National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for arctic ocean cloud

  1. Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project March 2012. [1] Six Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project model simulations are compared and Assimilation System models. Citation: Johnson, M., et al. (2012), Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness

  2. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    humidity above stratiform clouds on indirect aerosol climateOverview of Arctic cloud and radiation characteristics. J.of Arctic low-level clouds observed during the FIRE Arctic

  3. JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS). This data allows for observationally-based calculations ofradiative heating rate profiles within the Arctic atmosphere. In this paper we define cloud radiative heating rate forcing (CRHF) as the difference between

  4. Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment Matthew D a 35-GHz cloud radar and the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program operated a suite Clouds Experiment took place during April­July 1998, with the primary goal of investigating cloud

  5. Mass wasting on the submarine Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    ) made from nuclear submarine Hawkbill (SCICEX). Bathymetry is derived from multi-beam measurements madeMass wasting on the submarine Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean Yngve Kristoffersen a,, Bernard particulate matter in the water column accumulate as a uniform drape on submarine plateaus and ridges

  6. Characterizing Arctic Mixed-phase Cloud Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network ShapingDate:Characterization ofArctic Mixed-phase

  7. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

  8. Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

    2005-03-18

    The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

  9. Sensitivity of CAM5-Simulated Arctic Clouds and Radiation to Ice Nucleation Parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Shaocheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Yuying

    2013-08-01

    Sensitivity of Arctic clouds and radiation in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 to the ice nucleation process is examined by testing a new physically based ice nucleation scheme that links the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentration to aerosol properties. The default scheme parameterizes the IN concentration simply as a function of ice supersaturation. The new scheme leads to a significant reduction in simulated IN number concentrations at all latitudes while changes in cloud amount and cloud properties are mainly seen in high latitudes and middle latitude storm tracks. In the Arctic, there is a considerable increase in mid-level clouds and a decrease in low clouds, which result from the complex interaction among the cloud macrophysics, microphysics, and the large-scale environment. The smaller IN concentrations result in an increase in liquid water path and a decrease in ice water path due to the slow-down of the Bergeron-Findeisen process in mixed-phase clouds. Overall, there is an increase in the optical depth of Arctic clouds, which leads to a stronger cloud radiative forcing (net cooling) at the top of the atmosphere. The comparison with satellite data shows that the new scheme slightly improves low cloud simulations over most of the Arctic, but produces too many mid-level clouds. Considerable improvements are seen in the simulated low clouds and their properties when compared to Arctic ground-based measurements. Issues with the observations and the model-observation comparison in the Arctic region are discussed.

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - FIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01)govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA ARM Data

  11. The Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    Carbon sequestration Biological pump a b s t r a c t We present observation based estimatesThe Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n , A.C. Naveira Garabato a , T. Tsubouchi b , S January 2014 Keywords: Arctic Ocean Dissolved inorganic carbon Carbon budget Air­sea carbon dioxide flux

  12. Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories. Part I: Occurrence and Macrophysical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    distributions, temperature, mi- crophysical properties, thickness, and phase composition. Arctic cloud to derive estimates of cloud occurrence fraction, vertical distribution, persistence in time, diurnal cycle seasons for which the sun is above the horizon for at least part of the day. 1. Introduction Clouds play

  13. Impacts of ocean albedo alteration on Arctic sea ice restoration and Northern Hemisphere climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cvijanovic, Ivana; Caldeira, Ken; MacMartin, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is expected to transition into a seasonally ice-free state by mid-century, enhancing Arctic warming and leading to substantial ecological and socio-economic challenges across the Arctic region. It has been proposed that artificially increasing high latitude ocean albedo could restore sea ice, but the climate impacts of such a strategy have not been previously explored. Motivated by this, we investigate the impacts of idealized high latitude ocean albedo changes on Arctic sea ice restoration and climate. In our simulated 4xCO? climate, imposing surface albedo alterations over the Arctic Ocean leads to partial sea ice recovery and a modestmore »reduction in Arctic warming. With the most extreme ocean albedo changes, imposed over the area 70°–90°N, September sea ice cover stabilizes at ~40% of its preindustrial value (compared to ~3% without imposed albedo modifications). This is accompanied by an annual mean Arctic surface temperature decrease of ~2 °C but no substantial global mean temperature decrease. Imposed albedo changes and sea ice recovery alter climate outside the Arctic region too, affecting precipitation distribution over parts of the continental United States and Northeastern Pacific. For example, following sea ice recovery, wetter and milder winter conditions are present in the Southwest United States while the East Coast experiences cooling. We conclude that although ocean albedo alteration could lead to some sea ice recovery, it does not appear to be an effective way of offsetting the overall effects of CO? induced global warming.« less

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF MIXED-PHASE CLOUDS ON SURFACE SHORTWAVE IRRADIANCE DURING THE ARCTIC SPRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE INFLUENCE OF MIXED-PHASE CLOUDS ON SURFACE SHORTWAVE IRRADIANCE DURING THE ARCTIC SPRING Dan-phase stratiform clouds on the surface shortwave irradiance is examined using spectral irradiance measurements from.) spectroradiometer measured downwelling spectral irradiance in the interval 350­2200 nm, in one-minute averages

  15. Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s Jinlun.203°C. The warming of the world ocean is associated with an increase in global surface air temperature heat flux. Citation: Zhang, J. (2005), Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global

  16. Megatides in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions Stephen D. Griffiths,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    Megatides in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions Stephen D. Griffiths,1 and W. R. Peltier1's climate and ocean circulation. Citation: Griffiths, S. D., and W. R. Peltier (2008), Megatides occurred approx- imately 26,000 years ago, since the bathymetric changes are now well constrained [Peltier

  17. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using satellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between ? 0.2 and ? 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previousmore »studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550?nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds. « less

  18. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David D.

    2003-06-01

    A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

  19. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  20. Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

    2014-11-17

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

  1. The influence of mixedphase clouds on surface shortwave irradiance during the Arctic spring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The influence of mixedphase clouds on surface shortwave irradiance during the Arctic spring Dan irradiance is examined using unique spectral shortwave irradiance measurements made during the Indirect spectral irradiance from 350 to 2200 nm in oneminute averages throughout April­May 2008 from the ARM

  2. Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean W. R. Peltier,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean freshening W. R. Peltier,1 G to the response to North Atlantic freshening. Citation: Peltier, W. R., G. Vettoretti, and M. Stastna (2006 of the Atlantic by Heinrich Event 1 [Peltier, 2005]. Simi- larly, the onset of the Younger Dryas (Y-D) cold

  3. Export of nutrients from the Arctic Ocean Sinhu Torres-Valds,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    Export of nutrients from the Arctic Ocean Sinhué Torres-Valdés,1 Takamasa Tsubouchi,2 Sheldon Bacon Strait, the Barents Sea Opening (BSO), and Bering Strait. We found that the major exports of all three budgets show that statistically robust net silicate and phosphate exports exist, while the net nitrate

  4. Proceedings of the ASME 28th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    Proceedings of the ASME 28th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering-mail: frederic.alauzet@inria.fr ABSTRACT Engineering offshore problems require a continuous progress of numerical schemes. How- ever, this strategy requires advanced meshing techniques. As engineering offshore

  5. Ocean advection, Arctic-Atlantic Connections, Climate P.B.Rhines, University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean advection, Arctic-Atlantic Connections, Climate P.B.Rhines, University of Washington Sirpa Hakkinen, NASA Goddard SPC with David Bailey, Wei Cheng, Jerome Cuny, Trisha Sawatzky WUN Climate Track,Wintertime Storm Track,Wintertime Storm Track, Eurasian climate and weatherEurasian climate

  6. An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David Institute, Bremerhaven, Germany g Institute of Numerical Mathematics Russian Academy of Science, Moscow, potential and available potential energies, energy conversion and forcing rates are studied. The energy

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design togovCampaignsMASRAD: Pt. Reyes Stratus(MC3E):govCampaignsMixed-Phase Arctic

  8. Radiocarbon in particulate matter from the eastern sub-arctic Pacific Ocean; evidence of a source of terrestrial carbon to the deep sea.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druffel, Ellen R M; Honju, Susumu; Griffin, Sheila; Wong, C S

    1986-01-01

    in the sub-Arctic Pacific Ocean: Inter- natl North PacificSalmon of the North Pacific Ocean-Part II-Review of theproduced carbon-14 by the Pacific Ocean: Ph D dissert, Univ

  9. The ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and ozone forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John C.

    In recent decades, the Arctic has been warming and sea ice disappearing. By contrast, the Southern Ocean around Antarctica has been (mainly) cooling and sea-ice extent growing. We argue here that interhemispheric asymmetries ...

  10. Parameterizing correlations between hydrometeor species in mixed-phase Arctic clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Vincent E.; Nielsen, Brandon J.; Fan, Jiwen; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2011-08-16

    Mixed-phase Arctic clouds, like other clouds, contain small-scale variability in hydrometeor fields, such as cloud water or snow mixing ratio. This variability may be worth parameterizing in coarse-resolution numerical models. In particular, for modeling processes such as accretion and aggregation, it would be useful to parameterize subgrid correlations among hydrometeor species. However, one difficulty is that there exist many hydrometeor species and many microphysical processes, leading to complexity and computational expense.Existing lower and upper bounds (inequalities) on linear correlation coefficients provide useful guidance, but these bounds are too loose to serve directly as a method to predict subgrid correlations. Therefore, this paper proposes an alternative method that is based on a blend of theory and empiricism. The method begins with the spherical parameterization framework of Pinheiro and Bates (1996), which expresses the correlation matrix in terms of its Cholesky factorization. The values of the elements of the Cholesky matrix are parameterized here using a cosine row-wise formula that is inspired by the aforementioned bounds on correlations. The method has three advantages: 1) the computational expense is tolerable; 2) the correlations are, by construction, guaranteed to be consistent with each other; and 3) the methodology is fairly general and hence may be applicable to other problems. The method is tested non-interactively using simulations of three Arctic mixed-phase cloud cases from two different field experiments: the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE). Benchmark simulations are performed using a large-eddy simulation (LES) model that includes a bin microphysical scheme. The correlations estimated by the new method satisfactorily approximate the correlations produced by the LES.

  11. The role of ice nuclei recycling in the maintenance of cloud ice in Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solomon, A.; Feingold, G.; Shupe, M. D.

    2015-09-25

    This study investigates the maintenance of cloud ice production in Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus in large eddy simulations that include a prognostic ice nuclei (IN) formulation and a diurnal cycle. Balances derived from a mixed-layer model and phase analyses are used to provide insight into buffering mechanisms that maintain ice in these cloud systems. We find that, for the case under investigation, IN recycling through subcloud sublimation considerably prolongs ice production over a multi-day integration. This effective source of IN to the cloud dominates over mixing sources from above or below the cloud-driven mixed layer. Competing feedbacks between dynamical mixing andmore »recycling are found to slow the rate of ice lost from the mixed layer when a diurnal cycle is simulated. The results of this study have important implications for maintaining phase partitioning of cloud ice and liquid that determine the radiative forcing of Arctic mixed-phase clouds.« less

  12. The role of ice nuclei recycling in the maintenance of cloud ice in Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solomon, A.; Feingold, G.; Shupe, M. D.

    2015-04-21

    This study investigates the maintenance of cloud ice production in Arctic mixed phase stratocumulus in large-eddy simulations that include a prognostic ice nuclei (IN) formulation and a diurnal cycle. Balances derived from a mixed-layer model and phase analyses are used to provide insight into buffering mechanisms that maintain ice in these cloud systems. We find that for the case under investigation, IN recycling through subcloud sublimation considerably prolongs ice production over a multi-day integration. This effective source of IN to the cloud dominates over mixing sources from above or below the cloud-driven mixed layer. Competing feedbacks between dynamical mixing andmore »recycling are found to slow the rate of ice lost from the mixed layer when a diurnal cycle is simulated. The results of this study have important implications for maintaining phase partitioning of cloud ice and liquid that determine the radiative forcing of Arctic mixed-phase clouds.« less

  13. Nighttime Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Using AVHRR Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThreeFebruary 2015 ESH&SCSUWayneNicoleCloud

  14. The influence of mixed and phase clouds on surface shortwave irradiance during the Arctic spring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubin D.; Vogelmann A.

    2011-10-13

    The influence of mixed-phase stratiform clouds on the surface shortwave irradiance is examined using unique spectral shortwave irradiance measurements made during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. An Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD, Inc.) spectroradiometer measured downwelling spectral irradiance from 350 to 2200 nm in one-minute averages throughout April-May 2008 from the ARM Climate Research Facility's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site at Barrow. This study examines spectral irradiance measurements made under single-layer, overcast cloud decks having geometric thickness < 3000 m. Cloud optical depth is retrieved from irradiance in the interval 1022-1033 nm. The contrasting surface radiative influences of mixed-phase clouds and liquid-water clouds are discerned using irradiances in the 1.6-{micro}m window. Compared with liquid-water clouds, mixed-phase clouds during the Arctic spring cause a greater reduction of shortwave irradiance at the surface. At fixed conservative-scattering optical depth (constant optical depth for wavelengths {lambda} < 1100 nm), the presence of ice water in cloud reduces the near-IR surface irradiance by an additional several watts-per-meter-squared. This additional reduction, or supplemental ice absorption, is typically {approx}5 W m{sup -2} near solar noon over Barrow, and decreases with increasing solar zenith angle. However, for some cloud decks this additional absorption can be as large as 8-10 W m{sup -2}.

  15. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

  16. A 10 Year Climatology of Arctic Cloud Fraction and Radiative Forcing at Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Crosby, Kathryn; Long, Charles N.; Stone, R. S.; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2010-09-15

    A 10-yr record of Arctic cloud fraction and surface radiation budget has been generated using data collected from June 1998 to May 2008 at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site and the nearby NOAA Barrow Observatory (BRW). The record includes the seasonal variations of cloud fraction (CF), cloud liquid water path (LWP), precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface albedo, shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) fluxes and cloud radative forcings (CRFs), as well as their decadal variations. Values of CF derived from different instruments and methods agree well, having an annual average of ~0.74. Cloudiness increases from March to May, remains high (~0.8-0.9) from May to October, and then decreases over winter. More clouds and higher LWP and PWV occurred during the warm season (May-October) than the cold season (November-April). These results are strongly associated with southerly flow which transports warm, moist air masses to Barrow from the North Pacific and over area of Alaska already free of snow during the warm season and with a dipole pattern of pressure in which a high is centered over the Beaufort Sea and low over the Aleutians during the cold season. The monthly means of estimated clear-sky and measured allsky SW-down and LW-down fluxes at the two facilities are almost identical with the annual mean differences less than 1.6 W m-2. The downwelling and upwelling LW fluxes remain almost constant from January to March, then increase from March and peak during July-August. SW-down fluxes are primarily determined by seasonal changes in the intensity and duration of insolation over Northern Alaska, and are also strongly dependent on cloud fraction and optical depth, and surface albedo. The monthly variations of NET CRF generally follow the cycle of SW CRF, modulated by LW effects. On annual average, the negative SW CRF and positive LW CRF tend to cancel, resulting in annual average NET CRF of 2-4.5 Wm-2. Arctic clouds have a 3 net warming effect on the surface throughout the year, with exception of the snow-free period from middle June to middle September when there tends to be a cooling effect. The daily average surface albedos agree well at the two sites remaining high (>0.8) until late May, dropping below 0.2 after the snow melts around June and increasing during autumn once snow begins to accumulate. On the basis of long-term regression analyses CF has decreased by about 0.048 while temperature has risen by ?1.1 K over the 10-yr period, which can be characterized by tendencies of warming mainly during December and April. With regard to the 2007 record minimum Arctic ice extent, this study provides additional empirical evidence that decreased cloud cover and increased SW-down flux during summer contributed to anomalous ice melt in the region north of Barrow. At Barrow, average June-August CF decreased by 0.062 in 2007 from the 10-yr mean, while SW-down and NET fluxes increased by 28.4 Wm-2 and 11.3 Wm-2, respectively. The increase in the NET radiative flux during summer 2007 most likely contributed to an increase in surface air temperature of 1.6 K.

  17. VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wood, Robert [VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington; Bretherton, Christopher [GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington; Huebert, Barry [SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii; Mechoso, Roberto C. [VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA; Weller, Robert [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

    VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

  18. Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering May 31 -June 5 , 2009, Honolulu, Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering OMAE2009 IN RELIABILITY STUDIES FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES P. Agarwal Stress Engineering Services Houston, TX 77041, USA cases according to the IEC guidelines for offshore wind turbines, designers are required to estimate

  19. Terrigenous dissolved organic matter in the Arctic Ocean and its transport to surface and deep waters of the North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louchouarn, Patrick

    lignin phenols in polar surface waters are 7-fold to 16-fold higher than those in the Atlantic phenols provide some evidence of photochemical transformations of terrigenous DOM, but it appears the Arctic Ocean by microbial degradation is less clear and warrants further study. Physical transport

  20. Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Parameterizations in Short-Range Weather Forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, S; Boyle, J; Klein, S; Liu, X; Ghan, S

    2007-06-01

    By making use of the in-situ data collected from the recent Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment, we have tested the mixed-phase cloud parameterizations used in the two major U.S. climate models, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory climate model (AM2), under both the single-column modeling framework and the U.S. Department of Energy Climate Change Prediction Program-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Parameterization Testbed. An improved and more physically based cloud microphysical scheme for CAM3 has been also tested. The single-column modeling tests were summarized in the second quarter 2007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement metric report. In the current report, we document the performance of these microphysical schemes in short-range weather forecasts using the Climate Chagne Prediction Program Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Parameterizaiton Testbest strategy, in which we initialize CAM3 and AM2 with realistic atmospheric states from numerical weather prediction analyses for the period when Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment was conducted.

  1. 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 7 -Woodgate Schematic Surface and Atlantic Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    LHW ­ Lower Halocline Water AW ­ Atlantic Water DW ­ Deep Water WESTERN ARCTIC (PACIFIC) HALOCLINE Halocline Water LHW ­ Lower Halocline Water AW ­ Atlantic Water DW ­ Deep Water European Speak: e.g. Manley Circulation Jones, 2001 Typical Arctic profiles Bottom Water "the rest" Western Arctic warmer ATLANTIC WATER T

  2. Sources and Fate of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter in the Arctic Ocean and Surrounding Watersheds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Sally Annette

    2012-10-19

    of the Canadian Archipelago, 17 % of the DOM pool is of terrestrial origin, even though waters are diluted with sea ice melt, suggesting the likelihood of a subsurface plume of tDOM entrained within river runoff from Arctic Rivers. In the interior Arctic...

  3. Polluting of Winter Convective Clouds upon Transition from Ocean Inland Over Central California: Contrasting Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; Prather, Kimberly; Suski, Kaitlyn; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf

    2014-01-01

    In-situ aircraft measurements of aerosol chemical and cloud microphysical properties were conducted during the CalWater campaign in February and March 2011 over the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the coastal waters of central California. The main objective was to elucidate the impacts of aerosol properties on clouds and precipitation forming processes. In order to accomplish this, we compared contrasting cases of clouds that ingested aerosols from different sources. The results showed that clouds containing pristine oceanic air had low cloud drop concentrations and started to develop rain 500 m above their base. This occurred both over the ocean and over the Sierra Nevada, mainly in the early morning when the radiatively cooled stable continental boundary layer was decoupled from the cloud base. Supercooled rain dominated the precipitation that formed in growing convective clouds in the pristine air, up to the -21°C isotherm level. A contrasting situation was documented in the afternoon over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, when the clouds ingested high pollution aerosol concentrations produced in the Central Valley. This led to slow growth of the cloud drop effective radius with height and suppressed and even prevented the initiation of warm rain while contributing to the development of ice hydrometeors in the form of graupel. Our results show that cloud condensation and ice nuclei were the limiting factors that controlled warm rain and ice processes, respectively, while the unpolluted clouds in the same air mass produced precipitation quite efficiently. These findings provide the motivation for deeper investigations into the nature of the aerosols seeding clouds.

  4. The Relative Importance of Clouds and Sea Ice for the Solar Energy Budget of the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Stephen

    The Relative Importance of Clouds and Sea Ice for the Solar Energy Budget of the Southern Ocean) ABSTRACT The effects of clouds and sea ice on the solar radiation budget are determined for the Southern and for altered surface and cloud conditions. Poleward of 68°S in spring, ice causes a greater reduction of solar

  5. Intercomparison of Large-eddy Simulations of Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds: Importance of Ice Size Distribution Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alex; Cheng, Anning; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Ghan, Steven J.; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Korolev, Alexei; McFarquhar, Greg; Morrison, H.; Paukert, Marco; Savre, Julien; Shipway, Ben; Shupe, Matthew D.; Solomon, Amy; Sulia, Kara

    2014-03-14

    Large-eddy simulations of mixed-phase Arctic clouds by 11 different models are analyzed with the goal of improving understanding and model representation of processes controlling the evolution of these clouds. In a case based on observations from the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), it is found that ice number concentration, Ni, exerts significant influence on the cloud structure. Increasing Ni leads to a substantial reduction in liquid water path (LWP) and potential cloud dissipation, in agreement with earlier studies. By comparing simulations with the same microphysics coupled to different dynamical cores as well as the same dynamics coupled to different microphysics schemes, it is found that the ice water path (IWP) is mainly controlled by ice microphysics, while the inter-model differences in LWP are largely driven by physics and numerics of the dynamical cores. In contrast to previous intercomparisons, all models here use the same ice particle properties (i.e., mass-size, mass-fall speed, and mass-capacitance relationships) and a common radiation parameterization. The constrained setup exposes the importance of ice particle size distributions (PSD) in influencing cloud evolution. A clear separation in LWP and IWP predicted by models with bin and bulk microphysical treatments is documented and attributed primarily to the assumed shape of ice PSD used in bulk schemes. Compared to the bin schemes that explicitly predict the PSD, schemes assuming exponential ice PSD underestimate ice growth by vapor deposition and overestimate mass-weighted fall speed leading to an underprediction of IWP by a factor of two in the considered case.

  6. Shortwave aerosol radiative forcing over cloud-free oceans from Terra: 1. Angular models for aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) data to obtain near surface wind speed. The new aerosol ADMs are built to obtain aerosol properties within a Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) footprint and Special as functions of near-surface ocean wind speed and MODIS aerosol optical depth at 0.55 mm (t0.55). Among the new

  7. Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Instrumentation, Bergen, Norway An autonomous buoy which collects seismic reflection data and transmits to shore of the seismic buoy (thick red, green and black lines). - we have successfully developed an autonomous buoy

  8. Daytime Arctic Cloud Detection based on Multi-angle Satellite Data with Case Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Bin

    that the strongest dependences of surface air temperatures on increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels will occur of the similar remote sensing characteristics of clouds, ice- and snow-covered surfaces. This paper proposes two

  9. Colored dissolved organic matter dynamics across the shelf-basin interface in the western Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Laodong

    Ocean Ce´line Gue´guen,1,2 Laodong Guo,1,3 Michiyo Yamamoto-Kawai,1,4 and Noriyuki Tanaka1,5 Received 14 Ocean were examined by three-dimensional excitation/emission matrix (3-D EEM) spectroscopy. CDOM and Beaufort Sea transects. Penetration of the high CDOM signal, formed on the shelves, into the Canada Basin

  10. Ice properties of single-layer stratocumulus during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 2007; published 20 December 2007. [1] Measurements from the US Department of Energy Atmospheric or activation through cloud-phase chemistry could provide alternative explanations for M-PACE observations in general cir- culation models, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM

  11. Toward ice formation closure in Arctic mixedphase boundary layer clouds during ISDAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    above water saturation) and another in which initial IN concentrations were vertically uniform. A key aspect of the latter was an IN reservoir under the wellmixed cloud layer: as the simulations progressed, the reservoir IN slowly mixed upward, helping to maintain ice concentrations close to those observed. Given

  12. Uranium-series radionuclide records of paleoceanographic and sedimentary changes in the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Sharon Susanna

    2009-01-01

    The radionuclides ˛łąPa and ˛ł?Th, produced in the water column and removed from the ocean by particle scavenging and burial in sediments, offer a means for paleoceanographers to examine past dynamics of both water column ...

  13. Basalt petrogenesis beneath slow- and ultraslow-spreading Arctic mid-ocean ridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkins, Lynne J

    2009-01-01

    To explore the ability of melting mafic lithologies to produce alkaline ocean-island basalts (OIB), an experimental study was carried out measuring clinopyroxene (Cpx)melt and garnet (Gt)-melt partition coefficients during ...

  14. Allochthonous inputs of riverine picocyanobacteria to coastal waters in the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    strains along this gradient showed that the cyanobacterial sequences were divided into eight operational, includ- ing geothermal and sulphide-rich anoxic waters, as well as nutrient-poor open ocean waters

  15. Introduction Mixed-phase clouds, such as those found in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    /(m str) 1e-14 1e-13 1e-12 1e-11 1e-10 1e-9 1e-8 1e-7 Time (UT) Altitude(km) Effective Diameter 16 to the modeling com- munity. Without modification,models have struggled to maintain the delicate balance between, as they are observed in the atmo- sphere. In conjunction with the ARM Cloud Modeling working group we are investigating

  16. Session Papers North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 Unlimited Release4: "Short-Term Energy PricesSession

  17. Development of Cloud Microphysical Property Retrievals Using the University of Wisconsin Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    .6 2.8 1/(m str) 1e-14 1e-13 1e-12 1e-11 1e-10 1e-9 1e-8 1e-7 October 9,2004 Time (UT) Altitude:50 21:55 22:00 22:05 22:10 22:15 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 1/(m str) 1e-14 1e-13 1e-12 1e-11 1- eterization and Modeling Workgroup to increase our ability to simu- late mixed-phase boundary layer clouds

  18. NOAA's Role in the Arctic Presentation by Kathleen Crane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interact with the rest of the Arctic (marine, ice and terrestrial) system? · Which recent changes Fresh water In the Arctic Ocean The sources and pathways of fresh water into and out of the Arctic Ocean shape of the Beaufort Gyre, Surface Transport Pathways in Response to the Arctic Oscillation. #12

  19. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud Results are presented...

  20. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    dropped from near zero to -7°C. Subsequently mean energy budget residuals remained small and near zero. Energy budget transitions were dominated by the net radiative fluxes, largely controlledA transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo

  1. Clouds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Uncertainties associated with the microphysical and radiative properties of ice clouds remain an active research area because of the importance these clouds have in atmospheric radiative transfer problems and the energy balance of the Earth...

  2. 1 Copyright 2014 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2014 33rd International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, the WEC-Sim code is used to model a point absorber WEC Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to develop WEC-Sim, a publicly, Offshore and Arctic Engineering OMAE2014 June 8­13, 2014, San Francisco, California USA OMAE2014

  3. Water balance of the Arctic drainage system using GRACE gravimetry products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frappart, F; Ramillien, G; Famiglietti, JS

    2011-01-01

    of the Arctic Ocean freshwater balance and their interannualInteractions, 2, pp. 1–37. Water balance of the Arctic usingEWG climatology. Water balance of the Arctic using GRACE

  4. Correlation between present-day model simulation of Arctic cloud radiative forcing and sea ice consistent with positive winter convective cloud feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

    A positive feedback on winter sea-ice loss, based on warming due to radiative forcing caused by the onset of convective clouds in response to sea-ice loss, has recently been proposed. This feedback has thus far been ...

  5. Subseasonal Variability of the Southeast Pacific Stratus Cloud Deck* International Pacific Research Center, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Pacific Research Center, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa of Meteorology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii in the stratus cloud deck is closely related to variations in surface wind velocity, water vapor, sea level

  6. Parameterization of the Extinction Coefficient in Ice and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds during the ISDAC Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korolev, A; Shashkov, A; Barker, H

    2012-03-06

    This report documents the history of attempts to directly measure cloud extinction, the current measurement device known as the Cloud Extinction Probe (CEP), specific problems with direct measurement of extinction coefficient, and the attempts made here to address these problems. Extinction coefficient is one of the fundamental microphysical parameters characterizing bulk properties of clouds. Knowledge of extinction coefficient is of crucial importance for radiative transfer calculations in weather prediction and climate models given that Earth's radiation budget (ERB) is modulated much by clouds. In order for a large-scale model to properly account for ERB and perturbations to it, it must ultimately be able to simulate cloud extinction coefficient well. In turn this requires adequate and simultaneous simulation of profiles of cloud water content and particle habit and size. Similarly, remote inference of cloud properties requires assumptions to be made about cloud phase and associated single-scattering properties, of which extinction coefficient is crucial. Hence, extinction coefficient plays an important role in both application and validation of methods for remote inference of cloud properties from data obtained from both satellite and surface sensors (e.g., Barker et al. 2008). While estimation of extinction coefficient within large-scale models is relatively straightforward for pure water droplets, thanks to Mie theory, mixed-phase and ice clouds still present problems. This is because of the myriad forms and sizes that crystals can achieve, each having their own unique extinction properties. For the foreseeable future, large-scale models will have to be content with diagnostic parametrization of crystal size and type. However, before they are able to provide satisfactory values needed for calculation of radiative transfer, they require the intermediate step of assigning single-scattering properties to particles. The most basic of these is extinction coefficient, yet it is rarely measured directly, and therefore verification of parametrizations is difficult. The obvious solution is to be able to measure microphysical properties and extinction at the same time and for the same volume. This is best done by in situ sampling by instruments mounted on either balloon or aircraft. The latter is the usual route and the one employed here. Yet the problem of actually measuring extinction coefficient directly for arbitrarily complicated particles still remains unsolved.

  7. Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the radiative influence of mixed-phase clouds. Further, its impact on the development and evaluation of retrieval schemes from ground- and satellite-based remote sensors is...

  8. The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

    2011-01-21

    The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

  9. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 54 Environmental Sciences arctic; tundra; fine roots; root biomass; root production; root turnover; plant-soil, model Word Cloud More Like This Dataset...

  10. Pre-Cloud Aerosol, Cloud Droplet Concentration, and Cloud Condensation Nuclei from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere Land Study (VOCALS) Field Campaign First Quarter 2010 ASR Program Metric Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinman, LI; Springston, SR; Daum, PH; Lee, Y-N; Sedlacek, AJ; Senum, G; Wang, J

    2011-08-31

    In this, the first of a series of Program Metric Reports, we (1) describe archived data from the DOE G-1 aircraft, (2) illustrate several relations between sub-cloud aerosol, CCN, and cloud droplets pertinent to determining the effects of pollutant sources on cloud properties, and (3) post to the data archive an Excel spreadsheet that contains cloud and corresponding sub-cloud data.

  11. sedimentation under permanent ice cover in the Arc-tic Ocean. Cont. Shelf Res. 14: 279-293.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    390 Notes sedimentation under permanent ice cover in the Arc- tic Ocean. Cont. Shelf Res. 14: 279-293. HAWLEY, N. 1988. Flow in cylindrical sediment traps. J. Great Lakes Res. 14: 76-88. HOLM-HANSEN, O., C. J. Effectiveness of various treatments in retarding mi- crobial activity in sediment trap material

  12. Saharan dust as a causal factor of hemispheric asymmetry in aerosols and cloud cover over the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Da Sliva, Arlindo; Starobinets, Boris; Long, Charles N.; Kalashnikova, Olga; Alpert, Pinhas

    2015-07-09

    Meridional distribution of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over the tropical Atlantic Ocean (30°N – 30°S) was analyzed to assess seasonal variations of meridional AOT asymmetry. Ten-year MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero) data (July 2002 – June 2012) confirms that the Sahara desert emits a significant amount of dust into the atmosphere over the Atlantic Ocean. Only over the Atlantic Ocean did MERRAero show that desert dust dominates other aerosol species and is responsible for meridional aerosol asymmetry between the tropical North and South Atlantic. Over the 10-year period under consideration, both MISR measurements and MERRAero data showed a pronounced meridional AOTmore »asymmetry. The meridional AOT asymmetry, characterized by the hemispheric ratio (RAOT) of AOT averaged separately over the North and over the South Atlantic, was about 1.7. Seasonally, meridional AOT asymmetry over the Atlantic was the most pronounced between March and July, when dust presence is maximal (RAOT ranged from 2 to 2.4). There was no noticeable meridional aerosol asymmetry in total AOT from September to October. During this period the contribution of carbonaceous aerosols to total AOT in the South Atlantic was comparable to the contribution of dust aerosols to total AOT in the North Atlantic. During the same 10-year period, MODIS cloud fraction (CF) data showed that there was no noticeable asymmetry in meridional CF distribution in different seasons (the hemispheric ratio of CF ranged from 1.0 to 1.2). MODIS CF data illustrated significant cloud cover (CF of 0.7 – 0.9) with limited precipitation ability along the Saharan Air Layer.« less

  13. Distribution and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full report (1.6 mb) Appendix2863[pic]

  14. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. Latitudinal distribution of the recent Arctic warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr; Lesins, Glen K; Wang, Muyin

    2010-12-08

    Increasing Arctic temperature, disappearance of Arctic sea ice, melting of the Greenland ice sheet, sea level rise, increasing strength of Atlantic hurricanes are these impending climate catastrophes supported by observations? Are the recent data really unprecedented during the observational records? Our analysis of Arctic temperature records shows that the Arctic and temperatures in the 1930s and 1940s were almost as high as they are today. We argue that the current warming of the Arctic region is affected more by the multi-decadal climate variability than by an increasing concentration of carbon dioxide. Unfortunately, none of the existing coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models used in the IPCC 2007 cIimate change assessment is able to reproduce neither the observed 20th century Arctic cIimate variability nor the latitudinal distribution of the warming.

  16. An analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, A. D.

    This study used several model-based tools to analyse the dynamics of the Arctic Basin between 1997 and 2006 as a linked system of land-ocean-atmosphere C exchange. The analysis estimates that terrestrial areas of the Arctic ...

  17. Arctic house

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkel, Joel A. (Joel Abram), 1969-

    1999-01-01

    Currently available housing in the Arctic is limited to solutions that have been adapted from designs for less severe climates. This thesis has developed a new manner of residential construction designed specifically for ...

  18. Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  19. Further observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic Ocean) due to sea ice loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high pCO2sw (~290­320 matm), considering that surface waterFurther observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily

  20. Oceanography | Vol.24, No.3114 OCEAN WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Helen

    out ows via these pathways return freshwaters to the North Atlantic that were evaporated from tropical oceans, transported by the atmosphere, and delivered to the Arctic Ocean via precipi- tation, terrestrial

  1. Observational determination of albedo decrease caused by vanishing Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenman, Ian

    ) The decline of Arctic sea ice has been documented in over 30 y of satellite passive microwave observations- ments along with satellite microwave sea ice data to document the Arctic-wide decrease in planetary to an additional 6.4 ± 0.9 W/m2 of solar energy input into the Arctic Ocean region since 1979. Averaged over

  2. December 2013 www.arctic.noaa.gov/reportcard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Oslo, Department of Geosciences, 0316 Oslo, Norway Y. Cao, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China J Centre in Svalbard, UNIS, Norway Institute of Geography and Geology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark J.S. Christiansen, Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsř, Norway B

  3. Simulated Response of the Arctic Freshwater Budget to Extreme NAO Wind Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condron, Alan

    The authors investigate the response of the Arctic Ocean freshwater budget to changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) using a regional-ocean configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology GCM (MITgcm) ...

  4. Eleventh ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Atlanta, Georgia, March 19-23, 2001 Radar-based Retrievals of Cloud Properties in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Eleventh ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Atlanta, Georgia, March 19-23, 2001 1 Radar Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites, all techniques discussed here can be applied to measurements taken at the different ARM sites. Briefly summarized here

  5. Sandia Energy - Arctic Climate Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Climate Measurements Home Climate & Earth Systems Climate Measurement & Modeling Arctic Climate Measurements Arctic Climate Measurementscwdd2015-05-08T01:51:20+00:00 A...

  6. Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations October 2011; accepted 26 October 2011; published 24 December 2011. [1] Arctic clouds simulated-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its

  7. The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verlinde, J

    2010-10-18

    The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

  8. Arctic Energy Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 Arctic Energy Summit is a multi-disciplinary event expected to draw several hundred industry officials, scientists, academics, policy makers, energy professionals, and community leaders together to collaborate and share leading approaches on Arctic energy issues.

  9. Carbon dynamics in arctic vegetation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Street, Lorna Elizabeth

    2011-11-24

    Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the Arctic land surface and the global climate system. A large amount of organic carbon (C) is currently stored in Arctic soils; if ...

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Cloud Infrared Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlantic (ACE-ENA)Study the

  11. Sampling Strategy for Enumerating the Western Arctic Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the bowhead whale and discusses methods 20· 40· 80· N 60· 70· 30· 120· NORTH AMERICA ARCTIC OCEAN 150· W which scientific means of assessing the number of whales which can be safely removed from the bowhead stock stress relating to ac- tivities of offshore oil development, subsistence harvest, or natural fluctua

  12. Arctic Climate Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Mark D.; Robinson, David G.; Boslough, Mark B.; Backus, George A.; Peterson, Kara J.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Swiler, Laura Painton; Desilets, Darin Maurice; Reinert, Rhonda Karen

    2015-03-01

    This study began with a challenge from program area managers at Sandia National Laboratories to technical staff in the energy, climate, and infrastructure security areas: apply a systems-level perspective to existing science and technology program areas in order to determine technology gaps, identify new technical capabilities at Sandia that could be applied to these areas, and identify opportunities for innovation. The Arctic was selected as one of these areas for systems level analyses, and this report documents the results. In this study, an emphasis was placed on the arctic atmosphere since Sandia has been active in atmospheric research in the Arctic since 1997. This study begins with a discussion of the challenges and benefits of analyzing the Arctic as a system. It goes on to discuss current and future needs of the defense, scientific, energy, and intelligence communities for more comprehensive data products related to the Arctic; assess the current state of atmospheric measurement resources available for the Arctic; and explain how the capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories can be used to address the identified technological, data, and modeling needs of the defense, scientific, energy, and intelligence communities for Arctic support.

  13. "Just to orient us," Dr. Eric Steig be-gan, "Arctic means bear. It is the place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    packed the auditorium to capacity to hear Steig discuss his re- search on climate change and Steig, raising waves across the scien- tific community. He is the director of the Quaternary Research Center is ocean and the other is land. The Arctic is covered in sea ice." Data measuring levels of Arctic sea ice

  14. Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS)-Modular Ocean Model v4 (MOM4) coupled model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Sun, Rui; Han, J.; Pan, H. L.; Park, S.; Hannay, Cecile; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Teixeira, J.

    2014-07-25

    We present a diagnostic analysis of the marine low cloud climatology simulated by two state-of-the-art coupled atmosphere-ocean models: the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global Forecasting System (GFS). In both models, the shallow convection and boundary layer turbulence parameterizations have been recently updated: both models now use a mass-flux scheme for the parameterization of shallow convection, and a turbulence parameterization capable of handling Stratocumulus (Sc)-topped Planetary Boundary Layers (PBLs). For shallow convection, both models employ a convective trigger function based on the concept of convective inhibition and both include explicit convective overshooting/penetrative entrainment formulation. For Sc-topped PBL, both models treat explicitly turbulence mixing and cloud-top entrainment driven by cloud-top radiative cooling. Our focus is on the climatological transition from Sc to shallow Cumulus (Cu)-topped PBL in the subtropical eastern oceans. We show that in the CESM the coastal Sc-topped PBLs in the subtropical Eastern Pacific are well-simulated but the climatological transition from Sc to shallow Cu is too abrupt and happens too close to the coast. By contrast, in the GFS coupled simulation the coastal Sc amount and PBL depth are severely underestimated while the transition from Sc to shallow Cu is łdelayed˛ and offshore Sc cover is too extensive in the subtropical Eastern Pacific. We discuss the possible connections between such differences in the simulations and differences in the parameterizations of shallow convection and boundary layer turbulence in the two models.

  15. Arctic energy resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rey, L.

    1983-01-01

    The Arctic is a vulnerable region with immense resources. These range from the replenishable (tidal energy, hydroelectricity, wood, biomass, fish, game, and geothermal energy) to the non-replenishable (coal, minerals, natural gas, hydrocarbon deposits). But the problems of exploiting such resources without damaging the environment of the Arctic are formidable. In this book all aspects are considered: occurrence of energy resources; the technological and economic aspects of exploration and exploitation; the environmental and social impact of technological development.

  16. Remote sensing of total integrated water vapor, wind speed, and cloud liquid water over the ocean using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Norman Willis William

    1997-01-01

    A modified D-matrix retrieval method is the basis of the refined total integrated water vapor (TIWV), total integrated cloud liquid water (CLW), and surface wind speed (WS) retrieval methods that are developed. The 85 GHZ ...

  17. For JCLI CCSM Special Issue The influence of sea ice on ocean heat uptake in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    and the rate of ocean heat uptake. The warming rate in response to increasing green- house gases in models CO2 are investigated with CCSM3: A deep warming below 500 m and extending down several kilometers in the Southern Ocean and warming in a 200-m layer just below the surface in the Arctic Ocean. Ocean heat uptake

  18. The Necklace around the Arctic Arctic indigenous peoples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    national choir). #12;The economies of the Arctic settlements invariably involve fish, oil or gas: natural and Wildlife Service ( http://arctic.fws.gov/ ), and other sources. #12;Faroe Islands (~Denmark) Shetland

  19. Effect of coarse marine aerosols on stratocumulus clouds Yoav Lehahn,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostinski, Alex

    an important role not only over land for windpower estimation but also over the oceans by changing clouds

  20. 6, 96559722, 2006 Arctic smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Discussions Arctic smoke ­ record high air pollution levels in the European Arctic due to agricultural fires into the European Arctic and caused the most severe air pollution episodes ever recorded there. This paper confirms that biomass burning (BB) was in-5 deed the source of the observed air pollution, studies the transport

  1. EA-1193: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site

  2. EA-1193: Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site

  3. 90E 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 0 30 60 OCEAN ATLANTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREENLAND EUROPE AFRICA SOUTH AMERICA NORTH AMERICA ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN 418 625 626-636 637-641 642-644 645 646 647 648-649 650-656 657-659 660-661 662 1102-1103 1104-1106 1107 1108-1118 1119 1120 1121 1122 1123 1124 1125 1126-1134 998-1001 SOUTHERN OCEAN

  4. Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) AMF Deployment Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j eCommitteeCloud-Resolving3

  5. Ocean priOrities fOr the Obama administratiOn and cOngress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    : promote ocean renewable energy development and reinvest in our oceans 19 action 3: support state.S. Secretary of Transportation Members Samuel Bodman, Former U.S. Secretary of Energy Lillian Borrone, Former and regional ocean and coastal priorities 25 action 4: improve arctic research and management 29 assessment

  6. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shupe, Matthew

    2013-05-22

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  7. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  8. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of this contract, we participated in another ARM-sponsored experiment at the NSA during February-March 2007. This experiment is called the Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) and the GSR was operated successfully for the duration of the campaign. One of the principal goals of the experiment was to provide retrievals of water vapor during PWV amounts less than 2 mm and to compare GSR data with ARM radiometers and radiosondes. A secondary goal was to compare the radiometric response of the microwave and millimeter wavelength radiometers to water and ice clouds. In this final report, we will include the separate progress reports for each of the three years of the project and follow with a section on major accomplishments of the project.

  9. Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu X.; Lin W.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J.; Klein, S. A.; Shi, X.; Wang, Z.; Ghan, S. J.; Earle, M.; Liu, P. S. K.; Zelenyuk, A.

    2011-12-24

    Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m{sup -2}. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

  10. Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-12-24

    Arctic clouds simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic Spring and Fall seasons performed under the Cloud- Associated Parameterizations Testbed (CAPT) framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase stratocumulus, and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level clouds, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons and cloud fraction in the Spring season. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave (LW) radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. The model with a new ice nucleation parameterization moderately improves the model simulations by increasing cloud liquid water content in mixed-phase clouds through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron- Findeisen (WBF) process. The CAM5 single column model testing shows that change in the homogeneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C has a substantial impact on the modeled liquid water content through the slowing-down of liquid and rain-related processes. In contrast, collections of cloud ice by snow and cloud liquid by rain are of minor importance for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic.

  11. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John

    2013-06-30

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  12. 2006 Nature Publishing Group Episodic fresh surface waters in the Eocene Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakobsson, Martin

    with a local sea surface temperature rise from ,10 8C to 13 8C, pointing to simultaneous increases in salt. The recent Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 302 (or Arctic Coring Expedition, ACEX tolerant species have experimentally been pre-conditioned by gradual increase of salt concentrations

  13. NGEE Arctic Data Catalog

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFromJune 2013TECNGEE Arctic - Data

  14. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  15. Cloud coverage and height during FIRE ACE derived from Patrick Minnis,1 Venkatesan Chakrapani,2 David R. Doelling,2 Louis Nguyen,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Cloud coverage and height during FIRE ACE derived from AVHRR data Patrick Minnis,1 Venkatesan Robert F. Arduini,4 and Matthew Shupe5 Abstract. Cloud cover and height are derived from NOAA-12 and NOAA excellent temporal coverage during the May­July 1998 First ISCCP Regional Experiment Arctic Clouds

  16. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , the European Union and India) burn before they transition to renewable energy sources. The more carbon dioxide, the ice cover of the Arctic Ocean, and the other smaller mountain glaciers around the world retreat

  17. Preface: Crowds and Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    crowdsourcing, cloud computing, big data, and Internetdata include “cloud computing,” “algorithms,” “filters,” “cloud of claims about cloud computing and big data settle

  18. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  19. PROGRESS REPORT OF FY 2004 ACTIVITIES: IMPROVED WATER VAPOR AND CLOUD RETRIEVALS AT THE NSA/AAO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. R. Westwater; V. V. Leuskiy; M. Klein; A. J. Gasiewski; and J. A. Shaw

    2004-11-01

    The basic goals of the research are to develop and test algorithms and deploy instruments that improve measurements of water vapor, cloud liquid, and cloud coverage, with a focus on the Arctic conditions of cold temperatures and low concentrations of water vapor. The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. Although several technologies have been investigated to measure these column amounts, microwave radiometers (MWR) have been used operationally by the ARM program for passive retrievals of these quantities: precipitable water vapor (PWV) and integrated water liquid (IWL). The technology of PWV and IWL retrievals has advanced steadily since the basic 2-channel MWR was first deployed at ARM CART sites Important advances are the development and refinement of the tipcal calibration method [1,2], and improvement of forward model radiative transfer algorithms [3,4]. However, the concern still remains that current instruments deployed by ARM may be inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and IWL. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important because of the possibility of scaling and/or quality control of radiosondes by the water amount. Extremely dry conditions, with PWV less than 3 mm, commonly occur in Polar Regions during the winter months. Accurate measurements of the PWV during such dry conditions are needed to improve our understanding of the regional radiation energy budgets. The results of a 1999 experiment conducted at the ARM North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site during March of 1999 [5] have shown that the strength associated with the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line makes radiometry in this frequency regime suitable for measuring low amounts of PWV. As a portion of our research, we conducted another millimeter wave radiometric experiment at the NSA/AAO in March-April 2004. This experiment relied heavily on our experiences of the 1999 experiment. Particular attention was paid to issues of radiometric calibration and radiosonde intercomparisons. Our theoretical and experimental work also supplements efforts by industry (F. Solheim, Private Communication) to develop sub-millimeter radiometers for ARM deployment. In addition to quantitative improvement of water vapor measurements at cold temperature, the impact of adding millimeter-wave window channels to improve the sensitivity to arctic clouds was studied. We also deployed an Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) during this experiment, both for measuring continuous day-night statistics of the study of cloud coverage and identifying conditions suitable for tipcal analysis. This system provided the first capability of determining spatial cloud statistics continuously in both day and night at the NSA site and has been used to demonstrate that biases exist in inferring cloud statistics from either zenith-pointing active sensors (lidars or radars) or sky imagers that rely on scattered sunlight in daytime and star maps at night [6].

  20. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  1. Arctic sea ice animation (Tom Agnew, Environment Canada) Lecture 12 HAS222d Intro to energy and environment 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arctic sea ice animation (Tom Agnew, Environment Canada) #12;Lecture 12 HAS222d Intro to energy. moisture streamers: (1 Sverdrup...106 m3/sec tranport of water carries 2.2 x 1015 watt thermal energy and environment 2009 slides on water in the atmosphere P.B. Rhines #12;Satellite image of water vapor (not cloud

  2. Some Thoughts on the Freezing and Melting of Sea Ice and Their Effects on the Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Some Thoughts on the Freezing and Melting of Sea Ice and Their Effects on the Ocean K. Aagaard. The high-latitude freezing and melting cycle can variously result in haline con- vection, freshwater of this process is that water distilled at the surface of the Arctic Ocean by freezing ends up at mid

  3. How is the ocean filled? Geoffrey Gebbie1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    hydrographic property to distinguish between North Atlantic Deep Water and Ant- arctic Bottom Water, finding of the deep Pacific than North Atlantic Deep Water. Another answer might be obtained if more water masses were heat, freshwater, and gases with the atmosphere, but once water sinks into the ocean interior

  4. INFLUENCE OF ARCTIC CLOUD THERMODYNAMIC PHASE ON SURFACE SHORTWAVE FLUX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -phase" category, can affect the surface energy balance at the same order of magnitude as greenhouse gas increases Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02- 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form

  5. Simulating Arctic mixed-phase clouds: Sensitivity to environmental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShift EndShutdownSolar(SLMP®)

  6. Relationship Between Arctic Clouds and Synoptic-Scale Variability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners *Reindustrialization Reindustrialization As EMRelationship Between

  7. Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81Towards Heavy FermionsTowards

  8. Liquid Water the Key to Arctic Cloud Radiative Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E CChina (MillionLiquid Fuels andWater

  9. Dispelling Clouds of Uncertainty

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lewis, Ernie; Teixeira, Joăo

    2015-06-15

    How do you build a climate model that accounts for cloud physics and the transitions between cloud regimes? Use MAGIC.

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01)govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBAgovCampaignsFall

  11. Cloud Computing Adam Barker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    Cloud Computing 1 Adam Barker #12;Overview · Introduction to Cloud computing · Enabling technologies · Di erent types of cloud: IaaS, PaaS and SaaS · Cloud terminology · Interacting with a cloud: management consoles · Launching an instance · Connecting to an instance · Running your application · Clouds

  12. Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicklighter, David W.; Hayes, Daniel J; Mcclelland, James W; Peterson, Bruce; Mcguire, David; Melillo, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

  13. Comprehensive Ocean Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

  14. Lecture(s) 9 Slides from atmosphere-ocean lectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the required energy poleward. the atmosphere is a heat engine, with Hadley convection cells driven moisture: both the `sensible' and `latent' heat fuels the vigorous overturning of the cloud visible albedo and ice can insulate the ocean from the atmosphere above. When the ocean surface freezes

  15. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.

    2013-02-07

    The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

  16. Short-lived pollutants in the Arctic: their climate impact and possible mitigation strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Quinn, P.K.; Bates, T.S.; Baum, E.; Doubleday, N.; Fiore, A.M.; Flanner, M.; Fridlind, A.; Garrett, T.J.; Koch, D.; Menon, S.; Shindell, D.; Stohl, A.; Warren, S.G.

    2007-09-24

    Several short-lived pollutants known to impact Arctic climate may be contributing to the accelerated rates of warming observed in this region relative to the global annually averaged temperature increase. Here, we present a summary of the short-lived pollutants that impact Arctic climate including methane, tropospheric ozone, and tropospheric aerosols. For each pollutant, we provide a description of the major sources and the mechanism of forcing. We also provide the first seasonally averaged forcing and corresponding temperature response estimates focused specifically on the Arctic. The calculations indicate that the forcings due to black carbon, methane, and tropospheric ozone lead to a positive surface temperature response indicating the need to reduce emissions of these species within and outside the Arctic. Additional aerosol species may also lead to surface warming if the aerosol is coincident with thin, low lying clouds. We suggest strategies for reducing the warming based on current knowledge and discuss directions for future research to address the large remaining uncertainties.

  17. Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

  18. Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the discovered and undiscovered Arctic oil and natural gas resource base with respect to their location and concentration. The paper also discusses the cost and impediments to developing Arctic oil and natural gas resources, including those issues associated with environmental habitats and political boundaries.

  19. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to improve representation of the Arctic in Earth System Models Topography influences snow cover, thermal

  20. Seasonal dynamics of bacterial biomass and production in a coastal arctic ecosystem: Franklin Bay, western Canadian Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    Seasonal dynamics of bacterial biomass and production in a coastal arctic ecosystem: Franklin Bay 2008. [1] The Canadian Arctic Shelf Exchange Study (CASES) included the overwintering deployment biomass and production in a coastal arctic ecosystem: Franklin Bay, western Canadian Arctic, J. Geophys

  1. Toward Securing Sensor Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Router Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Tower-mount Antenna Tower-mount Antenna Wireless-Features-1GHz-Tegra-2-HigherRes-Screen/ #12;Router Router Router Router Mini Computer Mini Computer Mini Computer Mini Computer External Storage External Storage Router Router Router Router Cloud Computing Cloud

  2. Ad hoc cloud computing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGilvary, Gary Andrew

    2014-11-27

    Commercial and private cloud providers offer virtualized resources via a set of co-located and dedicated hosts that are exclusively reserved for the purpose of offering a cloud service. While both cloud models appeal to ...

  3. Short-Term Arctic Cloud Statistics at NSA from the Infrared Cloud Imager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShift End Shift End A shift endsNovember3 13

  4. Springtime Arctic haze contributions of submicron organic particles from European and Asian combustion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Jesse

    The composition of Arctic aerosol, especially during the springtime Arctic haze, may play an important role in the radiative balance of the Arctic. The contribution of organic components to Arctic haze has only recently ...

  5. CloudTransport: Using Cloud Storage for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houmansadr, Amir

    users' network traffic by tunneling it through a cloud storage ser- vice such as Amazon S3. The goal the bridge or identify other connections. CloudTransport can be used as a standalone service, a gateway

  6. Ocean circulation and properties in Petermann Fjord, Greenland H. L. Johnson,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Helen

    the Arctic. Glacial melt water appears on the northeast side of the fjord at depths between 200 m and is thought to lose at least 80% of its mass through basal melting. Based on three opportunistic ocean surveys of the resulting melt water. The 1100 m deep fjord is separated from neighboring Hall Basin by a sill between 350

  7. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and will change living conditions for plants and animals, including people. At the same time, the world will see systems -- is shrinking. Arctic sea ice reflects solar energy away from the Earth and acts as a natural stream flow. And as more and more water reaches the ocean, it is increasing sea level at a faster rate

  8. On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Jui-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Toward Vehicular Service Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2 Open Mobile Cloud Requirement . . . . .3.1 Mobile Cloud

  9. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reagan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Potential distribution of methane hydrate in the world'sisotopic evidence for methane hydrate instability duringHendy, L.L. , and R.J. Behl, Methane hydrates in quaternary

  10. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reagan, M.

    2012-01-01

    temperature based on a geothermal gradient of 8.7 ?C/100 m (match the desired initial geothermal gradient and supply theCase II.1: Reduced geothermal gradient Case II.2: Decreased

  11. The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2008-11-01

    The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

  12. BETR-world: A geographically explicit model of chemical fate: Application to transport of a-HCH to the arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toose, Liisa; Woodfine, David G.; MacLeod, Matthew; Mackay, Don; Gouin, Jenn

    2003-12-01

    The Berkeley Trent (BETR)-World model, a 25 compartment, geographically explicit fugacity-based model is described and applied to evaluate the transport of chemicals from temperate source regions to receptor regions (such as the Arctic). The model was parameterized using GIS and an array of digital data on weather, oceans, freshwater, vegetation and geo-political boundaries. This version of the BETR model framework includes modification of atmospheric degradation rates by seasonally variable hydroxyl radical concentrations and temperature. Degradation rates in all other compartments vary with seasonally changing temperature. Deposition to the deep ocean has been included as a loss mechanism. A case study was undertaken for a-HCH. Dynamic emission scenarios were estimated for each of the 25 regions. Predicted environmental concentrations showed good agreement with measured values for the northern regions in air , and fresh and oceanic water and with the results from a previous model of global chemical fate. Potential for long-range transport and deposition to the Arctic region was assessed using a Transfer Efficiency combined with estimated emissions. European regions and the Orient including China have a high potential to contribute a-HCH contamination in the Arctic due to high rates of emission in these regions despite low Transfer Efficiencies. Sensitivity analyses reveal that the performance and reliability of the model is strongly in sequenced by parameters controlling degradation rates.

  13. Characteristics of a Marine Stratocumulus to Cumulus Cloud Transition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapalac, Allison

    2014-12-08

    of stratocumulus clouds are commonly observed as either solid or broken cloud decks in regions where warm, subsiding air is present over cooler sea surface temperatures (SSTs) (Klein and Hartmann 1993; Wood 2012). The strong subsidence helps to maintain...). There is also large-scale subsidence that occurs year-round over the southeastern Pacific Ocean, resulting in a quasi-permanent surface anticyclone that is centered roughly at 27°S, 90°W (Garreaud and Muńoz 2004). This subtropical high brings southern low...

  14. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana E. Veron

    2012-04-09

    This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

  15. On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Jui-Ting

    2013-01-01

    1.2 Cloud computing to Vehicular CloudM. Gerla. Vehicular Cloud Computing, VCA 2012 Proceedings,single vehicle cannot. Cloud computing to Vehicular Cloud

  16. Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloane J. Wiktorowicz; Andrew P. Ingersoll

    2006-09-26

    Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune's deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be ~ 0.8 g/cm^3. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager flyby. As Neptune cools, the probability of a liquid ocean increases. Extrasolar "hot Neptunes," which presumably migrate inward toward their parent stars, cannot harbor liquid water oceans unless they have lost almost all of the hydrogen and helium from their deep interiors.

  17. Cloud Security by Max Garvey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolmach, Andrew

    Cloud Security Survey by Max Garvey #12;Cloudy Cloud is Cloudy What is the cloud? On Demand Service, performance SECaaS - Cloud hosted security measures Certifications - measurements for cloud security. #12;Cloud Questions If you have $0 security budget, could cloud be a security improvement? Who owns the data

  18. Drake passage and central american seaway controls on the distribution of the oceanic carbon reservoir

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fyke, Jeremy G.; D'Orgeville, Marc; Weaver, Andrew J.

    2015-05-01

    A coupled carbon/climate model is used to explore the impact of Drake Passage opening and Central American Seaway closure on the distribution of carbon in the global oceans. We find that gateway evolution likely played an important role in setting the modern day distribution of oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), which is currently characterized by relatively low concentrations in the Atlantic ocean, and high concentrations in the Southern, Indian, and Pacific oceans. In agreement with previous studies, we find a closed Drake Passage in the presence of an open Central American Seaway results in suppressed Atlantic meridional overturning and enhancedmore »southern hemispheric deep convection. Opening of the Drake Passage triggers Antarctic Circumpolar Current flow and a weak Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Subsequent Central American Seaway closure reinforces the AMOC while also stagnating equatorial Pacific subsurface waters. These gateway-derived oceanographic changes are reflected in large shifts to the global distribution of DIC. An initially closed Drake Passage results in high DIC concentrations in the Atlantic and Arctic oceans, and lower DIC concentrations in the Pacific/Indian/Southern oceans. Opening Drake Passage reverses this gradient by lowering mid-depth Atlantic and Arctic DIC concentrations and raising deep Pacific/Indian/Southern Ocean DIC concentrations. Central American Seaway closure further reinforces this trend through additional Atlantic mid-depth DIC decreases, as well as Pacific mid-depth DIC concentration increases, with the net effect being a transition to a modern distribution of oceanic DIC.« less

  19. Economic feasibility of shipping containers through the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Russell (Russell Clayton)

    2009-01-01

    As the Arctic ice cover continues to retreat, the possibility of regular transit through the Arctic becomes an increasing reality. Liner companies could take advantage of distance savings (up to 4000 nautical miles less ...

  20. Tuktoyaktuk : responsive strategies for a new Arctic urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchot, Pamela (Pamela Rae)

    2011-01-01

    The Canadian Arctic is facing a set of compounding crises that will drastically impact the future of its coastal frontier. At a time when climate change is having a detrimental impact on the Arctic landscape, Northern ...

  1. The seasonal dynamics of Arctic surface hydrology in permafrost environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trofaier, Anna Maria

    2014-11-11

    Climate-induced landscape evolution is resulting in changes to biogeochemical and hydrologi- cal cycling. In the Arctic and sub-Arctic permafrost zones, rising air temperatures are warming, and in some regions even thawing, the frozen ground...

  2. Program Analyses for Cloud Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tetali, Sai Deep

    2015-01-01

    search. ” In CCSW 09: Cloud Computing Security Workshop, pp.ACM workshop on Cloud computing security workshop, CCSW ’11,aspects of cloud computing, including security, performance

  3. Clonal Diversity in an Expanding Community of Arctic Salix spp. and a Model for Recruitment Modes of Arctic Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Greg

    Clonal Diversity in an Expanding Community of Arctic Salix spp. and a Model for Recruitment Modes identity in a population of Salix spp. shrubs at an arctic site with a known history of woody shrub

  4. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  5. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    2012-04-01

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  6. Climate Dynamics Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretherton, Chris

    -of-the-art coupled atmosphere-ocean models: the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR1 Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global2Climate Dynamics Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System

  7. Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

    2011-02-16

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

  8. PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud 1 PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud 2015-05-25 1 Web Windows Adobe Creative Cloud PC | Creative Cloud https://helpx.adobe.com/jp/creative-cloud Adobe Creative Cloud 5.1 Web TTInstaller(Windows )() http://www.officesoft.gsic.titech.ac

  9. ESTABLISHMENT OF CLOUD REGIMES FOR SYSTEMATIC EVALUATION OF CLOUD MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ESTABLISHMENT OF CLOUD REGIMES FOR SYSTEMATIC EVALUATION OF CLOUD MODELING Wuyin Lin1 , Yangang Liu Distinct cloud regimes can exist locally and globally. Such cloud regimes usually have close association, the classification of cloud regimes may be based on cloud properties and/or meteorological conditions. This study

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01)govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic CloudShortwaveand Land-Ecosystems

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01)govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic CloudShortwaveandgovCampaignsIPASRC

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - MASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01)govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic-govCampaignsLowerMeasurements Cloud

  13. Hyperscale Cloud Technical White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Hyperscale Cloud Technical White Paper Published: May 2015 Applies to: SQL Server 2016 CTP2, SQL in the cloud with greater scale and flexibility. Microsoft SQL Server is built for cloud integration--your organization can easily deploy SQL Server in a private cloud, hybrid cloud, or public cloud, and can use

  14. XSEDE Cloud Survey Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

  15. Research Cloud Computing Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    Research Cloud Computing Recommendations SRCPAC December 3, 2014 #12;Mandate and Membership SRCPAC convened this committee in Sept 2014 to investigate the role that cloud computing should play in our & Academic Affairs (Social Work) #12;Questions discussed · What cloud resources are available? · Which kinds

  16. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

    2008-12-31

    The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

  17. Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part I: Cloud Radiative Kernels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part I: Cloud Radiative 2011) ABSTRACT This study proposes a novel technique for computing cloud feedbacks using histograms integrated cloud feedbacks computed in this manner agree remarkably well with the adjusted change in cloud

  18. Taiwan UniCloud: A Cloud Testbed with Collaborative Cloud Services Wu-Chun Chung*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Yeh-Ching

    Taiwan UniCloud: A Cloud Testbed with Collaborative Cloud Services Wu-Chun Chung* , Po-Chi Shih}@cs.nthu.edu.tw Abstract--This paper introduces a prototype of Taiwan UniCloud, a community-driven hybrid cloud platform for academics in Taiwan. The goal is to leverage resources in multiple clouds among different organizations

  19. Computational Arctic Research at ARSC/UAF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newby, Gregory B.

    Supercomputing Center ­ Ph.D. Syracuse 1993, "Information Transfer" ­ Research interests in data Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources across Alaska and the Hawaiian Islands" · PI: Buck Sharpton Supercomputing Center University of Alaska Fairbanks U.S. Arctic Research Commission Meeting October 7, 2010 #12

  20. Relationship between Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    ` Relationship between Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Droplet is the relationship between below cloud base cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and satellite retrievals of cloud droplet cloud effective radius; however, satellites can not measure cloud condensation nuclei (CCN

  1. Community Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinos, Alexandros

    2009-01-01

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns over privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Our response is an alternative model for the Cloud conceptualisation, providing a paradigm for Clouds in the community, utilising networked personal computers for liberation from the centralised vendor model. Community Cloud Computing (C3) offers an alternative architecture, created by combing the Cloud with paradigms from Grid Computing, principles from Digital Ecosystems, and sustainability from Green Computing, while remaining true to the original vision of the Internet. It is more technically challenging than Cloud Computing, having to deal with distributed computing issues, including heterogeneous nodes, varying quality of service, and additional security constraints. However, these are not insurmountable challenge...

  2. Stochastic dynamics of Arctic sea ice Part II: Multiplicative noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Woosok

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the numerical solutions of a stochastic Arctic sea ice model with multiplicative noise over a wide range of external heat-fluxes, $\\Delta F_0$, which correspond to greenhouse gas forcing. When the noise is multiplicative, the noise-magnitude depends on the state-variable, and this will influence the statistical moments in a manner that differs from the additive case, which we analyzed in Part I of this study. The state variable describing the deterministic backbone of our model is the energy, $E(t)$, contained in the ice or the ocean and for a thorough comparison and contrast we choose the simplest form of multiplicative noise $\\sigma E(t) \\xi(t)$, where $\\sigma$ is the noise amplitude and $\\xi(t)$ is the noise process. The case of constant additive noise (CA) we write as $\\sigma\\overline{E_S}\\xi(t)$, in which $\\overline{E_S}$ is the seasonally averaged value of the periodic deterministic steady-state solution $E_S(t)$, or the deterministic seasonal cycle. We then treat the case of seasonally-varyi...

  3. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment TWP-ICE Cloud and rain characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, P.T., Jakob, C., and Mather, J.H.

    2004-05-31

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them.

  4. Federated Cloud Security Architecture for Secure and Agile Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Shouhuai

    Federated Cloud Security Architecture for Secure and Agile Clouds Weiliang Luo, Li Xu, Zhenxin Zhan. This chapter introduces the novel federated cloud security architecture that includes proactive cloud defense technologies for secure and agile cloud development. The federated security architecture consists of a set

  5. The proposed connection between clouds and cosmic rays: Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The proposed connection between clouds and cosmic rays: Cloud behaviour during the past 50 of cloud factors using both satellite and ground­based data. In particular, we search for evidence for the low cloud decrease predicted by the rising levels of solar activity and the low cloud­cosmic ray flux

  6. An Autonomous Reliabilit Cloud Comput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    An Autonomous Reliabilit Ami Cloud Comput Department of Computing and Informa Abstract--Cloud computing paradigm allo based access to computing and storages s Internet. Since with advances of Cloud. Keywords- Cloud computing; SLA negotiat I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing has transferred the services

  7. Fig 2 -Cloud energy collect infrastructure Energy Efficient (Green) Cloud !

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefčvre, Laurent

    Fig 2 - Cloud energy collect infrastructure Energy Efficient (Green) Cloud ! The Compatible software components Energy Monitoring of physical and virtual resources Energy usage exposing for users and clouds managers Energy monitoring streams for upper layers software Design Energy aware software

  8. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS:...

  9. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

  10. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent...

  11. Finance Idol Word Cloud

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This word cloud represents the topics discussed during the Big and Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs breakout session at the SunShot Grand Challenge.

  12. A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

    2013-06-18

    In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

  13. Bacterial production and microbial food web structure in a large arctic river and the coastal Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    in the surface waters decreased across the salinity gradient, dropping from 51,000 (river) to 30 (sea) cells m. Glucose enrichment experiments indicated that bacterial metabolism was carbon limited in the Mackenzie

  14. Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

    2008-09-01

    Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

  15. Program Analyses for Cloud Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tetali, Sai Deep

    2015-01-01

    search. ” In CCSW 09: Cloud Computing Security Workshop, pp.and M. Walfish. “Depot: Cloud storage with minimal trust. ”the 3rd ACM workshop on Cloud computing security workshop,

  16. Wind speed response of marine non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds over a diurnal cycle in cloud-system resolving simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2015-10-21

    Observed and projected trends in large scale wind speed over the oceans prompt the question: how might marine stratocumulus clouds and their radiative properties respond to future changes in large scale wind speed? Wind speed drives the surface fluxes of sensible heat, moisture, and momentum, and thereby acts on cloud liquid water path (LWP) and cloud radiative properties. We present an investigation of the dynamical response of non-precipitating, overcast marine stratocumulus clouds to different wind speeds, all else equal. In cloud-system resolving simulations, we find that higher wind speed leads to faster boundary layer growth and stronger entrainment. The dynamicalmore »driver is enhanced buoyant production of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) from latent heat release in cloud updrafts. LWP is enhanced during the night and in the morning at higher wind speed, and more strongly suppressed later in the day. Wind speed hence accentuates the diurnal LWP cycle by expanding the morning – afternoon contrast. The higher LWP at higher wind speed does not, however, enhance cloud top cooling because in clouds with LWP ⪆ 50 g m?2, long wave emissions are very insensitive to LWP. This leads to the more general conclusion that in sufficiently thick stratocumulus clouds, additional boundary layer growth and entrainment due to a boundary layer moistening arises by stronger production of TKE from latent heat release in cloud updrafts, rather than from enhanced longwave cooling. We find furthermore that large scale wind modulates boundary layer decoupling. At nighttime and at low wind speed during daytime, it enhances decoupling in part by faster boundary layer growth and stronger entrainment, and in part because circulation driven by shear from large scale wind in the sub-cloud layer hinders vertical moisture transport between the surface and cloud base. With increasing wind speed, however, in decoupled daytime conditions, shear-driven circulation due to large scale wind takes over from buoyancy-driven circulation in transporting moisture from the surface to cloud base, and thereby reduces decoupling and helps maintain LWP. The cloud radiative effect (CRE) responds to changes in LWP and cloud fraction, and higher wind speed translates to a stronger diurnally averaged CRE. However, the sensitivity of the diurnally averaged CRE to wind speed decreases with increasing wind speed.« less

  17. Cloud Feedbacks on Climate: A Challenging Scientific Problem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Norris, Joe [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, California, USA

    2010-09-01

    One reason it has been difficult to develop suitable social and economic policies to address global climate change is that projected global warming during the coming century has a large uncertainty range. The primary physical cause of this large uncertainty range is lack of understanding of the magnitude and even sign of cloud feedbacks on the climate system. If Earth's cloudiness responded to global warming by reflecting more solar radiation back to space or allowing more terrestrial radiation to be emitted to space, this would mitigate the warming produced by increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Contrastingly, a cloud response that reduced solar reflection or terrestrial emission would exacerbate anthropogenic greenhouse warming. It is likely that a mixture of responses will occur depending on cloud type and meteorological regime, and at present, we do not know what the net effect will be. This presentation will explain why cloud feedbacks have been a challenging scientific problem from the perspective of theory, modeling, and observations. Recent research results on observed multidecadal cloud-atmosphere-ocean variability over the Pacific Ocean will also be shown, along with suggestions for future research.

  18. Cloud Feedbacks on Climate: A Challenging Scientific Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Joe [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, California, USA

    2010-05-12

    One reason it has been difficult to develop suitable social and economic policies to address global climate change is that projected global warming during the coming century has a large uncertainty range. The primary physical cause of this large uncertainty range is lack of understanding of the magnitude and even sign of cloud feedbacks on the climate system. If Earth's cloudiness responded to global warming by reflecting more solar radiation back to space or allowing more terrestrial radiation to be emitted to space, this would mitigate the warming produced by increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Contrastingly, a cloud response that reduced solar reflection or terrestrial emission would exacerbate anthropogenic greenhouse warming. It is likely that a mixture of responses will occur depending on cloud type and meteorological regime, and at present, we do not know what the net effect will be. This presentation will explain why cloud feedbacks have been a challenging scientific problem from the perspective of theory, modeling, and observations. Recent research results on observed multidecadal cloud-atmosphere-ocean variability over the Pacific Ocean will also be shown, along with suggestions for future research.

  19. Cloud Feedbacks on Climate: A Challenging Scientific Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Joel (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego) [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego

    2010-05-10

    One reason it has been difficult to develop suitable social and economic policies to address global climate change is that projected global warming during the coming century has a large uncertainty range. The primary physical cause of this large uncertainty range is lack of understanding of the magnitude and even sign of cloud feedbacks on the climate system. If Earth's cloudiness responded to global warming by reflecting more solar radiation back to space or allowing more terrestrial radiation to be emitted to space, this would mitigate the warming produced by increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Contrastingly, a cloud response that reduced solar reflection or terrestrial emission would exacerbate anthropogenic greenhouse warming. It is likely that a mixture of responses will occur depending on cloud type and meteorological regime, and at present, we do not know what the net effect will be. This presentation will explain why cloud feedbacks have been a challenging scientific problem from the perspective of theory, modeling, and observations. Recent research results on observed multidecadal cloud-atmosphere-ocean variability over the Pacific Ocean will also be shown, along with suggestions for future research.

  20. Sandia Energy - Cloud Computing Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Home Stationary Power Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure Cloud Computing Services Cloud...

  1. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

  2. CONTRIBUTED Green Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Rod

    as well as data processing and data storage. We show that energy consumption in transport and switching | Cloud computing; core networks; data centers; energy consumption I. INTRODUCTION The increasing to energy consumption and cloud computing seems to be an alternative to office-based computing. By Jayant

  3. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: COMBINED OBSERVATIONAL-MODELING-THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: COMBINED OBSERVATIONAL of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT Cloud fraction and cloud albedo have long occupied the central stage as key cloud quantities in studying cloud-climate interaction; however their quantitative relationship

  4. Cloud computing security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Dongwan; Claycomb, William R.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-10-01

    Cloud computing is a paradigm rapidly being embraced by government and industry as a solution for cost-savings, scalability, and collaboration. While a multitude of applications and services are available commercially for cloud-based solutions, research in this area has yet to fully embrace the full spectrum of potential challenges facing cloud computing. This tutorial aims to provide researchers with a fundamental understanding of cloud computing, with the goals of identifying a broad range of potential research topics, and inspiring a new surge in research to address current issues. We will also discuss real implementations of research-oriented cloud computing systems for both academia and government, including configuration options, hardware issues, challenges, and solutions.

  5. New Trans-Arctic shipping routes navigable by midcentury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of additional ice reductions in the future, have fueled speculations of potential new trans-Arctic shippingNew Trans-Arctic shipping routes navigable by midcentury Laurence C. Smith1 and Scott R. Stephenson changes in sea ice will realistically impact ship navigation are lacking. To address this deficiency, we

  6. An Arctic Terrestrial Food-Chain Bioaccumulation Model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gobas, Frank

    An Arctic Terrestrial Food-Chain Bioaccumulation Model for Persistent Organic Pollutants B A R R Y tarandus), and wolf (Canis lupus) food-chains of Canada's central and western arctic region from measured concentrations of 25 organic chemicals forecasted for caribou and wolves from Cambridge Bay (69°07 N 105°03 W

  7. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Nome

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  8. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Barrow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  9. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Barrow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  10. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Nome

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  11. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Bethel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  12. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Bethel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  13. National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  14. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Fairbanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  15. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Anchorage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region. The purpose of this round is to give feedback on the elements of the draft plan.

  16. Critical Mechanisms for the Formation of Extreme Arctic Sea-Ice Extent in the Summers of 2007 and 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan; Zib, Benjamin J.; Xi, Baike; Stanfield, Ryan; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Xiangdong; Lin, B.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-07-29

    A warming Arctic climate is undergoing significant e 21 nvironmental change, most evidenced by the reduction of Arctic sea-ice extent during the summer. In this study, we examine two extreme anomalies of September sea-ice extent in 2007 and 1996, and investigate the impacts of cloud fraction (CF), atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV), downwelling longwave flux (DLF), surface air temperature (SAT), pressure and winds on the sea-ice variation in 2007 and 1996 using both satellite-derived sea-ice products and MERRA reanalysis. The area of the Laptev, East Siberian and West Chukchi seas (70-90oN, 90-180oE) has experienced the largest variation in sea-ice extent from year-to-year and defined here as the Area Of Focus (AOF). The record low September sea-ice extent in 2007 was associated with positive anomalies 30 of CF, PWV, DLF, and SAT over the AOF. Persistent anti-cyclone positioned over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia induced easterly zonal and southerly meridional winds. In contrast, negative CF, PWV, DLF and SAT anomalies, as well as opposite wind patterns to those in 2007, characterized the 1996 high September sea-ice extent. Through this study, we hypothesize the following positive feedbacks of clouds, water vapor, radiation and atmospheric variables on the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007. The record low sea-ice extent during the summer 2007 is initially triggered by the atmospheric circulation anomaly. The southerly winds across the Chukchi and East Siberian seas transport warm, moist air from the north Pacific, which is not only enhancing sea-ice melt across the AOF, but also increasing clouds. The positive cloud feedback results in higher SAT and more sea-ice melt. Therefore, 40 more water vapor could be evaporated from open seas and higher SAT to form more clouds, which will enhance positive cloud feedback. This enhanced positive cloud feedback will then further increase SAT and accelerate the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007.

  17. Model analysis of the anthropogenic aerosol effect on clouds over East Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2012-01-16

    A coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecast model coupled with Chemistry) was used to conduct a pair of simulations with present-day (PD) and preindustrial (PI) emissions over East Asia to examine the aerosol indirect effect on clouds. As a result of an increase in aerosols in January, the cloud droplet number increased by 650 cm{sup -3} over the ocean and East China, 400 cm{sup -3} over Central and Southwest China, and less than 200 cm{sup -3} over North China. The cloud liquid water path (LWP) increased by 40-60 g m{sup -2} over the ocean and Southeast China and 30 g m{sup -2} over Central China; the LWP increased less than 5 g m{sup -2} or decreased by 5 g m{sup -2} over North China. The effective radius (Re) decreased by more than 4 {mu}m over Southwest, Central, and Southeast China and 2 {mu}m over North China. In July, variations in cloud properties were more uniform; the cloud droplet number increased by approximately 250-400 cm{sup -3}, the LWP increased by approximately 30-50 g m{sup -2}, and Re decreased by approximately 3 {mu}m over most regions of China. In response to cloud property changes from PI to PD, shortwave (SW) cloud radiative forcing strengthened by 30 W m{sup -2} over the ocean and 10 W m{sup -2} over Southeast China, and it weakened slightly by approximately 2-10 W m{sup -2} over Central and Southwest China in January. In July, SW cloud radiative forcing strengthened by 15 W m{sup -2} over Southeast and North China and weakened by 10 W m{sup -2} over Central China. The different responses of SW cloud radiative forcing in different regions was related to cloud feedbacks and natural variability.

  18. Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

    2014-05-16

    To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

  19. COLORS OF A SECOND EARTH. II. EFFECTS OF CLOUDS ON PHOTOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF EARTH-LIKE EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, Yuka; Suto, Yasushi; Turner, Edwin L. [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kawahara, Hajime [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Fukuda, Satoru; Nakajima, Teruyuki [Center of Climate System Research, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8568 (Japan); Livengood, Timothy A., E-mail: yuka.fujii@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-09-10

    As a test bed for future investigations of directly imaged terrestrial exoplanets, we present the recovery of the surface components of the Earth from multi-band diurnal light curves obtained with the EPOXI spacecraft. We find that the presence and longitudinal distribution of ocean, soil, and vegetation are reasonably well reproduced by fitting the observed color variations with a simplified model composed of a priori known albedo spectra of ocean, soil, vegetation, snow, and clouds. The effect of atmosphere, including clouds, on light scattered from surface components is modeled using a radiative transfer code. The required noise levels for future observations of exoplanets are also determined. Our model-dependent approach allows us to infer the presence of major elements of the planet (in the case of the Earth, clouds, and ocean) with observations having signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) {approx}> 10 in most cases and with high confidence if S/N {approx}> 20. In addition, S/N {approx}> 100 enables us to detect the presence of components other than ocean and clouds in a fairly model-independent way. Degradation of our inversion procedure produced by cloud cover is also quantified. While cloud cover significantly dilutes the magnitude of color variations compared with the cloudless case, the pattern of color changes remains. Therefore, the possibility of investigating surface features through light-curve fitting remains even for exoplanets with cloud cover similar to Earth's.

  20. Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

  1. BLM Arctic Field Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump|LineMaine:Ayuda:NavegacionBARC09-167Arctic Field

  2. Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, C.J.; Warren, S.G.

    1999-08-01

    Surface synoptic weather reports for the entire globe, gathered from various available data sets, were processed, edited, and rewritten to provide a single data set of individual observations of clouds, spanning the 44 years 1952-1995 for ship data and the 26 years 1971-1996 for land station data. In addition to the cloud portion of the synoptic report, each edited report also includes the associated pressure, present weather, wind, air temperature, and dew point (and sea surface temperature over oceans).

  3. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

  4. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC · Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  5. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore »and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  6. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  7. Ocean Energy Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-08-05

    Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

  8. A developer's survey on different cloud platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doan, Dzung

    2009-01-01

    1 Introduction Cloud computing is a computing paradigm inFor this reason, cloud computing has also been describedparallel processing. Cloud computing can be contrasted with

  9. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coghlan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    their research efforts in cloud security. Experiences andinvolving cloud resources and security guidance is thedynamic nature of cloud systems, the security controls must

  10. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01

    outsourcing to the cloud and data security. Depending onconcerned about data security in the cloud. Data stored inrun in the cloud, while protecting data security guarantees.

  11. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01

    2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

  12. CloudSafe: Securing Data Processing within Vulnerable Virtualization Environments in the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Barbara G.

    CloudSafe: Securing Data Processing within Vulnerable Virtualization Environments in the Cloud large-scale cloud applications. Index Terms--cloud security, outsourced computation, side- channel, newly discovered vulnerabilities in cloud virtualization envi- ronment have threatened the security

  13. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  14. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre...

  15. National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks February 19, 2015 9:30AM to 10:30AM AKST Fairbanks, Alaska BLM...

  16. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Dutch HarborUnalaska February 27, 2015 10:00AM to 12:00PM EST Unalaska, Alaska Unalaska Public Library 64 Eleanor Dr. Unalaska, AK 99685...

  17. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Dutch HarborUnalaska February 27, 2015 1:30PM to 3:30PM EST Unalaska, Alaska Unalaska Public Library 64 Eleanor Dr. Unalaska, AK 99685...

  18. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Consultation and Stakeholder Outreach Session: Kotzebue February 23, 2015 10:00AM to 12:00PM AKST Kotzebue, Alaska Northwest Arctic Heritage Center 171 3rd Ave. Kotzebue, AK 9975...

  19. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Bethel February 25, 2015 1:30PM to 3:30PM AKST Bethel, Alaska AVCP Regional Housing Authority 411 Ptarmigan St. Bethel, AK 99559...

  20. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  1. CloudMan: A Platform for Portable Cloud Manufacturing Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    CloudMan: A Platform for Portable Cloud Manufacturing Services Soheil Qanbari, Samira Mahdi Zadeh Education (BIHE), Iran soroush.vedaeei@bihe.org Abstract--Cloud manufacturing refers to "as a Service" pro- duction model that exploits an on-demand access to a distributed pool of diversified manufacturing

  2. Attribution Analysis of Cloud Feedback 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chen

    2014-07-15

    Uncertainty on cloud feedback is the primary contributor to the large spread of equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) in climate models. In this study, we compare the short-term cloud feedback in climate models with observations, and evaluate...

  3. Software-Defined Mobile Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ku, Ian

    2014-01-01

    M. Gerla. “Towards Software- Defined VANETs: ArchitectureI. Ku, Y. Lu, and M. Gerla. “Software-Defined Mobile Cloud:C. Peylo, “CloudMAC: towards software defined WLANs,” ACM

  4. Opaque cloud detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-01-20

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Ground-based Cloud Tomography Experiment at SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01)govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic CloudShortwave

  6. Response of photosynthesis to ocean acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, KRM; Morris, JJ; Morris, JJ; Morel, FMM; Kranz, SA

    2015-01-01

    sub- tropical North Pacific Ocean. Aquatic Microbial Ecologytropical Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and contributes sub-

  7. CLOUD CHEMISTRY STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    is considered bere to comprise both cloud composition and reactions that take place in clouds. Clouds are a very special subset of tbe atmosphere because they present substantial amounts of condensed-phase water (liquid, the examples developed bere focus on these chemical systems. However, much of the resulting undetstanding

  8. Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estalella, Robert

    Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

  9. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, Christine; Mann, Julia; O Connor, Ewan; Hogan, Robin; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palinkonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  10. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; et al

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulusmore »and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.« less

  11. RISK ASSESSMENT CLOUD COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    SECURITY RESEARCH PRIVACY RISK ASSESSMENT AMC DATA FISMA CLOUD COMPUTING MOBILE DEVICES OPERATIONS PRACTICES TRENDS AUDITS policies #12;2 Privacy & Information Security Annual Update Thursday, June 20, 2013 of Breach statistics Plan to comply with requirements · Training and Education Information Security · Risk

  12. Fine-scale Horizontal Structure of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds M. Rambukkange1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory, 4 CIRES and NOAA-ETL (Corresponding author: J. Verlinde, 502 Walker Building. Above this layer, separated by a strong inversion, was the remnant of a small decaying lee-side low. Figure 1 shows the dry and dew point temperatures and horizontal wind component profiles through

  13. Using A-Train Arctic cloud observations to constrain and improve climate models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPPfinalUnexpectedofWykoW03:Connect Uses of antimicrobial

  14. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganisms to Speed Production of Biofuels Oak

  15. Ocean Energy Resource Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource assessment for the United States.

  16. ENCYCLOPEDIA OCEAN SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENCYCLOPEDIA OF OCEAN SCIENCES Editor-in-Chief JOHN H. STEELE Editors STEVE A. THORPE KARL K in Marine Biology 26: 115-168. Rosland Rand Giske .I (1997) A dynamic model for tbe life history

  17. Distribution and drivers of ectomycorrhizal fungal communities across the North American Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Lee

    of the North American Arctic. We collected roots from two principal arctic ectomycorrhizal host plants, Salix, and Pyronemataceae. Both host plants showed similar species richness, with 176 OTUs on Salix arctica and 154 OTUs

  18. A Climatology of the Arctic on Mid-Tropospheric Temperature Regulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony, Jeremy Patrick

    2014-06-24

    The Arctic is a unique and complex environment. Many factors play a role in determining the long-term climate of the Arctic, including mesoscale weather systems and many complex ice-albedo feedback mechanisms. Previous studies determined using real...

  19. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  20. CARINA (Carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean) Data from CDIAC

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The idea for CARINA developed at a workshop (CO2 in the northern North Atlantic) that was held at the HANSE-Wissenschaftskolleg (HANSE Institute for Advanced Study) in Delmenhorst, Germany from June 9 to 11, 1999. While the main scientific focus is the North Atlantic, some data from the South Atlantic have been included in the project, along with data from the Arctic Ocean. Data sets go back to 1972, and more than 100 are currently available. The data are also being used in conjunction with other projects and research groups, such as the Atlantic Ocean Carbon Synthesis Group. See the inventory of data at http://store.pangaea.de/Projects/CARBOOCEAN/carina/data_inventory.htm See a detailed table of information on the cruises at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/CARINA/Carina_table.html and also provides access to data files. The CARBOOCEAN data portal provides a specialized interface for CARINA data, a reference list for historic carbon data, and password protected access to the "Data Underway Warehouse.".

  1. Cluster analysis of cloud properties : a method for diagnosing cloud-climate feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Neil D.

    2008-01-01

    Zhang (2004), Comparing clouds and their seasonal variationstropical greenhouse effect and cloud radiative forcing. J.thermodynamic components of cloud changes. Clim. Dyn. , 22,

  2. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-06-06

    This volume contains appendices of the following: US Geological Survey Arctic operating orders, 1979; Det Noske Vertas', rules for the design, construction and inspection of offshore technology, 1977; Alaska Oil and Gas Association, industry research projects, March 1980; Arctic Petroleum Operator's Association, industry research projects, January 1980; selected additional Arctic offshore bibliography on sea ice, icebreakers, Arctic seafloor conditions, ice-structures, frost heave and structure icing.

  3. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Arctic and Subarctic Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-11-01

    Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools book detailing DOE's EnergySmart Schools Program for Arctic Climates.

  4. Exploring the LandOcean Contrast in Convective Vigor Using Islands F. J. ROBINSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherwood, Steven

    was idealized, with islands represented by regions of uniform surface heat flux without orography, using a rangeExploring the Land­Ocean Contrast in Convective Vigor Using Islands F. J. ROBINSON Department) observations over islands of increasing size to those simulated by a cloud- resolving model. The observed

  5. The impact of Arctic warming on the midlatitude jet-stream: Can it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    Opinion The impact of Arctic warming on the midlatitude jet-stream: Can it? Has it? Will it. An open question, however, is whether these Arctic changes have an effect on the jet-stream and thereby inquiries around three distinct questions: Can Arctic warming influence the midlatitude jet-stream? Has

  6. Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery Article Published.G. and Ravishankara, A.R. (2009) Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery's research outputs online #12;Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery J. F

  7. Proceedings of the ASME 28th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    - ficiency. This problem can be avoided or minimized by using blades made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics

  8. Seasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    conditions could play an important role in planning activities by shipping interests and coastal communities grounds might clear, or the likely extent of nearshore open water that could contribute to beach erosion Severity Index (BSI) to measure the navigability of the summer waters north of Alaska. Walsh used empirical

  9. Dynamics in the Deep Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean, Inferred by Thermistor Chain Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , stable basin often assumed. Vertical motions at the near-inertial (tidal) frequency have amplitudes of 10­ 20 m. These vertical displacements are surprisingly large considering the downward near that the staircase structure is likely maintained by a very weak heat flux and that most of the geothermal heat flux

  10. 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 1 -Woodgate What makes the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    INPUTS/OUTPUTS ­ E-P, rivers RIVERS (Russian and US) - order 3000 km3/yr freshwater Evaporation position, air pressure and temperature to satellite Photo D. Barton,1992 Satellites (SSM/I, AMSR), NASA

  11. Using leverages for objective analysis of PSMSL tide gauges in Arctic Ocean sea level reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applied to the tide gauges, using the Peltier ICE-5G model (Peltier, 2004). For this preliminary analysis

  12. Underwater radiated noise levels of a research icebreaker in the central Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 John A. Hildebrand and Sean M. Wiggins Scripps Institution 10 January 2012; revised 21 December 2012; accepted 22 January 2013) U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy that is complex due to scattering effects from ice, absorption of acoustic energy at the ice-water interface

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENA ContactsProductsSACR26,govCampaignsScintillometry and

  14. A Study of Cloud Processing of Organic Aerosols Using Models and CHAPS Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ervens, Barbara

    2012-01-17

    The main theme of our work has been the identification of parameters that mostly affect the formation and modification of aerosol particles and their interaction with water vapor. Our detailed process model studies led to simplifications/parameterizations of these effects that bridge detailed aerosol information from laboratory and field studies and the need for computationally efficient expressions in complex atmospheric models. One focus of our studies has been organic aerosol mass that is formed in the atmosphere by physical and/or chemical processes (secondary organic aerosol, SOA) and represents a large fraction of atmospheric particulate matter. Most current models only describe SOA formation by condensation of low volatility (or semivolatile) gas phase products and neglect processes in the aqueous phase of particles or cloud droplets that differently affect aerosol size and vertical distribution and chemical composition (hygroscopicity). We developed and applied models of aqueous phase SOA formation in cloud droplets and aerosol particles (aqSOA). Placing our model results into the context of laboratory, model and field studies suggests a potentially significant contribution of aqSOA to the global organic mass loading. The second focus of our work has been the analysis of ambient data of particles that might act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at different locations and emission scenarios. Our model studies showed that the description of particle chemical composition and mixing state can often be greatly simplified, in particular in aged aerosol. While over the past years many CCN studies have been successful performed by using such simplified composition/mixing state assumptions, much more uncertainty exists in aerosol-cloud interactions in cold clouds (ice or mixed-phase). Therefore we extended our parcel model that describes warm cloud formation by ice microphysics and explored microphysical parameters that determine the phase state and lifetime of Arctic mixed-phase clouds.

  15. Predicting and validating the tracking of a Volcanic Ash Cloud during the 2006 Eruption of Mt. Augustine Volcano

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webley, Peter W.; Atkinson, D.; Collins, Richard L.; Dean, K.; Fochesatto, J.; Sassen, Kenneth; Cahill, Catherine F.; Prata, A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mizutani, K.

    2008-11-01

    On 11 January 2006, Mount Augustine volcano in southern Alaska began erupting after 20-year repose. The Anchorage Forecast Office of the National Weather Service (NWS) issued an advisory on 28 January for Kodiak City. On 31 January, Alaska Airlines cancelled all flights to and from Anchorage after multiple advisories from the NWS for Anchorage and the surrounding region. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) had reported the onset of the continuous eruption. AVO monitors the approximately 100 active volcanoes in the Northern Pacific. Ash clouds from these volcanoes can cause serious damage to an aircraft and pose a serious threat to the local communities, and to transcontinental air traffic throughout the Arctic and sub-Arctic region. Within AVO, a dispersion model has been developed to track the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds. The model, Puff, was used operational by AVO during the Augustine eruptive period. Here, we examine the dispersion of a volcanic ash cloud from Mount Augustine across Alaska from 29 January through the 2 February 2006. We present the synoptic meteorology, the Puff predictions, and measurements from aerosol samplers, laser radar (or lidar) systems, and satellites. UAF aerosol samplers revealed the presence of volcanic aerosols at the surface at sites where Puff predicted the ash clouds movement. Remote sensing satellite data showed the development of the ash cloud in close proximity to the volcano and a sulfur-dioxide cloud further from the volcano consistent with the Puff predictions. Lidars showed the presence of volcanic aerosol with consistent characteristics aloft over Alaska and were capable of detecting the aerosol, even in the presence of scattered clouds and where the cloud is too thin/disperse to be detected by remote sensing satellite data. The lidar measurements revealed the different trajectories of ash consistent with the Puff predictions. Dispersion models provide a forecast of volcanic ash cloud movement that might be undetectable by any other means but are still a significant hazard. Validation is the key to assessing the accuracy of any future predictions. The study highlights the use of multiple and complementary observations used in detecting the trajectory ash cloud, both at the surface and aloft within the atmosphere.

  16. Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-24

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  17. CloudAnalyst: A CloudSim-based Visual Modeller for Analysing Cloud Computing Environments and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    CloudAnalyst: A CloudSim-based Visual Modeller for Analysing Cloud Computing Environments and Applications Bhathiya Wickremasinghe1 , Rodrigo N. Calheiros2 , and Rajkumar Buyya1 1 The Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems (CLOUDS) Laboratory Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering The University

  18. Cloud in a Bottle Demonstrate how pressure relates to cloud formation by making a cloud in a soda bottle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Cloud in a Bottle Demonstrate how pressure relates to cloud formation by making a cloud in a soda doesn't escape. 5. Squeeze the soda bottle and release, repeating several times. Eventually, a cloud construction paper (or anything dark) on half of the bottle may make the cloud easier to see. What Happened

  19. Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband December 2011. [1] A Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) was developed and deployed) through an optically thin cloud (optical depth

  20. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    mesoscale oceanic features are current coarse resolutionmesoscale r current variability associated with oceanic ringthe TIW- currents. These mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric

  1. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    mesoscale oceanic features are current coarse resolutionmesoscale r current variability associated with oceanic ringthe TIW- currents. These mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric

  2. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  3. An active atmospheric methane sink in high Arctic mineral cryosols

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lau, Maggie C.Y.; Stackhouse, B.; Layton, Alice C.; Chauhan, Archana; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chourey, Karuna; Mykytczuk, N. C.S.; Bennett, Phil C.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Burton, N.; et al

    2015-04-14

    The transition of Arctic carbon-rich cryosols into methane (CH?)-emitting wetlands due to global warming is a rising concern. However, the spatially predominant mineral cryosols and their CH? emission potential are poorly understood. Fluxes measured in situ and estimated under laboratory conditions coupled with -omics analysis indicate (1) mineral cryosols in the Canadian high Arctic contain atmospheric CH?-oxidizing bacteria; (2) the atmospheric CH? uptake flux increases with ground temperature; and, as a result, (3) the atmospheric CH? sink strength will increase by a factor of 5-30 as the Arctic warms by 5-15 °C over a century. We demonstrated that acidic mineralmore »cryosols have previously unrecognized potential of negative CH? feedback.« less

  4. Model-Driven Integration for a Service Placement Optimizer in a Sustainable Cloud of Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Jun

    --"Cloud of clouds" (or federated cloud) is an emerg- ing style of software deployment and execution to interoperate, federated clouds, model-driven system integration and sustainable clouds I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing, cost effective (e.g., energy effi- cient) service/data placement and avoidance of "lock

  5. CLOUD CLASSIFICATION AND CLOUD PROPERTY RETRIEVAL FROM MODIS , W. Paul Menzel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    6.4 CLOUD CLASSIFICATION AND CLOUD PROPERTY RETRIEVAL FROM MODIS AND AIRS Jun Li * , W. Paul Menzel Observing System's (EOS) Aqua satellite enable global monitoring of the distribution of clouds. The MODIS is able to provide at high spatial resolution (1 ~ 5km) a cloud mask, surface and cloud types, cloud phase

  6. PC Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud PC Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PC Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud 1 PC Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud 2015-05-25 1 Web Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud PC | Creative Cloud https://helpx.adobe.com/jp/creative-cloud Adobe Creative Cloud 5.1 Web TTInstaller (Mac OS X )() http://www.officesoft.gsic.titech.ac.jp/pdf

  7. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE): Cloud and Rain Characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PT May; C Jakob; JH Mather

    2004-05-30

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Commission DG RTD-1.2, and several United States, Australian, Canadian, and European Universities. This experiment will be undertaken over a 4-week period in early 2006. January and February corresponds to the wet phase of the Australia monsoon. This season has been selected because, despite Darwin’s coastal location, the convection that occurs over and near Darwin at this time is largely of maritime origin with a large fetch over water. Based on previous experiments, the convection appears typical of maritime convection with widespread convection that has complex organization, but is not as deep or as intense as continental or coastal convection. Therefore, it is expected that the convection and cloud characteristics will be representative of conditions typical for wide areas of the tropics.

  8. 90E 120 150E 180 150W 120 90 60 30W 0 30E 60 DSDP Legs 196 ( ), ODP Legs 100210 ( ), IODP Expeditions 301352 ( )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREENLAND EUROPE AFRICA SOUTH AMERICA NORTH AMERICA ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN SOUTHERN OCEAN AMERICA NORTH AMERICA ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN

  9. Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state’s Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

  10. Steroid estrogens in ocean sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braga, O.; Smythe, G.A.; Schäfer, Andrea; Feitz, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives results from a study measuring the abundance of steroid hormones in ocean sediments in the proximity of a deep ocean sewage outfall. The outfall is discharge point for an enhanced primary sewage treatment ...

  11. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01

    1.1 Cloud Computing Applications 1.2Zaharia. A view of cloud computing. Communications of theM. Voelker, Co-Chair Cloud computing has emerged as a model

  12. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coghlan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    4.3.1 Cloud Computing Attractive Features . 4.3.2A berkeley view of cloud computing. Technical Report UCB/matching computations on cloud computing platforms and hpc

  13. The Cloud Computing and Other Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borjon-Kubota, Martha Estela

    2011-01-01

    12. Fragments in Six 13. Cloud Computing 14. Phase 15.Note 48. Devoured vi Cloud Computing and other Variables I.CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Cloud Computing and Other Variables A

  14. Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2013-01-01

    the security implications of user-controlled cloud images?key security practices and policies on private clouds, suchand security poli- cies will remain, and sites moving to cloud

  15. Trusted Cloud: Microsoft Azure Security, Privacy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Trusted Cloud: Microsoft Azure Security, Privacy, and Compliance April 2015 #12;Trusted Cloud................................................................. 18 #12;Trusted Cloud: Microsoft Azure Security, Privacy, and Compliance | April, 2015 Introduction: Microsoft Azure Security, Privacy, and Compliance | April, 2015 #12;3 Contents Introduction

  16. Cicada: Predictive Guarantees for Cloud Network Bandwidth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCurts, Katrina

    2014-03-24

    In cloud-computing systems, network-bandwidth guarantees have been shown to improve predictability of application performance and cost. Most previous work on cloud-bandwidth guarantees has assumed that cloud tenants know ...

  17. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Properties In?uencing Electron Cloud Phenomena,” Appl. Surf.Dissipation of the Electron Cloud,” Proc. PAC03 (Portland,is no signi?cant electron-cloud under nominal operating

  18. Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2013-01-01

    2010. From Clusters To Clouds: xCAT 2 Is Out Of The Bag.Cost of Doing Science on the Cloud: The Montage Example. Incost of doing science on the cloud: the montage example. In

  19. Bringing Clouds into Focus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransen Plasma Asher An O2 RFand1120019Bringing Clouds into

  20. Ocean Engineering Development Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    the same conditions). 3) To demonstrate a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, naval architecture: Design/Fluid Mechanics Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior Focus: Naval Architecture and High Speed Small vessel under a variety of foil configurations, sea conditions, propulsion states and loads. 2) To perform

  1. Digital Ecosystems in the Clouds: Towards Community Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns of privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon, and Microsoft. Community Cloud Computing makes use of the principles of Digital Ecosystems to provide a paradigm for Clouds in the community, offering an alternative architecture for the use cases of Cloud Computing. Its more technically challenging, dealing with issues of distributed computing, such as latency, differential resource management, and additional security requirements. However, these are not insurmountable challenges, and with the need to retain control over our digital lives and the potential environmental consequences, its one we must pursue.

  2. Ocean Circulation Lynne D Talley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    to the topography, with low pressure in the center. Ocean currents transport heat from the tropics to the poles have gone to sea. As knowledge about ocean currents and capabilities to observe it below the surfaceOcean Circulation Lynne D Talley Volume 1, The Earth system: physical and chemical dimensions

  3. 6, 51375162, 2006 Oceanic ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W. Fairall et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Water-side turbulence enhancement of ozone deposition to the ocean C. W. Fairall1 , D. Helmig2 , L. Fairall (chris.fairall@noaa.gov) 5137 #12;ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W

  4. Strategic Plan National Ocean Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan of the National Ocean Service 2005-2010 U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic Strategic Plan for 2005 to 2010. This Plan heralds a new era for the ocean and coasts as NOS responds these challenges. The NOS Strategic Plan is synchronous with the NOAA Strategic Plan -- one NOAA, one workforce

  5. December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  6. February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Richter Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  7. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  8. Engineering by Design Ocean Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Engineering by Design Ocean Engineering Bachelor of Science Degree Virginia Tech For more engineering is a diverse field. At Virginia Tech, the major focus areas are ocean energy systems and ocean in the aerospace and related industries and in the shipbuilding, naval engineering, and ship design fields. Some

  9. Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

  10. Cloud Computing and Validation of Expandable In Silico Livers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ropella, Glen EP; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-01-01

    with access to computer clusters. Cloud technology coupledto computer clusters. The availability of cloud technology

  11. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coghlan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    of computer security are evolving for cloud computingcomputer forensic space a way to integrate their tools with the cloudthe cloud business model. In addition to answering computer

  12. WEATHER MODIFICATION BY AIRCRAFT CLOUD SEEDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vali, Gabor

    WEATHER MODIFICATION BY AIRCRAFT CLOUD SEEDING BERYULEV G.P. Head, Department of Cloud Physics and Weather Modification Central Aerological Observatory Rosgidromet, Russian Federation #12

  13. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  14. Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow (Preliminary analysis of 2008 Biomass/poll. Factor: all data Pollution factor: depth data #12;2009 Data set for receptor modeling with limited analytes Factor 1: biomass Factor 2: pollution Factor 3: marine Factor 4: biomass #12;Factor

  15. Network Modeling of Arctic Melt Ponds Meenakshi Barjatiaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Network Modeling of Arctic Melt Ponds Meenakshi Barjatiaa , Tolga Tasdizena,b, , Boya Songc. In late spring and summer, the albedo of the ice pack is determined primarily by melt ponds that form on the sea ice surface. The transition of pond configurations from isolated structures to interconnected

  16. Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated threedimensional model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wuhu

    Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated three­dimensional model study Chipperfield winter­spring chemical ozone loss from 1991 2003, its observed correlation with low temperatures. CTM throughout studied. The model reproduces large column winters also captures shape of ozone loss profile

  17. Monday, March 23, 2009 PHOENIX: EXPLORATION OF THE MARTIAN ARCTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Monday, March 23, 2009 PHOENIX: EXPLORATION OF THE MARTIAN ARCTIC 8:30 a.m. Waterway Ballroom 1 Chairs: Raymond Arvidson Peter Smith 8:30 a.m. Smith P. H. * Water at the Phoenix Landing Site [#1329] The Phoenix mission found a water ice layer 5 cm beneath a dry soil overburden. The presence of Ca

  18. Cloud Seeding By: Julie Walter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    , smoke, that then are cooled because of the high altitudes. As the water or condensation nuclei cool more titled "Cat's Cradle" a young scientist has in his possession an ice crystal that has the power to freeze of those clouds. Winds can form suddenly and blow clouds away from the targeted area. Some experiments show

  19. Final Technical Report for "Ice nuclei relation to aerosol properties: Data analysis and model parameterization for IN in mixed-phase clouds"Ă?Âť (DOE/SC00002354)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul J. DeMott, Anthony J. Prenni; Sonia M. Kreidenweis

    2012-09-28

    Clouds play an important role in weather and climate. In addition to their key role in the hydrologic cycle, clouds scatter incoming solar radiation and trap infrared radiation from the surface and lower atmosphere. Despite their importance, feedbacks involving clouds remain as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate models. To better simulate cloud processes requires better characterization of cloud microphysical processes, which can affect the spatial extent, optical depth and lifetime of clouds. To this end, we developed a new parameterization to be used in numerical models that describes the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentrations active to form ice crystals in mixed-phase (water droplets and ice crystals co-existing) cloud conditions as these depend on existing aerosol properties and temperature. The parameterization is based on data collected using the Colorado State University continuous flow diffusion chamber in aircraft and ground-based campaigns over a 14-year period, including data from the DOE-supported Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The resulting relationship is shown to more accurately represent the variability of ice nuclei distributions in the atmosphere compared to currently used parameterizations based on temperature alone. When implemented in one global climate model, the new parameterization predicted more realistic annually averaged cloud water and ice distributions, and cloud radiative properties, especially for sensitive higher latitude mixed-phase cloud regions. As a test of the new global IN scheme, it was compared to independent data collected during the 2008 DOE-sponsored Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). Good agreement with this new data set suggests the broad applicability of the new scheme for describing general (non-chemically specific) aerosol influences on IN number concentrations feeding mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds. Finally, the parameterization was implemented into a regional cloud-resolving model to compare predictions of ice crystal concentrations and other cloud properties to those observed in two intensive case studies of Arctic stratus during ISDAC. Our implementation included development of a prognostic scheme of ice activation using the IN parameterization so that the most realistic treatment of ice nuclei, including their budget (gains and losses), was achieved. Many cloud microphysical properties and cloud persistence were faithfully reproduced, despite a tendency to under-predict (by a few to several times) ice crystal number concentrations and cloud ice mass, in agreement with some other studies. This work serves generally as the basis for improving predictive schemes for cloud ice crystal activation in cloud and climate models, and more specifically as the basis for such a scheme to be used in a Multi-scale Modeling Format (MMF) that utilizes a connected system of cloud-resolving models on a global grid in an effort to better resolve cloud processes and their influence on climate.

  20. Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

  1. ALIEN MAPS OF AN OCEAN-BEARING WORLD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Meadows, Victoria S.; Robinson, Tyler [Astronomy Department and Astrobiology Program, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Livengood, Timothy A.; Deming, Drake [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lisse, Carey M. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, SD/SRE, MP3-E167, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); A'Hearn, Michael F.; Wellnitz, Dennis D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Seager, Sara [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. 54-1626, MA 02139 (United States); Charbonneau, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)], E-mail: cowan@astro.washington.edu

    2009-08-01

    When Earth-mass extrasolar planets first become detectable, one challenge will be to determine which of these worlds harbor liquid water, a widely used criterion for habitability. Some of the first observations of these planets will consist of disc-averaged, time-resolved broadband photometry. To simulate such data, the Deep Impact spacecraft obtained light curves of Earth at seven wavebands spanning 300-1000 nm as part of the EPOXI mission of opportunity. In this paper, we analyze disc-integrated light curves, treating Earth as if it were an exoplanet, to determine if we can detect the presence of oceans and continents. We present two observations each spanning 1 day, taken at gibbous phases of 57 deg. and 77 deg., respectively. As expected, the time-averaged spectrum of Earth is blue at short wavelengths due to Rayleigh scattering, and gray redward of 600 nm due to reflective clouds. The rotation of the planet leads to diurnal albedo variations of 15%-30%, with the largest relative changes occurring at the reddest wavelengths. To characterize these variations in an unbiased manner, we carry out a principal component analysis of the multi-band light curves; this analysis reveals that 98% of the diurnal color changes of Earth are due to only two dominant eigencolors. We use the time variations of these two eigencolors to construct longitudinal maps of the Earth, treating it as a non-uniform Lambert sphere. We find that the spectral and spatial distributions of the eigencolors correspond to cloud-free continents and oceans despite the fact that our observations were taken on days with typical cloud cover. We also find that the near-infrared wavebands are particularly useful in distinguishing between land and water. Based on this experiment, we conclude that it should be possible to infer the existence of water oceans on exoplanets with time-resolved broadband observations taken by a large space-based coronagraphic telescope.

  2. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  3. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  4. Draft NISTIR 80061 NIST Cloud Computing2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft NISTIR 80061 NIST Cloud Computing2 Forensic Science Challenges NIST Cloud Computing Forensic Computing11 Forensic Science Challenges 12 NIST Cloud Computing Forensic Science Working Group13 Information challenges77 faced by experts when responding to incidents that have occurred in a cloud-computing ecosystem

  5. Secure Cloud Computing With Brokered Trusted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secure Cloud Computing With Brokered Trusted Sensor Networks Profs. Steven Myers,Apu Kapadia, Xiao-mount Antenna Tower-mount Antenna Wireless Bridge Security Threats 1. Cloud or Grid 2. Communication Channels 3 Computing Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Tower-mount Antenna Tower-mount Antenna Wireless Bridge Security

  6. An Architecture for Trusted Clouds Mike Burmester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burmester, Mike

    reasoning will play a major role. In this paper we analyze the cloud paradigm from a security point of view, but it is also technically easier to secure. Finally, the Cloud has a dark side, at least from a security point regulatory and security policies; and hybrid clouds. Services. There are three basic cloud on demand

  7. Why the network matters in cloud computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    this promise, and security concerns still loom AT&T NetBond AT&T network enabled cloud computing provides highly-secure access, with the cloud functioning just like another MPLS VPN site. It also allowsWhy the network matters in cloud computing The promise of cloud hinges on flexibility, agility

  8. NIST Cloud Computing Forum and Workshop VIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Cloud Computing Forum and Workshop VIII Kevin Mills, NIST July 9, 2015 #12;NIST Cloud Project Research Goals Kevin Mills, NIST #12;NIST Cloud Computing Forum and Workshop VIII July 2 015 failure scenarios in a cloud system · Ongoing work on run-time methods · Where to find more information 3

  9. EWI PDS A.Iosup Research Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Research, PDS Group, TU Delft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosup, Alexandru

    EWI PDS A.Iosup Research Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Research, PDS Group, TU Delft Cloud Computing Research http://www.pds.ewi.tudelft.nl/~iosup/research_cloud.html Rationale why and how is this work relevant? Cloud computing is an emerging commercial infrastructure paradigm that promises

  10. Storm Clouds Rising: Security Challenges for IaaS Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storm Clouds Rising: Security Challenges for IaaS Cloud Computing Brian Hay Kara Nance Matt Bishop on security concerns for computational cloud computing from the perspectives of cloud service users, cloud.hay@alaska.edu klnance@alaska.edu bishop@cs.ucdavis.edu Abstract Securing our digital assets has become increasingly

  11. Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    General Terms Algorithms, Design, Human Factors, Languages, Performance, Security Keywords Camera, cloudVision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See Paramvir Bahl Matthai Philipose argue that for computers to do more for us, we need to show the cloud what we see and embrace cloud

  12. EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 CLOUD AMOUNT CHANGES AND THEIR CONNECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 CLOUD AMOUNT CHANGES #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 Climatology Project (ISCCP) D2 dataset exhibits a 2.6% per decade decrease in the global all-cloud cloud

  13. Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey December 2013 A method for separating the three components of the marine stratocumulus (MSC) aerosol cloud interactions radiative effects, i.e., the cloud cover, liquid water path (LWP) and cloud drop radius (Twomey

  14. Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosup, Alexandru

    1 Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup Pierre (Vrije U.). Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming (Rain for the Thirsty) #12;Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming 2 Intermezzo: Tips on how

  15. Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical modeling of drizzle evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical I, the influence of cloud microphysics and dynamics on the shape of cloud radar Doppler spectra in warm stratiform clouds was discussed. The traditional analysis of radar Doppler moments was extended

  16. A CloudSat cloud object partitioning technique and assessment and integration of deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    A CloudSat cloud object partitioning technique and assessment and integration of deep convective, USA Abstract A cloud object partitioning algorithm is developed to provide a widely useful database of deep convective clouds. It takes contiguous CloudSat cloudy regions and identifies various length

  17. Transitions of cloud-topped marine boundary layers characterized by AIRS, MODIS, and a large eddy simulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Qing; Kahn, Brian; Xiao, Heng; Schreier, Mathias; Fetzer, E. J.; Teixeira, J.; Suselj, Kay

    2013-08-16

    Cloud top entrainment instability (CTEI) is a hypothesized positive feedback between entrainment mixing and evaporative cooling near the cloud top. Previous theoretical and numerical modeling studies have shown that the persistence or breakup of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds may be sensitive to the CTEI parameter. Collocated thermodynamic profile and cloud observations obtained from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments are used to quantify the relationship between the CTEI parameter and the cloud-topped MBL transition from stratocumulus to trade cumulus in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Results derived from AIRS and MODIS are compared with numerical results from the UCLA large eddy simulation (LES) model for both well-mixed and decoupled MBLs. The satellite and model results both demonstrate a clear correlation between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction. Despite fundamental differences between LES steady state results and the instantaneous snapshot type of observations from satellites, significant correlations for both the instantaneous pixel-scale observations and the long-term averaged spatial patterns between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction are found from the satellite observations and are consistent with LES results. This suggests the potential of using AIRS and MODIS to quantify global and temporal characteristics of the cloud-topped MBL transition.

  18. Climatological data for clouds over the globe from surface observations, 1982--1991: The total cloud edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, C.J.; Warren, S.G.; London, J.

    1994-10-01

    Routine, surface synoptic weather reports from ships and land stations over the entire globe, for the ten-year period December 1981 through November 1991, were processed for total cloud cover and the frequencies of occurrence of clear sky, precipitation, and sky-obscured due to fog. Archived data, consisting of various annual, seasonal and monthly averages, are provided in grid boxes that are typically 2.5{degrees} {times} 2.5{degrees} for land and 5{degrees} {times} 5{degrees} for ocean. Day and nighttime averages are also given separately for each season. Several derived quantities, such as interannual variations and annual and diurnal harmonics, are provided as well. This data set incorporates an improved representation of nighttime cloudiness by utilizing only those nighttime observations for which the illuminance due to moonlight exceeds a specified threshold. This reduction in the night-detection bias increases the computed global average total cloud cover by about 2%. The impact on computed diurnal cycles is even greater, particularly over the oceans where is found, in contrast to previous surface-based climatologies, that cloudiness is often greater at night than during the day.

  19. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  20. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  1. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-01-13

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    310, the Ocean the Ocean Energy Thermal Energy Conversionfor the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary

  3. Genome Sequence of the Arctic Methanotroph Methylobacter tundripaludum SV96

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svenning, Mette M [University of Tromso, Norway; Hestnes, Anne Grethe [University of Tromso, Norway; Wartiainen, Ingvild [University of Tromso, Norway; Stein, Lisa Y. [University of Alberta, Edmondton, Canada; Klotz, Martin G [University of Louisville, Louisville; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G. [University of Washington, Seattle; Spang, Anja [University of Vienna, Austria; Bringel, Francoise O. [University of Strasbourg; Vuilleumier, Stephane [University of Strasbourg; Lajus, Aurelie [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Medigue, Claudine [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Methylobacter tundripaludum SV96(T) (ATCC BAA-1195) is a psychrotolerant aerobic methane-oxidizing gammaproteobacterium (Methylococcales, Methylococcaceae) living in High Arctic wetland soil. The strain was isolated from soil harvested in July 1996 close to the settlement Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway (78 degrees 56'N, 11 degrees 53'E), and described as a novel species in 2006. The genome includes pmo and pxm operons encoding copper membrane monooxygenases (Cu-MMOs), genes required for nitrogen fixation, and the nirS gene implicated in dissimilatory nitrite reduction to NO but no identifiable inventory for further processing of nitrogen oxides. These genome data provide the basis to investigate M. tundripaludum SV96, identified as a major player in the biogeochemistry of Arctic environments.

  4. Analysis of gas chilling alternatives for Arctic pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvoiris, A.; McMillan, D.K.; Taksa, B.

    1994-12-31

    The operation of buried natural gas pipelines in Arctic regions requires installation of gas chilling facilities at compressor stations. These facilities are required in order to cool compressed pipeline gases to temperatures below that of permanently frozen surrounding soil. If these pipeline gas temperatures are too high, the frozen ground around the pipelines will eventually thaw. This is undesirable for many reasons amongst which are ground settlement and possible catastrophic failure of the pipeline. This paper presents the results of a study which compared several alternative methods of gas chilling for possible application at one of the compressor stations on the proposed new Yamal-Center gas pipeline system in the Russian Arctic. This technical and economic study was performed by Gulf Interstate Engineering (GIE) for GAZPROM, the gas company in Russia that will own and operate this new pipeline system. Geotechnical, climatical and other information provided by GAZPROM, coupled with information developed by GIE, formed the basis for this study.

  5. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world’s ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today’s state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources.

  6. ARM - Oceanic Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSA Related Links AntarcticaNews fromOceanic

  7. Ocean | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGE Energy Resources, IncIncOccidental,OceanLtd

  8. Photolysis rates in correlated overlapping cloud fields: Cloud-J 7.3c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Collins, W. : Effect of clouds on photolysis and oxidants insimulation of in- and below-cloud photolysis in troposphericS. , and Liu, X. : Effects of cloud overlap in photochemical

  9. Estimating Migration Resistance: a Case Study of Greenlandic Arctic Terns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensz, Christopher

    2013-01-15

    Chris Hensz University of Kansas Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Biodiversity Institute Estimating Migration Resistance: a Case Study of Greenlandic Arctic Terns The Problem 1: How do migratory animals choose... d ay °C m /s Models ? Implemented in R ? Models: ? Linear exploration Southern Migration, 9 birds, n=929 Northern Migration, 9 birds, n=629 Future Directions 1: Finish non-linear model 2: Generalize procedure and include...

  10. Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01

    Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

  11. Polar Gas to pick route for Arctic Y Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-26

    Polar Gas Project is considering four possible Y line routes to move gas reserves from the Arctic Islands and the MacKenzie Delta/Beaufort Sea areas to southern Canada. All four routes are west of the single line route proposed by Polar Gas Ltd. in 1977 to run from the Arctic Islands to Longlac, Ontario, and would connect with existing pipelines at either Longlac, Winnipeg, Calgary, or Edmonton. Marketable reserves in the High Arctic Islands are estimated at 12.7 trillion cubic feet, not counting 3-6 trillion cubic feet probably contained in recent discoveries; the MacKenzie Delta reserves are estimated at 5.8 trillion cubic feet. The gas will be chilled to 0C for passage through permafrost regions, to prevent thawing of the soil, but the gas will be at higher temperatures in other areas, with various construction techniques used to protect the area of discontinuous permafrost from thawing. More than $70 million has been spent on project studies. An application will be filed in 1981, and the pipeline could be completed in 7-10 years.

  12. Structural monitoring helps assess deformations in Arctic pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyman, K.J.; Lara, P.F.

    1986-11-10

    Advanced structural monitoring systems can play an important role in the evaluation of arctic pipeline distortions along the alignment. These systems can influence pipeline design requirements, reduce capital costs, and improve operating reliability. Differential soil movements resulting from terrain instabilities are the main features which threaten a pipeline's structural integrity and affect the design of buried pipeline systems in the Arctic. Economic, aesthetic, and safety concerns make conventional buried construction an optimum design choice for an arctic crude-oil or gas-pipeline transportation system. However, variable frozen and thawed soil conditions underlying the pipeline along a discontinuous permafrost corridor pose a challenge to the design and operation of such systems. Crude-oil pipelines which must operate at elevated temperatures can be installed in unfrozen soils or in permafrost soils where initially frozen segments will exhibit limited settlement under the thawed conditions imposed by pipeline construction and operation. Ice-rich portions of the frozen alignment may have an unacceptable settlement potential for a warm buried pipeline. In contrast, natural-gas pipelines can be operated cold to increase throughput capability and to prevent the problems associated with thawing permafrost.

  13. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iversen, Colleen M; Sloan, Victoria L; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; McGuire, A. David; Norby, Richard J; Walker, Anthony P; Warren, Jeffrey; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2015-01-01

    Arctic tundra is characterized by short-statured plant communities underlain by carbon (C)-rich soils and permafrost. Ecosystem C and nutrient cycles in tundra are driven by complex interactions between plants and their environment. However, root dynamics are one of the least understood aspects of plant growth in the Arctic. We synthesized available literature on tundra roots and discussed their representation in terrestrial biosphere models. Belowground biomass in tundra ecosystems can be an order of magnitude larger than aboveground biomass. Data on root production and turnover in tundra is sparse, limiting our understanding of the controls over root dynamics in these systems. Roots are shallowly distributed in the thin layer of soil that thaws each year, and are often found in the organic horizon at the soil surface. Species-specific differences in root distribution, mycorrhizal colonization, and resource partitioning may affect plant species competition under changing climatic conditions. Model representation of belowground processes has increased in complexity over recent years, but data are desperately needed to fill the gaps in model treatment of tundra roots. Future research should focus on estimates of root production and lifespan, and interactions between roots and the surrounding soil across the diversity of tundra ecosystems in the Arctic.

  14. A SYNERGY OF MICROWAVE CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY AND SCANNING RADAR: MOVING TOWARD A 3D VIEW OF CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A SYNERGY OF MICROWAVE CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY AND SCANNING RADAR: MOVING TOWARD A 3D VIEW OF CLOUDS D complementary techniques, i.e., cloud microwave tomography and scanning radar, to retrieve 3D cloud properties the sixth moment of cloud droplets, while cloud tomography, by remotely probing cloud microwave emission

  15. Redefining the Cloud based on Beneficial Service Characteristics A New Cloud Taxonomy Leads to Economically Reasonable Semi-cloudification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redefining the Cloud based on Beneficial Service Characteristics A New Cloud Taxonomy Leads, Germany kemmler@lrz.de Keywords: Cloud, Semi-cloud, Service, Cloud Service, Semi-cloud Service, Service Management. Abstract: Cloud services promise benefits for customers and providers such as scalability

  16. Oceans and Ecosystems Research Changing levels of Oceanic Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the atmospheric, the remainder is taken up by land plants and oceans. · We study the uptake by the oceans both EPA qualified the increasing CO2 levels as a pollutant along with the other greenhouse gases Ch4, N2O & wind Algorithm development pCO2= f(SST, color) Co-located satellite data Regional satellite SST & color

  17. OCEAN PREDICTION WITH THE HYBRID COORDINATE OCEAN MODEL (HYCOM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . of South Florida, Fugro-GEOS, ROFFS, Orbimage, Shell, ExxonMobil #12;414 ERIC P. CHASSIGNET ET AL-resolving, real-time global and basin-scale ocean prediction system in the context of the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE). Keywords: HYCOM, GODAE, LAS, data assimilation, metrics. 1. Introduction

  18. Resource Allocation and Scheduling in Heterogeneous Cloud Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Gunho

    2012-01-01

    1] Open Cirrus cloud computing testbed. http://10] Early experiments in cloud computing. http://on Hot topics in cloud computing, pages 12–12, 2009. [29

  19. Cloud Computing and Validation of Expandable In Silico Livers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ropella, Glen EP; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-01-01

    benefit analysis of cloud computing versus desktop grids.as: Ropella and Hunt: Cloud computing and validation ofCloud computing and validation of expandable in silico

  20. RFID Asset Management Solution with Cloud Computation Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, Arunabh

    2012-01-01

    A berkeley view of cloud computing”, EECS Department,and S. Sarma, “Cloud computing, rest and mashups to simplifyand/or frameworks. Cloud computing can be defined as

  1. Simulations of Midlatitude Frontal Clouds by Single-Column and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and 4 cloud resolving models (CRMs) in simulating a strong midlatitude frontal cloud system taken from the Spring 2000 Cloud Intensive Observational Period at the ARM Southern...

  2. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  3. The Evolution of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ryan P.; The ATLAS collaboration; Love, Peter; Leblanc, Matthew Edgar; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Paterson, Michael; Gable, Ian; Sobie, Randall; Field, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has successfully incorporated cloud computing technology and cloud resources into its primarily grid-based model of distributed computing. Cloud R&D activities continue to mature and transition into stable production systems, while ongoing evolutionary changes are still needed to adapt and refine the approaches used, in response to changes in prevailing cloud technology. In addition, completely new developments are needed to handle emerging requirements. This work will describe the overall evolution of cloud computing in ATLAS. The current status of the VM management systems used for harnessing IAAS resources will be discussed. Monitoring and accounting systems tailored for clouds are needed to complete the integration of cloud resources within ATLAS' distributed computing framework. We are developing and deploying new solutions to address the challenge of operation in a geographically distributed multi-cloud scenario, including a system for managing VM images across multiple clouds, ...

  4. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Kollias, Pavlos; Lewis, Ernie R.

    2015-03-01

    The recent ship-based MAGIC (Marine ARM GCSS Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds) field campaign with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) deployed on the Horizon Lines cargo container M/V Spirit provided nearly 200 days of intraseasonal high-resolution observations of clouds, precipitation, and marine boundary layer (MBL) structure on multiple legs between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii. During the deployment, MBL clouds exhibited a much higher frequency of occurrence than other cloud types and occurred more often in the warm season than in the cold season. MBL clouds demonstrated a propensity to produce precipitation, which often evaporatedmore »before reaching the ocean surface. The formation of stratocumulus is strongly correlated to a shallow MBL with a strong inversion and a weak transition, while cumulus formation is associated with a much weaker inversion and stronger transition. The estimated inversion strength is shown to depend seasonally on the potential temperature at 700 hPa. The location of the commencement of systematic MBL decoupling always occurred eastward of the locations of cloud breakup, and the systematic decoupling showed a strong moisture stratification. The entrainment of the dry warm air above the inversion appears to be the dominant factor triggering the systematic decoupling, while surface latent heat flux, precipitation, and diurnal circulation did not play major roles. MBL clouds broke up over a short spatial region due to the changes in the synoptic conditions, implying that in real atmospheric conditions the MBL clouds do not have enough time to evolve as in the idealized models. (auth)« less

  5. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xiaoli [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Lewis, Ernie R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental, and Climate Sciences Dept.

    2015-03-01

    The recent ship-based MAGIC (Marine ARM GCSS Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds) field campaign with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) deployed on the Horizon Lines cargo container M/V Spirit provided nearly 200 days of intraseasonal high-resolution observations of clouds, precipitation, and marine boundary layer (MBL) structure on multiple legs between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii. During the deployment, MBL clouds exhibited a much higher frequency of occurrence than other cloud types and occurred more often in the warm season than in the cold season. MBL clouds demonstrated a propensity to produce precipitation, which often evaporated before reaching the ocean surface. The formation of stratocumulus is strongly correlated to a shallow MBL with a strong inversion and a weak transition, while cumulus formation is associated with a much weaker inversion and stronger transition. The estimated inversion strength is shown to depend seasonally on the potential temperature at 700 hPa. The location of the commencement of systematic MBL decoupling always occurred eastward of the locations of cloud breakup, and the systematic decoupling showed a strong moisture stratification. The entrainment of the dry warm air above the inversion appears to be the dominant factor triggering the systematic decoupling, while surface latent heat flux, precipitation, and diurnal circulation did not play major roles. MBL clouds broke up over a short spatial region due to the changes in the synoptic conditions, implying that in real atmospheric conditions the MBL clouds do not have enough time to evolve as in the idealized models. (auth)

  6. Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Lewis M.

    The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

  7. Oceans and Human Health (and climate change)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    Oceans and Human Health (and climate change) Tracy K. Collier Science Dimensions and Ocean Health in a Changing Climate, USC March 12, 2013 1 #12 use Climate change Closes the loop in understanding connections between ocean health and human health

  8. Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dales, K Phillips

    1957-01-01

    Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

  9. Marine Ecosystems Ocean Environment Research Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been studying how CO2 emissions affect the ocean system for more than three decades and conQnue to monitor ocean acidificaQon in all the world's oceans from

  10. Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

    2008-04-15

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

  11. HOW TO COOK OCEAN PERCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is an excellent food fish with firm fle h. When cooked, the meat is white and flaky, with a delicate flavor. Ocean to the consumer until 1935. At that time, the indlu;try began experimenting with filleting and freezing ocean pel

  12. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

  13. January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  14. Ocean Systems Lecture 16 & 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerson, Peter J.

    to thrive in oceans and lakes they need sunlight and nutrients. But thermal stratification tends to separateOcean Systems Lecture 16 & 17 #12;Hydroclimate, heat budgets and stratification For plants the nature of stratification. Light, less dense, water floats on top of colder, less dense water. Plankton

  15. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case, and approved February 13, 2015 (received for review September 8, 2014) Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes

  16. Directional change in upland tundra plant communities 20-30 years after seismic exploration in the Canadian low-arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    in the Canadian low-arctic Kemper, J. Todd1,2 & Macdonald, S. Ellen1Ă 1 Department of Renewable Resources Energy Board of Canada. Introduction Arctic tundra plant communities are subject to both natural of low-arctic plant communities two to three decades after seismic ex- ploration. Location: Mackenzie

  17. Multiple Effects of Changes in Arctic Snow Cover Terry V. Callaghan, Margareta Johansson, Ross D. Brown, Pavel Ya. Groisman,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Raymond S.

    , there are likely to be some benefits from a changing Arctic snow regime such as more even run-off from melting snow that favours hydropower operations. Keywords Snow Á Arctic Á Climate Á Albedo Á Hydrology Á Ecology Á and river ice surfaces for 8­10 months each year. Arctic climate has entered a unique period relative

  18. The impact of precession changes on the Arctic climate during the last interglacialglacial transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Born, Andreas

    The impact of precession changes on the Arctic climate during the last interglacial­glacial temperature to the summer Arctic melt process are evaluated. Timing of the perihelion is varied in each melting of snow is found primarily as a result of feedbacks from the delayed seasonal cycle of hydrologic

  19. Ascorbate dynamics and oxygen consumption during arousal from hibernation in Arctic ground squirrels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drew, Kelly L.

    at the time of peak O2 consumption and peak plasma urate production. The ascor- bate decrease didAscorbate dynamics and oxygen consumption during arousal from hibernation in Arctic ground and oxygen consumption during arousal from hibernation in Arctic ground squirrels. Am J Physiol Regulatory

  20. Potential DOC production from size-fractionated Arctic tundra soils Chunhao Xu a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Laodong

    and available for biogeochemical cycling through coastal erosion (Rachold et al., 2000; Guo et al., 2004 of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA b International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Permafrost Alaska Soil organic carbon (SOC) accumulated inthe Arctic regions has beensubject to impacts

  1. SIMULATION OF BLOWING SNOW IN THE CANADIAN ARCTIC USING A DOUBLE-MOMENT MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    SIMULATION OF BLOWING SNOW IN THE CANADIAN ARCTIC USING A DOUBLE-MOMENT MODEL STEPHEN J. DÉRY and M the development of a double-moment model of blowing snow and its application to the Canadian Arctic. We first snow mixing ratio and total particle num- bers, both moments of particles that are gamma

  2. Vegetation characteristics and primary productivity along an arctic transect: implications for scaling-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and changes in the region's energy balance. Arctic terrestrial ecosystems are important com- ponents of the global C cycle. They cover an area of more than 7 Â 106 km2 and contain over 11% of the world's organic matter pool (Callaghan & Maxwell 1995). Studies of the C balance of speci®c arctic tun- dra ecosystems

  3. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation and Stakeholder Outreach Session: Kotzebue

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  4. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Dutch Harbor/Unalaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  5. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Dutch Harbor/Unalaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  6. A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface covered in melt ponds is essential for a realistic estimate of the albedo for global climate models. We

  7. Mobilization pathways of organic carbon from permafrost to arctic rivers in a changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Laodong

    Mobilization pathways of organic carbon from permafrost to arctic rivers in a changing climate rivers and Arctic coastal regions. To elucidate the transport pathways of SOC, radiocarbon composition is more readily influenced by modern terrestrial biomass, especially in large river basins which also

  8. Arctic ice export events and their potential impact on global climate during the late Pleistocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, Dennis

    Arctic ice export events and their potential impact on global climate during the late Pleistocene export events are identified from the Laurentide and the Innuitian ice sheets, between 14 and 34 ka, the Arctic export events appear to occur prior to Heinrich events. INDEX TERMS: 4207 Oceanography: General

  9. ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic ice-covered lake Jessica-cover extent and dynamics on this perennially ice-covered, High Arctic lake. These pellets are interpreted growth. The pellets remain frozen in the ice until a summer or series of summers with reduced ice cover

  10. Growing season methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at a sub-arctic wetland in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Blei, Emanuel; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01

    Methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes were measured at several sites in a sub-arctic wetland near Abisko, Sweden (68°28?N 18°49?E) throughout the 2008 growing season. Averaged over 92 flux measurements the sub-arctic ...

  11. Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    -scale control on energy flux and primary and secondary production, ultimately reaching the top of the food chainLatitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony size Naturama, Dronningemaen 30, 5700 Svendborg, Denmark 4 Department of Arctic Environment, National

  12. Be production-rate calibration for the Arctic NICOLA S E. YOUNG,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    A 10 Be production-rate calibration for the Arctic NICOLA´ S E. YOUNG,1,2 * JOERG M. SCHAEFER,1 2013; Accepted 18 April 2013 ABSTRACT: We present a Baffin Bay 10 Be production-rate calibration published 10 Be calibration datasets to develop an Arctic 10 Be production rate. Our calibration comprises

  13. Ocean Surface Topography Mission/ Jason 2 Launch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Surface Topography Mission/ Jason 2 Launch PreSS KiT/JUNe 2008 #12;#12;Media Contacts Steve .............................................................................................................................. 7 Why Study Ocean Surface Topography

  14. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is...

  15. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  16. Ocean Power (4 Activities) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    our existing non-renewable resources. Ocean power is divided into three categories: wave energy, tidal energy, and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) Systems. It is...

  17. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; et al

    2015-01-09

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar tomore »observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.« less

  18. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; Lin, Yanluan; Morcrette, J. -J.; Mulcahay, Jane; Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Yang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar to observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.

  19. Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-07-25

    A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

  20. An Inter-Cloud Architecture for Future Internet Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrakis, Euripides G.M.

    An Inter-Cloud Architecture for Future Internet Infrastructures STELIOS SOTIRIADIS, Technical, Technical University of Crete, Greece Iaan latest years, the concept of interconnecting clouds to allow of cloud resources from Internet users. An efficient common management between different clouds

  1. Disruptive technology business models in cloud computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krikos, Alexis Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing, a term whose origins have been in existence for more than a decade, has come into fruition due to technological capabilities and marketplace demands. Cloud computing can be defined as a scalable and flexible ...

  2. The Evolution of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ryan P; The ATLAS collaboration; Brasolin, Franco; Cordeiro, Cristovao; Desmarais, Ron; Field, Laurence; Gable, Ian; Giordano, Domenico; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Hover, John; Leblanc, Matthew Edgar; Love, Peter; Paterson, Michael; Sobie, Randall; Zaytsev, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has successfully incorporated cloud computing technology and cloud resources into its primarily grid-based model of distributed computing. Cloud R&D activities continue to mature and transition into stable production systems, while ongoing evolutionary changes are still needed to adapt and refine the approaches used, in response to changes in prevailing cloud technology. In addition, completely new developments are needed to handle emerging requirements. This paper describes the overall evolution of cloud computing in ATLAS. The current status of the virtual machine (VM) management systems used for harnessing infrastructure as a service (IaaS) resources are discussed. Monitoring and accounting systems tailored for clouds are needed to complete the integration of cloud resources within ATLAS' distributed computing framework. We are developing and deploying new solutions to address the challenge of operation in a geographically distributed multi-cloud scenario, including a system for ma...

  3. VOLUMETRIC SNAPPING: WATERTIGHT TRIANGULATION OF POINT CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floater, Michael S.

    VOLUMETRIC SNAPPING: WATERTIGHT TRIANGULATION OF POINT CLOUDS Tim Volodine KULeuven, Department: meshing, surface reconstruction, volumetric grid, contouring, point clouds. Abstract: We propose, a volumetric method that does not rely on a signed distance function was proposed recently by Hornung

  4. Changes in high cloud conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himebrook, Richard Frank

    1974-01-01

    of contrails, while in a more humid environment contrails wi. ll form. ilovis et al. (1970) showed that, over the 0. 68-2. 4p wavelength interval, "naturally" formed ice clouds and a fresh contrail show different signatures (which could be observed... prime cause for a change in the amount of high clouds, the Location of stations with respect to the jet routes was also reviewed. Atlanta, Ceorgia, was selected because it is a ma ~or air Lr r- minal and its upper-air liow advects jet...

  5. AnonymousCloud: A Data Ownership Privacy Provider Framework in Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamlen, Kevin W.

    AnonymousCloud: A Data Ownership Privacy Provider Framework in Cloud Computing Safwan Mahmud Khan their computation results are ultimately delivered. To provide this data ownership privacy, the cloud's distributed-anonymity; authentication; cloud computing; in- formation security; privacy; Tor I. INTRODUCTION Revolutionary advances

  6. CloudHKA: A Cryptographic Approach for Hierarchical Access Control in Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    CloudHKA: A Cryptographic Approach for Hierarchical Access Control in Cloud Computing Yi-Ruei Chen1, cloud computing, proxy re-encryption 1 Introduction Outsourcing data to cloud server (CS) becomes , Cheng-Kang Chu2 , Wen-Guey Tzeng3 , and Jianying Zhou4 1,3 Department of Computer Science, National

  7. CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    . Keywords: cloud computing, information policy, rechnology policy, grid computing, security, privacyCLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy: Computing in a Policy Cloud? Forthcoming in the Journal of Information Technology and Politics, 5(3). Paul T. Jaeger

  8. IsYour Network Cloud Ready? Network EnableYour Cloud With MPLSVPNs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    -enabled cloud that is highly-secure and reliable. It is critical for enterprises to evaluate a network, but the high level of shared infrastructure creates concerns about security risks.As a result, the public cloudIsYour Network Cloud Ready? Network EnableYour Cloud With MPLSVPNs A FROST & SULLIVAN EXECUTIVE

  9. Home is Safer than the Cloud! Privacy Concerns for Consumer Cloud Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for sensitive data over cloud storage. However, users desire better security and are ready to pay for services storage systems. General Terms Human Factors, Security, Privacy. Keywords Cloud Storage, Social FactorsHome is Safer than the Cloud! Privacy Concerns for Consumer Cloud Storage Iulia Ion , Niharika

  10. CloudWatcher: Network Security Monitoring Using OpenFlow in Dynamic Cloud Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Guofei

    CloudWatcher: Network Security Monitoring Using OpenFlow in Dynamic Cloud Networks (or: How to Provide Security Monitoring as a Service in Clouds?) Seungwon Shin SUCCESS Lab Texas A&M University Email, basically, we can employ existing network security devices, but applying them to a cloud network requires

  11. StressCloud: A Tool for Analysing Performance and Energy Consumption of Cloud Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yun

    StressCloud: A Tool for Analysing Performance and Energy Consumption of Cloud Applications Feifei. It requires the evaluation of system performance and energy consumption under a wide variety of realistic and energy consumption analysis tool for cloud applications in real-world cloud environments. Stress

  12. THREE-DIMENSIONAL CLOUD STRUCTURE OBSERVED DURING DOE ARM'S 2009 CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY FIELD EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THREE-DIMENSIONAL CLOUD STRUCTURE OBSERVED DURING DOE ARM'S 2009 CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY FIELD EXPERIMENT on Cloud Physics, Portland, OR June 28-July 2, 2010 Environmental Sciences Department/Atmospheric Sciences Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)'s cloud tomography Intensive Observation Period (IOP

  13. Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing broadening and drizzle growth in shallow liquid clouds remain not well understood. Detailed, cloudscale. Profiling, millimeterwavelength (cloud) radars can provide such observations. In particular, the first three

  14. Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus hygroscopic aerosols were introduced into a solid marine stratocumulus cloud (200 m thick) by burning hygroscopic flares mounted on an aircraft. The cloud microphysical response in two parallel seeding plumes

  15. Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaeger, Trent

    Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman Security Architecture University Park, PA, USA yus138,hvijay,tjaeger@cse.psu.edu Abstract--Cloud computing has commoditized compute paradigm, its adoption has been stymied by cloud platform's lack of trans- parency, which leaves customers

  16. Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1 1 Department of Meteorology, University. INTRODUCTION In recent years Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) have become an increasingly important tool for CRM data, which allows one to investigate statistical prop- erties of the lifecycles of the "clouds

  17. The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommerville, Ian

    1 The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise Ali Khajeh-Hosseini, David Greenwood, James W. Smith, Ian Sommerville Cloud Computing Co-laboratory, School of Computer Science University of St Andrews, UK {akh, dsg22, jws7, ifs}@cs.st-andrews.ac.uk Abstract Cloud computing

  18. Comparison of MISR and MODIS cloud-top heights in the presence of cloud overlap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    Comparison of MISR and MODIS cloud-top heights in the presence of cloud overlap C.M. Naud a, , B July 2006; accepted 3 September 2006 Abstract Coincident MISR and MODIS cloud-top heights retrieved March 2000 and October 2003. The difference between MODIS and MISR cloud-top heights is assessed

  19. Ralf Klessen: PPV, Oct. 24, 2005 Molecular CloudMolecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klessen,Ralf

    Ralf Klessen: PPV, Oct. 24, 2005 Molecular CloudMolecular Cloud Turbulence and Star formation three ,,steps" of star formation: 1.1. formation of molecular clouds in the disk of ourformation of molecular clouds in the disk of our galaxygalaxy 2.2. formation of protostellar coresformation

  20. Moving magnetic cloud -1Moving magnetic cloud -1 "Double change of frame" calculation...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    #12;19 Moving magnetic cloud - 1Moving magnetic cloud - 1 "Double change of frame" calculation... #12;eb. 2005 -- Cosmic-rays & Particle Acceleration -- E. Parizot (IPN Orsay) 21 Moving magnetic cloud - 2Moving magnetic cloud - 2 #12;Karlsruhe, 23-25 Feb. 2005 -- Cosmic-rays & Particle Acceleration

  1. To Cloud or Not to Cloud: Measuring the Performance of Mobile Gaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    To Cloud or Not to Cloud: Measuring the Performance of Mobile Gaming Chun-Ying Huang Department Tsing-Hua University Hsinchu, Taiwan chsu@cs.nthu.edu.tw ABSTRACT Mobile cloud gaming allows gamers an open source cloud gaming platform to conduct extensive experiments on real mobile clients. Our

  2. Determination of cloud liquid water distribution using 3D cloud tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Determination of cloud liquid water distribution using 3D cloud tomography Dong Huang,1 Yangang Liu; published 2 July 2008. [1] The cloud microwave tomography method for remotely retrieving 3D distributions of cloud Liquid Water Content (LWC) was originally proposed by Warner et al. in the 1980s but has lain

  3. CloudTracker: Using Execution Provenance to Optimize the Cost of Cloud Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    CloudTracker: Using Execution Provenance to Optimize the Cost of Cloud Use Geoffrey Douglas, Brian simulations using commercial clouds. We present a framework, called CLOUDTRACKER, that transparently records information from a simula- tion that is executed in a commercial cloud so that it may be "replayed" exactly

  4. The Open Cloud Testbed: A Wide Area Testbed for Cloud Computing Utilizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    The Open Cloud Testbed: A Wide Area Testbed for Cloud Computing Utilizing High Performance Network of cloud platforms and services have been developed for data intensive computing, including Hadoop, Sector, CloudStore (formerly KFS), HBase, and Thrift. In order to benchmark the performance of these systems

  5. The Cloud Computing and Other Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borjon-Kubota, Martha Estela

    2011-01-01

    bodies. Saturated. We watch clouds simmer over the stillnessnoise like a fountain spring simmers between your thighs. A

  6. "Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    /JPSS ­ UAV ­ Ocean optics, Biological ­ Laser penetration New opportunity · Insitu Sensors ­ (Gliders"Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories" "Ocean Observatories Contributions to Ocean Models and Data Assimilation For Ecosystems" Ocean Optics 2012 Glasgow Scotland Robert Arnone

  7. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore »embedded functional traits.« less

  8. Auditing the Structural Reliability of the Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    . Icebergs in the Clouds: the Other Risks of Cloud Computing. In HotCloud, 2012. #12;Correlated Failures of occurrences. #12;Talk Outline Challenges Our approach Evaluation #12;Talk Outline Challenges Our approach Evaluation #12;Challenges 1. How to acquire dependency information automatically? 2. How to organize

  9. Towards a Ubiquitous Cloud Computing Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Merwe, Kobus

    Towards a Ubiquitous Cloud Computing Infrastructure Jacobus Van der Merwe, K.K. Ramakrishnan of a number of cloud computing use cases. We specifically consider cloudbursting and follow-the-sun and focus that are also network service providers. I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing is rapidly gaining acceptance

  10. Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Pierangela Samarati*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samarati, Pierangela

    1 Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Authors Pierangela Samarati* Universitŕ degli Studi di Milano, Italy sabrina.decapitani@unimi.it Keywords cloud security confidentiality integrity availability secure data storage and processing Summary The cloud has emerged as a successful computing paradigm

  11. Security Architecture for Federated Mobile Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Shouhuai

    Security Architecture for Federated Mobile Cloud Computing Shouhuai Xu and E. Paul Ratazzi, federated mobile cloud computing imposes a diverse set of new chal- lenges, especially from a security clouds for security purposes? How should we deal with the tar- geted attackers that attempt to launch

  12. VULCAN: Vulnerability Assessment Framework for Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavi, Krishna

    services on Cloud is complex because the security depends on the vulnerability of infrastructure, platform services on Cloud is complex because the security depends on the vulnerability of infrastruc- ture?". Or "I want to host this software application in this cloud environment, what security vulnerabilities I

  13. Cloud Enterprise Storage and Data Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Henrik Bćrbak

    Cloud Enterprise Storage and Data Migration 20097733 Bobby Nielsen, 20003686 Frederik Kierbye}@cs.au.dk 20130324 Abstract This document presents a research in Enterprise Cloud Storage and Data Migration. The hypothesis is that, it is easy to migrate data between cloud platforms, including changing api

  14. MEBSURIXG CLOUD MOVEMENTS A Science Service Feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -.- - MEBSURIXG CLOUD MOVEMENTS I A Science Service Feature Released upon receist but intended on Meteorology Vatching the clouds drift by, a traditional pastime of idle people, i s part Of the professional his head. He makes his cloud observations w i t h the aid of an instrument known as a nei

  15. Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudakov, Ivan; Golden, Kenneth M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds that develop on the surface of sea ice floes during the late spring and summer largely determine their albedo $-$ a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a simple sea ice climate model passing through a bifurcation point $-$ an irreversible critical threshold as the system warms, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a nonlinear phase transition model for melt ponds, and bifurcation analysis of a simple climate model with ice - albedo feedback as the key mechanism driving the system to a potential bifurcation point.

  16. Method for preventing thaw settlement along offshore arctic pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duthweiler, F.C.

    1987-06-30

    A method is described for installing a warm fluid-bearing pipeline across an arctic seafloor, the method comprising: (1) drilling a series of boreholes along the seafloor through a thawed zone of subsea soil to penetrate a distance into a zone of permafrost; (2) circulating a warm circulation fluid through the boreholes to create a slump trough on the surface of the seafloor by creating a prethawing zone in the permafrost zone; and (3) installing a pipeline bearing a warm fluid along the bottom of the slump trough without causing further substantial slumping along the seafloor.

  17. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlantic (ACE-ENA)StudygovCampaignsArctic

  18. Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

    2014-09-23

    Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

  19. The Link Foundation Ocean Engineering and Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    and ocean instrumentation. Application Available online at www.linkoe.org or write to/email: Forms and DrThe Link Foundation Ocean Engineering and Instrumentation Ph.D. Fellowship Program Objectives: To foster ocean engineering and ocean instrumentation research; to enhance both the theoretical

  20. Response of photosynthesis to ocean acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, KRM; Morris, JJ; Morris, JJ; Morel, FMM; Kranz, SA

    2015-01-01

    primary productiv- ity, especially in the oligotrophic regions of the ocean. In addition to the energy

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CARIBBEAN OCEAN HISTORY AND THE CRETACEOUS Scientist, Leg 165 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College of any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LESSER ANTILLES FOREARC J. Casey Moore Staff Science Representative, Leg 110 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Direct* Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean

  3. INSTRUCTIONS INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP) MANUSCRIPT AND PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, Texas 77845, USA A signed copyright of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program or any other publications of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Author

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 109 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  5. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORWEGIAN SEA Olav Eldholm Co-Chief Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Pni±ip o Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  6. WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Product Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Product Documentation Ocean Climate Laboratory NODC / NESDIS / NOAA Silver: World Ocean Atlas 2013 Product Documentation. T. Boyer, Ed.; A. Mishonov, Technical Ed.; 14 pp such as mixed layer depth. Upon publishing Climatological Atlas of the World Ocean in 1982, he distributed

  7. Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

  8. Unlocking the Secrets of Clouds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clouds may look soft, fluffy and harmless to the untrained eye, but to an expert climate model scientist they represent great challenges. Fortunately the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate and Research Facility is kicking off a five-month study which should significantly clear the air.

  9. POTENTIAL OF CLOUD-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason R.

    .!! Cover!photos!courtesy!of!the!National!Energy!Research!Scientific!Computing!Center!and!Google.! #12;! ! ! The Energy Efficiency Potential of Cloud-Based Software: A U.S. Case Study ! Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory June, 2013 Research Team Eric!Masanet! Arman!Shehabi! Jiaqi!Liang! Lavanya!Ramakrishnan! Xiao

  10. ARM Data for Cloud Parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2006-10-02

    The PI's ARM investigation (DE-IA02-02ER633 18) developed a physically-based subgrid-scale saturation representation that fully considers the direct interactions of the parameterized subgrid-scale motions with subgrid-scale cloud microphysical and radiative processes. Major accomplishments under the support of that interagency agreement are summarized in this paper.

  11. Newsletter of Coastal Ocean Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science Workshop Executive Summary Draft OCEAN.US Airlie House Workshop Update Evolution of the Cross and the following working groups: 1.Trace elements in ecological and biogeochemical processes 2.Physical forcing

  12. Mercury in the Anthropocene Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamborg, Carl

    The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the ...

  13. Ocean Renewable Energy Conference X

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 10th annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference provides attendees a forum to share new ideas and concepts, opportunity to learn from leading-edge practitioners and policy-makers, information...

  14. MPAS-Ocean Development Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Douglas W.; Ringler, Todd D.; Petersen, Mark R.; Jones, Philip W.; Maltrud, Mathew E.

    2012-06-13

    The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) is a modeling framework developed jointly between NCAR and LANL, built to allow core developers to: rapidly develop new dynamical cores, and leverage improvements made to shared codes. MPAS-Ocean (MPAS-O) is a functioning ocean model capable of high resolution, or highly vairable resolution simulations. The first MPAS-O publication is expected by the end of the year.

  15. Dept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Only Indian and Pacific Ocean GlobalEEZ100km from shorelineAtlantic OceanIndo-Pacific #12;OTEC MODELINGDept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology of deep layers, Increase in THC strength 1) Global 2) EEZ 3)100km from Shoreline 4) Only Atlantic Ocean 5

  16. Ocean Sci., 5, 313327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    . The role of the penetration length scale of short- wave radiation into the surface ocean and its impactOcean Sci., 5, 313­327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/ © Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Ocean Science Regional impacts of ocean color

  17. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal; Siegel et al., 1995] have demonstrated that the penetration of EVIS in the upper layer of the ocean plays

  18. How Long Can Tiny HI Clouds Survive?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Nagashima; Shu-ichiro Inutsuka; Hiroshi Koyama

    2006-03-10

    We estimate the evaporation timescale for spherical HI clouds consisting of the cold neutral medium surrounded by the warm neutral medium. We focus on clouds smaller than 1pc, which corresponds to tiny HI clouds recently discovered by Braun & Kanekar and Stanimirovi{\\'c} & Heiles. By performing one-dimensional spherically symmetric numerical simulations of the two-phase interstellar medium (ISM), we derive the timescales as a function of the cloud size and of pressure of the ambient warm medium. We find that the evaporation timescale of the clouds of 0.01 pc is about 1Myr with standard ISM pressure, $p/k_{B}\\sim 10^{3.5}$ K cm$^{-3}$, and for clouds larger than about 0.1 pc it depends strongly on the pressure. In high pressure cases, there exists a critical radius for clouds growing as a function of pressure, but the minimum critical size is $\\sim$ 0.03 pc for a standard environment. If tiny HI clouds exist ubiquitously, our analysis suggests two implications: tiny HI clouds are formed continuously with the timescale of 1Myr, or the ambient pressure around the clouds is much higher than the standard ISM pressure. We also find that the results agree well with those obtained by assuming quasi-steady state evolution. The cloud-size dependence of the timescale is well explained by an analytic approximate formula derived by Nagashima, Koyama & Inutsuka. We also compare it with the evaporation rate given by McKee & Cowie.

  19. Status of Wind-Diesel Applications in Arctic Climates: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Corbus, D.

    2007-12-01

    The rising cost of diesel fuel and the environmental regulation for its transportation, use, and storage, combined with the clear impacts of increased arctic temperatures, is driving remote communities to examine alternative methods of providing power. Over the past few years, wind energy has been increasingly used to reduce diesel fuel consumption, providing economic, environmental, and security benefits to the energy supply of communities from Alaska to Antarctica. This summary paper describes the current state of wind-diesel systems, reviews the operation of wind-diesel plants in cold climates, discusses current research activities pertaining to these systems, and addresses their technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems in Alaska will be reviewed. Specific focus will also be given to the control of power systems with large amounts of wind generation and the complexities of replacing diesel engine waste heat with excess wind energy, a key factor in assessing power plants for retrofit. A brief overview of steps for assessing the viability of retrofitting diesel power systems with wind technologies will also be provided. Because of the large number of isolated diesel minigrids, the market for adding wind to these systems is substantial, specifically in arctic climates and on islands that rely on diesel-only power generation.

  20. International and United States documents on oceans law and policy. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Volume 3 of the five-volume compilation contains major international documents relating to ocean issues. It groups the documents under 11 major headings: Polar Policy (Arctic and Antarctic); Marine scientific research and development; Non-living resources under national jurisdiction; Exclusive economic zone; Deep seabed mining; Maritime boundaries; Dispute prevention and settlement; Special regimes (including canals, straits, etc.); Communication (undersea cables and broadcasting); and Arms control and the law of naval warfare. The title page for each document includes full citations. While most are presented in their entirety, a few have been edited to save space. A separate abstract on Deep seabed mining was prepared for the Energy Data Base and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis.

  1. Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2009-01-01

    over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

  2. Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling â?? Application to the wavelet variability model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

  3. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  4. Evaluation and Intercomparison of Cloud Fraction and Radiative Fluxes in Recent Reanalyses over the Arctic Using BSRN Surface Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    Reanalysis Project (20CR), (iv) ECMWF's Interim Reanalysis (ERA-I), and (v) NCEP­Department of Energy (DOE of renewable energy resources, investigation of extreme weather and climatic events, and health risk conditions. Reanalyses are used for a variety of applications, including as a source for the development

  5. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01

    M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  6. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  8. Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Ted Stevens that the Energy Information Administration provide an assessment of federal oil and natural gas leasing in the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Alaska.

  9. The Impact of Global Warming on the Carbon Cycle of Arctic Permafrost...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: The Impact of Global Warming on the Carbon Cycle of Arctic Permafrost: An Experimental and Field Based Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Impact...

  10. Source attributions of pollution to the Western Arctic during the NASA ARCTAS field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-8 aircraft during theand Woollen, J. : MERRA: NASA’s Modern-Era RetrospectiveWestern Arctic during the NASA ARCTAS field campaign H. P.

  11. The NGEE Arctic Data Archive -- Portal for Archiving and Distributing Data and Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boden, Thomas A; Palanisamy, Giri; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Killeffer, Terri S; Krassovski, Misha B; Hook, Leslie A

    2014-01-01

    The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project is committed to implementing a rigorous and high-quality data management program. The goal is to implement innovative and cost-effective guidelines and tools for collecting, archiving, and sharing data within the project, the larger scientific community, and the public. The NGEE Arctic web site is the framework for implementing these data management and data sharing tools. The open sharing of NGEE Arctic data among project researchers, the broader scientific community, and the public is critical to meeting the scientific goals and objectives of the NGEE Arctic project and critical to advancing the mission of the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Biological and Environmental (BER) Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) program.

  12. Satellite Retrievals of Arctic and Equatorial Rain and Snowfall Rates Using Millimeter Wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surussavadee, Chinnawat

    A new global precipitation retrieval algorithm for the millimeter-wave Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit is presented that also retrieves Arctic precipitation rates over surface snow and ice. This algorithm improves upon ...

  13. Building skills : a construction trades training facility for the eastern Canadian Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roszler, Sarah Katherine, 1977-

    2005-01-01

    On April 1, 1999, the Inuit of the Eastern Canadian Arctic achieved sovereignty over a new territory, Nunavut, envisioning economic self-reliance, political self-determination, and renewal of confidence in Inuit community. ...

  14. Impacts of Climate Change on Human Access and Resource Development in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephenson, Scott Ryan

    2014-01-01

    C. (2014). Russian Arctic LNG project to name shippers,tax breaks to benefit Yamal LNG project (21 October). Globalthe first- ever transit by an LNG carrier in November 2012 (

  15. bowhead whales. The Naval Arctic Re-search Laboratory at Barrow, Alaska,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Greenland whale, or bowhead. Unpubl. manuscr. [Vol. 15, Encyclopedia Arctica], 71 p. Avail. Dartmouth. Biology of the bowhead whale (Sa/aena mysticetus) in the western Arctic. Unpubl. manuscr., 93 p. Dep. Bio

  16. Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Laura Marie

    2014-04-25

    Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

  17. Patterns of shrub expansion in Alaskan arctic river corridors suggest phase transition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naito, Adam T; Cairns, David M

    2015-01-01

    of tall shrubs. Given current understanding of the local-scale implications for hydrol- ogy, surface energy balances, and carbon and nutrient cycling as a result of enhanced shrub cover, the comple- tion of this phase transition will alter tundra ecosystem... in Alaskan arctic river corridors suggest phase transition Adam T. Naito & David M. Cairns Department of Geography, Texas A&M University, 810 Eller O&M Building, Mailstop 3147 TAMU, College Station, Texas 77843-3147 Keywords Alaska, Arctic, landscape analysis...

  18. Secure Cloud Computing with a Virtualized Network Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akella, Aditya

    Secure Cloud Computing with a Virtualized Network Infrastructure Fang Hao, T.V. Lakshman, Sarit the rapid development in the field of cloud com- puting, security is still one of the major hurdles to cloud to users. At the other end of the spectrum, highly secured cloud services (e.g. Google "government cloud

  19. Fog Computing: Mitigating Insider Data Theft Attacks in the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    approach for securing data in the cloud using offensive decoy technology. We monitor data access security in a Cloud environment. I. INTRODUCTION Businesses, especially startups, small and medium busi. This is considered as one of the top threats to cloud computing by the Cloud Security Alliance [1]. While most Cloud

  20. Page 1Securing the Microsoft Cloud Securing the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Page 1Securing the Microsoft Cloud Securing the Microsoft Cloud #12;Page 2Securing the Microsoft to have confidence in Microsoft as their preferred cloud provider. Our security policies and practices their security and compliance related needs. Securing the Microsoft Cloud #12;Page 3Securing the Microsoft Cloud

  1. Organizational challenges in cloud adoption and enablers of cloud transition program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajendran, Sneha

    2013-01-01

    With the proliferation of cloud computing, organizations have been able to get access to never seen before computing power and resources. Cloud computing has revolutionized the utilization of computing resources through ...

  2. Aircraft Observations of Sub-cloud Aerosol and Convective Cloud Physical Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axisa, Duncan

    2011-02-22

    This research focuses on aircraft observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions in cumulus clouds. The data were collected in the summer of 2004, the spring of 2007 and the mid-winter and spring of 2008 in Texas, ...

  3. Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

    2014-01-01

    The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

  4. Active layer dynamics and arctic hydrology and meteorology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Man`s impact on the environment is increasing with time. To be able to evaluate anthropogenic impacts on an ecosystems, it is necessary first to understand all facets of how the ecosystems works: what the main processes (physical, biological, chemical) are, at what rates they proceed, and how they can be manipulated. Arctic ecosystems are dominated by physical processes of energy exchange. This project has concentrated on a strong program of hydrologic and meteorologic data collection, to better understand dominant physical processes. Field research focused on determining the natural annual and diurnal variability of meteorologic and hydrologic variables, especially those which may indicate trends in climatic change. Comprehensive compute models are being developed to simulate physical processes occurring under the present conditions and to simulate processes under the influence of climatic change.

  5. Assessing Cloud Spatial and Vertical Distribution with Infrared Cloud Analyzer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and Biofuels BiomassAssembly of aCloud Spatial and

  6. An AeroCom Assessment of Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and Sea Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, Mian; De Luca, N.; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Liu, Xiaohong; Mann, G. W.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Yun, Yuxing; Zhang, Kai

    2014-03-07

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea-ice. Here, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea-ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004-2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng g?1 for an earlier Phase of AeroCom models (Phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng g?1 for a more recent Phase of AeroCom models (Phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng g?1. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model–measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60-90?N) atmospheric residence time for BC in Phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with the fact that most Arctic BC deposition originates from extra-Arctic emissions, these results suggest that aerosol removal processes are a leading source of variation in model performance. The multi-model mean (full range) of Arctic radiative effect from BC in snow is 0.15 (0.07-0.25) W m?2 and 0.18 (0.06-0.28) W m?2 in Phase I and Phase II models, respectively. After correcting for model biases relative to observed BC concentrations in different regions of the Arctic, we obtain a multi-model mean Arctic radiative effect of 0.17 W m?2 for the combined AeroCom ensembles. Finally, there is a high correlation between modeled BC concentrations sampled over the observational sites and the Arctic as a whole, indicating that the field campaign provided a reasonable sample of the Arctic.

  7. Fragmentation in rotating isothermal protostellar clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodenheimer, P.; Tohline, J.E.; Black, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an extensive set of 3-D hydrodynamic calculations that have been performed to investigate the susceptibility of rotating clouds to gravitational fragmentation are presented. (GHT)

  8. Interstellar Turbulence, Cloud Formation and Pressure Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Vazquez-Semadeni

    1998-10-23

    We discuss HD and MHD compressible turbulence as a cloud-forming and cloud-structuring mechanism in the ISM. Results from a numerical model of the turbulent ISM at large scales suggest that the phase-like appearance of the medium, the typical values of the densities and magnetic field strengths in the intercloud medium, as well as Larson's velocity dispersion-size scaling relation in clouds may be understood as consequences of the interstellar turbulence. However, the density-size relation appears to only hold for the densest simulated clouds, there existing a large population of small, low-density clouds, which, on the other hand, are hardest to observe. We then discuss several tests and implications of a fully dynamical picture of interstellar clouds. The results imply that clouds are transient, constantly being formed, distorted and disrupted by the turbulent velocity field, with a fraction of these fluctuations undergoing gravitational collapse. Simulated line profiles and estimated cloud lifetimes are consistent with observational data. In this scenario, we suggest it is quite unlikely that quasi-hydrostatic structures on any scale can form, and that the near pressure balance between clouds and the intercloud medium is an incidental consequence of the density field driven by the turbulence and in the presence of appropriate cooling, rather than a driving or confining mechanism.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOUDS IN TITAN'S TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Penteado, Paulo; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, Roger; Nicholson, Phil; Jaumann, Ralf

    2009-09-10

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 {mu}m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8 deg. - 20 deg. S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape.

  10. Modeling microwave/electron-cloud interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattes, M; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the separate codes BI-RME and ECLOUD or PyECLOUD, we are developing a novel joint simulation tool, which models the combined effect of a charged particle beam and of microwaves on an electron cloud. Possible applications include the degradation of microwave transmission in tele-communication satellites by electron clouds; the microwave-transmission tecchniques being used in particle accelerators for the purpose of electroncloud diagnostics; the microwave emission by the electron cloud itself in the presence of a magnetic field; and the possible suppression of electron-cloud formation in an accelerator by injecting microwaves of suitable amplitude and frequency. A few early simulation results are presented.

  11. Storm-induced upwelling of high pCO2 waters onto the continental shelf of the western Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    shelf. A single 10-day event led to the outgassing of 0.18­0.54 Tg-C and caused aragonite outgassing events and the expansion of waters that are undersaturated in carbonate minerals over the shelf

  12. Tundra, Biome 9 Tundra is mostly a relatively thin ring around the arctic ocean. Again, no proper Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerson, Peter J.

    more water than plants can use in every month, not to mention that permafrost soils impeded drainage mineral matter. Here they are mainly just lifting the grit, which will fall back as the ice melts

  13. Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Ethan H.

    2008-01-01

    residual energy of seismic exploration reflecting off thesources such as seismic exploration and shipping activitynoise sources like seismic oil exploration, eventual oil and

  14. 1 Copyright 2014 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2014 33rd International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Steve

    University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada Rocky S. Taylor 1, 2 1 Memorial University of Newfoundland. John's, NL, Canada ABSTRACT A series of small-scale ice indentation tests has been carried out to study indenter shapes (a flat plate and a spherical indenter). Indentation rates of 0.1 mm/s, 1 mm/s and 10 mm

  15. April 12, 2014: The Era of Cloud Computing is coming Headline: The Era of Cloud Computing is coming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    April 12, 2014: The Era of Cloud Computing is coming #12;Headline: The Era of Cloud Computing of Cloud Computing at a seminar in MANIT and RGPV on Saturday. Inset headline: This is the right time to build a career in Cloud Computing Article: Prof. Rajkumar Buyya gave guidance to students about Cloud

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CLOUD COMPUTING, VOL. XX, NO. X, XXXX 1 Cloud Federations in the Sky: Formation Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosu, Daniel

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CLOUD COMPUTING, VOL. XX, NO. X, XXXX 1 Cloud Federations in the Sky for cloud resources. The cloud providers' available resources may not be sufficient enough to cope with such demands. Therefore, the cloud providers need to reshape their business structures and seek to improve

  17. RETRIEVALS OF CLOUD OPTICAL DEPTH AND EFFECTIVE RADIUS FROM A THIN-CLOUD ROTATING SHADOWBAND RADIOMETER (TC-RSR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETRIEVALS OF CLOUD OPTICAL DEPTH AND EFFECTIVE RADIUS FROM A THIN-CLOUD ROTATING SHADOWBAND Division Brookhaven National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT A thin cloud cloud. We applied Min and Duan's retrieval algorithm to the field measurements of TC-RSR to derive cloud

  18. Land-ocean contrasts under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Observations and climate models show a pronounced land-ocean contrast in the responses of surface temperature and the hydrological cycle to global warming: Land temperatures increase more than ocean temperatures, low-level ...

  19. PHYSICS OF OCEAN CIRCULATION Instructor: S. Riser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    Topography Tides Wind Geothermal heating Surface flows elsewhere #12;How deep is the ocean? The average ocean circulation #12;UNITS Horizontal distance: km (= 105 cm) Vertical distance: m Velocity: cm/sec Density: g/cm3

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 PRELIMINARY REPORT GAS HYDRATE SAMPLING ON THE BLAKE RIDGE of Tokyo (Japan) National Science Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program (Belgium, Denmark, Finland