the Arctic and its adjacent seas export) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning

Hu, Aixue

5

Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice Dirk Notz,1,4 Miles G. McPhee,2 M. Grae the simultaneous growth and ablation of a layer of ice between an under-ice melt pond and the underlying ocean. Such ``false bottoms'' are the only significant source of ice formation in the Arctic during summer. Analytical

Worster, M. Grae

6

A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice. In the summer the upper layers of sea ice and snow melts producing meltwater that accumulatesA model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface

Feltham, Daniel

7

Age characteristics in a multidecadal Arctic sea ice simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from adding a tracer for age of sea ice to a sophisticated sea ice model that is widely used for climate studies are presented. The consistent simulation of ice age, dynamics, and thermodynamics in the model shows explicitly that the loss of Arctic perennial ice has accelerated in the past three decades, as has been seen in satellite-derived observations. Our model shows that the September ice age average across the Northern Hemisphere varies from about 5 to 8 years, and the ice is much younger (about 2--3 years) in late winter because of the expansion of first-year ice. We find seasonal ice on average comprises about 5% of the total ice area in September, but as much as 1.34 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} survives in some years. Our simulated ice age in the late 1980s and early 1990s declined markedly in agreement with other studies. After this period of decline, the ice age began to recover, but in the final years of the simulation very little young ice remains after the melt season, a strong indication that the age of the pack will again decline in the future as older ice classes fail to be replenished. The Arctic ice pack has fluctuated between older and younger ice types over the past 30 years, while ice area, thickness, and volume all declined over the same period, with an apparent acceleration in the last decade.

Hunke, Elizabeth C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitz, Cecllia M [UNIV. OF WASHINGTON

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Estimating sea ice area flux across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago using enhanced AMSR-E  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This produced a net loss of sea ice area of about 122 √? 103 km2 or roughly 174 km3 a√?1 which is presumedEstimating sea ice area flux across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago using enhanced AMSR-E T. Agnew is used to estimate daily sea ice area fluxes between the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and the Arctic Ocean

Long, David G.

9

September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 warming above present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 C global warming above present Irina; published 24 March 2012. [1] The decline of Arctic sea ice is one of the most visible signs of climate change over the past several decades. Arctic sea ice area shows large interannual variability due

Fischlin, Andreas

10

Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations P. Rampal,1,2 J the Arctic sea ice velocity field as the superposition of a mean field and fluctuations. We study how subtracting the mean field, are analyzed in terms of diffusion properties. Although the Arctic sea ice cover

Boyer, Edmond

11

Arctic sea ice modeling with the material-point method.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic sea ice plays an important role in global climate by reflecting solar radiation and insulating the ocean from the atmosphere. Due to feedback effects, the Arctic sea ice cover is changing rapidly. To accurately model this change, high-resolution calculations must incorporate: (1) annual cycle of growth and melt due to radiative forcing; (2) mechanical deformation due to surface winds, ocean currents and Coriolis forces; and (3) localized effects of leads and ridges. We have demonstrated a new mathematical algorithm for solving the sea ice governing equations using the material-point method with an elastic-decohesive constitutive model. An initial comparison with the LANL CICE code indicates that the ice edge is sharper using Materials-Point Method (MPM), but that many of the overall features are similar.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Arctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec-edented low extents in the summer of 2007,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling, ice extent remains far below normal. Understanding Sea Ice Loss Key factors behind this recordArctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec- edented low extents in the summer of 2007, raising concern that the Arctic may be on the verge of a fundamental transition toward a seasonal ice cover

Clements, Craig

13

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

Moore, John

14

Multiple equilibria and abrupt transitions in Arctic summer sea ice extent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, version 3 (CCSM3). The resulting nonlinear equations produce abrupt sea ice transitions resembling thoseMultiple equilibria and abrupt transitions in Arctic summer sea ice extent William J. Merryfield monograph "Arctic Sea Ice Decline", 19 October 2007 Corresponding author address: Dr. William Merryfield

Monahan, Adam Hugh

15

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu, Claes Rooth and Rainer Bleck February 18, 2003 Abstract The variability of the net sea ice production and the sea ice circulation model. The wind driven divergence (or ice flux export) is the major factor controlling the net sea

Hu, Aixue

16

Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

Quirk, Laura Marie

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

17

Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the continued ice melt [Polyakov et al., 2005], and recent work shows that heat from the Atlantic layer can91 The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies Uma S. Bhatt,1 and Robert A. Tomas3 The impact of reduced Arctic summer sea ice on the atmosphere is investigated by forcing

Bhatt, Uma

19

Scale Dependence and Localization of the Deformation of Arctic Sea Ice David Marsan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and internal stress gradients, producing spatial gradients in the ice velocity that we refer to as deformationScale Dependence and Localization of the Deformation of Arctic Sea Ice David Marsan Laboratoire de of Arctic sea ice over a 3-day time period is performed for scales of 10 to 1000 km. The deformation field

20

Ice Mass Balance Buoys: A tool for measuring and attributing changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Mass Balance Buoys: A tool for measuring and attributing changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover Jacqueline A. Richter-Menge1 , Donald K. Perovich1 , Bruce C. Elder1 , Keran Claffey1 Abstract Recent observational and modeling studies indicate that the Arctic sea ice cover is undergoing

Rigor, Ignatius G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current K. A. Cox,1 J. D cycle, Arctic sea ice decline, and increasing Greenland glacial melt. Here we use new d18 O data from the East Greenland Current system at Cape Farewell and Denmark Strait to determine the relative proportions

Rohling, Eelco

22

NOAA's Arctic Science Days Day 1: Science, Weather and Sea Ice, and International Partnerships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA's Arctic Science Days 1 Day 1: Science, Weather and Sea Ice, and International Partnerships 1 Observing Networks [IASOA, RUSALCA, PAG, CBMP & SAON] 2. Ed Farley (NOAA/AFSC, remote): Implications of sea ice loss on NOAA trust resources: NOAA's Loss of Sea Ice (LOSI) Program 3. Sue Moore (NOAA

23

Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice H. Eicken) program's field site in the northern Chukchi Sea, snow and ice meltwater flow was found to have a strong impact on the heat and mass balance of sea ice during the summer of 1998. Pathways and rates of meltwater

Eicken, Hajo

24

SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS Yuliya Tarabalka Research Association, MD, USA. e-mail: yuliya.tarabalka@inria.fr ABSTRACT The melting of sea ice, it is important to investigate how rapidly sea ice floes melt. For this purpose, a new TempoSeg method

Boyer, Edmond

25

Variations in the age of Arctic sea-ice and summer sea-ice extent Ignatius G. Rigor1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. On time scales of days to weeks, wind stresses from storms produce ridges of sea-ice and areas of openVariations in the age of Arctic sea-ice and summer sea-ice extent Ignatius G. Rigor1,2 and John M] Three of the past six summers have exhibited record low sea-ice extent on the Arctic Ocean. These minima

Rigor, Ignatius G.

26

Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo $\\alpha$. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snow melt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freeze up. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at $\\alpha \\gtrsim $ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the $\\alpha$ distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained pro...

Agarwal, S; Wettlaufer, J S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario John C. Moore1 , Annette Rinke1,2 , Xiaoyong Yu1 , Duoying Ji1 , Xuefeng Cui1 , Yan Li3 , Kari Alterskjær4 , Jón Egill Centre, Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract We analyze simulated sea ice

Robock, Alan

28

arctic sea ice: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 388 Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the...

29

Arctic catastrophes in an idealized sea ice model Ian Eisenman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermodynamics, varying open water fraction, an energy balance atmosphere, and scalable CO2. We find that summer.e., reflectiveness) between sea ice and the open water that is exposed when it melts. Bare or snow-covered sea ice reflects most sunlight back to space, while the dark ocean surface absorbs most incident light. Global

Eisenman, Ian

30

Atmospheric Circulation and Its Effect on Arctic Sea Ice in CCSM3 Simulations at Medium and High Resolution*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Canadian archipelago, where the T85 winds produce thicker ice than their T42 counterparts. Seasonal forcingAtmospheric Circulation and Its Effect on Arctic Sea Ice in CCSM3 Simulations at Medium and High) ABSTRACT The simulation of Arctic sea ice and surface winds changes significantly when Community Climate

Bitz, Cecilia

31

Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will indirectly alter energy transfer through the pelagic food web and ultimately impact apex predators. We-based observations of sea ice concentration from the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR, 1979 recession of high Arctic seasonal ice cover created a temporally predictable primary production bloom

Laidre, Kristin L.

32

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Decline in ice thickness from sub data 1 10/16/07 The decline in arctic sea-ice thickness: separating the spatial, annual, and1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decline in ice thickness from sub data 1 10/16/07 The decline in arctic sea-ice thickness/14/07 & 10/16/079 10 11 #12;Decline in ice thickness from sub data 2 10/16/07 Abstract11 Naval submarines have collected operational data of sea-ice draft (90% of thickness) in the12 Arctic Ocean since 1958

Percival, Don

34

The area and volume of sea ice in the Arc-tic Ocean is decreasing, with some predict-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, while loss of sea ice could cause stress for polar bears. Moreover, global climate may be affected ice forms in winter,which melts and/or gets exported out of the Arctic. The recent decrease in summer of this community is evi- dence that the sea ice cap has not disap- peared during the Quaternary. The remains

Long, Bernard

35

The development of a signal processing network for a real-time Arctic sea ice classification system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIGNAL PROCESSING NETWORK FOR A REAL-TIME ARCTIC SEA ICE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM A Thesis by WILLIAM DOUGLAS NORDHAUS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIGNAL PROCESSING NETWORK FOR A REAL-TIME ARCTIC SEA ICE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM A Thesis by William Douglas Nordhaus Approved as to style...

Nordhaus, William D

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from the southeastern Canada Basin2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from (Arctic Ocean) to act as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions12 expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high13 pCO2sw (~290-320 atm

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

37

Critical Mechanisms for the Formation of Extreme Arctic Sea-Ice Extent in the Summers of 2007 and 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A warming Arctic climate is undergoing significant e 21 nvironmental change, most evidenced by the reduction of Arctic sea-ice extent during the summer. In this study, we examine two extreme anomalies of September sea-ice extent in 2007 and 1996, and investigate the impacts of cloud fraction (CF), atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV), downwelling longwave flux (DLF), surface air temperature (SAT), pressure and winds on the sea-ice variation in 2007 and 1996 using both satellite-derived sea-ice products and MERRA reanalysis. The area of the Laptev, East Siberian and West Chukchi seas (70-90oN, 90-180oE) has experienced the largest variation in sea-ice extent from year-to-year and defined here as the Area Of Focus (AOF). The record low September sea-ice extent in 2007 was associated with positive anomalies 30 of CF, PWV, DLF, and SAT over the AOF. Persistent anti-cyclone positioned over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia induced easterly zonal and southerly meridional winds. In contrast, negative CF, PWV, DLF and SAT anomalies, as well as opposite wind patterns to those in 2007, characterized the 1996 high September sea-ice extent. Through this study, we hypothesize the following positive feedbacks of clouds, water vapor, radiation and atmospheric variables on the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007. The record low sea-ice extent during the summer 2007 is initially triggered by the atmospheric circulation anomaly. The southerly winds across the Chukchi and East Siberian seas transport warm, moist air from the north Pacific, which is not only enhancing sea-ice melt across the AOF, but also increasing clouds. The positive cloud feedback results in higher SAT and more sea-ice melt. Therefore, 40 more water vapor could be evaporated from open seas and higher SAT to form more clouds, which will enhance positive cloud feedback. This enhanced positive cloud feedback will then further increase SAT and accelerate the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007.

Dong, Xiquan; Zib, Benjamin J.; Xi, Baike; Stanfield, Ryan; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Xiangdong; Lin, B.; Long, Charles N.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

38

arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Yi-Ping Ma,1, USA The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area

Golden, Kenneth M.

39

Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend R. W. LINDSAY, J. ZHANG, A. SCHWEIGER, M. STEELE, AND H. STERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend R. W. LINDSAY, J. ZHANG, A. SCHWEIGER, M ice extent in the summer of 2007 was unprecedented in the historical record. A coupled ice≠ocean model is used to determine the state of the ice and ocean over the past 29 yr to investigate the causes

Zhang, Jinlun

40

THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers... "Sea ice is projected] - a phenomenon sometimes referred to as "Arctic amplification". As Arctic temperatures rise, sea ice melts for the 20th century. The rate at which the modeled 21st century Arctic warming and sea ice melting occurs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

AMSR-E Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document: Sea Ice Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Arctic perennial ice regions, and the ice temperature is produced from an algorithm similar to the Nimbus1 AMSR-E Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document: Sea Ice Products Thorsten Markus and Donald J 20771 1. Overview The AMSR-E sea ice standard level 3 products include sea ice concentration, sea ice

Waliser, Duane E.

42

Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series Laurence C. Smith,1 of melt onset can be observed over small ice caps, as well as the major ice sheets and multi-year sea ice for 14 small Arctic ice caps from 1992≠2000. Interannual and regional variability in the timing of melt

Smith, Laurence C.

43

SNOW ON ANTARCTIC SEA ICE Robert A. Massom,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SNOW ON ANTARCTIC SEA ICE Robert A. Massom,1 Hajo Eicken,2 Christian Haas,3 Martin O. Jeffries,2 on Antarctic sea ice plays a complex and highly variable role in air-sea-ice interaction pro- cesses of thicker snow and thin- ner ice in the Antarctic relative to the Arctic (e.g., the importance of flooding

Warren, Stephen

44

Sea-ice thickness measurement based on the dispersion of ice swell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-azimuth angles. The parameterization, that includes finding the best modeled ice thickness, is performed by usingSea-ice thickness measurement based on the dispersion of ice swell David Marsana) ISTerre, CNRS propagating in the Arctic sea ice cover is exploited in order to locally measure the ice thickness

45

Seasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service and the U. S. National Ice Center) produces summer outlooks of ice conditions for specific regionsSeasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1 J. Zhang,1 A. J. Schweiger,1 29 February 2008. [1] How well can the extent of arctic sea ice be predicted for lead periods of up

Zhang, Jinlun

46

Sea Ice Enhancements to Polar WRF* Keith M. Hines1**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

covering Europe and the Arctic Ocean demonstrate remote impacts of Arctic sea ice thickness on18 midSea Ice Enhancements to Polar WRF* Keith M. Hines1** , David H. Bromwich,1,2 , Lesheng Bai1 model (Polar WRF), a polar-optimized version of2 WRF, is developed by and available to the community

Howat, Ian M.

47

Fractionation of Dissolved Solutes and Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter During Experimental Sea Ice Formation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past decade there has been an overall decrease in Arctic Ocean sea ice cover. Changes to the ice cover have important consequences for organic carbon cycling, especially over the continental shelves. When sea ice is formed, dissolved organic...

Smith, Stephanie 1990-

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

48

Correlation between present-day model simulation of Arctic cloud radiative forcing and sea ice consistent with positive winter convective cloud feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A positive feedback on winter sea-ice loss, based on warming due to radiative forcing caused by the onset of convective clouds in response to sea-ice loss, has recently been proposed. This feedback has thus far been ...

Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

49

arctic ice islands: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

analogous to the effects of the Arctic region; KEYWORDS: Arctic Ocean, ice rafting, climate change Citation: Darby, D. A., and J. F. Bischof (2004), A Holocene record of...

50

Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere S, such as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). This study examines relationships between changes in total sea ice extent north of 70. These results suggest that a decrease in seasonal ice cover influencing other mechanisms of DMS production could

51

Can a Convective Cloud Feedback Help to Eliminate Winter Sea Ice at High CO2 Concentrations?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have remote effects on global climate as well. Accurate forecasting of winter sea ice has significantCan a Convective Cloud Feedback Help to Eliminate Winter Sea Ice at High CO2 Concentrations? DORIAN) ABSTRACT Winter sea ice dramatically cools the Arctic climate during the coldest months of the year and may

Tziperman, Eli

52

Reducing uncertainty in high-resolution sea ice models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system, reflecting a significant amount of solar radiation, insulating the ocean from the atmosphere and influencing ocean circulation by modifying the salinity of the upper ocean. The thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice have shown a significant decline in recent decades with implications for global climate as well as regional geopolitics. Increasing interest in exploration as well as climate feedback effects make predictive mathematical modeling of sea ice a task of tremendous practical import. Satellite data obtained over the last few decades have provided a wealth of information on sea ice motion and deformation. The data clearly show that ice deformation is focused along narrow linear features and this type of deformation is not well-represented in existing models. To improve sea ice dynamics we have incorporated an anisotropic rheology into the Los Alamos National Laboratory global sea ice model, CICE. Sensitivity analyses were performed using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA) to determine the impact of material parameters on sea ice response functions. Two material strength parameters that exhibited the most significant impact on responses were further analyzed to evaluate their influence on quantitative comparisons between model output and data. The sensitivity analysis along with ten year model runs indicate that while the anisotropic rheology provides some benefit in velocity predictions, additional improvements are required to make this material model a viable alternative for global sea ice simulations.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Further observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic Ocean) due to sea ice loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean) due to sea ice loss Brent G.T. Else,1 R.J. Galley,1 B. Lansard,2 D.G. Barber,1 K. Brown,3 L as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high pCO2sw (~290≠320 matm), considering that surface water

Boyer, Edmond

54

Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo H. Eicken,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that feedback processes involving the input of solar energy and subsequent changes in Arctic pack-ice albedo, and properties of first-year and multiyear sea ice have been studied at two field sites in the North American variability in pond fraction varying by more than a factor of 2 and hence area-averaged albedo (varying

Eicken, Hajo

55

NorthNorth Sea ice and glaciers are melting, permafrost is thawing, tundra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

], in which rising temperatures produce short- er winters and less extensive snow and ice cover, with ripple#12;NorthNorth in the Sea ice and glaciers are melting, permafrost is thawing, tundra scientists yielding to shrubs--and changes will affect not just the Arctic but the entire planet REDUCTION IN SEA ICE

Sturm, Matthew

56

Controls on Eurasian coastal sea ice formation, melt onset and decay from ERS scatterometry: regional contrasts and effects of river  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

first-year sea ice (FYI) are observed in the Eurasian Arctic using the C-band (5.3 GHz) European RemoteControls on Eurasian coastal sea ice formation, melt onset and decay from ERS scatterometry and Kolyma rivers. Melt onset of the sea ice surface is associated with abrupt changes in s0 40, with values

Smith, Laurence C.

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic animals-a review Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ROTHROCK... and the intensification of the cyclonic circulation in the eastern Arctic Ocean. The response of Arctic sea ice... into the eastern Arctic from the Canada Basin,...

58

Biogeochemistry in Sea Ice: CICE model developments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polar primary production unfolds in a dynamic sea ice environment, and the interactions of sea ice with ocean support and mediate this production. In spring, for example, fresh melt water contributes to the shoaling of the mixed layer enhancing ice edge blooms. In contrast, sea ice formation in the fall reduces light penetration to the upper ocean slowing primary production in marine waters. Polar biogeochemical modeling studies typically consider these types of ice-ocean interactions. However, sea ice itself is a biogeochemically active medium, contributing a significant and, possibly, essential source of primary production to polar regions in early spring and fall. Here we present numerical simulations using the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) with prognostic salinity and sea ice biogeochemistry. This study investigates the relationship between sea ice multiphase physics and sea ice productivity. Of particular emphasis are the processes of gravity drainage, melt water flushing, and snow loading. During sea ice formation, desalination by gravity drainage facilitates nutrient exchange between ocean and ice maintaining ice algal blooms in early spring. Melt water flushing releases ice algae and nutrients to underlying waters limiting ice production. Finally, snow loading, particularly in the Southern Ocean, forces sea ice below the ocean surface driving an upward flow of nutrient rich water into the ice to the benefit of interior and freeboard communities. Incorporating ice microphysics in CICE has given us an important tool for assessing the importance of these processes for polar algal production at global scales.

Jeffery, Nicole [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hunke, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turner, Adrian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

59

3, 9991020, 2007 Summer sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CPD 3, 999≠1020, 2007 Summer sea ice during the early Holocene H. Goosse et al. Title Page Abstract on the early Holocene climate constrains the summer sea ice projections for the 21st century H. Goosse, E #12;CPD 3, 999≠1020, 2007 Summer sea ice during the early Holocene H. Goosse et al. Title Page

Boyer, Edmond

60

Tourism: A Growing Presence in an Ice Diminishing Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tourism: A Growing Presence in an Ice Diminishing Arctic Dr. John Snyder Strategic Studies, Inc. Centennial, Colorado #12;The Significance of Arctic Tourism · Tourism is the single largest human presence economies rely on tourism for revenue, jobs, personal income, and public finance. It's future is thus

Kuligowski, Bob

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

airborne arctic stratospheric: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

62

arctic cloudy boundary: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

63

arctic ground squirrel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

64

alesund arctic base: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

65

arctic stratospheric expedition: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

66

arctic ground squirrels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic seabird colony Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 5 Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony Summary: Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and...

68

Surface Impedance Tomography for Antarctic Sea Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface Impedance Tomography for Antarctic Sea Ice C. Sampsona , K. M. Goldena , A. Gullya , A. P, Australia Abstract During the 2007 SIPEX expedition in pack ice off the coast of East Antarctica, we measured the electrical conductivity of sea ice via surface impedance tomography. Resistance data from

Golden, Kenneth M.

69

The convective desalination of sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

containing both liquid brine and solid (pure water) ice. Frad is the flux of penetrating solar radiation. Thus the thermal properties of sea ice are composed of those of the solid and liquid phases that make up sea ice. Fixed-salinity models used in older...

Rees Jones, David

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Lesson Summary Students will learn about the Arctic Beaufort Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lesson Summary Students will learn about the Arctic Beaufort Sea and research the adaptations of people and animals in the arctic regions. They will also learn about how their actions can affect the Arctic and learn about the International Polar Year. Prior Knowledge & Skills · Research skills

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

71

ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic ice-covered lake Jessica-cover extent and dynamics on this perennially ice-covered, High Arctic lake. These pellets are interpreted growth. The pellets remain frozen in the ice until a summer or series of summers with reduced ice cover

Vincent, Warwick F.

72

ARKTOS: An intelligent system for SAR sea ice image classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an intelligent system for satellite sea ice image analysis named Advanced Reasoning using Knowledge for T ping Of Sea ice (ARKTOS). ARKTOS performs fully automated analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sea ice images by mimicking...

Soh, L. K.; Tsatsoulis, Costas; Gineris, D.; Bertoia, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long Brigham Young for mapping polar sea ice extent. In this study, a new al- gorithm for polar sea ice mapping is developed of Bayes detection to produce sea ice extent maps. Statistical models for sea ice and ocean are represented

Long, David G.

74

NASA's sea ice program: present and future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· New remote sensing applications Infer properties such as sea ice thickness from ICESat Research · WhatNASA's sea ice program: present and future Thomas Wagner, PhD Program Scientist, Cryosphere NASA for remote sensing · New algorithms to interpret satellite data Improvements to long term satellite record

Kuligowski, Bob

75

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP/KNMI/TEC/RP/147 Validation of ASCAT 12.5-km winds The Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) delivers an operational level 2 wind product produces a level 1 product with 12.5-km WVC spacing that has a resolution of approximately 25 km. Since

Stoffelen, Ad

76

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP2/KNMI/TEC/RP/194 Quality Control of Ku. The OSCAT level 2a data are available in near-real time and OWDP is used at KNMI to produce the Ocean and Sea Ice (OSI) SAF wind product which is made available to users. A beta version of OWDP is also

Stoffelen, Ad

77

J1.15 PARAMETERIZING THE TURBULENT SURFACE FLUXES OVER SUMMER SEA ICE Edgar L Andreas1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the surface heat budget for that year at several sites around the SHEBA ice camp (Andreas et al. 1999; Persson1 of 9 J1.15 PARAMETERIZING THE TURBULENT SURFACE FLUXES OVER SUMMER SEA ICE Edgar L Andreas1* , P to study the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) lasted for a year (Uttal et al. 2002). Our

Persson, Ola

78

Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that lateral ocean heat flux from the shelf to the basin melts a substantial amount of ice in the marginal iceSeasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover Lena M to characterize differences in upwelling near the shelf break in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea due to varying sea ice

Pickart, Robert S.

79

Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ocean heat flux42 from the shelf to the basin melts a substantial amount of ice in the marginal ice Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover Lena M the shelfbreak in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea due to3 varying sea-ice conditions. The record is divided into three

Pickart, Robert S.

80

Hydrographic Preconditioning for Seasonal Sea Ice Anomalies in the Labrador Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study investigates the hydrographic processes involved in setting the maximum wintertime sea ice (SI) extent in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. The analysis is based on an ocean and sea ice state estimate covering ...

Fenty, Ian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ICE SHEET SOURCES OF SEA LEVEL RISE AND FRESHWATER DISCHARGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICE SHEET SOURCES OF SEA LEVEL RISE AND FRESHWATER DISCHARGE DURING THE LAST DEGLACIATION Anders E the sources of sea level rise and freshwater dis- charge to the global oceans associated with retreat of ice­10 m sea level rise at 19.0­19.5 ka, sourced largely from Northern Hemisphere ice sheet retreat

Carlson, Anders

82

Sandia National Laboratories: Arctic sea ice  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear EnergyCouncilSandia's Work

83

UnderSea Solutions, Inc. Arctic AUV Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the conceptual design and analysis of an AUV, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, for Arctic under-ice water sampling Electrical Design: ? Power Consumption ? Battery Requirements & Selection ? Thrust Motor Requirements for nose cone Lift points Hull Form The hydrodynamic form of the AUV determines the propulsion energy

Wood, Stephen L.

84

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP/KNMI/TEC/TN/165 CMOD5.n - the CMOD5 GMF SAF to produce neutral winds rather than real 10m winds. Currently, the CMOD5 Geophysical Model]. KNMI subsequently produced a CMOD5.n Lookup Table and tested the retrieved Maximum Likelihood Estimator

Stoffelen, Ad

85

Sea ice control of water isotope transport to Antarctica and implications for ice core interpretation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associated with diabatic heating. The interior deuterium excess response is more strongly affected by sea ice ice and the local conditions may have remote influences [Jacobs and Comiso, 1997; StammerjohnSea ice control of water isotope transport to Antarctica and implications for ice core

Noone, David

86

115 year ice-core data from Akademii Nauk ice cap, Severnaya Zemlya: high-resolution record of Eurasian Arctic climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

115 year ice-core data from Akademii Nauk ice cap, Severnaya Zemlya: high-resolution record ABSTRACT. From 1999 to 2001 a 724 m deep ice core was drilled on Akademii Nauk ice cap, Severnaya Zemlya Greenland are needed. Therefore, in the Eurasian Arctic several ice cores from ice caps on Svalbard

Fischer, Hubertus

87

Modeling of Antarctic sea ice in a general circulation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice model is developed and coupled with the Melbourne University general circulation model to simulate the seasonal cycle of the Antarctic sea ice distributions The model is efficient, rapid to compute, and useful for a range of climate studies. The thermodynamic part of the sea ice model is similar to that developed by Parkinson and Washington, the dynamics contain a simplified ice rheology that resists compression. The thermodynamics is based on energy conservation at the top surface of the ice/snow, the ice/water interface, and the open water area to determine the ice formation, accretion, and ablation. A lead parameterization is introduced with an effective partitioning scheme for freezing between and under the ice floes. The dynamic calculation determines the motion of ice, which is forced with the atmospheric wind, taking account of ice resistance and rafting. The simulated sea ice distribution compares reasonably well with observations. The seasonal cycle of ice extent is well simulated in phase as well as in magnitude. Simulated sea ice thickness and concentration are also in good agreement with observations over most regions and serve to indicate the importance of advection and ocean drift in the determination of the sea ice distribution. 64 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Wu, Xingren; Budd, W.F. [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia)] [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia); Simmonds, I. [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)] [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

INVESTIGATION OF SEASONAL SEA-ICE THICKNESS VARIABILITY IN THE ROSS SEA Beth A. Schellenberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

routinely produced weekly ice charts since the 1970's. From the period of 1995 to 2000, classificationINVESTIGATION OF SEASONAL SEA-ICE THICKNESS VARIABILITY IN THE ROSS SEA Beth A. Schellenberg P1.23 1. INTRODUCTION A number of studies suggest a connections between sea-ice variability

Geiger, Cathleen

89

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David. Understanding the Arctic Ocean energy balance is important because it can strengthen our understanding for Atmosphere-Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NYU, 200 Water

Zhang, Jinlun

90

State estimation of the Labrador Sea with a coupled sea ice-ocean adjoint model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea ice (SI) and ocean variability in marginal polar and subpolar seas are closely coupled. SI variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection/mode water formation, ...

Fenty, Ian Gouverneur

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Real-time processing of remote sensor data as applied to Arctic ice classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by JAMES AUSTIN PERMENTER partial ! Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by James Austin Permenter Approved as to style and content by: ] ( rman of Commi...

Permenter, James Austin

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Balance E. Hanna 1 ice loss over Greenland. Recent warm events are about the same magnitude, if not smaller, than those warming, remain incompletely understood. Satellite Observations The Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) contains 7

Box, Jason E.

93

Effects of Changes in Arctic Lake and River Ice Terry Prowse, Knut Alfredsen, Spyros Beltaos, Barrie R. Bonsal,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice in the Arctic are projected to produce a variety of effects on hydrologic, ecological, and socio impacts that are directly produced by changes in freshwater ice. The details and diversityEffects of Changes in Arctic Lake and River Ice Terry Prowse, Knut Alfredsen, Spyros Beltaos

Vincent, Warwick F.

94

Modelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios of future climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). A consequence of climatic warming in the high Arctic will be an increase in surface melting of glaciers and ice component of the mass accumulation of many glaciers and ice caps in thModelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios

95

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof aChristinaCliff joinsClimate, Ocean and Sea Ice

96

POLAR SEA-ICE CLASSIFICATION USING ENHANCED RESOLUTION NSCAT DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLAR SEA-ICE CLASSIFICATION USING ENHANCED RESOLUTION NSCAT DATA Q. P. Remund and D. G. Long of the scatterometer image reconstruction with filter (SIRF) algorithm. SIRF produces images of A and B where A is U is shown to have high correlation with the NSIDC SSM/I derived multiyear ice maps. INTRODUCTION Polar sea

Long, David G.

97

Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness Jacqueline A the Ice Mass Balance buoy (IMB) in response to the need for monitoring changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover. The IMB is an autonomous, ice-based system. IMB buoys provide a time series of ice

Geiger, Cathleen

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean supplementary Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 3, 2009 Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Summary: . Global climate change is reducing the extent of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, providing greater...

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic valley findings Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weingartner Summary: The 2007 Bering Strait Oceanic Heat Flux and anomalous Arctic Sea-ice Retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate... Abstract: To illuminate the role of Pacific Waters in...

100

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database. INTRODUCTION................................................................................. 33 2. HISTORY

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

Solomon, Amy

102

Coupled Sea IceĖOcean-State Estimation in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea ice variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection, mode-water formation, and the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation. Historically, quantifying the relationship ...

Fenty, Ian

103

Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, downward longwave radiation, and therefore net heat flux. The faster warming of the arctic ice­ocean systemWarming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s Jinlun Zhang Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences

Zhang, Jinlun

104

ARKTOS: An Intelligent System for SAR Sea Ice Image Classification Leen-Kiat Soh1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in meteorology and in global climate studies. For example, the thickness of sea ice influences the heat fluxARKTOS: An Intelligent System for SAR Sea Ice Image Classification Leen-Kiat Soh1 , Costas sea ice image analysis named ARKTOS (Advanced Reasoning using Knowledge for Typing Of Sea ice). ARKTOS

Kansas, University of

105

SEA ICE MAPPING ALGORITHM FOR QUIKSCAT AND SEAWINDS Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEA ICE MAPPING ALGORITHM FOR QUIKSCAT AND SEAWINDS Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long Brigham Young@ee.byu.edu Abstruct- Polar sea ice extent is an important input to global climate models and is considered are sensitive to the pres- ence of sea ice. An algorithm has been developed for sea ice extent detection using

Long, David G.

106

Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices of the following: US Geological Survey Arctic operating orders, 1979; Det Noske Vertas', rules for the design, construction and inspection of offshore technology, 1977; Alaska Oil and Gas Association, industry research projects, March 1980; Arctic Petroleum Operator's Association, industry research projects, January 1980; selected additional Arctic offshore bibliography on sea ice, icebreakers, Arctic seafloor conditions, ice-structures, frost heave and structure icing.

Sackinger, W. M.

1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

107

Acceleration of the contribution of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to sea level rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

make a large sea?level rise contribu- tion, Geophys. Res.and Antarctic ice sheets to sea level rise E. Rignot, 1,2 I.ice sheets to sea level rise, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 38,

Rignot, E.; Velicogna, I.; van den Broeke, M. R; Monaghan, A.; Lenaerts, J. T. M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Time varying arctic climate change amplification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural p...

Saha, Raj

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Modeling Coulombic failure of sea ice with leads Alexander V. Wilchinsky1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Coulombic failure of sea ice with leads Alexander V. Wilchinsky1 and Daniel L. Feltham1 ice failure under lowconfinement compression is modeled with a linear Coulombic criterion that can of anisotropy we consider a simplified anisotropic sea ice model where the sea ice thickness depends

Feltham, Daniel

111

Modeled methanesulfonic acid (MSA) deposition in Antarctica and its relationship to sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been investigated with the goal of producing a proxy for sea ice cover in past climates [SaigneModeled methanesulfonic acid (MSA) deposition in Antarctica and its relationship to sea ice P. J] Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) has previously been measured in ice cores in Antarctica as a proxy for sea ice extent

Holmes, Christopher D.

112

Brine fluxes from growing sea ice A. J. Wells,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction [2] The spatiotemporal distribution of the liquid phase within sea ice, a porous array of iceBrine fluxes from growing sea ice A. J. Wells,1,2 J. S. Wettlaufer,1,2,3 and S. A. Orszag2] It is well known that brine drainage from growing sea ice has a controlling influence on its mechanical

Wettlaufer, John S.

113

Sea ice floes dissipate the energy of steep ocean waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave attenuation by ice floes is an important parameter for modelling the Arctic Oceans. At present, attenuation coefficients are extracted from linear models as a function of the incident wave period and floe thickness. Recent explorations in the Antarctic Mixed Ice Zone (MIZ) revealed a further dependence on wave amplitude, suggesting that nonlinear contributions are non-negligible. An experimental model for wave attenuation by a single ice floe in a wave flume is here presented. Observations are compared with linear predictions based on wave scattering. Results indicate that linear models perform well under the effect of gently sloping waves. For more energetic wave fields, however, transmitted wave height is normally over predicted. Deviations from linearity appear to be related to an enhancement of wave dissipation induced by unaccounted wave-ice interaction processes, including the floe over wash.

Toffoli, Alessandro; Meylan, Michael H; Cavaliere, Claudio; Alberello, Alberto; Elsnab, John; Monty, Jason P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A model for the consolidation of rafted sea ice , D. L. Feltham2,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This process is widespread in the North Caspian Sea where multiple rafting produces thick sea ice features floes override one another multiple times to produce thick sea ice features [Babko et al., 2002A model for the consolidation of rafted sea ice E. Bailey1 , D. L. Feltham2,3 , and P. R. Sammonds1

Feltham, Daniel

115

A model for the consolidation of rafted sea ice E. Bailey,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice. This process is widespread in the north Caspian Sea, where multiple rafting produces thick sea override one another multiple times to produce thick sea ice features [Babko et al., 2002]. This process observed that as many as four layers of ice were rafted in the southeastern Beaufort Sea to produce a total

Feltham, Daniel

116

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

longwave (LW) radiation emitted from the land, ocean, ice,radiation forcing data sets for large-scale sea ice models in the Southern Ocean.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic kara sea Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 INTRODUCTION Although much progress has been recently made concerning the Summary: -level rise. Keywords: late Quaternary stratigraphy, Barents-Kara ice sheet, Pechora Sea,...

118

arctic ice dynamics: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

W. F. Vincent (2008), Seasonal dynamics of bacterial Vincent, Warwick F. 168 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

119

Breaking the Ice: Navigation in the Arctic Grace Xingxin Gao, Liang Heng, Todd Walter, and Per Enge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breaking the Ice: Navigation in the Arctic Grace Xingxin Gao, Liang Heng, Todd Walter, and Per Enge (ION) Early Achievement Award. Liang Heng is a Ph.D. candidate under the guidance of Professor Per Enge

Gao, Grace Xingxin

120

Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural periodicity and produces burst patterns very similar to what is observed in temperature proxy data. Numerical experiments with the model also suggests that the characteristic period of 1,500 years is due to the geometry, or the effective heat capacity, of the ocean that comes under sea ice cover.

Raj Saha

2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Physica B 338 (2003) 274283 Critical behavior of transport in sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and bacterial communities living in sea ice, and remote sensing of the sea ice pack from space. Recently, we mediates the exchange of heat, moisture, gases, momentum, and solar radiation between the ocean

Golden, Kenneth M.

122

An Analysis of Past and Future Changes in the Ice Cover of Two High-Arctic Lakes Based on Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Landsat Imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and heat energy between a lake and its surroundings (Adams, 1981). In high-arctic lakes, changes in ice climate data are limited, remote sensing of lake-ice conditions can provide valuable insight into climaticAn Analysis of Past and Future Changes in the Ice Cover of Two High-Arctic Lakes Based on Synthetic

Bradley, Raymond S.

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic sea ice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

glacier ice loss following ice shelf July 25, 2011 Summary: of further ice loss and sea level rise likely to result from ongoing changes along the Antarctic Peninsula... multiple...

124

Ocean Heat Transport, Sea Ice, and Multiple Climate States: Insights from Energy Balance Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several extensions of energy balance models (EBMs) are explored in which (i) sea ice acts to insulate the

Rose, Brian Edward James

125

Ice-associated phytoplankton blooms in the southeastern Bering Sea Meibing Jin,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice-associated phytoplankton blooms in the southeastern Bering Sea Meibing Jin,1 Clara Deal,1 Jia 2007. [1] Ice-associated phytoplankton blooms in the south- eastern Bering Sea can critically impact ice algal components, our 1-D ecosystem model successfully reproduced the observed ice

126

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Frazil Deposition Under Growing Sea Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice M.J. McGuinness,1,4 M.J.M. Williams,2 P.J. Langhorne,3 C. Purdie,3 J. Crook4 Abstract. Platelet ice may be an important component of Antarctic land-fast sea ice. Typically, it is found at depth in first-year landfast sea ice cover, near ice shelves. To explain why platelet ice is not commonly

McGuinness, Mark

127

Streamline Regularization for Large Discontinuous Motion of Sea Ice , C. A. Geiger1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Streamline Regularization for Large Discontinuous Motion of Sea Ice M. Thomas1 , C. A. Geiger1 , P the sea ice on the po- lar ocean surfaces serve as thermal regulators for the planet. The variable thickness and dynamic nature of the sea ice is intimately connected with the thermal reg- ulation

Geiger, Cathleen

128

Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice M.J. McGuinness \\Lambda , H a programme recently set up to directly measure the thermal conductivity of young sea ice. An array of thermistors frozen into first≠year Antarctic sea ice provides temperature against depth data, which is fitted

129

Sea ice extent mapping using Ku band scatterometer data Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea ice extent mapping using Ku band scatterometer data Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long enhancement techniques can be used to increase the utility of scatterometer data in monitoring sea-ice extent is the incidence angle dependence of o . Dual-polarization A and B parameters are used to identify sea ice

Long, David G.

130

Sea Ice Mapping Using Enhanced Resolution Advanced Scatterometer Images Steven Reeves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea Ice Mapping Using Enhanced Resolution Advanced Scatterometer Images Steven Reeves A thesis Rights Reserved #12;ABSTRACT Sea Ice Mapping Using Enhanced Resolution Advanced Scatterometer Images Steven Reeves Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Master of Science Sea ice is of great

Long, David G.

131

ERDC/CRRELTR-06-16 Propagation of Uncertainties in Sea Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the global heat bal- ance. This capability is attributed to the unique location of sea ice at the interface in the polar region has precipitated increased efforts to measure sea ice thickness as an index for global heatERDC/CRRELTR-06-16 Propagation of Uncertainties in Sea Ice Thickness Calculations from Basin

Geiger, Cathleen

132

ASSESSING THE UTILITY OF MODIS FOR MONITORING SNOW AND SEA ICE EXTENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has begun. For the first time daily, global maps of snow cover and sea ice extent are being produced, global maps of snow cover and sea ice extent are being produced in a fully automated fashion from spaceASSESSING THE UTILITY OF MODIS FOR MONITORING SNOW AND SEA ICE EXTENT G. Scharfen, S. Khalsa U

Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

133

Mid-Pliocene sea level and continental ice volume based on coupled benthic Mg/Ca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by rising sea level caused by the melting of alpine glaciers and small ice caps and portionsMid-Pliocene sea level and continental ice volume based on coupled benthic Mg/Ca palaeotemperatures composition of seawater, and estimate continental ice volume and sea-level variability during the Mid

134

Holocene sea-ice variations in Greenland: onshore evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Holocene sea-ice variations in Greenland: onshore evidence Ole Bennike* (Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, ōster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark) Received 12 August 2002; revised manuscript accepted 2 April 2003 Abstract: The oldest dated driftwood log from northern Greenland is c. 9300

Ingůlfsson, ”lafur

135

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

136

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

137

Sea Ice in the Global Climate System Kenneth M. Golden1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea Ice in the Global Climate System Kenneth M. Golden1 , Elizabeth Hunke2 , Cecilia Bitz3 Figure 2. The Antarctic sea ice pack with an open lead in the distance. (K. M. Golden) Figure 1. Pancake ice in the Southern Ocean off the coast of East Antarctica. (K. M. Golden

Golden, Kenneth M.

138

Abrupt climate shifts in Greenland due to displacements of the sea ice edge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that a reduction in sea ice extent in the North Atlantic produces a climatic response consistent with abruptAbrupt climate shifts in Greenland due to displacements of the sea ice edge Camille Li,1 David S ice could be changes in ocean thermohaline circulation (OTC) or rearrangements of the tropical

Schrag, Daniel

139

Abrupt climate changes for Iceland during the last millennium: evidence from high resolution sea ice reconstructions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed using a novel proxy based on the presence in sediments of a biomarker (IP25) produced by sea ice produced by sea ice algae (Figure 2), to obtain an uninterrupted, high resolution (ca. 2-5 yr) record ice reconstructions Guillaume Massé1 , Steven J. Rowland1 , Marie-Alexandrine Sicre2 , Jeremy Jacob3

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

140

Figure 1. Recurrent modular network architecture Recurrent modular network architecture for sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. Recurrent modular network architecture Recurrent modular network architecture for sea ice classification in the Marginal Ice Zone using ERS SAR images Andrey V. Bogdanov1a , Marc Toussaint1b , Stein of SAR images of sea ice. Additionally to the local image information the algorithm uses spatial context

Toussaint, Marc

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The consolidation and bond strength of rafted sea ice Eleanor Bailey a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

override one an- other multiple times to produce thick sea ice features (Babko et al., 2002). This processThe consolidation and bond strength of rafted sea ice Eleanor Bailey a, , P.R. Sammonds a,b , D.L. Feltham b,c a Rock & Ice Physics Laboratory, Department of Earth Sciences, University College London

Feltham, Daniel

142

Author's personal copy Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glaciation of Baffin Island, Arctic Canada: key  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

t Melting glaciers and ice caps on Baffin Island contribute roughly half of the sea-level rise from all ice future response of arctic glaciers and ice caps to climate change motivates the use of paleodata throughout the Holocene to its present margin (Barnes Ice Cap) except for two periods of rapid retreat

Briner, Jason P.

143

Sandia National Laboratories: marginal sea ice zone  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine bladelifetime is the cumulative time under loadmarginal sea

144

Air-sea-ice interactions at the Ronne Polynya, southern Weddell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air-sea-ice interactions at the Ronne Polynya, southern Weddell Sea, Antarctica Emma Kathleen;Contents Abstract 2 Acknowledgements 7 1 Introduction 8 1.1 Air-sea-ice interactions in the Antarctic.3 Entrainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 3.3.1 The entrainment parameter

Renfrew, Ian

145

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 43, NO. 3, MARCH 2005 647 Sea Ice Mapping Method for SeaWinds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 43, NO. 3, MARCH 2005 647 Sea Ice Mapping the ocean and atmosphere. Atmospheric heat exchange over sea ice is up to two orders of magnitude less than Abstract--A sea ice mapping algorithm for SeaWinds is devel- oped that incorporates statistical and spatial

Long, David G.

146

Summer and early-fall sea-ice concentration in the Ross Sea: comparison of in situ ASPeCt observations and satellite passive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

channels and techniques to produce the total sea-ice concentration. Some work has been done to validateSummer and early-fall sea-ice concentration in the Ross Sea: comparison of in situ ASPe-mail: knuthma@clarkson.edu 2 118 West Castle Lane, San Antonio, TX 78213, USA ABSTRACT. Sea-ice conditions were

Texas at San Antonio, University of

147

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara, and Information Service #12;World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver Spring International Ocean Atlas and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 2004: I

148

Analysis of Antarctic Sea Ice Thickness: A Newly Created Database for 2000-2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of Antarctic sea ice thickness are sporadic in space and time, hindering knowledge of its variability. A proxy based on stage of development data from the National Ice Center (NIC) weekly operational charts is used to create a high...

Morgan, Benjamin Patrick

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Role of Oceans and Sea Ice in Abrupt Transitions between Multiple Climate States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The coupled climate dynamics underlying large, rapid, and potentially irreversible changes in ice cover are studied. A global atmosphereĖoceanĖsea ice general circulation model with idealized aquaplanet geometry is forced ...

Rose, Brian E. J.

150

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Smoluchowski Coagulation Models Of Sea Ice Thickness1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with thickness. This tail characterises the range of ice thickness produced4 by mechanical redistribution of ice Of Sea Ice Thickness1 Distribution Dynamics2 D. Godlovitch,1 R. Illner,2 and A. Monahan,1 D. Godlovitch ICE Abstract. Sea ice thickness distributions display a ubiquitous exponential de-3 crease

Illner, Reinhard

151

E-Print Network 3.0 - artic sea ice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C S C I E N C E S Summary: are melting most rapidly? Which types of melting ice cause sea level rise? And what have been the main... contributors to sea level rise so far? What are...

152

The Arctic Ocean--a Canadian perspective from IPY H. Melling & R. Francois & P. G. Myers & W. Perrie &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resulting from ice melt. Careful experiments have revealed that Arctic phytoplankton growth is constrained with the atmosphere is dramatically reduced by its ice cap. Sea ice inhibits transfers of vapour and heat reflectivity and latent heat reduce the ocean's absorption of sunshine, and slow ice melting until insolation

Long, Bernard

153

arctic seas assessment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 398 2003: Global analyses of sea...

154

The role of sea ice in the temperature-precipitation feedback of glacial cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

91904, Israel e-mail: hezi.gildor@huji.ac.il Y. Ashkenazy Department of Solar Energy and Environmental climate history can shed some light. Sea ice is a key player in the climate system and in the hydrological, the various effects of sea ice in the hydrological cycle are isolated. It is demonstrated that for a cold LGM

Tziperman, Eli

155

The role of sea ice in the temperature-precipitation feedback of glacial cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is demonstrated that for a cold LGM like state, a warmer climate (as a result of reduced sea-ice cover) leads, Jerusalem 91904, Israel e-mail: hezi.gildor@huji.ac.il Y. Ashkenazy Department of Solar Energy unsatisfactory, yet upon which past climate history can shed some light. Sea ice is a key player in the climate

Tziperman, Eli

156

Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology , L.-S. Bai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland J. E. Box 1 , L.-S. Bai 1 , R across the southern half of Greenland led to substantially higher west coast sea ice thickness and concentration. Even so, record-setting summer temperatures around Greenland, combined with an intense melt

Box, Jason E.

157

HIGH RESOLUTION MOTION ESTIMATION OF SEA ICE USING AN IMPLICIT QUAD-TREE APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and dynamic nature of sea ice is intimately connected with the thermal regulation of planetary heat transferHIGH RESOLUTION MOTION ESTIMATION OF SEA ICE USING AN IMPLICIT QUAD-TREE APPROACH M. Thomas, C. A data products. Since the motion is extracted from the image data iteratively, the estimated field

Geiger, Cathleen

158

The Transient Atmospheric Circulation Response to North Atlantic SST and Sea Ice Anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Transient Atmospheric Circulation Response to North Atlantic SST and Sea Ice Anomalies CLARA of the wintertime atmospheric circu- lation response to imposed patterns of SST and sea ice extent anomalies may produce different responses to the same SST anomaly depend- ing on their simulation

Hurrell, James

159

Electromagnetic and physical properties of sea ice formed in the presence of wave action  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating the magnitude of brine flux to the upper ocean requires an ability to assess the dynamics of the formation of sea ice in a region. Brine storage and rate of expulsion is determined by the environmental conditions under which the sea ice...

Onstott, R. G.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Gow, A. J.; Grenfell, T. C.; Jezek, K. C.; Perovich, D. K.; Swift, C. T.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Dependence of NAO variability on coupling with sea ice Courtenay Strong Gudrun Magnusdottir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dependence of NAO variability on coupling with sea ice Courtenay Strong · Gudrun Magnusdottir N) is shown to depend on its coupling with area-averaged sea ice concentration anomalies whereby positive N tends to produce negative B, which in turn forces negative N. The effects

Magnusdottir, Gudrun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Discrete-element model for the interaction between ocean waves and sea ice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the mechanical behavior of sea ice in response to ocean waves. The wave/ice interaction can potentially lead to the fracture and fragmentation of sea ice depending on the wave amplitude and period. The fracture behavior of sea ice is explicitly modeled by a DEM method, where sea ice is modeled by densely packed spherical particles with finite size. These particles are bonded together at their contact points through mechanical bonds that can sustain both tensile & compressive forces and moments. Fracturing can be naturally represented by the sequential breaking of mechanical bonds. For a given amplitude and period of incident ocean wave, the model provides information for the spatial distribution and time evolution of stress and micro-fractures and the fragment size distribution. We demonstrate that the fraction of broken bonds,, increases with increasing wave amplitude. In contrast, the ice fragment size decreases with increasing amplitude.

Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

162

Unusual narwhal sea ice entrapments and delayed autumn freeze-up trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monoceros) occur when rapid changes in weather and wind conditions create a formation of fast ice in bays residence time. Keywords Climate change √Ā Narwhal √Ā Natural mortality √Ā Sassat √Ā Sea ice entrapment-J√łrgensen 2005, 2011), ice entrapments are a source of natural mortality. These events occur when a sudden change

Laidre, Kristin L.

163

A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

melting is responsible for, 60% comes from glaciers and ice caps.and ice caps will continue to be the dominant contributor to sea-level rise from the land ice-melting

Adachi, Yosuke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Physical Controls on Ice Variability in the Bering Sea /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

region. The model also produces less ice near much of thewinds (Figure 3.13c,d) produce more ice growth and more iceThe model produces variations in total ice area anomalies

Li, Linghan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

ERA-40 SST and Sea Ice Concentration Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lower boundary condition of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice concentration (sic) is a critical forcing of the lower frequencies in multi-decadal global atmospheric reanalyses such as ERA-40. Partly in response to the ERA-40 project, new SST/sic data sets have been developed that are considerably improved over those available to the first-generation reanalyses. This paper documents the input SST/sic data sets and the processing that created the daily SST/sic specification for the ERA-40 period 1956-2001. The source data are: (1) the monthly mean HadISST data set from the UKMO Hadley Centre for 1956-1981; and (2) the weekly NCEP 2DVAR data for 1982-present. Both data sets are reanalyses of satellite and conventional SST/sic observations. The principal reason for the higher quality of these source data sets is the use of a common consensus sic and a common sic-SST relationship in the sea ice margins. The use of a common sic resulted in a very smooth transition between HadISST and NCEP 2DVAR, despite differences in data assimilation techniques and monthly versus weekly analyses. No special action was required to insure consistency at the transition unlike as was necessary for the AMIP II experiment (Fiorino, 1997). The only special processing was application of the AMIP II mid-month calculation (Taylor et al., 2000) for the interpolation of monthly mean data to daily values. This scheme insures that the monthly mean of the daily-interpolated data is nearly identical to the input monthly mean. Detailed comparisons of the SST and sic during the HadISST-NCEP transition, and other long time series, are given. We also compare the NCEP 2DVAR (circa 2000) to a newer version of the OISST (V2, circa 2001) and demonstrate that the small differences should have no impact on the ERA-40 atmosphere reanalyses.

Fiorino, M

2001-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

166

Dynamics of the sea ice edge in Davis Strait M.P. Heide-Jrgensen a,, H. Stern b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the banks of West Greenland, sea ice produced further north in Baffin Bay was advected to the banks as shownAuthor's personal copy Dynamics of the sea ice edge in Davis Strait M.P. Heide-J√łrgensen a,, H October 2006; accepted 27 October 2006 Available online 22 December 2006 Abstract Sea ice concentration

Laidre, Kristin L.

167

This chapter describes observations of continuing change in the Arctic environmental system. It is or-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the longest period and largest area of ice sheet melt since at least 1978, and the highest melt rate since in the Canadian Arctic, where the rate of mass loss from small glaciers and ice caps continued to increase system. It is or- ganized into five broad sections: atmosphere, ocean, sea ice cover, land, and Greenland

Bhatt, Uma

168

A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 21st-Century Sea-Level Rise. Science, 321, 1340; DOI:in the Face of Sea-Level Rise: A Hybrid Modeling Approachof ice sheets to sea-level rise. Bibliography Alcamo, J. et

Adachi, Yosuke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 42, NO. 7, JULY 2004 1433 Automatic Detection and Validity of the Sea-Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in relation to the ice motion in the Marginal Ice Zone and the integration time necessary to produce Detection and Validity of the Sea-Ice Edge: An Application of Enhanced-Resolution QuikScat/SeaWinds Data Abstract--Sea-ice edge detection is an essential task at the different national ice services to secure

Long, David G.

170

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

Lettenmaier, Dennis P

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

171

Radioactive contamination of the Arctic Region, Baltic Sea, and the Sea of Japan from activities in the former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contamination of the Arctic regions of northern Europe and Russia, as well as the Sea of Japan, may become a potential major hazard to the ecosystem of these large areas. Widespread poor radioactive waste management practices from nuclear fuel cycle activities in the former Soviet Union have resulted in direct discharges to this area as well as multiple sources that may continue to release additional radioactivity. Information on the discharges of radioactive materials has become more commonplace in the last year, and a clearer picture is emerging of the scale of the contamination. Radioactivity in the Arctic oceans is now reported to be four times higher than would be derived from fallout from weapons tests. Although the characteristics and extent of the contamination are not well known, it has been stated that the contamination in the Arctic may range from 1 to 3.5 billion curies. As yet, no scientific sampling or measurement program has occurred that can verify the amount or extent of the contamination, or its potential impact on the ecosystem.

Bradley, D.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Radionuclides in the Arctic seas from the former Soviet Union: Potential health and ecological risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the assessment reported here is to evaluate the health and environmental threat to coastal Alaska posed by radioactive-waste dumping in the Arctic and Northwest Pacific Oceans by the FSU. In particular, the FSU discarded 16 nuclear reactors from submarines and an icebreaker in the Kara Sea near the island of Novaya Zemlya, of which 6 contained spent nuclear fuel (SNF); disposed of liquid and solid wastes in the Sea of Japan; lost a {sup 90}Sr-powered radioisotope thermoelectric generator at sea in the Sea of Okhotsk; and disposed of liquid wastes at several sites in the Pacific Ocean, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. In addition to these known sources in the oceans, the RAIG evaluated FSU waste-disposal practices at inland weapons-development sites that have contaminated major rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean. The RAIG evaluated these sources for the potential for release to the environment, transport, and impact to Alaskan ecosystems and peoples through a variety of scenarios, including a worst-case total instantaneous and simultaneous release of the sources under investigation. The risk-assessment process described in this report is applicable to and can be used by other circumpolar countries, with the addition of information about specific ecosystems and human life-styles. They can use the ANWAP risk-assessment framework and approach used by ONR to establish potential doses for Alaska, but add their own specific data sets about human and ecological factors. The ANWAP risk assessment addresses the following Russian wastes, media, and receptors: dumped nuclear submarines and icebreaker in Kara Sea--marine pathways; solid reactor parts in Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean--marine pathways; thermoelectric generator in Sea of Okhotsk--marine pathways; current known aqueous wastes in Mayak reservoirs and Asanov Marshes--riverine to marine pathways; and Alaska as receptor. For these waste and source terms addressed, other pathways, such as atmospheric transport, could be considered under future-funded research efforts for impacts to Alaska. The ANWAP risk assessment does not address the following wastes, media, and receptors: radioactive sources in Alaska (except to add perspective for Russian source term); radioactive wastes associated with Russian naval military operations and decommissioning; Russian production reactor and spent-fuel reprocessing facilities nonaqueous source terms; atmospheric, terrestrial and nonaqueous pathways; and dose calculations for any circumpolar locality other than Alaska. These other, potentially serious sources of radioactivity to the Arctic environment, while outside the scope of the current ANWAP mandate, should be considered for future funding research efforts.

Layton, D W; Edson, R; Varela, M; Napier, B

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

adjoint sea-ice export: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 296 Generated using version 3.0 of the official...

174

Methods for biogeochemical studies of sea ice: The state of the art, caveats, and recommendations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scales, the study of sea-ice biogeochemistry has expanded rapidly. Scientists have come to this field from a variety of disciplines, including glaciology, oceanography, sedimentology, and even tundra ecology; as we attempt to understand the complex...

Miller, Lisa A.; Fripiat, Francois; Else, Brent G.T.; Bowman, Jeff S.; Brown, Kristina A.; Collins, R. Eric; Ewert, Marcela; Fransson, Agneta; Gosselin, Michel; Lannuzel, Delphine; Meiners, Klaus M.; Michel, Christine; Nishioka, Jun; Nomura, Daiki; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Russell, Lynn M.; SÝrensen, Lise Lotte; Thomas, David N.; Tison, Jean-Louis; van Leeuwe, Maria A.; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Wolf, Eric W.; Zhou, Jiayun

2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

175

Oceanic control of the sea ice edge and multiple equilibria in the climate system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I study fundamental mechanisms of atmosphere-ocean-sea ice interaction. Hierarchies of idealized models are invoked to argue that multiple equilibria and abrupt change are robust features of the climate system. The main ...

Rose, Brian E. J. (Brian Edward James)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sphere-sea-ice-ocean... .01.015 12;are included within the latest generation of Earth System Models in order to allow more direct... for Space Studies and Center for Climate...

177

Observed Feedback between Winter Sea Ice and the North Atlantic Oscillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

variability and climate feedbacks in a global coupled model.Ocean JOURNAL OF CLIMATE feedback on the North Atlantic2009 STRONG ET AL. Observed Feedback between Winter Sea Ice

Strong, Courtenay; Magnusdottir, Gudrun; Stern, Hal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

MFV Korenbloem LT 535 sea trials no1: ICES area VIIe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MFV Korenbloem LT 535 sea trials no1: ICES area VIIe the results Pete, the Skipper #12;the `new SWFPO #12;discarded fish (all species) reduced by 60% in the Korenbloem new net 0 1000 2000 3000 4000

179

A broad spectral, interdisciplinary investigation of the electromagnetic properties of sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper highlights the interrelationship of research completed by a team of investigators and presented in the several individual papers comprising this Special Section on the Office of Naval Research (ONR), Arlington, VA, Sponsored Sea Ice...

Jezek, K. C.; Perovich, D. K.; Golden, K. M.; Luther, C.; Barber, D. G.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Grenfell, T. C.; Jordan, A. K.; Mobley, C. D.; Nghiem, S. V.; Onstott, R. G.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS surface. In 1997-1998, a large multi-agency effort made the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA with the ice pack in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas for one year. Surface-based remote sensors generated

Shupe, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Wilkins Ice Shelf collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content is rising rapidlyHigh-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Mark A. Bourassa1 conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­sea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related

Gille, Sarah T.

182

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and in 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf51 collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 2 Mark A conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­27 sea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related

Gille, Sarah T.

183

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Mark Bourassa1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperatures, seasonal sea ice, and the remoteness of the regions all conspire to make observations difficult latitudes - the vertical exchanges of heat, momentum and material between the ocean, atmosphere and ice1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Research

Gille, Sarah T.

184

Discontinuous Non-Rigid Motion Analysis of Sea Ice using C-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellite Imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discontinuous Non-Rigid Motion Analysis of Sea Ice using C-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellite@cis.udel.edu Cathleen Geiger Snow and Ice Branch USACRREL 72 Lyme Rd, Hanover, NH 03755 cathleen@cis.udel.edu Abstract Sea-ice motion consists of complex non-rigid motions in- volving continuous, piece-wise continuous

Delaware, University of

185

Multiple sea-ice states and abrupt MOC transitions in a general circulation ocean model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different land ice distributions represent present-day and cold-climate conditions. In each case the ocean is observed. The cold climate runs lead to meridional sea-ice extents that are different by up to four degrees. Y. Ashkenazy (&) √Ā D. Mirzayof Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, BIDR, Ben

Tziperman, Eli

186

Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Received 7 December 2009; accepted 4Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked to Sea Ice Decline Uma S. Bhatt*,1 Donald A Institute, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

Bhatt, Uma

187

The sensitivity of the Late Saalian (140 ka) and LGM (21 ka) Eurasian ice sheets to sea surface conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the climatic cooling effect from the large ice sheet topography. Late Saalian SST are simulated using an AGCM-hemispheric asymmetry caused by the larger ice-albedo feedback, cooling climate. The resulting Late Saalian ice sheetThe sensitivity of the Late Saalian (140 ka) and LGM (21 ka) Eurasian ice sheets to sea surface

Jakobsson, Martin

188

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Contribution of Icelandic ice caps to sea level rise:1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Contribution of Icelandic ice caps - 2 BJ®ORNSSON ET AL.: MASS LOSS FROM ICELANDIC ICE CAPS In total, Icelandic ice caps contain 3,600 km3 of ice, which if melted would3 raise sea level by 1 cm. Here, we present an overview of mass

Berthier, Etienne

189

MFV Kerrie Marie BM172 (New Net MK 2) sea trials no11: ICES area VIIe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MFV Kerrie Marie BM172 (New Net MK 2) sea trials no11: ICES area VIIe the results John, the Skipper fishing line and replaced it with a traditional 36mm rope fishing line in the new net" (see sea trials No4). "The new net didn't dig into the fishing grounds as much and discards were reduced much more

190

Tide Model Accuracy in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, from InSAR Observations of Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tide Model Accuracy in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, from InSAR Observations of Ice Shelf Motion Sea Sector of West Antarctica. · Tide model accuracy in this remote region is poorly constrained, yet tide models contribute to simulations of ocean heat transfer, and to the removal of unwanted tidal

191

Millennial-scale stable oscillations between sea ice and convective deep water formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the last ice age there were several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events. The climatic effects of the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest and most abrupt temperature anomalies. Similar but weaker oscillations also took place during the interglacial period. This paper proposes an auto-oscillatory mechanism between sea ice and convective deep water formation in the north Atlantic as the source of the persistent cycles. A simple dynamical model is constructed by coupling and slightly modifying two existing models of ocean circulation and sea ice. The model exhibits mixed mode oscillations, consisting of decadal scale small amplitude oscillations, and a large amplitude relaxation fluctuation. The decadal oscillations occur due to the insulating effect of sea ice and leads to periodic ventilation of heat from the polar ocean. Gradually an instability builds up in the polar column and results in an abrupt initiation of convection an...

Saha, Raj

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Contribution to Thomas D. & G. S. Dieckmann (eds.): SEA ICE -AN INTRODUCTION TO ITS PHYSICS, BIOLOGY , CHEMISTRY AND GEOLOGY, Blackwell Science, London, 2003, pp. 22-81  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Contribution to Thomas D. & G. S. Dieckmann (eds.): SEA ICE - AN INTRODUCTION TO ITS PHYSICS to the macroscopic to the regional scale: Growth, microstructure and properties of sea ice1 Hajo Eicken 2 of the importance of sea ice over a wide range of scales in time and space. Considering the degree to which the ice

Eicken, Hajo

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean ice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Will) This chart shows the drop in ... Source: Strayer, David L. - Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 14 Rapid reduction of Arctic...

194

A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5¬įN during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar properties. An initial warm, melt

Brooks, Ian M.

195

255FEBRUARY 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | he Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that determine the surface energy budget and the sea≠ice mass balance in the Arctic (Moritz et al. 1993; Perovich of the vertical and horizontal energy exchanges within the ocean≠ice≠atmosphere system. The SHEBA pro- gram for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; TURENNE--Canadian Coast Guard, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; SERREZE

Shupe, Matthew

196

Predicting Land-Ice Retreat and Sea-Level Rise with the Community Earth System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coastal stakeholders need defensible predictions of 21st century sea-level rise (SLR). IPCC assessments suggest 21st century SLR of {approx}0.5 m under aggressive emission scenarios. Semi-empirical models project SLR of {approx}1 m or more by 2100. Although some sea-level contributions are fairly well constrained by models, others are highly uncertain. Recent studies suggest a potential large contribution ({approx}0.5 m/century) from the marine-based West Antarctic Ice Sheet, linked to changes in Southern Ocean wind stress. To assess the likelihood of fast retreat of marine ice sheets, we need coupled ice-sheet/ocean models that do not yet exist (but are well under way). CESM is uniquely positioned to provide integrated, physics based sea-level predictions.

Lipscomb, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

197

Designing for effective stationkeeping in ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and intervention vessels for Arctic oil and gas. #12;2. An effective Ice Management system · Ice Management for the CIVArctic vessel. - Comparison with the ice model tests carried out in the Aker Arctic ice tank in May 2011

N√łrv√•g, Kjetil

198

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 52, NO. 4, APRIL 2014 2149 Mitigation of Sea Ice Contamination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 52, NO. 4, APRIL 2014 2149 Mitigation such as the Oceansat-2 scatterometer. Index Terms--QuikCSAT, remote sensing, scatterometry, sea ice, wind, wind, atmospheric heat flow, ocean currents, and possibly sea ice formation. Satellite scat- terometry enables daily

Long, David G.

199

A physically based parameterization of gravity drainage for sea-ice modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an integral aspect of any cou- pled climate model [Gent , 2012]. Although only a few me- ters thick, sea ice plays a significant role in the coupling between ocean and atmosphere because it reflects a higher proportion of solar radiation than open water... suspect the latter is a result of our neglect of solar radiation, and brine expulsion, which would transport salt downwards within the ice, increasing the solid fraction in the upper ice and thereby reducing the permeabil- ity and local Rayleigh number. We...

Rees Jones, David W.; Worster, M. Grae

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

200

Journal of Climate, 2005, Vol 18, p 2903-2921 Maintenance of the Sea-Ice Edge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

location the principal drivers of the oceanic heat flux that melts sea ice are absorbed solar radiation radiation is the largest component of the ocean energy budget, and the large seasonal range of insolation pole depends primarily on coastlines, ice motion, and the melt rate at the ice-ocean interface. At any

Bitz, Cecilia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and in 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf51 collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 2 Mark A-latitude surface fluxes will require close collaboration among meteorologists,33 oceanographers, ice physicists

Gille, Sarah T.

202

The Rate-and State-Dependence of Sea Ice Friction Ben Lishman, Peter Sammonds, Daniel Feltham, and Alex Wilchinsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for further work. 2. Experimental programme To produce a quantitative constitutive description of ice frictionPOAC09-66 The Rate- and State- Dependence of Sea Ice Friction Ben Lishman, Peter Sammonds, Daniel Feltham, and Alex Wilchinsky Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, and Centre for Polar Observation

Feltham, Daniel

203

High latitudes present extreme conditions for the measurement and estimation of airsea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related physical processes and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High latitudes present extreme conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­sea and ice of the Earth's climate. HigH-LatitudE OcEan and SEa icE SurfacE fLuxES: cHaLLEngES fOr cLimatE rESEarcH by Mark change can manifest itself in astonishing ways. Arctic sea ice extent at the end of the melt season

Renfrew, Ian

204

Polynyas, Leads in the Southern Ocean -Encyclopedia of the Antarctic The sea ice surrounding Antarctica and covering much of the Southern Ocean is far from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polynyas, Leads in the Southern Ocean - Encyclopedia of the Antarctic The sea ice surrounding with patches of open water and cracks. Larger, persistent areas of open water within the sea ice pack are called polynyas (a word of Russian origin); while linear cracks in the sea ice are called leads

Renfrew, Ian

205

In the Greenland and Norwegian Seas, sea ice advanced farther south and persisted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at high latitudes, ice-age conditions were not so different from those of today, with global cooling was that the larger area of snow and ice produced a cooling feedback through increased reflection of solarenergy, which found considerable ice-age cooling off Peru and along the Equator10 . Although the aver- age

Kurapov, Alexander

206

The Ross Sea Response to Evolving Ocean-Ice Interactions in a Changing Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decade (1994Ė2007) mostly (50%) from larger melt water inputs from the Pine Island (17.7 km^3 per decade) and Dotson (14.8 km^3 per decade) glaciers. Two decades of steady (1978-2000) strengthening of sea ice productivity (200 km^3 per decade) within...

Wiederwohl, Christina 1980-

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

207

A model of melt pond evolution on sea ice P. D. Taylor and D. L. Feltham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

short-wave radiation. The difference in solar energy ab- sorption between pond-covered and bare sea ice Observation and Modelling, Department of Space and Climate Physics, University College London, London, UK ponds influence the summertime energy and mass balance through the albedo-feedback mechanism [Ebert

Feltham, Daniel

208

Influence of the Sea Ice Thickness Distribution on Polar Climate in CCSM3 MARIKA M. HOLLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat transport to changing CO2 levels contributes to different high latitude warming simulations and sea ice which amplify climate change and variability. In increasing atmospheric CO2 scenarios Group MS-B216, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico JULIE L. SCHRAMM National Center

209

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameterization in BRM scheme accounts for two general mech- anisms distinguishable according to the involvement of liquid phase in the ice

Sednev, I.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

ARM - Lesson Plans: When Floating Ice Melts in the Sea  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAcid RainThe Pacific and ElWhen Floating Ice

211

Connecting recruitment of Antarctic krill and sea ice John Wiedenmann,a,b* Katherine A. Cresswell,b and Marc Mangelb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Connecting recruitment of Antarctic krill and sea ice John Wiedenmann,a,b* Katherine A. Cresswell show a nonlinear relationship between recruitment and sea ice area in the combined Bellingshausen range of ice area, and minimal recruitment otherwise. This finding may allow for an adaptive approach

Mangel, Marc

212

Modeling Sea Ice-Ocean-Ecosystem Responses to Climate Changes in the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas with Data Assimilation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Marine Science and Technology, Haoguo Hu - CILER, University of Michigan Overview This project will useModeling Sea Ice-Ocean-Ecosystem Responses to Climate Changes in the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas-Investigators: Leo Oey - Princeton University, Tel Ezer - Old Dominion University, K. Mizobata - Tokyo University

213

A View of Antarctic Ice-Sheet Evolution from Sea-Level and Deep-Sea Isotope Changes During the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Proceedings of the 10th International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.3133/of2007-1047.kp06 A View of Antarctic Ice-Sheet Evolution from Sea-Level and Deep-Sea Isotope Changes During the Late...

Miller, K. G.; Wright, J. D.; Katz, M. E.; Browning, J. V.; Cramer, B. S.; Wade, Bridget S.; Mizintseva, S. F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Estimation of the thin ice thickness and heat flux for the Chukchi Sea Alaskan coast polynya from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager data,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of the thin ice thickness and heat flux for the Chukchi Sea Alaskan coast polynya from shows that the SSM/I thicknesses and heat fluxes are valid for ice thicknesses less than 10­20 cm, comparison with other numerical and satellite estimates of the ice production shows that although our ice

Washington at Seattle, University of

215

Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Insights from a 3-D Cloud-Resolving Model with Size-Resolved Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The single-layer mixed-phase clouds observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) programís Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) are simulated with a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) coupled with an explicit bin microphysics scheme and a radar-lidar simulator. Two possible ice enhancement mechanisms Ė activation of droplet evaporation residues by condensation-followed-by-freezing and droplet freezing by contact freezing inside-out, are scrutinized by extensive comparisons with aircraft and radar and lidar measurements. The locations of ice initiation associated with each mechanism and the role of ice nuclei (IN) in the evolution of mixed-phase clouds are mainly addressed. Simulations with either mechanism agree well with the in-situ and remote sensing measurements on ice microphysical properties but liquid water content is slightly underpredicted. These two mechanisms give very similar cloud microphysical, macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative properties, although the ice nucleation properties (rate, frequency and location) are completely different. Ice nucleation from activation of evaporation nuclei is most efficient near cloud top areas concentrated on the edges of updrafts, while ice initiation from the drop freezing process has no significant location preference (occurs anywhere that droplet evaporation is significant). Both enhanced nucleation mechanisms contribute dramatically to ice formation with ice particle concentration of 10-15 times higher relative to the simulation without either of them. The contribution of ice nuclei (IN) recycling from ice particle evaporation to IN and ice particle concentration is found to be very significant in this case. Cloud can be very sensitive to IN initially and form a nonquilibrium transition condition, but become much less sensitive as cloud evolves to a steady mixed-phase condition. The parameterization of Meyers et al. [1992] with the observed MPACE IN concentration is able to predict the observed mixed-phase clouds reasonably well. This validation may facilitate the application of this parameterization in the cloud and climate models to simulate Arctic clouds.

Fan, Jiwen; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Khain, Alexander

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

216

Snowball Earth: A thin-ice solution with flowing sea glaciers David Pollard and James F. Kasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optical properties of sea ice and with the equatorward flow of sea glaciers. Here we use a coupled energy processes beyond the scope of zonal mean energy-balance models may significantly affect the solutions and (2 today's value. This is approximately the value of the solar constant predicted at 600 Myr ago [Gough

217

Non-nuclear submarine tankers could cost-effectively move Arctic oil and gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before the advent of nuclear propulsion for U.S. Navy submarines, fuel cells were considered to be the next logical step forward from battery powered submarines which required recharging. But with the launching of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954, the development of fuel-cell propulsion was sidelined by the naval community. Nearly 30 years later fuel-cell propulsion on board submarines is actually more cost-effective than the use of nuclear propulsion. In the Artic Ocean, the use of the submarine tanker has long been considered commercially appropriate because of the presence of the polar ice cap, which inhibits surface ship transport. The technical difficulty and high operating cost of Arctic icebreaking tankers are strong arguments in favor of the cheaper, more efficient submarine tanker. Transiting under the polar ice cap, the submarine tanker is not an ''Arctic'' system, but merely a submerged system. It is a system usable in any ocean around the globe where sufficient depth exists (about 65% of the global surface). Ice breakers are another story; their design only makes them useful for transit through heavy sea ice in coastal environments. Used anywhere else, such as in the open ocean or at the Arctic ice cap, they are not a cost-effective means of transport. Arctic sea ice conditions require the Arctic peculiar icebreaking tanker system to do the job the hard way-on the surface. But on the other hand, Arctic sea ice conditions are neatly set aside by the submarine tanker, which does it the energy-efficient, elegant way submerged. The submarine tanker is less expensive to build, far less expensive to operate, and does not need to be nuclear propelled.

Kumm, W.H.

1984-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

218

20 InsideGNSS SEP T EMBER /OC T OBER 2011 www.insidegnss.com he Arctic houses an estimated 90 billion barrels of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of global climate change. New summer sea lanes have already opened up, and projections of sea ice loss. The combination of undiscovered oil and climate change are driving a dramatic increase in the demand of the untapped oil in the world. Russia, Canada, and the United States plan to explore the Arctic for extensive

Stanford University

219

Rapid dynamic activation of a marine-based Arctic ice cap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 8908 Meier, M. F., M. B. Dyurgerov, U. K. Rick, S. OíNeel, W. Tad Pfeffer, R. S. Anderson, S. P. Anderson, and A. F. Glazovsky (2007), Glaciers dominate Eustatic sea-level rise in the 21st century, Science, 317(5841), 1064Ė1067. Moholdt, G., J. O. Hagen...

McMillan, Malcolm; Shepherd, Andrew; Gourmelen, Noel; Dehecq, Amaury; Leeson, Amber; Ridout, Andrew; Flament, Thomas; Hogg, Anna; Gilbert, Lin; Benham, Toby; van den Broeke, Michiel; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Fettweis, Xavier; NoŽl, Brice; Strozzi, Tazio

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

220

90 4,000 Meters under the Ice The Arctic is one of the habitats undergoing the most  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PlanckResearch 89 RUSSIA Special RUSSIA Special #12;#12;TEXT MAREN EMMERICH The Arctic is one of the habitats

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Title: Aerodynamic and Scalar Roughness over Snow and Sea Ice In Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, the aerodynamic roughness, z0, is the artificial height  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Aerodynamic and Scalar Roughness over Snow and Sea Ice Abstract: In Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, the aerodynamic roughness, z0, is the artificial height above the surface at which the wind speed the theory and measurement of the aerodynamic and scalar roughness lengths over snow and sea ice. The data

222

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using AMSR-E 89 GHz Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using AMSR progress in sea ice concentration remote sensing by satellite microwave radiometers has been stimulated models, e.g. the heat flux between ocean and atmosphere, especially near coast- lines and in polynyas. (2

Bremen, Universität

223

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 38, NO. 4, JULY 2000 1843 An Iterative Approach to Multisensor Sea Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 38, NO. 4, JULY 2000 1843 An Iterative play a critical role in the global climate, the remote sensing community has had a keen interest in the variability of polar sea ice characteris- tics. Sea ice influences heat transfer between the warmer ocean

Long, David G.

224

Examining Sea Ice in the Southern Ocean Using ArcGIS Tracy L. DeLiberty, Cathleen A. Geiger and Mary D. Lemcke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. On the contrary, the southern ice cover modeling results produce conflicting responses in global warming scenariosExamining Sea Ice in the Southern Ocean Using ArcGIS Tracy L. DeLiberty, Cathleen A. Geiger at the University of Delaware, the Australian Antarctic Division, the National Ice Center (NIC), Clarkson University

Geiger, Cathleen

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic reduces root Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface albedo, leading to amplified ice melting. The Arctic... , the total ice production over the Arctic Ocean is reduced (Figure 3e). In summer, a decrease in ice... What...

226

The rapid disintegration of Arctic sea ice, like the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf in Canada, is a cause for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thomas Stocker, who co-chairs a working group of the prestigious Intergovernmental Panel on Climate, making them more efficient in terms of heating. Also, savings can be made in private mobility. swissinfo there are developments in the climate system that need to be studied very carefully, for example variations of solar

Stocker, Thomas

227

Enhancing the resolution of sea ice in long-term global ocean general circulation model (gcm) integrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open water in sea ice, such as leads and polynyas, plays a crucial role in determining the formation of deep- and bottom-water, as well as their long-term global properties and circulation. Ocean general circulation models (GCMs) designed...

Kim, Joong Tae

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

228

Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

Sackinger, W. M.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo Springer-Verlag 2010 Abstract Snow surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5¬įN during indicated four distinct tempera- ture regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar

Shupe, Matthew

230

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud and aerosol data acquired by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Convair-580 aircraft in, above, and below single-layer arctic stratocumulus cloud during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 were used to test three aerosol indirect effects hypothesized to act in mixed-phase clouds: the riming indirect effect, the glaciation indirect effect, and the cold second indirect effect. The data showed a correlation of R= 0.75 between liquid drop number concentration, Nliq, inside cloud and ambient aerosol number concentration NPCASP below cloud. This, combined with increasing liquid water content LWC with height above cloud base and the nearly constant profile of Nliq, suggested that liquid drops were nucleated from aerosol at cloud base. No strong evidence of a riming indirect effect was observed, but a strong correlation of R = 0.69 between ice crystal number concentration Ni and NPCASP above cloud was noted. Increases in ice nuclei (IN) concentration with NPCASP above cloud combined with the subadiabatic LWC profiles suggest possible mixing of IN from cloud top consistent with the glaciation indirect effect. The higher Nice and lower effective radius rel for the more polluted ISDAC cases compared to data collected in cleaner single-layer stratocumulus conditions during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment is consistent with the operation of the cold second indirect effect. However, more data in a wider variety of meteorological and surface conditions, with greater variations in aerosol forcing, are required to identify the dominant aerosol forcing mechanisms in mixed-phase arctic clouds.

Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg; Korolev, Alexei; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Lawson, R. P.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Wolde, Mengistu; Laskin, Alexander; Freer, Matthew

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

231

Model-Data Fusion Studies of Pacific Arctic Climate and Ice-Ocean Processes Jia Wang1, Hajo Eicken2, Yanling Yu3, X. Bai4, Jinlun Zhang3, H. Hu4, Moto Ikeda5, Kohei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Ecosystems Research (CILER), School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, 4840 South1 Model-Data Fusion Studies of Pacific Arctic Climate and Ice-Ocean Processes Jia Wang1, Hajo. Tel: 734-741-2281; Email: Jia.Wang@noaa.gov 2. University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute

Zhang, Jinlun

232

Inter-annual sea-ice dynamics and micro-algal biomass in winter pack ice of Marguerite Bay, Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solar energy into the pack-ice ecosystem. Such a tractable atmosphere ocean­ice­biota coupling may help (Atkinson et al., 2004; Loeb et al., 1997), as well as marine mammals and birds (Ainley et al., 2005 and Ross, 2003)--ironically at a time when the pronounced seasonal cycle of solar radiation coupled

Stewart, Frank

233

Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

Cheon, Woo Geunn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Changes in sea-level associated with modifications on the mass balance of the Greenland and Antartic ice sheets over the 21st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes in runoff from Greenland and Antarctica are often cited as one of the major concerns linked to anthropogenic changes in climate. The changes in mass balance, and associated changes in sea-level, of these two ice ...

Bugnion, Vťronique.

235

A New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part II: Single-Column Modeling of Arctic Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the arctic bound- ary layer, the presence of leads (cracks) in the sea ice surface, the persistence of mixed-phaseA New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part- dicted cloud boundaries and total cloud fraction compare reasonably well with observations. Cloud phase

Shupe, Matthew

236

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Chinese Journal of Polar Science, Vol. 19, No.2, 168 -184, December 2008 Modeling seasonal variations of ocean and sea ice circulation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CILER) , School of Natural Resources and Envi- ronment, University of Michigan, 4840 S State Road, Ann variations of ocean and sea ice circulation in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas: A model-data fusion study Wang, M148108 USA 2 Department of Ocean Sciences, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 4

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - altimeter sea ice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that, on horizontal scales of hundreds to thousands of kilometers, the sea surface... sea-level rise, and altimeter data sets - reflect the changing nature of satellite...

240

Mathematical model for ice formation in the Arctic during Alain Pham Ngoc Dinh and Phan Thanh Nam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s in the ice and the ocean during a time dt is = -I T x F b,h0 + O T x Oc,h0 sdt, where I, O are thermal conductivities of the ice and the ocean. Finally, the law of conservation of energy, i.e. U = , leads pond and the underlying ocean, called false-bottoms. The simultaneous growth and ablation of false

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol...

243

Simulating Arctic Climate Warmth and Icefield Retreat in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Devon, and Meighen ice caps in the Canadian Arctic, and possibly in Camp Century (northwest Greenland the entire western Arctic from 57-N to 85-N, including Greenland and smaller scale ice caps in Iceland Project members In the future, Arctic warming and the melting of polar glaciers will be considerable

Ingůlfsson, ”lafur

244

65J.M. Grebmeier and W. Maslowski (eds.), The Pacific Arctic Region: Ecosystem Status and Trends in a Rapidly Changing Environment, DOI 10.1007/978-94-017-8863-2_4,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Sapporo, Japan K. Mizobata Department of Ocean Sciences, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo, Japan J.E. Overland Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric mechanisms responsible for the diminishing sea ice cannot be explained by the leading Arctic Oscillation (AO

Zhang, Jinlun

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic springtail megaphorura Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Fish Resources of the Arctic Management Area... (Arctic FMP) and Amendment 29 to the Fishery Management Plan for Bering Sea Aleutian Islands King Source: NOAA Marine...

246

A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Products for the Arctic Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in AirĖSea Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The uncertainties related to atmospheric fields in the Arctic Ocean from commonly used and recently available reanalysis products are investigated. Fields from the 1) ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) Common ...

Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

247

Archimedean Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The striking boundary dependency (the Arctic Circle phenomenon) exhibited in the ice model on the square lattice extends to other planar set-ups. We present these findings for the triangular and the Kagome lattices. Critical connectivity results guarantee that ice configurations can be generated using the simplest and most efficient local actions. Height functions are utilized throughout the analysis. At the end there is a surprise in store: on the remaining Archimedean lattice for which the ice model can be defined, the 3.4.6.4. lattice, the long range behavior is completely different from the other cases.

Kari Eloranta

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

248

Economic feasibility of shipping containers through the Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the Arctic ice cover continues to retreat, the possibility of regular transit through the Arctic becomes an increasing reality. Liner companies could take advantage of distance savings (up to 4000 nautical miles less ...

Pollock, Russell (Russell Clayton)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Grounding-line migration in plan-view marine ice-sheet models: results of the ice2sea MISMIP3d intercomparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models (SSA, AĖHySSA) produce larger ice sheets than modelsplan-view ice-sheet models they produce different results.the Antarctic ice sheet should at least produce grounding-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Mesoscale Modeling During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic (Curry et al. 2000) and through various feedback mechanisms exert a strong influence on the Arctic climate. Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. It has been hypothesized that mixed-phase clouds are maintained through a balance between liquid water condensation resulting from the cloud-top radiative cooling and ice removal by precipitation (Pinto 1998; Harrington et al. 1999). In their modeling study Harrington et al. (1999) found that the maintenance of this balance depends strongly on the ambient concentration of ice forming nucleus (IFN). In a follow-up study, Jiang et al. (2002), using only 30% of IFN concentration predicted by Meyers et al. (1992) IFN parameterization were able to obtain results similar to the observations reported by Pinto (1998). The IFN concentration measurements collected during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004 over the North Slope of Alaska and the Beaufort Sea (Verlinde et al. 2005), also showed much lower values then those predicted (Prenne, pers. comm.) by currently accepted ice nucleation parameterizations (e.g. Meyers et al. 1992). The goal of this study is to use the extensive IFN data taken during M-PACE to examine what effects low IFN concentrations have on mesoscale cloud structure and coastal dynamics.

Avramov, A.; Harringston, J.Y.; Verlinde, J.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

In: Lozn et al., Climate of the 21st century: Changes and risks. GEO, Hamburg/Germany, pp. 206-211, The response of polar sea ice to climate variability and change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reductions in ice coverage with important consequences for the global heat budget. With global climate models and anthropogenic climate change. While satellite remote sensing can now provide sea-ice data sets of sufficient, reductions in ice extent due to, e.g., perturbations in atmospheric heat transfer into the polar regions

Eicken, Hajo

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean expedition Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic will lead to a better understanding of how the Summary: between the U.S. and Russia began with the expedition of the Bering and Chukchi Seas ( Arctic Ocean... . Arctic...

253

Ice-sheet model sensitivities to environmental forcing and their use in projecting future sea level (the SeaRISE project)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for shallow polythermal ice sheets. Philos. Trans. R. Soc.doi:10.3189/2013JoG12J125 Ice-sheet model sensitivities to1993) On the initiation of ice sheets. Ann. Glaciol. , 18,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Ice-sheet model sensitivities to environmental forcing and their use in projecting future sea level (the SeaRISE project)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes that can produce rapid ice loss, (2) large-scalesimulate the same ice sheet can produce different behaviorss. The Antarctic ice sheet is predicted to produce a greater

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Unusual narwhal sea ice entrapments and delayed autumn freeze-up trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entrapments of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) occur when rapid changes in weather and wind conditions create-up by prolonging their summer residence time. Keywords Climate change √Ā Narwhal √Ā Natural mortality √Ā Sassat √Ā Sea of natural mortality. These even

Laidre, Kristin L.

256

Multiple sea-ice states and abrupt MOC transitions in a general circulation ocean model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

represent present-day and cold-climate conditions. In each case the ocean model is initiated with both ice of about three degrees in latitude between the different runs is observed. The cold climate runs lead. Mirzayof Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, BIDR, Ben-Gurion University, 84990 Midreshet

Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

257

Effect of shear rupture on aggregate scale formation in sea ice Alexander V. Wilchinsky,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

joints connecting floes that move under the action of the wind stresses. The adopted shear rupture around the angles given by the wing crack theory determining diamondshaped blocks. The ice block (floe harder to attain and compressive failure becomes equally important leading to elongation of blocks

Feltham, Daniel

258

Projected state of the Arctic Sea Ice and Permafrost by 2030 Karsten Steinhaeuser, Esther Parish, Alex Sorokine, Auroop R. Ganguly*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parish, Alex Sorokine, Auroop R. Ganguly* Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37830 Email: gangulyar@ornl.gov Phone: 865 Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Email: rossb@ornl.gov Phone: 865-576-1034 Background

Minnesota, University of

259

Parameterization of the Extinction Coefficient in Ice and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds during the ISDAC Field Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the history of attempts to directly measure cloud extinction, the current measurement device known as the Cloud Extinction Probe (CEP), specific problems with direct measurement of extinction coefficient, and the attempts made here to address these problems. Extinction coefficient is one of the fundamental microphysical parameters characterizing bulk properties of clouds. Knowledge of extinction coefficient is of crucial importance for radiative transfer calculations in weather prediction and climate models given that Earth's radiation budget (ERB) is modulated much by clouds. In order for a large-scale model to properly account for ERB and perturbations to it, it must ultimately be able to simulate cloud extinction coefficient well. In turn this requires adequate and simultaneous simulation of profiles of cloud water content and particle habit and size. Similarly, remote inference of cloud properties requires assumptions to be made about cloud phase and associated single-scattering properties, of which extinction coefficient is crucial. Hence, extinction coefficient plays an important role in both application and validation of methods for remote inference of cloud properties from data obtained from both satellite and surface sensors (e.g., Barker et al. 2008). While estimation of extinction coefficient within large-scale models is relatively straightforward for pure water droplets, thanks to Mie theory, mixed-phase and ice clouds still present problems. This is because of the myriad forms and sizes that crystals can achieve, each having their own unique extinction properties. For the foreseeable future, large-scale models will have to be content with diagnostic parametrization of crystal size and type. However, before they are able to provide satisfactory values needed for calculation of radiative transfer, they require the intermediate step of assigning single-scattering properties to particles. The most basic of these is extinction coefficient, yet it is rarely measured directly, and therefore verification of parametrizations is difficult. The obvious solution is to be able to measure microphysical properties and extinction at the same time and for the same volume. This is best done by in situ sampling by instruments mounted on either balloon or aircraft. The latter is the usual route and the one employed here. Yet the problem of actually measuring extinction coefficient directly for arbitrarily complicated particles still remains unsolved.

Korolev, A; Shashkov, A; Barker, H

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

260

Leaching of radionuclides from furfural-based polymers used to solidify reactor compartments and components disposed of in the Arctic Kara Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the course of operating its nuclear navy, the former Soviet Union (FSU) disposed of reactor vessels and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in three fjords on the east coast of Novaya Zemlya and in the open Kara Sea within the Novaya Zemlya Trough during the period 1965 to 1988. The dumping consisted of 16 reactors, six of which contained SNF and one special container that held ca. 60% of the damaged SNF and the screening assembly from the No. 2 reactor of the atomic icebreaker Lenin. At the time, the FSU considered dumping of decommissioned nuclear submarines with damaged cores in the bays of and near by the Novaya Zemlya archipelago in the Arctic Kara Sea to be acceptable. To provide an additional level of safety, a group of Russian scientists embarked upon a course of research to develop a solidification agent that would provide an ecologically safe barrier. The barrier material would prevent direct contact of seawater with the SNF and the resultant leaching and release of radionuclides. The solidification agent was to be introduced by flooding the reactors vessels and inner cavities. Once introduced the agent would harden and form an impermeable barrier. This report describes the sample preparation of several ``Furfurol'' compositions and their leach testing using cesium 137 as tracer.

HEISER,J.H.; SIVINTSEV,Y.; ALEXANDROV,V.P.; DYER,R.S.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Glaciers, ice sheets, and sea level: effect of a CO/sub 2/-induced climatic change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The workshop examined the basic questions of how much water has been exchanged between land ice and ocean during the last century, what is happening now, and, given existing climate-modeling prediction, how much exchange can be expected in the next century. In addition, the evidence for exchange was examined and gaps in that evidence were identified. The report includes the 23 presentations made at the workshop, summarizes the workshop discussion, and presents the Committee's findings and recommendations. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 23 presentations.

none,

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Paleoreconstruction of Particulate Organic Carbon Inputs to the High-Arctic Colville River Delta, Beaufort Sea, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beaufort Sea. iv DEDICATION This dissertation is dedicated to my partner, John, and the rest of my family ? thanks for all the support and love you have given me over the past four years. v ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would first...

Schreiner, Kathryn 1983-

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

263

Ice deformation near SHEBA R. W. Lindsay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the vicinity of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ice camp that is suitable for forcing factor for regional heat fluxes, ice growth and melt rates, and ice strength [Maykut, 1982Ice deformation near SHEBA R. W. Lindsay Polar Science Center, University of Washington, Seattle

Lindsay, Ron

264

Solar Radiative Heating in First Year Sea Ice M.J. McGuinness 1 , K.A. Landman 2 , H.J. Trodahl 3 , A.E. Pantoja 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Radiative Heating in First Year Sea Ice M.J. McGuinness 1 , K.A. Landman 2 , H.J. Trodahl 3 ice show daily oscillations consistent with heating by solar radiation. We present and solve a heat for solar power absorption based on Monte Carlo scatter­ ing simulations of penetrating photons. We observe

265

The Holocene climate evolution in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere simulated by a coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean-vegetation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 a) b) Sea-ice area -2.0 -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 -9000 -8000 -7000 -6000 -5000 -4000 -3000 -2000 concentrations 500 550 600 650 700 750 -9000 -8000 -7000 -6000 -5000 -4000 -3000 -2000 -1000 0 Time [yr] CH4conc -8000 -7000 -6000 -5000 -4000 -3000 -2000 -1000 0 Time [yr] W/m 2 JAN FEBDEC MAR AUG NOV OCTSEP JUL CH4

Renssen, Hans

266

A Climatology of the Arctic on Mid-Tropospheric Temperature Regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Arctic is a unique and complex environment. Many factors play a role in determining the long-term climate of the Arctic, including mesoscale weather systems and many complex ice-albedo feedback mechanisms. Previous studies determined using real...

Anthony, Jeremy Patrick

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

267

Reconstruction of the Past and Forecast of the Future European and British Ice Sheets and Associated SeaĖLevel Change†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this project is to improve our understanding of the past European and British ice sheets as a basis for forecasting their future. The behaviour of these ice sheets is investigated by simulating them using a ...

Hagdorn, Magnus K M

268

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

Gutowski, William J.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce independent assessments of the state of polar iceproduce these predictions account for thermal expansion, changes in non-polar glaciers and ice

Adachi, Yosuke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic pack ice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ice pack has... to state with certainty, whether the Antarctic continent is warming or cooling overall. Trends in sea ice... snowmelt over Alaska and eastern Siberia, and ice...

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic ice pack Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ice pack has... to state with certainty, whether the Antarctic continent is warming or cooling overall. Trends in sea ice... snowmelt over Alaska and eastern Siberia, and ice...

272

Amundsen Sea sea-ice variability, atmospheric circulation, and spatial variations in snow isotopic composition from new West Antarctic firn cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent work has documented dramatic changes in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) over the past 30 years (e.g., mass loss, glacier acceleration, surface warming) due largely to the influence of the marine environment. ...

Criscitiello, Alison Sara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Radiocarbon in particulate matter from the eastern sub-arctic Pacific Ocean; evidence of a source of terrestrial carbon to the deep sea.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EASTERN SUB-ARCTIC PACIFIC OCEAN: EVIDENCE OF A SOURCEfrom the deep Northeast Pacific Ocean. Due to the largeMap of the North Pacific Ocean (after Favorite, Dodimead &

Druffel, Ellen R M; Honju, Susumu; Griffin, Sheila; Wong, C S

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Wind, sea ice, inertial oscillations and upper ocean mixing in Marguerite Bay, Western Antarctic Peninsula : observations and modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two years of moored oceanographic and automatic weather station data which span the winter ice seasons of 2001-2003 within Marguerite Bay on the western Antarctic Peninsula (wAP) shelf were collected as part of the Southern ...

Hyatt, Jason

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Autosub missions beneath Polar Ice: Preparation and Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autosub missions beneath Polar Ice: Preparation and Experience Gwyn Griffiths Southampton, May 2004 #12;Autosub Polar Campaigns J 2001 - Krill distribution and sea ice thickness studies in the northern Weddell Sea (Brierley, Fernandes and Brandon). J 2003 - Sea ice thickness, Bellingshausen Sea

Griffiths, Gwyn

276

CO2 isotopes as tracers of firn air diffusion and age in an Arctic ice cap with summer melting, Devon Island, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the effects of summer melting. The 14 CO2 profile from the permeable firn includes the 1963 thermonuclear peak, and accumulation rates were calibrated with the depth of the 1963 thermonuclear 3 H peak. The average ages for CO2 and the ice matrix. Calibrated with the 1963 peak for thermonuclear 14 CO2, a 21.2-year reaction halftime

Chappellaz, J√©r√īme

277

On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Paquita Zuidema, Paul Lawson, Hugh Morrison U of Miami/SPEC, Inc. Boulder CO/NCAR #12;Arctic clouds are often: mixed-phase (ie. both ice + supercooled water) yet long-lasting (despite disequilibrium) #12;why? - are ice nuclei over

Zuidema, Paquita

278

Arctic house  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently available housing in the Arctic is limited to solutions that have been adapted from designs for less severe climates. This thesis has developed a new manner of residential construction designed specifically for ...

Turkel, Joel A. (Joel Abram), 1969-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Use of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to Identify and Characterize Overwintering Areas of Fish in Ice-Covered Arctic RIvers: A Demonstration with Broad Whitefish and their Habitats in the Sagavanirktok River, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In northern climates, locating overwintering fish can be very challenging due to thick ice cover. Areas near the coast of the Beaufort Sea provide valuable overwintering habitat for both resident and anadromous fish species; identifying and understanding their use of overwintering areas is of special interest. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from two spaceborne satellites was examined as an alternative to radiotelemetry for identifying anadromous fish overwintering. The presence of water and ice were sampled at 162 sites and fish were sampled at 16 of these sites. From SAR imagery alone, we successfully identified large pools inhabited by overwintering fish in the ice-covered Sagavanirktok River. In addition, the imagery was able to identify all of the larger pools (mean minimum length of 138m (range 15-470 m; SD=131)) of water located by field sampling. The effectiveness of SAR to identify these pools varied from 31% to 100%, depending on imagery polarization, the incidence angle range, and the orbit. Horizontal transmitĖvertical receive (HV) polarization appeared best. The accuracy of SAR was also assessed at a finer pixel-by-pixel (30-m x30-m) scale. The best correspondence at this finer scale was obtained with an image having HV polarization. The levels of agreement ranged from 54% to 69%. The presence of broad whitefish (the only anadromous species present) was associated with salinity and pool size (estimated with SAR imagery); fish were more likely to be found in larger pools with low salinity. This research illustrates that SAR imaging has great potential for identifying under-ice overwintering areas of riverine fish. These techniques should allow managers to identify critical overwintering areas with relatively more ease and lower cost than traditional techniques.

Brown, Richard S.; Duguay, Claude R.; Mueller, Robert P.; Moulton, Larry; Doucette, Peter J.; Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine sediments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle in Summary: through the Arctic system, with implications for the marine sediment record. Quantitatively, sea... account for a major fraction of the 12;2 Holocene...

283

Characterization of the bi-directional reflectance (BRDF) of sea-ice in response to deposited aerosol for the inter-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aerosol for the inter- calibration and validation of satellite remotes sensing products. Supervisors of large areas of the globe. Remote sensing observations performed in the visible and near infrared (e-ice will be measured in the UV-Vis part of the solar spectrum as a function of zenith and azimuthal angles. The BRDF

Royal Holloway, University of London

284

Dynamics and energetics of the cloudy boundary layer in simulations of off-ice flow in the marginal ice zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kinetic energy even in the present case where very strong surface heat fluxes occur. Ice-phase. Inclusion of the ice phase significantly affected the radiative budget as compared to purely liquid clouds, illustrating the importance of ice-phase­radiative couplings for accurate simulations of arctic clouds

Harrington, Jerry Y.

285

BISICLES Captures Details of Retreating Antarctic Ice  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

suggest that the shrinking West Antarctic ice sheet is contributing to global sea level rise. But until recently, scientists could not accurately model the physical...

286

Ice sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is eroding West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Geophysical Researchand Yungel, J. (2000). Greenland Ice Sheet: High-Elevation2004). The west Antarctic ice sheet and long term climate

Bentley, Charles G.; Thomas, Robert H.; Velicogna, Isabella

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Time-variable gravity observations of ice sheet mass balance: Precision and limitations of the GRACE satellite data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contribution to sea-level rise observed by GRACE withand ice caps to sea level rise, Nature, 482, 514Ė518. King,ice sheets to sea level rise, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 38,

Velicogna, I.; Wahr, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Final Technical Report for Project "Improving the Simulation of Arctic Clouds in CCSM3"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has focused on the simulation of Arctic clouds in CCSM3 and how the modeled cloud amount (and climate) can be improved substantially by altering the parameterized low cloud fraction. The new formula, dubbed 'freeezedry', alleviates the bias of excessive low clouds during polar winter by reducing the cloud amount under very dry conditions. During winter, freezedry decreases the low cloud amount over the coldest regions in high latitudes by over 50% locally and more than 30% averaged across the Arctic (Fig. 1). The cloud reduction causes an Arctic-wide drop of 15 W m{sup -2} in surface cloud radiative forcing (CRF) during winter and about a 50% decrease in mean annual Arctic CRF. Consequently, wintertime surface temperatures fall by up to 4 K on land and 2-8 K over the Arctic Ocean, thus significantly reducing the model's pronounced warm bias (Fig. 1). While improving the polar climate simulation in CCSM3, freezedry has virtually no influence outside of very cold regions (Fig. 2) or during summer (Fig. 3), which are space and time domains that were not targeted. Furthermore, the simplicity of this parameterization allows it to be readily incorporated into other GCMs, many of which also suffer from excessive wintertime polar cloudiness, based on the results from the CMIP3 archive (Vavrus et al., 2008). Freezedry also affects CCSM3's sensitivity to greenhouse forcing. In a transient-CO{sub 2} experiment, the model version with freezedry warms up to 20% less in the North Polar and South Polar regions (1.5 K and 0.5 K smaller warming, respectively) (Fig. 4). Paradoxically, the muted high-latitude response occurs despite a much larger increase in cloud amount with freezedry during non-summer months (when clouds warm the surface), apparently because of the colder modern reference climate. These results of the freezedry parameterization have recently been published (Vavrus and D. Waliser, 2008: An improved parameterization for simulating Arctic cloud amount in the CCSM3 climate model. J. Climate, 21, 5673-5687.). The article also provides a novel synthesis of surface- and satellite-based Arctic cloud observations that show how much the new freezedry parameterization improves the simulated cloud amount in high latitudes (Fig. 3). Freezedry has been incorporated into the CCSM3.5 version, in which it successfully limits the excessive polar clouds, and may be used in CCSM4. Material from this work is also appearing in a synthesis article on future Arctic cloud changes (Vavrus, D. Waliser, J. Francis, and A. Schweiger, 'Simulations of 20th and 21st century Arctic cloud amount in the global climate models assessed in the IPCC AR4', accepted in Climate Dynamics) and was used in a collaborative paper on Arctic cloud-sea ice coupling (Schweiger, A., R. Lindsay, S. Vavrus, and J. Francis, 2008: Relationships between Arctic sea ice and clouds during autumn. J. Climate, 21, 4799-4810.). This research was presented at the 2007 CCSM Annual Workshop, as well as the CCSM's 2007 Atmospheric Model Working Group and Polar Working Group Meetings. The findings were also shown at the 2007 Climate Change Prediction Program's Science Team Meeting. In addition, I served as an instructor at the International Arctic Research Center's (IARC) Summer School on Arctic Climate Modeling in Fairbanks this summer, where I presented on the challenges and techniques used in simulating polar clouds. I also contributed to the development of a new Arctic System Model by attending a workshop in Colorado this summer on this fledgling project. Finally, an outreach activity for the general public has been the development of an interactive web site () that displays Arctic cloud amount in the CMIP3 climate model archive under present and future scenarios. This site allows users to make polar and global maps of a variety of climate variables to investigate the individual and ensemble-mean GCM response to greenhouse warming and the extent to which models adequately represent Arctic clouds in the modern clima

Stephen J. Vavrus

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hydrological and biogeochemical cycling along the Greenland ice sheet margin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global warming has led to a significant increase in Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) melt and runoff since 1990, resulting in escalated export of fresh water and associated sediment to the surrounding North Atlantic and Arctic ...

Bhatia, Maya Pilar, 1979-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Retrieval of Cloud Phase Using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Data during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving climate model predictions over Earth's polar regions requires a comprehensive knowledge of polar cloud microphysics. Over the Arctic, there is minimal contrast between the clouds and background snow surface, making it difficult to detect clouds and retrieve their phase from space. Snow and ice cover, temperature inversions, and the predominance of mixed-phase clouds make it even more difficult to determine cloud phase. Also, since determining cloud phase is the first step toward analyzing cloud optical depth, particle size, and water content, it is vital that the phase be correct in order to obtain accurate microphysical and bulk properties. Changes in these cloud properties will, in turn, affect the Arctic climate since clouds are expected to play a critical role in the sea ice albedo feedback. In this paper, the IR trispectral technique (IRTST) is used as a starting point for a WV and 11-{micro}m brightness temperature (T11) parameterization (WVT11P) of cloud phase using MODIS data. In addition to its ability to detect mixed-phase clouds, the WVT11P also has the capability to identify thin cirrus clouds overlying mixed or liquid phase clouds (multiphase ice). Results from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) MODIS phase model (AMPHM) are compared to the surface-based cloud phase retrievals over the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site and to in-situ data taken from University of North Dakota Citation (CIT) aircraft which flew during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE). It will be shown that the IRTST and WVT11P combined to form the AMPHM can achieve a relative high accuracy of phase discrimination compared to the surface-based retrievals. Since it only uses MODIS WV and IR channels, the AMPHM is robust in the sense that it can be applied to daytime, twilight, and nighttime scenes with no discontinuities in the output phase.

Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, P.; Shupe, M.; Uttal, T.; Poellot, M.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

291

State of the Earth's Cryosphere at the Beginning of the 21st Century: Glaciers, Global Snow Cover, Floating Ice, and Permafrost and Periglacial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Floating Ice, and Permafrost and Periglacial Environments-- FLOATING ICE: SEA ICE By CLAIRE L. PARKINSON., and JANE G. FERRIGNO U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PROFESSIONAL PAPER 1386≠A≠4≠I Sea ice covers vast areas. The extensive cover of sea ice has major impacts on the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and marine

Fleskes, Joe

292

Chinese Journal of Polar Science, Vol. 19, No.2, 218 -229, December 2008 A coupled ice-ocean ecosystem model for I-D and 3-D applica-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chinese Journal of Polar Science, Vol. 19, No.2, 218 - 229, December 2008 A coupled ice and Chukchi Seas is strongly influenced by the annual cycle of sea ice. Here pelagic and sea ice algal ecosystems coexist and interact with each other. Ecosystem modeling of sea ice associated phytoplankton

293

2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 1 -Woodgate What makes the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"? Decreasing Ice cover Local communities subsistence Arctic Shipping Routes? Oil/Gas Exploration Links - follows slopes and ridges - quite weak (strongest flows=eddies) - separates from slopes .. somehow - cools penetration into Arctic except through North Atlantic due to fairly zonal steering and blocking by land masses

Washington at Seattle, University of

294

Moisture budget of the Arctic atmosphere from TOVS satellite data David G. Groves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and radiative heating of the atmosphere. These, in turn, affect surface temperature, ice growth and melt and hemispheric atmospheric processes affect the Arctic Ocean. The lack of humidity data over the Arctic Ocean. Our method yields an average annual net precipitation of 15.1 cm yrņ1 over the polar cap (poleward

Francis, Jennifer

295

U.S. Arctic Research Policy: What do we need to know now?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;11 September 2007 Arctic ice retreat ­ minimum coverage and thickness #12;Carbon dioxide climbs #12;Methane: mitigation, adaptation, Arctic feedbacks, alternative energy, sequestration, Black Carbon Task Force · Involve indigenous communities in decisions · Enhance scientific monitoring and research into local

Kuligowski, Bob

296

Ice in the Environment: Proceedings of the 16th IAHR International Symposium on Ice Dunedin, New Zealand, 2nd6th December 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice in the Environment: Proceedings of the 16th IAHR International Symposium on Ice Dunedin, New OF DETERMINING A GEOPHYSICAL-SCALE SEA ICE RHEOLOGY FROM LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS Daniel Feltham1 and Peter Sammonds2 and Daniel Hatton2 ABSTRACT We present a methodology that allows a sea ice rheology, suitable

Feltham, Daniel

297

The spatial response function of SeaWinds backscatter measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regions are used to produce images of the Earth's land and ice surfaces to support climate studies in a wide variety of studies, including ocean wind retrieval, sea-ice mapping and classification, iceberg are also collected over the land and ice areas of the Earth. SeaWinds measurements over these land and ice

Long, David G.

298

View of NY harbor from the JOIDES Resolution! in an ice-free world (73 m rise)!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Caps:! Melting land ice adds to ocean volume, but not sea ice! IPCC2001! Alpine! #12;Why Is global sea level Is rising today?! .! Melting mountain glaciers/ice caps ("alpine" and! continental ice sheets error: 20-60 cm (does not include ice sheet melting)! http://www.realclimate.org/images/sealevel_1.jpg

299

Global Simulations of Ice nucleation and Ice Supersaturation with an Improved Cloud Scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process-based treatment of ice supersaturation and ice-nucleation is implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The new scheme is designed to allow (1) supersaturation with respect to ice, (2) ice nucleation by aerosol particles and (3) ice cloud cover consistent with ice microphysics. The scheme is implemented with a 4-class 2 moment microphysics code and is used to evaluate ice cloud nucleation mechanisms and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloud occurrence better than previous versions of the model. Simulations indicate heterogeneous freezing and contact nucleation on dust are both potentially important over remote areas of the Arctic. Cloud forcing and hence climate is sensitive to different formulations of the ice microphysics. Arctic radiative fluxes are sensitive to the parameterization of ice clouds. These results indicate that ice clouds are potentially an important part of understanding cloud forcing and potential cloud feedbacks, particularly in the Arctic.

Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Morrison, H.; Park, Sungsu; Conley, Andrew; Klein, Stephen A.; Boyle, James; Mitchell, David; Li, J-L F.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

The historical global sea-level budget J.C. MOORE,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-level contributions from glaciers and small ice caps, the Greenland ice sheet and thermosteric sea level are available unsurveyed high-latitude small glaciers and ice caps. The sea-level budget from 1850 is estimated using because it takes $50 times more energy to raise sea level by ocean heating than by ice melting (Trenberth

Moore, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Good morning, everyone. I'm Martin Jeffries, Principal Editor of the Arctic Report Card and a science advisor to the U.S. Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the University of Virginia, and Dr. Don Perovich of Dartmouth College. They will talk about vegetation and sea to independent peer-review organized by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) of the Arctic Council. Key highlights from the essays are presented on the front page of the Web site, where you'll also

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic peninsula ice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

glacier ice loss following ice shelf July 25, 2011 Summary: of further ice loss and sea level rise likely to result from ongoing changes along the Antarctic Peninsula... glaciers...

303

Using Radar, Lidar and Radiometer Data from NSA and SHEBA to Quantify Cloud Property Effects on the Surface Heat Budget in the Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud and radiation data from two distinctly different Arctic areas are analyzed to study the differences between coastal Alaskan and open Arctic Ocean region clouds and their respective influence on the surface radiation budget. The cloud and radiation datasets were obtained from (1) the DOE North Slope of Alaska (NSA) facility in the coastal town of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) the SHEBA field program, which was conducted from an icebreaker frozen in, and drifting with, the sea-ice for one year in the Western Arctic Ocean. Radar, lidar, radiometer, and sounding measurements from both locations were used to produce annual cycles of cloud occurrence and height, atmospheric temperature and humidity, surface longwave and shortwave broadband fluxes, surface albedo, and cloud radiative forcing. In general, both regions revealed a similar annual trend of cloud occurrence fraction with minimum values in winter (60-75%) and maximum values during spring, summer and fall (80-90%). However, the annual average cloud occurrence fraction for SHEBA (76%) was lower than the 6-year average cloud occurrence at NSA (92%). Both Arctic areas also showed similar annual cycle trends of cloud forcing with clouds warming the surface through most of the year and a period of surface cooling during the summer, when cloud shading effects overwhelm cloud greenhouse effects. The greatest difference between the two regions was observed in the magnitude of the cloud cooling effect (i.e., shortwave cloud forcing), which was significantly stronger at NSA and lasted for a longer period of time than at SHEBA. This is predominantly due to the longer and stronger melt season at NSA (i.e., albedo values that are much lower coupled with Sun angles that are somewhat higher) than the melt season observed over the ice pack at SHEBA. Longwave cloud forcing values were comparable between the two sites indicating a general similarity in cloudiness and atmospheric temperature and humidity structure between the two regions.

Janet Intrieri; Mathhew Shupe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A new synthesis program The Impact of Sea-Ice on Bottom-up and Top-down Controls of Crustacean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute of Ocean Sciences BEST-BSIERP Bering Sea Project bsierp.nprb.org The eastern Bering Sea study region showing the locations of the four long-term biophysical moorings (purple stars), and hydrographic, Deep-Sea Research II Trajectories of three satellite-tracked drifters drogued at 40 m (1990 in green

Rigor, Ignatius G.

305

FESD Proposal, Type I VOICE: Volcano, Ocean, Ice, and Carbon Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in continental ice volume and sea level produce changes in pressure and stress within the crust and mantleFESD Proposal, Type I VOICE: Volcano, Ocean, Ice, and Carbon Experiments Project Manager: Charles during Pleistocene ice ages. We posit that changes in sea level and ice volume drive changes in volcanism

Huybers, Peter

306

Impact of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet interactions on climate sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet interactions on climate sensitivity H. Goelzer ∑ P versions including interactive Greenland and Ant- arctic ice sheet models and model versions with fixed ice a few global climate models exist that include dynami- cally coupled models for the Greenland (e

Goelzer, Heiko

307

Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

severe than feared Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists say The team found that accelerating ice sheet...

308

The Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon sequestration Biological pump a b s t r a c t We present observation based estimatesThe Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n , A.C. Naveira Garabato a , T. Tsubouchi b , S January 2014 Keywords: Arctic Ocean Dissolved inorganic carbon Carbon budget Air­sea carbon dioxide flux

Naveira Garabato, Alberto

309

Sea Level Rise Media Release  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea Level Rise Media Release Coverage Report 07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves 06/11/2009 Rising sea levels could see U.S. Atlantic coast cities make hard choices; Where to let Baltimore Chronicle & Sentinel, The 06/08/2009 Rapid rise in sea levels on East Coast predicted Pittsburgh

Hu, Aixue

310

Sandia National Laboratories: Ice-Sheet Simulation Code Matures...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Antarctic Ice Sheets, with particular attention to their contributions to global sea-level rise. Our recent highlight is the successful completion of a controlled mesh...

311

Carbon dynamics in arctic vegetation†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the Arctic land surface and the global climate system. A large amount of organic carbon (C) is currently stored in Arctic soils; if ...

Street, Lorna Elizabeth

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

312

Bedmap2: improved ice bed, surface and thickness datasets for Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Potential Sea-Level Rise from a Col- lapse of theof floating ice and sea level rise, Geophys. Res. Lett. ,contribution to sea-level rise (58 m) are simi- lar to those

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Eddy-resolving simulations of the Fimbul Ice Shelf cavity circulation: Basal melting and exchange with open ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that govern the heat supply to ice shelves in the Eastern Weddell Sea. The simulations confirm the low melt

Lilly, Jonathan

314

Ice Classification in the Southern Ocean Using ERS-1 Scatterometer David S.Early, David G. Long  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Classification in the Southern Ocean Using ERS-1 Scatterometer Data David S.Early, David G for classifying Southern Ocean sea ice from enhanced resolution ERS-1 scat- terometer images is presented of a measure of the anisotropy, is used to further help delineate sea ice types. Ice 'l'ype Backscatter feange

Long, David G.

315

Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 Ķm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 Ķm), known as the ďsmall modeĒ. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 Ķm wavelength relative to 11 Ķm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 Ķm. This makes the 12/11 Ķm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 Ķm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ice sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mitigates recent sea-level rise. Science, 308, 1898-1901J. (2004). Accelerated sea-level rise from West Antarctica.and contributions to sea-level rise: 1992-2002. Journal of

Bentley, Charles G.; Thomas, Robert H.; Velicogna, Isabella

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Effects of simulated natural variability on Arctic temperature projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- sea ice-ocean model is used to examine the effects of natural variability on climate projections starting from different strengths and phases of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and cryosphere give rise to a variety of climate feedbacks as such as ice- albedo and cloud feedbacks. The direct

Drange, Helge

318

THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO GLOBAL SEA-LEVEL CHANGE Conor Mc three major sources, the Greenland ice sheet, Antarctica, and other eustatic components. Each has its own predictable spatial signal, and particular attention was paid to the Greenland ice sheet, given

319

20th-Century Industrial Black Carbon Emissions Altered Arctic Climate Forcing Joseph R. McConnell,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in ice cores indicate that sources and concentrations of BC in Greenland precipitation varied greatly, industrial emissions resulted in a seven-fold increase in ice core BC concentrations with most change to 1910, estimated surface climate forcing in early summer from BC in Arctic snow was about 3 W m­2

Saltzman, Eric

320

Arctic energy resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is a vulnerable region with immense resources. These range from the replenishable (tidal energy, hydroelectricity, wood, biomass, fish, game, and geothermal energy) to the non-replenishable (coal, minerals, natural gas, hydrocarbon deposits). But the problems of exploiting such resources without damaging the environment of the Arctic are formidable. In this book all aspects are considered: occurrence of energy resources; the technological and economic aspects of exploration and exploitation; the environmental and social impact of technological development.

Rey, L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The ice flow behavior in the neighborhood of the grounding line. Non-Newtonian case.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ice flow behavior in the neighborhood of the grounding line. Non-Newtonian case. Marco A line dynamics. The grounding line is the line where tran- sition between ice attached to the solid ground and ice floating over the sea takes place. We analyze a mathematical model describing the ice flow

Fontelos, Marco

322

aging north sea: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 117 Usage of videomosaic for computed aided...

323

The Role of Snow and Ice in the Climate System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global snow and ice cover (the 'cryosphere') plays a major role in global climate and hydrology through a range of complex interactions and feedbacks, the best known of which is the ice - albedo feedback. Snow and ice cover undergo marked seasonal and long term changes in extent and thickness. The perennial elements - the major ice sheets and permafrost - play a role in present-day regional and local climate and hydrology, but the large seasonal variations in snow cover and sea ice are of importance on continental to hemispheric scales. The characteristics of these variations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, and evidence for recent trends in snow and ice extent are discussed.

Barry, Roger (NSIDC) [NSIDC

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

324

Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

6, 96559722, 2006 Arctic smoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussions Arctic smoke ­ record high air pollution levels in the European Arctic due to agricultural fires into the European Arctic and caused the most severe air pollution episodes ever recorded there. This paper confirms that biomass burning (BB) was in-5 deed the source of the observed air pollution, studies the transport

Boyer, Edmond

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctica larsen ice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... Source: Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 17 Climate scenarios of sea level rise for northwestern Europe Summary: of the Larsen B ice shelf lubrication...

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic ice shelf Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County... of further ice loss and sea level rise likely to ... Source: Cambridge, University of - Department of Applied...

328

An update on land-ice modeling in the CESM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass loss from land ice, including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets as well as smaller glacier and ice caps, is making a large and growing contribution to global sea-level rise. Land ice is only beginning to be incorporated in climate models. The goal of the Land Ice Working Group (LIWG) is to develop improved land-ice models and incorporate them in CESM, in order to provide useful, physically-based sea-level predictions. LJWG efforts to date have led to the inclusion of a dynamic ice-sheet model (the Glimmer Community Ice Sheet Model, or Glimmer-CISM) in the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which was released in June 2010. CESM also includes a new surface-mass-balance scheme for ice sheets in the Community Land Model. Initial modeling efforts are focused on the Greenland ice sheet. Preliminary results are promising. In particular, the simulated surface mass balance for Greenland is in good agreement with observations and regional model results. The current model, however, has significant limitations: The land-ice coupling is one-way; we are using a serial version of Glimmer-CISM with the shallow-ice approximation; and there is no ice-ocean coupling. During the next year we plan to implement two-way coupling (including ice-ocean coupling with a dynamic Antarctic ice sheet) with a parallel , higher-order version of Glimmer-CISM. We will also add parameterizations of small glaciers and ice caps. With these model improvements, CESM will be able to simulate all the major contributors to 21st century global sea-level rise. Results of the first round of simulations should be available in time to be included in the Fifth Assessment Report (ARS) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Lipscomb, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

Contemporary Sea Level Rise Anny Cazenave and William Llovel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contemporary Sea Level Rise Anny Cazenave and William Llovel Laboratoire d'¬īetudes en g reserved 1941-1405/10/0115-0145$20.00 Key Words sea level rise, climate change, land ice melt, ocean we report on most recent results on contemporary sea level rise. We first present sea level

Siegel, David A.

330

Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterizationIntercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud

Zuidema, Paquita

331

High Resolution Wind Retrieval from SeaWinds David G. Long  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proven useful in a variety of land and ice applications and are being operationally used for sea ice monitoring and iceberg tracking. SeaWinds land and ice appli- cations have been aided by the use- surement response, is exploited by reconstruction and resolu- tion enhancement algorithms to produce

Long, David G.

332

Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

View of NY harbor from the JOIDES Resolution in an ice-free world (73 m rise)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

less dense global 20th century warming ~0.6įC 1.6 mm/yr sea-level rise Melting Glaciers & Ice Caps? Melting Mountain Glaciers and Ice Caps: Alpine glaciers 0.6 mm/yr Greenland Ice Cap IPCC2001: near 0-80 cm IPPC 2007 error: 20-60 cm (does not include ice sheet melting) http

334

High-Resolution Monitoring of Internal Layers Over the Greenland Ice Sheet P. Kanagaratnam, S.P. Gogineni  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Resolution Monitoring of Internal Layers Over the Greenland Ice Sheet P. Kanagaratnam, S ice plays an important role in the rise of the Earth's sea level. A key variable in assessing the mass balance of an ice sheet is accumulation rate, which is currently determined from ice cores and pits

Kansas, University of

335

ACSD/CRB/CCRM Hindcasting Winds and Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND WAVE REANALYSIS OBJECTIVEOBJECTIVE To produce aTo produce a high qualityhigh quality ·· Ice concentration dataIce concentration data ­­ Walsh and Johnson, ArcticWalsh and Johnson, Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice Data, US Navy/NOAA Iceand Antarctic Sea Ice Data, US Navy/NOAA Ice CenterCenter #12;5 ACSD

336

Fundamental problems of modeling the dynamics of internal gravity waves with applications to the Arctic Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we consider fundamental problems of the dynamics of internal gravity waves. We present analytical and numerical algorithms for calculating the wave fields for a set of values of the parameters, as observed in the ocean. We show that our mathematical models can describe the wave dynamics of the Arctic Basin, taking into account the actual physical characteristics of sea water, topography of its floor, etc. The numerical and analytical results show that the internal gravity waves have a significant effect on underwater sea objects in the Arctic Basin.

Vitaly V. Bulatov; Yuriy V. Vladimirov

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

337

07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves of Climate Refugees Treehugger 06/30/2009 MELTING GREENLAND ICE SHEETS MAY THREATEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/30/2009 MELTING GREENLAND ICE SHEETS MAY THREATEN NORTHEAST U.S., CANADA Federal News Service 06/30/2009 Sea raises spectre of displaced humanity peopleandplanet.net 06/16/2009 Melting Greenland Ice Sheets May Report - Online 06/02/2009 Melting Greenland Ice Sheets May Threaten Northeast, Canada usagnet 06

Hu, Aixue

338

Probabilistic calibration of a Greenland Ice Sheet model using spatially-resolved synthetic observations: toward projections of ice mass loss with uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Probabilistic calibration of a Greenland Ice Sheet model using spatially-resolved synthetic on how well the model reproduces the Greenland Ice Sheet profile. We improve on the previous state et al., 2012). Here, we focus on the Greenland Ice Sheet component of future sea level rise

Haran, Murali

339

Ecological Implications of Changes in the Arctic Cryosphere Warwick F. Vincent, Terry V. Callaghan, Dorthe Dahl-Jensen,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecosystems, from mountain glaciers and ice caps to tundra, inland waters, and icy seas. Many an overview of how climate-dependent alterations in snow, water, ice, and permafrost are affecting be compounded by a shift toward increasingly frequent episodes of winter rain and melting that cause surface ice

Vincent, Warwick F.

340

Development of a Seismic Snow Streamer and Use of Multi-Offset Reflection for Determining Glacier Ice Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glaciers and ice sheets are important to climate research due to their role in controlling worldwide weather and temperature patterns as well as their potential impact in sea level rise. Because of this, scientists are attempting to model large ice...

Velez Gonzalez, Jose Antonio

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Granular flow in the marginal ice zone BY DANIEL L. FELTHAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the balance equation of fluctuation kinetic energy. The steady solution of these equations is found to leading in determining the dynamics of the MIZ. Here, sea ice is treated as a granular material with a composite rheology. A simplified model of the MIZ is introduced consisting of the along and across momentum balance of the sea ice

Feltham, Daniel

343

Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea" Iced Yerba Mate Latte Iced Chai Tea Latte Original, Green Tea Canned Soda Xing Tea Bottled Water Arizona Teas Energy Drinks Red Bull, SF Red Bull & Bing Jones Sodas $0 Cafe au Lait Hot Tea Yerba Mate "Tea" Yerba Mate Latte Chai Tea Latte - Original, Green Tea, or Sugar

344

E-Print Network 3.0 - albedo image improves Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of multiyear Arctic sea ice D. K. Perovich Engineer Research... 2002. 1 As part of ice albedo feedback studies during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean Source:...

345

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic region baltic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

investigate the water cycle and the heat balance in GCM and regional... of a 3D-coupled ice- ocean model for the Baltic Sea and ... Source: Ds, Kristofer - Department of...

346

Orbital and CO2 forcing of late Paleozoic continental ice sheets Daniel E. Horton,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) produce large changes in late Paleozoic ice volume ($1.3 √? 108 km3 ) and sea level ($20 to 245 m). Between cold summer orbit, but still produces significant ice volumes ($8¬≠12 √? 107 km3 ). Our results highlightOrbital and CO2 forcing of late Paleozoic continental ice sheets Daniel E. Horton,1 Christopher J

Poulsen, Chris J.

347

Modelling West Antarctic ice sheet growth and collapse through the past five million years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, isolated ice caps on West Antarctic islands. Transitions between glacial, intermediate and collapsed states temperature and specified sea level. A new parameterization of sub- ice-shelf ocean melt based on modernLETTERS Modelling West Antarctic ice sheet growth and collapse through the past five million years

348

Is the Relationship between Great Lakes Ice Cover and Climate Patterns Statistically Significant?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is the Relationship between Great Lakes Ice Cover and Climate Patterns Statistically Significant) - NOAA GLERL Overview This work is based on previous projects titled "Great Lakes Ice Cycle" conducted and climate GCM products along with historical sea ice observations including recent satellite measurements

349

West antarctic ice sheet collapse: Chimera or clear danger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specter of a west antarctic collapse has been with us for 25 years. Recently, certain official assessments concerned primarily with the future response to projected global warming have concluded that Antarctica will not cause much sea-level rise within the planning horizon of a century or so. At the same time startling new results on ice sheet (in)stability have been emerging, pointing to less stability then previously believed. Some recent results are reviewed briefly: Heinrich layers in the North Atlantic show basally lubricated surges of the Laurentide ice sheet; the west antarctic ice sheet collapsed recently; the modern west antarctic ice sheet is changing rapidly locally; the bed of ice stream B is exceptionally well lubricated by water and water-saturated soft sediments; the modern ice sheet is thinning slowly on average; a model west antarctic ice sheet undergoes rapid collapses long after forcing and probably related to penetration of warmth to the bed. 23 refs.

Alley, R.B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)); MacAyeal, D.R. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

E-Print Network 3.0 - anoxic baltic sea Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Baltic Sea Research Warnemunde (IOW), Seestrasse 15, D-18119 Warnemunde, Germany... . Dippner, S. Hille et al. Ice Age), the environmental conditions of the central...

351

U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.

Donald Gautier; Timothy Klett

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Temperature and precipitation history of the Arctic G.H. Miller a,*, J. Brigham-Grette b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswich, NJ 08901, USA q Cooperative Institute. During the penultimate interglaciation, w130 to w120 ka ago, solar energy in summer in the Arctic ice sheets had melted by 6 ka ago. Solar energy reached a summer maximum (9% higher than at present) w

Robock, Alan

353

Effect of the potential melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the Meridional Overturning Circulation and global climate in the future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of the potential melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the Meridional Overturning February 2011 Keywords: Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Sea level Greenland Ice Sheet Global of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the mid-1990s. This increased ice sheet mass loss might be an evidence of global

Han, Weiqing

354

15 SEPTEMBER 2004 3623B I T Z A N D R O E 2004 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that trends in the atmosphere or ice circulation are not necessary to produce a relatively high rate for the High Rate of Sea Ice Thinning in the Arctic Ocean C. M. BITZ Polar Science Center, University of sea ice draft show that the ice has thinned in some parts of the Arctic Ocean at a remarkably high

Bitz, Cecilia

355

Sandia National Laboratories: observed sea ice loss  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine bladelifetime ismobile testnationalnuclear reactor designobserved

356

Sandia National Laboratories: sea ice characteristics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbineredox-active perovskiteremoving thereversetunneling microscopyice

357

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean Communities of WesternVail GlobalPROGRAM MISSIONScienceOcean and

358

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe MolecularPlaceThe publicationmixed-phase

359

Red Sea during the Last Glacial Maximum: Implications for sea level reconstruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Gildor,1 and W. R. Peltier2 Received 13 February 2007; revised 29 July 2007; accepted 30 October 2007 based on the ICE-5G (VM2) model. Citation: Biton, E., H. Gildor, and W. R. Peltier (2008), Red Sea sea level reduction for the LGM interval range between approximately 120 m [Peltier, 2004, 2002

Peltier, W. Richard

360

"A Tour of the Cryosphere 2009" Though cold and often remote, the icy reaches of the Arctic, Antarctic, and other frozen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These currents influence climate worldwide. Most ice exists in the cold polar regions, but we see glaciers like"A Tour of the Cryosphere 2009" Transcript Though cold and often remote, the icy reaches. Offshore, sea ice forms when the surface of the ocean freezes, pushing salt out of the ice. The cold salty

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PALeo-constraints on SEA-level rise (PALSEA) -a PAGES/IMAGES working group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PALeo-constraints on SEA-level rise (PALSEA) - a PAGES/IMAGES working group Coordinators: Mark for the reduction in ice sheets and subsequent rise in sea level over the next century are highly uncertain rise. Interglacial sea levels constrain the global sensitivity of sea-level to radiative forcing. Well

Siddall, Mark

362

Modeling Wind-Driven Circulation and Landfast Ice-Edge Processes during Polynya Events in Northern Baffin Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attached to the ice edge that is generated during strong northerly wind events. Primary production heat polynyas. In the former case, sea ice is continuously advected by winds and/or currents away fromModeling Wind-Driven Circulation and Landfast Ice-Edge Processes during Polynya Events in Northern

363

www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 302 14 NOVEMBER 2003 1111 Algal Clues to Antarctic Ice Shelf Ages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Perspective by Wolff) present an ice core record of methanesulfonic acid, a species produced by algae livingwww.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 302 14 NOVEMBER 2003 1111 Algal Clues to Antarctic Ice Shelf Ages The naturally high variability of sea ice extent in Antarctica and the short duration of instrumental records

Nori, Franco

364

Canada's Arctic Gateway: Discussion Paper Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Canada's Arctic Gateway: Discussion Paper Summary September 2010 The following summarizes key Canada's Arctic Gateway a reality in terms of both national public policy and international presence the Government of Canada's national gateway policy framework. This discussion paper's use of the term "Arctic

Martin, Jeff

365

Deep-Sea Research I 52 (2005) 519542 Davis Strait volume, freshwater and heat fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle is a complex combination of land runoff, precipitation, ice freezing≠melting and input of salty that the freshwater flux coming out of Baffin Bay asso- ciated with the sea ice melting in that area repre- sents 70 to the melting of ice drifting with the shelf Labrador Current (Khatiwala et al., 2002). Hud- son Bay runoff

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

Turner, David D.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 11 JULY 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO901 Patterns of Indian Ocean sea-level change in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

continental ice1 . However, sea-level rise is not globally uniform1­5 . Regional sea levels can be affected Ocean sea level with climate-model simulations, to identify a distinct spatial pattern of sea-level rise on some coasts and islands in the Indian Ocean. Global mean sea-level rise since the 1950s has been

Fasullo, John

368

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorption scale ice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

99, NO. C12, PAGES 25,281-25,294, DECEMBER 15, 1994 The effect of sea ice on the solar energy budget in the Summary: in the solar energy absorption and partitioning in the entire...

369

Investigation of coastal dynamics of the Antarctic Ice Sheet using sequential Radarsat SAR images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increasing human activities have brought about a global warming trend, and cause global sea level rise. Investigations of variations in coastal margins of Antarctica and in the glacial dynamics of the Antarctic Ice Sheet provide useful diagnostic...

Tang, Sheng-Jung

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

A wavebased model for the marginal ice zone including a floe breaking parameterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,2 A. Kohout,3 and L. Bertino1 Received 1 October 2010; revised 10 December 2010; accepted 29 December implementation into twodimensional sea ice models in mind. Citation: Dumont, D., A. Kohout, and L. Bertino (2011

371

Explorations of AtmosphereĖOceanĖIce Climates on an Aquaplanet and Their Meridional Energy Transports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The degree to which total meridional heat transport is sensitive to the details of its atmospheric and oceanic components is explored. A coupled atmosphere, ocean, and sea ice model of an aquaplanet is employed to simulate ...

Marshall, John C.

372

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harris, Taryl L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

374

Using ice cores from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, scientists have been able to study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using ice cores from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, scientists have been able to study ice's ice sheets. Ice sheets are huge areas of permanent ice. There are only three ice sheets on Earth: the Greenland Ice Sheet, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, and the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Greenland Ice Sheet

375

Information fusion for estimation of summer MIZ ice concentration from SAR imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we define the concept of information fusion and show how we used it to estimate summer sea ice concentration in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) from single-channel SAR satellite imagery, We used data about melt stage, wind speed...

Haverkamp, Donna S.; Tsatsoulis, Costas

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Dear Author: Your proofs are presented in a new design for all AGU journal articles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario John C. Moore1 , Annette Rinke1

Moore, John

377

E-Print Network 3.0 - astro-venture atmospheric sciences Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2005. Provided images and input for web site for 5... in wintertime Arctic sea ice. Advisor: Jody W. Deming Masters of Science, Oceanography ... Source: Washington at Seattle,...

378

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 777787, 2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/10/777/2010/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- appearance of the Arctic ice cap during the sunlit period of the year would radically reduce the local albedo absorbed solar flux on sea-ice extent and cloud amount was assessed. Although sea ice and cloud affect sea-ice melt occurring possibly earlier this century (Stroeve et al., 2008). September 2008 was marked

Meskhidze, Nicholas

379

The sea-level conundrum: case studies from palaeo-archives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level; climate change; ice sheets. Background The eustatic sea-level (ESL) rise predicted for the 21st., 2005). IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) projections of 21st-century sea-level rise included attempted to predict sea-level rise over the 21st century using a simple response model which assumes

Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.

380

arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ice-ocean boundary conditions for coupled models Gavin A. Schmidt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that must be simulated in any comprehensive earth system model incorporating ocean, atmosphere, sea ice different groups (a central fo- cus in the ongoing PRogramme for Integrated earth System Modelling (PRISM) and Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) projects). This paper addresses developments in coupling at sea

Bitz, Cecilia

382

Mobile Ice Nucleus Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This first year report presents results from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to assess the flow and temperature profiles within the mobile ice nucleus spectrometer.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Kok, G. L.

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

383

Ice Drilling Gallonmilkjugs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Drilling Materials · Gallonmilkjugs · Syringes,largeand small · Pitchers · Spraybottles · 13x9? ·Isitbettertosquirtthewaterslowlyorasquicklyaspossible? ·Doestherateatwhichyousquirtthewaterchangethediameteroftheholes? ·Doesthetypeof`drill

Saffman, Mark

384

Morphology and distribution of the Acanthoecidae (Choanoflagellata) from the Weddell Sea during the austral summer, 1977  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and salinity of the stations occupied during the Weddell Sea Biocruise, Feb. -Mar. , 1977. ~ . . . ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ Page Table 2. Distribution of Acanthoecidae from the Weddell Sea Biocruise, Feb. -Mar. , 1977. (I) denotes ice. 12 LIST OF FIGURES I"igure 1.... Morphology of Acanthoecidae. ~Pa e 1'igure 2 Cruise track and pack ice limits of the Veddell Sea Biocruiset Feb. -Mar. , 1977. Dashed line represents the pack ice limit and the solid line represents the cruise track. Pig 3. D~th 1 1 1 t 14 Figure 4...

Buck, Kurt Randall

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to improve representation of the Arctic in Earth System Models Topography influences snow cover, thermal

386

Reionization on ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The case for substantial far infrared ice emission in local ultraluminous infrared galaxies, expected based on the presence of mid-infrared ice absorption in their spectra and the known far infrared optical properties of ice, is still largely unsupported by direct observation owing to insufficient far infrared spectral coverage. Some marginal supportive evidence is presented here. A clear consequence of far infrared ice emission is the need to extend the range of redshifts considered for submillimeter sources. This is demonstrated via the example of HDF 850.1. The solid phase of the ISM during reionization may be dominated by ice, and this could lead to the presence of reionization sources in submillimeter source catalogs. Submillimeter sources not detected at 24 micron in the GOODS-N field are examined. Two candidate reionization sources are identified at 3.6 micron through possible Gunn-Peterson saturation in the Z band.

C. C. Dudley; M. Imanishi; P. R. Maloney

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Earth'sFuture Sea level rise and its coastal impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth'sFuture Sea level rise and its coastal impacts Anny Cazenave1 and Gonéri Le Cozannet2 1LEGOS and land ice melt in turn are causing sea level to rise. Sea level rise and its impacts on coastal zones and public. In this review paper, we summarize the most up-to-date knowledge about sea level rise and its

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

388

Sea-Level and Climate Change: Should I Sell My Shore House? Kenneth G. Miller,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sea-level rise and land subsidence (sinking). We conclude the following: - The rate of global sea-level. - Global sea-level is predicted to rise by >80 cm (2.6 ft) by 2100 due to thermal expansion of seawater and melting of ice sheets. - Sea-level rise on the U.S. East Coast will exceed 1 m (~3 ft) by 2100 due

389

Arctic Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300AlgoilEnergy InformationArcata, California: EnergyArco EnergyArctic Solar

390

ARM - Arctic Meetings of Interest  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |NovemberARMContactsARM Engineering andPlansAmountResearchArctic

391

Very ice rich permafrost Moderately ice rich permafrost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TK lake Very ice rich permafrost Permafrost forest Moderately ice rich permafrost Open Bog Open Fen characteristics (mainly ice content) and burn severity determine trajectories of ecosystem succession post in the presence of moderately ice rich permafrost but have high resilience only under low burn severity in very

Ruess, Roger W.

392

Ice Cream with a Heart Create a new Clemson Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Cream with a Heart Contest! Create a new Clemson Ice Cream flavor! Raise money for your favorite charity! Win a free Clemson Ice Cream party for your organization! Enter at www organizations. The contest is called Ice Cream with a Heart and its purpose is to help student organizations

Duchowski, Andrew T.

393

LES Simulations of Roll Clouds Observed During Mixed- Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roll clouds, and associated roll convection, are fairly common features of the atmospheric boundary layer. While these organized cumuliform clouds are found over many regions of the planet, they are quite ubiquitous near the edge of the polar ice sheets. In particular, during periods of off-ice flow, when cold polar air flows from the ice pack over the relatively warm ocean water, strong boundary layer convection develops along with frequent rolls. According to Bruemmer and Pohlman (2000), most of the total cloud cover in the Arctic is due to roll clouds. In an effort to examine the influences of mixed-phase microphysics on the boundary layer evolution of roll clouds during off-ice flow, Olsson and Harrington (2000) used a 2D mesoscale model coupled to a bulk microphysical scheme (see Section 2). Their results showed that mixed-phase clouds produced more shallow boundary layers with weaker turbulence than liquid-phase cases. Furthermore, their results showed that because of th e reduced turbulent drag on the atmosphere in the mixed-phase case, regions of mesoscale divergence in the marginal ice-zone were significantly affected. A follow-up 2D study (Harrington and Olsson 2001) showed that the reduced turbulent intensity in mixed-phase cases was due to precipitation. Ice precipitation caused downdraft stabilization which fed back and caused a reduction in the surface heat fluxes. In this work, we extend the work of Olsson and Harrington (2000) and Harrington and Olsson (2001) by examining the impacts of ice microphysics on roll convection. We will present results that illustrate how microphysics alters roll cloud structure and dynamics.

Greenberg, S.D.; Harrington, J.Y.; Prenni, A.; DeMott, P.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

394

Did changes in the Subpolar North Atlantic trigger the recent mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Did changes in the Subpolar North Atlantic trigger the recent mass loss from the Greenland Ice) Leigh A. Stearns (University of Kansas) The Greenland Ice Sheet's (GIS) contribution to sea level rise and nearly-simultaneous acceleration of several outlet glaciers in Greenland's western and southeastern

Straneo, Fiamma

395

corded in ice cores is not steady; instead it comes in a series of pulses-just what you  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

corded in ice cores is not steady; instead it comes in a series of pulses-just what you would depths of between 500 and 700 meters-just where the ice-age drop in sea level might have decomposed How Many Genes Had to Change to Produce Corn? Recent molecular data suggest that mutations in as few

Doebley, John

396

Springtime Arctic haze contributions of submicron organic particles from European and Asian combustion sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The composition of Arctic aerosol, especially during the springtime Arctic haze, may play an important role in the radiative balance of the Arctic. The contribution of organic components to Arctic haze has only recently ...

Kroll, Jesse

397

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic environmental change Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring (Roshydomet) and, Arctic... Ocean Currents in the Arctic Basin International ... Source: Washington at Seattle,...

398

G. Arfeuille L. A. Mysak L.-B. Tremblay Simulation of the interannual variability of the wind-driven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Reanalysis data is used to produce the year-to- year variations in the sea-ice circulation and thickness. We-driven Arctic sea-ice cover during 1958¬Ī1998 Received: 27 January 1999 / Accepted: 8 July 1999 Abstract A thermodynamic-dynamic sea-ice model based on a granular material rheology developed by Tremblay and Mysak

399

DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF ICE Alexe BOSAK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ic 28o halo observed at least 7 times since 1629 octahedral particles of ice Ic! #12;Cooling downDIFFRACTION STUDIES OF ICE Alexe√Į BOSAK European Synchrotron Radiation Facility #12;Ice as the mild threat ice Ih the only ice in the crust #12;Ice as the absolute weapon Ice IX : melting point 45.8¬įC

Titov, Anatoly

400

Global ice sheet modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

JOURNAL OF QUATERNARY SCIENCE (2001) 16(8) 773777 Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Baltic seas. A sudden outburst of the lakes' water to the Arctic Ocean when the ice sheet thinned to 110 m in the north, reflecting a larger glacio-isostatic depression near the ice margin than farther

Jakobsson, Martin

402

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the University of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusionsub-freezing conditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusionstrategies exist to prevent ice formation, there is little

Dursch, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

ICE Raids: Compounding Production, Contradiction, and Capitalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

America: Factories and ICE Raids Produce Citizens Americansubjects. ICE raids (re)produce workersí contradictoryfactories and ICE raids have come to produce immigrant

Reas, Elizabeth I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Woodgate, Arctic Ocean Circulation Page 1:13 February 2012 ARCTIC OCEAN CIRCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deep) Bering Strait, through which about 0.8Sv (1Sv=106 m3 s-1 ) of water enters the Arctic. Properties: 206-221-3268 Accepted for Nature Education Knowledge Project, May 2012 Welcome to the Arctic Ocean Circle, contains deep (~ 4500m) basins, the slowest spreading ridges in the world, and about 15

Washington at Seattle, University of

405

Coherent radar ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed two 150-MHz coherent radar depth sounders for ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet. We developed one of these using connectorized components and the other using radio frequency integrated circuits (RFICs). Both...

Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Braaten, David A.; Leuschen, C.; Legarsky, J.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Stiles, J.; Allen, C.; Jezek, K.; Akins, T.

2001-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

406

Self-Organized Criticality as a Method of Procedural Modeling Computer Graphics Lab, David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science, University of Waterloo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulate the melting of the polar ice cap in a plausible way. I have used the following parameters in 1982. Simulation of ice cap melting. Polar ice cap in 2008. [1] H. Ahlenius. Arctic Sea Ice Minimum on the sampling density of the graph). POLAR ICE CAP The extended SOC-based procedural modeling method can

Waterloo, University of

407

Tuktoyaktuk : responsive strategies for a new Arctic urbanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Canadian Arctic is facing a set of compounding crises that will drastically impact the future of its coastal frontier. At a time when climate change is having a detrimental impact on the Arctic landscape, Northern ...

Ritchot, Pamela (Pamela Rae)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Anthropogenic Impacts on Polar Bear Biology and the Arctic Ecosystem.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite its relative distance from most populated regions of the world, the Arctic has been significantly impacted by anthropogenic contamination and climate change. The entire Arctic ecosystem has been affected, with upper trophic level predators...

Jordan, John E.

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

arctic ocean experiment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

410

NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

411

MEAT, POULTRY, Still contains ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEAT, POULTRY, SEAFOOD Still contains ice crystals and feels as cold, there will be some texture and Clavor loss. Discard DAIRY Still contains ice crystals and feels Ice cream, frozen yogurt Discard Discard Cheese (soft and semi-soft) Refreeze. May

Liskiewicz, Maciej

412

Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in the marginal seas of Siberia: implications for the fate and removal of pollutants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the estimation of the residence time of river water entering the Kara Sea. The model-derived scavenging parameters for 114 Th and "OPb clearly indicate particle concentrations, influenced by resuspension, ice melt, and continental runoff, primarily control...

Schwantes, Jon Michael

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 24, NO.12, PAGES 1503-1506, JUNE 15, 1997 Spatial variations in the rate of sea level rise caused by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the rate of sea level rise caused by the present-day melting of glaciers and ice sheets Clinton P. Conrad. Becausemostlong duration tide gaugesarein.the northernhemisphere,if the sources of sea level rise are unbalanced between the two hemispheres,estimates of global sea level rise could be in error by 10 to 20%. Individual

Conrad, Clint

414

ice | proceedings Forensic Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice | proceedings Forensic Engineering Volume 165 Issue FE4 November 2012 Forensic Engineering or economic damage. Research and practice papers are sought on traditional or modern forensic engineering, design and construction. Topics covered also include research and education best practice in forensic

Mottram, Toby

415

Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN) concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel studies of the cloud phase parameter space. Large sensitivity to the IN/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterization in models.

Morrison, H.; Zuidema, Paquita; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Luo, Yali; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shipway, Ben

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

416

Hail ice impact on composite structures at glancing angles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigation of high velocity ice impacts on woven carbon/and ice sphere. .by trailing ice fragments. ..

Funai, Sho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

418

Sea Mammals:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawandaUniversity21PreparedRffiS.-Sea

419

Formation of high density amorphous ice by decompression of ice VII and ice VIII at 135 K  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ice Ih and are found to have very similar structures. By cooling liquid water along the water trans- forms into ice VIII when cooled . With this in mind Klug et al. were able to produce low densityFormation of high density amorphous ice by decompression of ice VII and ice VIII at 135 K Carl Mc

McBride, Carl

420

3 Alpine and Arctic Soil Microbial Communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-free ecosystems is presently expanding rapidly as a result of glacier and ice cap melting due to global warming receiving recent atten- tion because they are in watersheds that are the source of water (from snow and ice melt) for a large proportion of the world's population, especially in areas downstream from the Andes

Colorado at Boulder, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hidden force floating ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because of the segmental specific-heat disparity of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) and the Coulomb repulsion between oxygen ions, cooling elongates the O:H-O bond at freezing by stretching its containing angle and shortening the H-O bond with an association of larger O:H elongation, which makes ice less dense than water, allowing it to float.

Chang Q. Sun

2015-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

422

Ice Storm Supercomputer  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

"A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

423

Greenland Ice Sheet Retreat Since the Little Ice Age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and I. Willis (2012), Greenland's shrinking ice cover: "fastfluctuations in southeast Greenland, Nat. Geosci. , 5(6),T. Decker (2011), Analysis of Greenland marine- terminating

Beitch, Marci Jillian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Physical Controls on Ice Variability in the Bering Sea /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the ocean, which includes solar radiation ab- sorbedwith solar radiation absorbed by the ocean (Bitz et al. ,winter ocean heat flux, (e) winter net longwave radiation, (

Li, Linghan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Monitoring Arc+c Sea Ice Data product development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ng, New Orleans, LA 22-27 Feb 2012 #12;Photo courtesy of J. Overland, from Overland Records from Environmental Satellites, 2004 ≠ At least 30 years ≠ Thorough inter-sensor

Colorado at Boulder, University of

426

ARM - What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmr

427

Fiery Ice From the Seas The First Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Submitted by: Hawai`i Natural Energy Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy to support the event. Additional funds were

428

Engineering Notes Ice Shape Characterization Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Notes Ice Shape Characterization Using Self-Organizing Maps Stephen T. McClain Baylor. Introduction DURING the validation and verification of ice accretion codes, predicted ice shapes must be compared with experimental measurements of wind-tunnel or atmospheric ice shapes. Current methods for ice

Tino, Peter

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic wind technology Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

arctic wind technology Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic wind technology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NOAA's Arctic VisiON &...

430

APPLICATION OF CARBOHYDRATES AND PHENOLS AS BIOMARKERS TO STUDY DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER RESERVOIRS IN ARCTIC RIVERS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic rivers are the dominant pathways for the transport of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon to the Arctic Ocean, but knowledge of sources, transformations and transfer of organic carbon and nitrogen in Arctic river watersheds is extremely...

McMahon, Rachel

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

431

The effect of freezing on the sulfate-chloride and density-chloride ratios of sea-water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the sulphate-chloride ratio would be expected to have a corresponi- ingly larger effect, on density than would one of the less abundant iona. CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW Evidence for Sulphate Enricl ment in Ice The sulphate-chloride ratio was studied... as early as 1907 vhen Ringer performed laboratory freezing experiments vith sea-vater in which he cooled sea-water until solid salts began to freeze out. of solution. l Portions of the ice and the brine below the ice vere collected and analyzed...

Burkhalter, Albert Charles

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fire and Ice Issue 9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

£s FIRE AND ICE # 9 IB FIRE ICE #9 A Blake/Avon slash fanzine r Available from: Kathleen Resch POBox 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 Kathleener@aol.com FIRE AND ICE # 9copyright © May, 2005 by Kathleen Resch for the contributors. No reprints... or reproduction without the written permission ofthe author/artist This is an amateur publication and is not p intended to infringe upon the rights ofany holders of"Blake's 7" copyrights. FIRE AND ICE 9 TABLE OF CONTENTS LEAVING ROOM 101 by Nova 2 TOO MANY...

Multiple Contributors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 53055320, 2011 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/5305/2011/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy market model to construct emission invento- ries of Arctic shipping and petroleum activities ­ Published: 6 June 2011 Abstract. The Arctic sea-ice is retreating faster than pre- dicted by climate models" the Arctic Ocean to increased human activ- ities such as transit shipping and expanded oil and gas pro

Meskhidze, Nicholas

434

ICE Raids: Compounding Production, Contradiction, and Capitalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is just a cheap way of boosting ICE Ďcriminal aliení arrestRegardless of whether or not ICE is motivated by maintainingWorkers in America: Factories and ICE Raids Produce Citizens

Reas, Elizabeth I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

ICE Pulse Oximeter Smart Alarm App Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICE Pulse Oximeter Smart Alarm App Requirements 6 March 2012 Revision 0 for an Integrated Clinical Environment (ICE) pulse oximetry monitoring app that provides.2 References [Purpose: List all ICE standards, and other standards and references

Huth, Michael

436

Richard C. Lathrop WICCI Science Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interfaith Community for the Earth (ICE) Aldo Leopold Audubon Society #12;Weather vs. Climate Weather of sea ice in the Arctic is one of many signs of warming #12;Source: J. Magnuson, UW-Madison Ice-on Day 2007 Photo: Peter W. Schmitz Lake Mendota Decrease in duration of ice cover on lakes One of many signs

Sheridan, Jennifer

437

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine mammals Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of Arctic ships include ship strikes on marine mammals, the introduction of alien species, disruption... . G. Addressing Impacts on Marine Mammals: That the Arctic...

438

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic sediments implies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Luminescence dating supports central Arctic Ocean cm-scale sedimentation rates... sediment cores from the central Arctic Ocean and by using an independent absolute dating...

439

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Abstract: A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic...

440

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine food Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment Summary: long term effects from these changes on the Arctic marine ecosystem. Concerned over potential effects... change in the Arctic region, and determined...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine environment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment Summary: long term effects from these changes on the Arctic marine ecosystem. Concerned over potential effects... change in the Arctic region, and determined...

442

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic slope annual Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic cooling silentium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;Abstract The Arctic is melting ...fast. 12;IMPACTS OF A WARMING ARCTIC... 's Greenhouse Effect Thesur face cools by radiating heat energyupward. ... Source: Zender, Charles -...

444

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean archaeal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Andy Casper... : eukaryotic flagellates as a major component of the Arctic Ocean food web Sebastien Roy: Life in the dark... AND IN THE ARCTIC OCEAN CATHERINE VALLIRES ......

445

A parallel high-order accurate finite element nonlinear Stokes ice sheet model and benchmark experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The numerical modeling of glacier and ice sheet evolution is a subject of growing interest, in part because of the potential for models to inform estimates of global sea level change. This paper focuses on the development of a numerical model that determines the velocity and pressure fields within an ice sheet. Our numerical model features a high-fidelity mathematical model involving the nonlinear Stokes system and combinations of no-sliding and sliding basal boundary conditions, high-order accurate finite element discretizations based on variable resolution grids, and highly scalable parallel solution strategies, all of which contribute to a numerical model that can achieve accurate velocity and pressure approximations in a highly efficient manner. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our model by analytical solution tests, established ice sheet benchmark experiments, and comparisons with other well-established ice sheet models.

Leng, Wei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ju, Lili [University of South Carolina; Gunzburger, Max [Florida State University; Price, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ringler, Todd [Los Alamos National Laboratory,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice Slurry Technology available for licensing: Proprietary method and equipment for making an ice slurry coolant to induce...

447

arctic flora origins: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

combustion of fossil fuels and biomass, may have a severe impact on the sensitive Arctic climate, possibly altering the temperature profile, cloud temperature and amount, the...

448

arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

449

alaskan arctic tundra: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

450

arctic charr salvelinus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have raised concern over potential responses of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, a cold-adapted freshwateranadromous fish species in (more) Sinnatamby, Ramila Niloshini...

451

arctic char salvelinus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have raised concern over potential responses of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, a cold-adapted freshwateranadromous fish species in (more) Sinnatamby, Ramila Niloshini...

452

arctic research station: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Rocky Mountain Research Sta- tion is one of five 19 Z .Atmospheric Research 51 1999 4575 Cloud resolving simulations of Arctic stratus Geosciences Websites Summary: Z...

453

arctic climate system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

454

alaskan arctic coastal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

455

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Analysis ANWR Coastal Plain Assessment 3. Summary Glossary References Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated...

456

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

457

arctic ocean sediments: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

458

arctic ocean sediment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

459

arctic populations differential: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 168 Arctic catastrophes in an idealized...

460

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

Luther, Douglas S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

arctas arctic research: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic. It often serves as the measuring stick for global climate change. It is where warming has been strongest in the past century, Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

462

arctic study area: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

463

arctic polar vortex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

464

Fire and Ice Issue 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

^ $$% i&l /P^ \\0 rffej FIRE AND ICE AVAILABLE FROM Kathleen Resch PO Box 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 FIRE AND ICE II TABLE OF CONTENTS COVER by Phoenix FRONTISPIECE by Gayle Feyrer "Flashpoint" by Rachel Duncan 1 PEDESTAL by Thomas 2 "A Damn Fine...

Multiple Contributors

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

BLM Arctic Field Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT BiomassArnprior,Aurantia SACitas Jump Logo: BLM Arctic Field

466

Dynamics of ice shelf rift propagation and iceberg calving inferred from geodetic and seismic observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2. Ice Shelves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Ice Rheology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.vi Calving Glaciers and Ice

Bassis, Jeremy N.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Examinations of ice formation processes in Florida cumuli using ice nuclei measurements of anvil ice crystal particle residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

importance of different ice formation processes in cumuli and the cirrus anvils they produce. Cirrus playExaminations of ice formation processes in Florida cumuli using ice nuclei measurements of anvil ice crystal particle residues Anthony J. Prenni,1 Paul J. DeMott,1 Cynthia Twohy,2 Michael R. Poellot

468

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

469

NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2008) Arctic Fall Temperature Anomalies Greater Than +5į C 2. CAUSES for Reduced Sea Ice #12;[Woodgate et al to the Beaufort Sea Marbled eelpout Walleye pollock Salmon snailfishBigeye sculpin Pacific cod Bering flounder Baseline Observatory Barrow Arctic Haze Air Pollution (Decrease Since the Fall of the USSR) >50% Decrease

Kuligowski, Bob

470

WRITTEN STATEMENT BY LAURA K. FURGIONE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for years of oil and gas exploration in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, this hearing puts a well Arctic weather forecasts and severe storm warnings, better short- and long-term sea ice forecasts that supports safe and environmentally sustainable economic activity in the Arctic, including oil and gas

471

Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

net C uptake by terrestrial Arctic ecosystems. Predicting the fate of permafrost- sequestered carbon of these changes in the carbon cycle will depend on climate-driven changes in Arctic biogeochemical, vegetation, and hydrological processes, creating a critical feedback loop. A goal of the NGEE project is to assess the CO2

472

4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OSD 4, 709≠732, 2007 Ice-shelf ≠ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf M. R. Price Title Page published in Ocean Science Discussions are under open-access review for the journal Ocean Science Ice-shelf ≠ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements M. R. Price 1

Boyer, Edmond

473

Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes and Water Levels John J. Magnuson Center to everything else." #12;The Invisible Present The Invisible Place Magnuson 2006 #12;Ice-on Day 2007 Peter W. Schmitz Photo Local Lake Mendota #12;Ice Breakup 2010 Lake Mendota March 20 #12;March 21 Ice Breakup 2010

Sheridan, Jennifer

474

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEYWESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ponents in its inaugural season. Former bench boss Dave Snyder, in whose honor the Wesleyan ice rink2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEYWESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEY #12....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

475

Ice Shelf Water plume flow beneath Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Shelf Water plume flow beneath Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica Paul R. Holland,1 Daniel L Filchner- Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica and its underlying ocean cavity. Ice Shelf Water (ISW) plumes are initiated by the freshwater released from a melting ice shelf and, if they rise, may become supercooled

Feltham, Daniel

476

ORIGINAL PAPER A bacterial ice-binding protein from the Vostok ice core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce a 54 kDa ice-binding protein (GenBank EU694412) that is similar to ice-binding proteins previously- vival at sub-zero temperatures by producing proteins that bind to and inhibit the growth of ice crystalsORIGINAL PAPER A bacterial ice-binding protein from the Vostok ice core James A. Raymond √? Brent C

Christner, Brent C.

477

The Effects of Rotation and Ice Shelf Topography on Frazil-Laden Ice Shelf Water Plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Antarctica. In addition, it is found that the model only produces reasonable marine ice formation rates whenThe Effects of Rotation and Ice Shelf Topography on Frazil-Laden Ice Shelf Water Plumes PAUL R of the dynamics and thermodynamics of a plume of meltwater at the base of an ice shelf is presented. Such ice

Feltham, Daniel

478

Global simulations of ice nucleation and ice supersaturation with an improved cloud scheme in the Community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloud are sensitive to the parameterization of ice clouds. These results indicate that ice clouds are potentiallyGlobal simulations of ice nucleation and ice supersaturation with an improved cloud scheme

Gettelman, Andrew

479

NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled of ice shelves and their progenitor ice sheets. To explore the magnitude of surface melt occurring over) and most of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) by the year 2500. Capping CO2 concentrations at present

Meissner, Katrin Juliane

480

Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical and astrobiological consequences (Invited)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MR22A-05 Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical) electrical-properties measurements of laboratory- produced saline ice, salt hydrates, and ice-silicate cutoff. In ice-silicate mixtures, brine channels are evident above the eutectic temperature only when

Stillman, David E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic sea ice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Comment on ``A quantitative framework for interpretation of basal ice facies formed by ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heave would be expected to produce were revealed beneath the Kamb Ice Stream by the pioneering boreholeComment on ``A quantitative framework for interpretation of basal ice facies formed by ice quantitative framework for interpretation of basal ice facies formed by ice accretion over subglacial sediment

Worster, M. Grae

482

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fjord sediment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic fjord sediment...

483

Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories,Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie') and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katie's dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpson's Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2013-2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2013-2014 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model of collaboration among · EHSEM · SEAS Safety Program · SEAS Facilities which accounts for the regulatory component

485

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model of collaboration among · EHSEM · SEAS Safety Program · SEAS Facilities which accounts for the regulatory component

486

2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 17 -Woodgate Global models in the Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E - Lecture 17 - Woodgate Deep waters of the Atlantic from http://sam://iodp.tamu.edu/publications/PR/303PR/images/Fig01.jpg Dickson et al, refs Denmark Strait ~ 650m deep Iceland Scotland Ridge ~ 400

Washington at Seattle, University of

487

The Rising Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the thick of a sea level rise. After reading the evidencepredictive figure for ocean level rise by the turn of thethat a 7-foot (2 m) sea level rise by the year 2100 should

Miller, Ryder W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Method of forming clathrate ice  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultrasonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. These small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

Hino, Toshiyuki (Tokyo, JP); Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Method of forming calthrate ice  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultransonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. Thes small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

Hino, T.; Gorski, A.J.

1985-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

490

An experimental and theoretical study of the ice accretion process during artificial and natural icing conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. This technique allows ice thickness to be measured with an accuracy of ?0.5 mm; ...

Kirby, Mark Samuel

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Neglecting ice-atmosphere interactions underestimates ice sheet melt in millennial-scale deglaciation simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laurentide and Innutian ice sheets during the Last Glacialclimate of the laurentide ice sheet at the LGM, J. Clim. ,1958), The flow law of ice: A discussion of the assumptions

Pritchard, M. S.; Bush, A. B.; Marshall, S. J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Arctic Energy Summit | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of4 Federal RegisterPowerPA00133 -Archer Daniels MidlandArctic

493

amorphous ice transition: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

artificial and natural icing conditions MIT - DSpace Summary: Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an...

494

alpine deep ice: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

artificial and natural icing conditions MIT - DSpace Summary: Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an...

495

Improvements in Representations of Cloud Microphysics for BBHRP and Models using Data Collected during M-PACE and TWP-ICE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In our research we proposed to use data collected during the 2004 Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) and the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) to improve retrievals of ice and mixed-phase clouds, to improve our understanding of how cloud and radiative processes affect cloud life cycles, and to develop and test methods for using ARM data more effectively in model. In particular, we proposed to: 1) use MPACE in-situ data to determine how liquid water fraction and cloud ice and liquid effective radius (r{sub ei} and r{sub ew}) vary with temperature, normalized cloud altitude and other variables for Arctic mixed-phase clouds, and to use these data to evaluate the performance of model parameterization schemes and remote sensing retrieval algorithms; 2) calculate rei and size/shape distributions using TWP-ICE in-situ data, investigate their dependence on cirrus type (oceanic or continental anvils or cirrus not directly traced to convection), and develop and test representations for MICROBASE; 3) conduct fundamental research enhancing our understanding of cloud/radiative interactions, concentrating on effects of small crystals and particle shapes and sizes on radiation; and 4) improve representations of microphysical processes for models (fall-out, effective density, mean scattering properties, rei and rew) and provide them to ARM PIs. In the course of our research, we made substantial progress on all four goals.

Greg M. McFarquhar

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

496

Mineral dust and elemental black carbon records from an Alpine ice core (Colle Gnifetti glacier) over the last millennium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) over the last millennium Florian Thevenon,1,2 Flavio S. Anselmetti,3 Stefano M. Bernasconi,1 and Margit Gnifetti glacier (Monte Rosa, Swiss-Italian Alps, 45¬į550 N, 7¬į520 E, 4455 m above sea level) using chemical for ice core studies. In particular, the Colle Gnifetti glacier saddle, located in the Monte Rosa Massif

Gilli, Adrian

497

Ice Nuclei in Marine Air: Biogenic Particles or Dust?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earthís energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

Burrows, Susannah M.; Hoose, C.; Poschl, U.; Lawrence, M.

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

498

Prominent bacterial heterotrophy and sources of [superscript 13]C-depleted fatty acids to the interior Canada Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent decades, the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean has experienced rapidly decreasing summer sea ice coverage and freshening of surface waters. It is unclear how these changes translate to deeper waters, particularly ...

Shah, S. R.

499

Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria, E-mail: Valeria.Molinero@utah.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Utah, 315 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)

2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

500

NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-135 Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

____________________________________________________________________________ Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Update: Winters 2003, 2004, and 2005 Raymond A. Assel NOAA, Great..................................................................................................6 DATES OF FIRST (LAST) ICE AND ICE DURATION. .............................................................7 SEASONAL PROGRESSION OF ICE COVER