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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Arctic Ocean Radiative Fluxes and Cloud Forcing Estimated from the ISCCP C2 Cloud Dataset, 1983?1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative fluxes and cloud forcings for the ocean areas of the Arctic are computed from the monthly cloud product of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for 1983?90. Spatially averaged short-wave fluxes compare well with ...

Axel J. Schweiger; Jeffrey R. Key

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Distribution and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Validation of Cloud Cover and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia D. A. Spangenberg and V. Chakrapani Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia Introduction Determination of cloud radiation interactions over large areas of the Arctic is possible only with the use of data from polar orbiting satellites. Cloud detection using satellite data is difficult in the Arctic due to the minimal contrast between clouds and the underlying snow surface in visible and infrared wavelengths. Polar clouds are frequently warmer or at the same brightness temperature as the background surface, complicating cloud detection. The brightness temperature differences between the

3

Overview of Arctic Cloud and Radiation Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To provide a background for ARM's activities at the North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean sites, an overview is given of our current state of knowledge of Arctic cloud and radiation properties and processes. The authors describe the Arctic ...

Judith A. Curry; Julie L. Schramm; William B. Rossow; David Randall

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Nighttime Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Using AVHRR Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Using AVHRR Data D. A. Spangenberg, D. R. Doelling, and V. Chakrapani Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Hampton, Virginia T. Uttal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado Introduction Clouds play an important role in the Arctic energy budget. The magnitude and significance of the radiative impact of polar clouds, however, are not well known. Polar nocturnal clouds are often warmer or at the same temperature as the background snow surface, complicating cloud detection. Also, these clouds tend to be thin, with lower emittances than clouds occurring during the summer. Using only the infrared (IR) channels of satellite data to characterize cloud amount and distribution in the Arctic is

5

Evaluation of an AVHRR Cloud Detection and Classification Method over the Central Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cloud classification method that uses both multispectral and textural features with a maximum likelihood discriminator is applied to full-resolution AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) data from 100 NOAA polar-orbiter overpasses ...

Dan Lubin; Esther Morrow

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Intercomparison of Bulk Cloud Microphysics Schemes in Mesoscale Simulations of Springtime Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A persistent, weakly forced, horizontally extensive mixed-phase boundary layer cloud observed on 4–5 May 1998 during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA)/First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional ...

H. Morrison; J. O. Pinto

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Arctic Ocean circulation patterns revealed by GRACE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of ocean bottom pressure (OBP) anomalies from the satellite mission GRACE, complemented by information from two ocean models, are used to investigate the variations and distribution of the Arctic Ocean mass from 2002 through 2011. The ...

Cecilia Peralta-Ferriz; James H. Morison; John M. Wallace; Jennifer A. Bonin; Jinlun Zhang

8

Toward an Explanation of the Annual Cycle of Cloudiness over the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual cycle of low cloud amount over the Arctic Ocean is examined using climatological data and a radiative-turbulent column model. Three hypotheses for the annual cycle are formulated, compared with climatological data for consistency, and ...

J. A. Beesley; R. E. Moritz

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) was conducted from 27 September through 22 October 2004 over the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) on the North Slope of Alaska. The ...

J. Verlinde; J. Y. Harrington; V. T. Yannuzzi; A. Avramov; S. Greenberg; S. J. Richardson; C. P. Bahrmann; G. M. McFarquhar; G. Zhang; N. Johnson; M. R. Poellot; J. H. Mather; D. D. Turner; E. W. Eloranta; D. C. Tobin; R. Holz; B. D. Zak; M. D. Ivey; A. J. Prenni; P. J. DeMott; J. S. Daniel; G. L. Kok; K. Sassen; D. Spangenberg; P. Minnis; T. P. Tooman; M. Shupe; A. J. Heymsfield; R. Schofield

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Vertical Motions in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of Arctic mixed-phase stratiform clouds and their relation to vertical air motions are examined using ground-based observations during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) in Barrow, Alaska, during fall 2004. The ...

Matthew D. Shupe; Pavlos Kollias; P. Ola G. Persson; Greg M. McFarquhar

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories. Part II: Thermodynamic Phase Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud phase defines many cloud properties and determines the ways in which clouds interact with other aspects of the climate system. The occurrence fraction and characteristics of clouds distinguished by their phase are examined at three Arctic ...

Matthew D. Shupe

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Arctic and Subarctic Ocean Flux of Potential Vorticity and the Arctic Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to observations, the Arctic Ocean circulation beneath a shallow thermocline can be schematized by cyclonic rim currents along shelves and over ridges. In each deep basin, the circulation is also believed to be cyclonic. This circulation ...

Jiayan Yang

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Dynamical and Microphysical Characteristics of Arctic Clouds during BASE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, observations from aircraft, Doppler radar, and LANDSAT are used to better understand dynamical and microphysical characteristics of low-level Arctic clouds for climate change studies. Observations during the Beaufort and Arctic ...

I. Gultepe; G. Isaac; D. Hudak; R. Nissen; J. W. Strapp

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project, with a focus on the field experiment that was conducted from October 1997 to October 1998. The primary objective of the field work was to collectocean, ice, ...

Taneil Uttal; Judith A. Curry; Miles G. Mcphee; Donald K. Perovich; Richard E. Moritz; James A. Maslanik; Peter S. Guest; Harry L. Stern; James A. Moore; Rene Turenne; Andreas Heiberg; Mark C. Serreze; Donald P. Wylie; Ola G. Persson; Clayton A. Paulson; Christopher Halle; James H. Morison; Patricia A. Wheeler; Alexander Makshtas; Harold Welch; Matthew D. Shupe; Janet M. Intrieri; Knut Stamnes; Ronald W. Lindsey; Robert Pinkel; W. Scott Pegau; Timothy P. Stanton; Thomas C. Grenfeld

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Arctic Ocean Response to the North Atlantic Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climatically sensitive zone of the Arctic Ocean lies squarely within the domain of the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO), one of the most robust recurrent modes of atmospheric behavior. However, the specific response of the Arctic to annual ...

R. R. Dickson; T. J. Osborn; J. W. Hurrell; J. Meincke; J. Blindheim; B. Adlandsvik; T. Vinje; G. Alekseev; W. Maslowski

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Observed Relationships between Arctic Longwave Cloud Forcing and Cloud Parameters Using a Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A neural network technique is used to quantify relationships involved in cloud–radiation feedbacks based on observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) project. Sensitivities of longwave cloud forcing (CFL) to cloud parameters ...

Yonghua Chen; Filipe Aires; Jennifer A. Francis; James R. Miller

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Shupe, Matthew CIRES/NOAA/ETL Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Mixed-phase clouds play a unique role in the Arctic, where the delicate balance of phases in these clouds can have a profound impact on the surface radiation balance and various cloud-atmosphere-radiation-surface feedback processes. A better understanding of these clouds is clearly important and has been a recent objective of the ARM program. To this end, multiple sensors including radar, lidar, and temperature soundings, have been utilized in an automated cloud type classification scheme for clouds observed at the North Slope of Alaska site. The performance of this new algorithm at identifying mixed-phase cloud conditions is compared with an

18

AMOC: Acoustic monitoring of the ocean climate of the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of AMOC is to develop and design an acoustic system for long?term monitoring of the ocean temperature and ice thickness in the Arctic Ocean including the Fram Strait

Ola M. Johannessen; AMOC Group

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Intensification of Geostrophic Currents in the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous sampling of upper-ocean hydrographic data in the Canada Basin from various sources spanning from 2003 through 2011 provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe changes occurring in a major feature of the Arctic Ocean. In a 112-km-...

Miles G. McPhee

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Relationships between Arctic Sea Ice and Clouds during Autumn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The connection between sea ice variability and cloud cover over the Arctic seas during autumn is investigated by analyzing the 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40) products and the Television and Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS) Operational ...

Axel J. Schweiger; Ron W. Lindsay; Steve Vavrus; Jennifer A. Francis

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Cirriform Rotor Cloud Observed on a Canadian Arctic Ice Cap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thin rotor cloud was observed on the lee side of Penny Ice Cap in the Canadian Arctic on 21 April 1996. The cloud consisted of thin cirriform layers, so that its motion was clearly observed. By means of time-lapse camera photography, the ...

Hisashi Ozawa; Kumiko Goto-Azuma; Koyuru Iwanami; Roy M. Koerner

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

LES Simulations of Roll Clouds Observed During Mixed- Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Roll clouds, and associated roll convection, are fairly common features of the atmospheric boundary layer. While these organized cumuliform clouds are found over many regions of the planet, they are quite ubiquitous near the edge of the polar ice sheets. In particular, during periods of off-ice flow, when cold polar air flows from the ice pack over the relatively warm ocean water, strong boundary layer convection develops along with frequent rolls. According to Bruemmer and Pohlman (2000), most of the total cloud cover in the Arctic is due to roll clouds. In an effort to examine the influences of mixed-phase microphysics on the boundary layer evolution of roll clouds during off-ice flow, Olsson and Harrington (2000) used a 2D mesoscale model coupled to a bulk microphysical scheme (see Section 2). Their results showed that mixed-phase clouds produced more shallow boundary layers with weaker turbulence than liquid-phase cases. Furthermore, their results showed that because of th e reduced turbulent drag on the atmosphere in the mixed-phase case, regions of mesoscale divergence in the marginal ice-zone were significantly affected. A follow-up 2D study (Harrington and Olsson 2001) showed that the reduced turbulent intensity in mixed-phase cases was due to precipitation. Ice precipitation caused downdraft stabilization which fed back and caused a reduction in the surface heat fluxes. In this work, we extend the work of Olsson and Harrington (2000) and Harrington and Olsson (2001) by examining the impacts of ice microphysics on roll convection. We will present results that illustrate how microphysics alters roll cloud structure and dynamics.

Greenberg, S.D.; Harrington, J.Y.; Prenni, A.; DeMott, P.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

24

On the Relationship between Thermodynamic Structure and Cloud Top, and Its Climate Significance in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud and thermodynamic characteristics from three Arctic observation sites are investigated to understand the collocation between low-level clouds and temperature inversions. A regime where cloud top was 100–200 m above the inversion base [cloud ...

Joseph Sedlar; Matthew D. Shupe; Michael Tjernström

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Mesoscale Modeling During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic (Curry et al. 2000) and through various feedback mechanisms exert a strong influence on the Arctic climate. Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. It has been hypothesized that mixed-phase clouds are maintained through a balance between liquid water condensation resulting from the cloud-top radiative cooling and ice removal by precipitation (Pinto 1998; Harrington et al. 1999). In their modeling study Harrington et al. (1999) found that the maintenance of this balance depends strongly on the ambient concentration of ice forming nucleus (IFN). In a follow-up study, Jiang et al. (2002), using only 30% of IFN concentration predicted by Meyers et al. (1992) IFN parameterization were able to obtain results similar to the observations reported by Pinto (1998). The IFN concentration measurements collected during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004 over the North Slope of Alaska and the Beaufort Sea (Verlinde et al. 2005), also showed much lower values then those predicted (Prenne, pers. comm.) by currently accepted ice nucleation parameterizations (e.g. Meyers et al. 1992). The goal of this study is to use the extensive IFN data taken during M-PACE to examine what effects low IFN concentrations have on mesoscale cloud structure and coastal dynamics.

Avramov, A.; Harringston, J.Y.; Verlinde, J.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

26

Arctic Ocean Warming Contributes to Reduced Polar Ice Cap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of modern and historical observations demonstrates that the temperature of the intermediate-depth (150–900 m) Atlantic water (AW) of the Arctic Ocean has increased in recent decades. The AW warming has been uneven in time; a local 1°C ...

Igor V. Polyakov; Leonid A. Timokhov; Vladimir A. Alexeev; Sheldon Bacon; Igor A. Dmitrenko; Louis Fortier; Ivan E. Frolov; Jean-Claude Gascard; Edmond Hansen; Vladimir V. Ivanov; Seymour Laxon; Cecilie Mauritzen; Don Perovich; Koji Shimada; Harper L. Simmons; Vladimir T. Sokolov; Michael Steele; John Toole

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

On the circulation of Atlantic Water in the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An idealized eddy-resolving numerical model and an analytic three-layer model are used to develop ideas about what controls the circulation of Atlantic Water in the Arctic Ocean. The numerical model is forced with a surface heat flux, uniform ...

Michael A. Spall

28

Hafnium isotopes in Arctic Ocean water Bettina Zimmermann a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-GEOMAR, 24148 Kiel, Germany d Laboratory for Isotope Geology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007, SEHafnium isotopes in Arctic Ocean water Bettina Zimmermann a , Don Porcelli b,*, Martin Frank c-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden e Department of Geology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202, USA f

Baskaran, Mark

29

The Summer Cyclone Maximum over the Central Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fascinating feature of the northern high-latitude circulation is a prominent summer maximum in cyclone activity over the Arctic Ocean, centered near the North Pole in the long-term mean. This pattern is associated with the influx of lows ...

Mark C. Serreze; Andrew P. Barrett

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE  

SciTech Connect

An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN) concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel studies of the cloud phase parameter space. Large sensitivity to the IN/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterization in models.

Morrison, H.; Zuidema, Paquita; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Luo, Yali; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shipway, Ben

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

Major Cloud Plumes in the Arctic and Their Relation to Fronts and Ice Movement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the movement of orographic cloud plumes from one island to another in the Svalbard-Novaya Zemlya region of the Barents Sea revealed a close association with similar movements of arctic fronts. Strong northerly winds behind arctic ...

Robert W. Fett

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The Influence of Changes in Cloud Cover on Recent Surface Temperature Trends in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented to assess the influence of changes in Arctic cloud cover on the surface temperature trend, allowing for a more robust diagnosis of causes for surface warming or cooling. Seasonal trends in satellite-derived Arctic surface ...

Yinghui Liu; Jeffrey R. Key; Xuanji Wang

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

TOWARDS A CHARACTERIZATION OF ARCTIC MIXED-PHASE CLOUDS CIRES/NOAA/ETL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, radar-based retrieval methods. On average, mixed-phase cloud ice particle mean diameters increase fromTOWARDS A CHARACTERIZATION OF ARCTIC MIXED-PHASE CLOUDS Shupe, M. CIRES/NOAA/ETL Kollias, P Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Mixed-phase clouds play a unique role in the Arctic

34

A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA Case Study of Mixed-Phase Arctic Boundary Layer Clouds: Entrainment Rate Limitations on Rapid Primary Ice Nucleation Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of long-lived mixed-phase Arctic boundary layer clouds on 7 May 1998 during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE)–Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE)/Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic ...

Ann M. Fridlind; Bastiaan van Diedenhoven; Andrew S. Ackerman; Alexander Avramov; Agnieszka Mrowiec; Hugh Morrison; Paquita Zuidema; Matthew D. Shupe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient Noise in the Arctic Ocean,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Vol.for sound speed in the oceans,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Vol. 70,Pritchard, R. S. , “Arctic Ocean Background Noise Caused by

Roth, Ethan H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Ocean Heat Transport as a Cause for Model Uncertainty in Projected Arctic Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic climate is governed by complex interactions and feedback mechanisms between the atmosphere, ocean, and solar radiation. One of its characteristic features, the Arctic sea ice, is very vulnerable to anthropogenically caused warming. ...

Irina Mahlstein; Reto Knutti

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Observational and Theoretical Studies of Solar Radiation in Arctic Stratus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of clouds-radiation experiments was carried out in June 1980 in Arctic stratus clouds occurring over the Beaufort Sea using the NCAR Electra aircraft. This paper is an analysis of the hemispheric radiation fields obtained with Eppley ...

G. F. Herman; J. A. Curry

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories. Part I: Occurrence and Macrophysical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud observations over the past decade from six Arctic atmospheric observatories are investigated to derive estimates of cloud occurrence fraction, vertical distribution, persistence in time, diurnal cycle, and boundary statistics. Each ...

Matthew D. Shupe; Von P. Walden; Edwin Eloranta; Taneil Uttal; James R. Campbell; Sandra M. Starkweather; Masataka Shiobara

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Cloud Clusters and Superclusters over the Oceanic Warm Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrared satellite images of the oceanic warm-pool region (8O°E-160°W) have been objectively processed to reveal tropical “cloud clusters” with temperature colder than a given threshold. Cloud clusters span a somewhat lognormal distribution of ...

Brain E. Mapes; Robert A. Houze Jr.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Review of science issues, deployment strategy, and status for the ARM north slope of Alaska-Adjacent Arctic Ocean climate research site  

SciTech Connect

Recent climate modeling results point to the Arctic as a region that is particularly sensitive to global climate change. The Arctic warming predicted by the models to result from the expected doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide is two to three times the predicted mean global warming, and considerably greater than the warming predicted for the Antarctic. The North Slope of Alaska-Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA-AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is designed to collect data on temperature-ice-albedo and water vapor-cloud-radiation feedbacks, which are believed to be important to the predicted enhanced warming in the Arctic. The most important scientific issues of Arctic, as well as global, significance to be addressed at the NSA-AAO CART site are discussed, and a brief overview of the current approach toward, and status of, site development is provided. ARM radiometric and remote sensing instrumentation is already deployed and taking data in the perennial Arctic ice pack as part of the SHEBA (Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic ocean) experiment. In parallel with ARM`s participation in SHEBA, the NSA-AAO facility near Barrow was formally dedicated on 1 July 1997 and began routine data collection early in 1998. This schedule permits the US Department of Energy`s ARM Program, NASA`s Arctic Cloud program, and the SHEBA program (funded primarily by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research) to be mutually supportive. In addition, location of the NSA-AAO Barrow facility on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration land immediately adjacent to its Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory Barrow Observatory includes NOAA in this major interagency Arctic collaboration.

Stamnes, K. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.; Ellingson, R.G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Meteorology; Curry, J.A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Aerospace and Engineering Sciences; Walsh, J.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Zak, B.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

An Observational Estimate of Volume and Freshwater Flux Leaving the Arctic Ocean through Nares Strait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic Ocean is an important link in the global hydrological cycle, storing freshwater and releasing it to the North Atlantic Ocean in a variable fashion as pack ice and freshened seawater. An unknown fraction of this return flow passes ...

Andreas Münchow; Humfrey Melling; Kelly K. Falkner

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Variations in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types over the Ocean from Surface Observations, 1954–2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synoptic weather observations from ships throughout the World Ocean have been analyzed to produce a climatology of total cloud cover and the amounts of nine cloud types. About 54 million observations contributed to the climatology, which now ...

Ryan Eastman; Stephen G. Warren; Carole J. Hahn

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Influence of parameterized ice habit on simulated mixed phase Arctic clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of parameterized ice habit on simulated mixed phase Arctic clouds Alexander Avramov1 12 February 2010. [1] The phase partitioning of cloud mass between liquid and ice in mixed phase clouds and its dependence on ambient ice nuclei (IN) concentrations and ice habit parameterizations

45

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

Solomon, Amy

46

Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Simulated by a Cloud-Resolving Model: Comparison with ARM Observations and Sensitivity to Microphysics Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single-layer mixed-phase stratiform (MPS) Arctic clouds, which formed under conditions of large surface heat flux combined with general subsidence during a subperiod of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s Mixed-Phase Arctic ...

Yali Luo; Kuan-Man Xu; Hugh Morrison; Greg McFarquhar

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Arctic Cloud Microphysics Retrievals from Surface-Based Remote Sensors at SHEBA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An operational suite of ground-based, remote sensing retrievals for producing cloud microphysical properties is described, assessed, and applied to 1 yr of observations in the Arctic. All measurements were made in support of the Surface Heat ...

Matthew D. Shupe; Taneil Uttal; Sergey Y. Matrosov

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Turbulence Structure of Arctic Stratus Clouds Derived from Measurements and Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from a detailed case study of an Arctic stratus cloud over the Fram Strait that is based on aircraft measurements and model calculations. The measurements have been performed during MIZEX 1984 (Marginal Ice Zone Experiment) ...

Jörg E. Finger; Peter Wendling

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Remote Sensing of Surface and Cloud Properties in the Arctic from AVHRR Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Algorithms to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius in the Arctic using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data are developed, using a comprehensive radiative transfer model in which the atmosphere is coupled to the ...

W. Han; K. Stamnes; Dan Lubin

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Sensitivity of CAM5-Simulated Arctic Clouds and Radiation to Ice Nucleation Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensitivity of Arctic clouds and radiation in the Community Atmospheric Model, version 5, to the ice nucleation process is examined by testing a new physically based ice nucleation scheme that links the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number ...

Shaocheng Xie; Xiaohong Liu; Chuanfeng Zhao; Yuying Zhang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Retrieval of Cloud Phase Using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Data during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Improving climate model predictions over Earth's polar regions requires a comprehensive knowledge of polar cloud microphysics. Over the Arctic, there is minimal contrast between the clouds and background snow surface, making it difficult to detect clouds and retrieve their phase from space. Snow and ice cover, temperature inversions, and the predominance of mixed-phase clouds make it even more difficult to determine cloud phase. Also, since determining cloud phase is the first step toward analyzing cloud optical depth, particle size, and water content, it is vital that the phase be correct in order to obtain accurate microphysical and bulk properties. Changes in these cloud properties will, in turn, affect the Arctic climate since clouds are expected to play a critical role in the sea ice albedo feedback. In this paper, the IR trispectral technique (IRTST) is used as a starting point for a WV and 11-{micro}m brightness temperature (T11) parameterization (WVT11P) of cloud phase using MODIS data. In addition to its ability to detect mixed-phase clouds, the WVT11P also has the capability to identify thin cirrus clouds overlying mixed or liquid phase clouds (multiphase ice). Results from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) MODIS phase model (AMPHM) are compared to the surface-based cloud phase retrievals over the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site and to in-situ data taken from University of North Dakota Citation (CIT) aircraft which flew during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE). It will be shown that the IRTST and WVT11P combined to form the AMPHM can achieve a relative high accuracy of phase discrimination compared to the surface-based retrievals. Since it only uses MODIS WV and IR channels, the AMPHM is robust in the sense that it can be applied to daytime, twilight, and nighttime scenes with no discontinuities in the output phase.

Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, P.; Shupe, M.; Uttal, T.; Poellot, M.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

52

How Well Do Regional Climate Models Reproduce Radiation and Clouds in the Arctic? An Evaluation of ARCMIP Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downwelling radiation in six regional models from the Arctic Regional Climate Model Intercomparison (ARCMIP) project is systematically biased negative in comparison with observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ...

Michael Tjernström; Joseph Sedlar; Matthew D. Shupe

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types in Relation to Sea Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea ice extent and thickness may be affected by cloud changes, and sea ice changes may in turn impart changes to cloud cover. Different types of clouds have different effects on sea ice. Visual cloud reports from land and ocean regions of the ...

Ryan Eastman; Stephen G. Warren

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Surface Albedo over the Arctic Ocean Derived from AVHRR and Its Validation with SHEBA Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for retrieving the broadband albedo over the Arctic Ocean using advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data obtained from NOAA polar-orbiting satellites. Visible and near-infrared albedos over snow and ice surfaces ...

Xiaozhen Xiong; Knut Stamnes; Dan Lubin

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Deep-Water Flow over the Lomonosov Ridge in the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic Ocean likely impacts global climate through its effect on the rate of deep-water formation and the subsequent influence on global thermohaline circulation. Here, the renewal of the deep waters in the isolated Canadian Basin is ...

M-L. Timmermans; P. Winsor; J. A. Whitehead

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and...

57

The Melting of Ice in the Arctic Ocean: The Influence of Double-Diffusive Transport of Heat from Below  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation was originally prompted by two oceanographic observations: an increased rate of melting of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, and the advance of an anomalously warm tongue of Atlantic water intruding across the Arctic below the ...

J. S. Turner

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Use of ARM/NSA Data to Validate and Improve the Remote Sensing Retrieval of Cloud and Surface Properties in the Arctic from AVHRR Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM/NSA Data to Validate and Improve the ARM/NSA Data to Validate and Improve the Remote Sensing Retrieval of Cloud and Surface Properties in the Arctic from AVHRR Data X. Xiong QSS Group, Inc. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service Office of Research and Applications Camp Springs, Maryland R. Storvold and C. Marty Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska K. H. Stamnes Stevens Institute of Technology Hoboken, New Jersey B. D. Zak Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Introduction Clouds in the Arctic have an important impact on the radiative energy balance. However, the effects of clouds still constitute one of the largest uncertainties in the study of climate change. Because the surface

59

Cloud Color and Ocean Radiant Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well recognized that clouds regulate the flux of solar radiation reaching the sea surface. Clouds also affect the spectral distribution of incident irradiance. Observations of spectral and total incident solar irradiance made from the ...

David A. Siegel; Toby K. Westberry; J. Carter Ohlmann

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part II: Single-Column Modeling of Arctic Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the arctic bound- ary layer, the presence of leads (cracks) in the sea ice surface, the persistence of mixed-phaseA New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part- dicted cloud boundaries and total cloud fraction compare reasonably well with observations. Cloud phase

Zuidema, Paquita

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations  

SciTech Connect

A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

Turner, David D.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The role of clouds and oceans in global greenhouse warming  

SciTech Connect

During the past three years we have conducted several studies using models and a combination of satellite data, in situ meteorological and oceanic data, and paleoclimate reconstructions, under the DoE program, Quantifying the Link Between Change in Radiative Balance and Atmospheric Temperature''. Our goals were to investigate effects of global cloudiness variations on global climate and their implications for cloud feedback and continue development and application of NYU transient climate/ocean models, with emphasis on coupled effects of greenhouse warming and feedbacks by both the clouds and oceans. Our original research plan emphasized the use of cloud, surface temperature and ocean data sets interpreted by focused climate/ocean models to develop a cloud radiative forcing scenario for the past 100 years and to assess the transient climate response; to narrow key uncertainties in the system; and to identify those aspects of the climate system most likely to be affected by greenhouse warming over short, medium and long time scales.

Hoffert, M.I.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

SciTech Connect

Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Session Papers North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

over the NSAAAO throughout the year, it is well positioned to address these issues. Ice Phase Clouds Ice phase clouds are important globally, not just regionally. However, at...

65

Projected Impact of Climate Change on the Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean by a Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual energy budget of the Arctic Ocean is characterized by a net heat loss at the air–sea interface that is balanced by oceanic heat transport into the Arctic. Two 150-yr simulations (1950–2099) of a global climate model are used to examine ...

James R. Miller; Gary L. Russell

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A Critical Examination of Satellite Cloud Retrieval from AVHRR in the Arctic Using SHEBA Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the validity and limitations associated with retrieval of cloud optical depth ? and effective droplet size re in the Arctic from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) channels 2 (0.725–1.10 ?m), 3 (3.55–3.93 ?m), ...

Xiaozhen Xiong; Dan Lubin; Wei Li; Knut Stamnes

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Ice properties of single-layer stratocumulus during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice properties of single-layer stratocumulus during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: 2 opportunity to study poorly understood ice formation processes in mixed-phase stratocumulus. Using, were not significant sources of ice based on parameterizations from existing studies. After surveying

68

The Sensitivity of Springtime Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Clouds to Surface Layer and Cloud-Top Inversion Layer Moisture Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study a series of idealized large eddy simulations is used to understand the relative impact of cloud top and subcloud layer sources of moisture on the microphysical-radiative-dynamical feedbacks in an Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus (...

Amy Solomon; Matthew D. Shupe; Ola Persson; Hugh Morrison; Takanobu Yamaguchi; Peter M. Caldwell; Gijs de Boer

69

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) sponsored by the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and Atmospheric Science Programs. The primary aim of ISDAC was to examine indirect effects of aerosols on clouds that contain both liquid and ice water. The experiment utilized the ARM permanent observational facilities at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) in Barrow. These include a cloud radar, a polarized micropulse lidar, and an atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer as well as instruments specially deployed for ISDAC measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation and spectral shortwave radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties during ISDAC, collecting data using an unprecedented 42 cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 hours on 12 different days. Data were obtained above, below and within single-layer stratus on 8 April and 26 April 2008. These data enable a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect the microphysical and radiative properties of arctic clouds influenced by different surface conditions. Observations acquired on a heavily polluted day, 19 April 2008, are enhancing this understanding. Data acquired in cirrus on transit flights between Fairbanks and Barrow are improving our understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Ultimately the ISDAC data will be used to improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and to determine the extent to which long-term surface-based measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation and radiative heating in the Arctic.

McFarquhar, Greg; Ghan, Steven J.; Verlinde, J.; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Mengistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Fan, Jiwen; Flynn, Connor J.; Gultepe, Ismail; Hubbe, John M.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander; Lawson, Paul; Leaitch, W. R.; Liu, Peter S.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lubin, Dan; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Macdonald, A. M.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.; Xie, Shaocheng; Zelenyuk, Alla; Bae, Kenny; Freer, Matthew; Glen, Andrew

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Simulating Arctic mixed-phase clouds: Sensitivity to environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as well as aggregates to precipitation fluxes and radar reflectivity. Observations of icewater drop size distributions, cloud phase, etc., allow us to constrain model...

71

Mesoscale Modeling of Springtime Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds Using a New Two-Moment Bulk Microphysics Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new two-moment bulk microphysics scheme is implemented into the polar version of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) to simulate arctic mixed-phase boundary layer stratiform clouds observed during ...

H. Morrison; J. O. Pinto

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Impact of a Reduced Arctic Sea Ice Cover on Ocean and Atmospheric Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic sea ice cover declined over the last few decades and reached a record minimum in 2007, with a slight recovery thereafter. Inspired by this the authors investigate the response of atmospheric and oceanic properties to a 1-yr period of ...

Jan Sedlá?ek; Reto Knutti; Olivia Martius; Urs Beyerle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ice-Tethered Profiler Measurements of Dissolved Oxygen under Permanent Ice Cover in the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four ice-tethered profilers (ITPs), deployed between 2006 and 2009, have provided year-round dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements from the surface mixed layer to 760-m depth under the permanent sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean. These ITPs drifted ...

M.-L. Timmermans; R. Krishfield; S. Laney; J. Toole

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Low-Frequency Variability in the Arctic Atmosphere, Sea Ice, and Upper-Ocean Climate System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low-frequency natural variability of the arctic climate system is modeled using a single-column, energy balance model of the atmosphere. sea ice, and upper-ocean system. Variability in the system is induced by forcing with realistic, random ...

C. M. Bitz; D. S. Battisti; R. E. Moritz; J. A. Beesley

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Late-Twentieth-Century Simulation of Arctic Sea Ice and Ocean Properties in the CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To establish how well the new Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) simulates the properties of the Arctic sea ice and ocean, results from six CCSM4 twentieth-century ensemble simulations are compared here with the available data. It ...

Alexandra Jahn; Kara Sterling; Marika M. Holland; Jennifer E. Kay; James A. Maslanik; Cecilia M. Bitz; David A. Bailey; Julienne Stroeve; Elizabeth C. Hunke; William H. Lipscomb; Daniel A. Pollak

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Winter convection transports Atlantic Water heat to the surface layer in the eastern Arctic Ocean.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one year (2009–2010) record of temperature and salinity profiles from Ice Tethered Profiler (ITP) buoys in the Eurasian Basin (EB) of the Arctic Ocean is used to quantify the flux of heat from the upper pycnocline to the surface mixed layer. The ...

Igor V. Polyakov; Andrey V. Pnyushkov; Robert Rember; Laurie Padman; Eddy C. Carmack; Jennifer M. Jackson

77

A Numerical Study of Sea Ice and Ocean Circulation in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sea-ice model based bulk-viscous plastic dynamics and 3-layer thermodynamics is coupled to a multilevel primitive equation model of the Arctic Ocean and Greenland Sea. The combined model is forced by inflow through the Faeroe-Shetland Channel ...

Albert J. Semtner Jr.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Simulated Arctic Ocean Freshwater Budgets in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic Ocean freshwater budgets in climate model integrations of the twentieth and twenty-first century are examined. An ensemble of six members of the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) is used for the analysis, allowing the ...

Marika M. Holland; Joel Finnis; Mark C. Serreze

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The distribution of neodymium isotopes in Arctic Ocean basins Don Porcelli a,*, Per S. Andersson b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PR, UK b Laboratory for Isotope Geology, Swedish MuseumThe distribution of neodymium isotopes in Arctic Ocean basins Don Porcelli a,*, Per S. Andersson b of Natural History, Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden c Department of Geology, Wayne State University

Baskaran, Mark

80

Winter Convection Transports Atlantic Water Heat to the Surface Layer in the Eastern Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1-yr (2009/10) record of temperature and salinity profiles from Ice-Tethered Profiler (ITP) buoys in the Eurasian Basin (EB) of the Arctic Ocean is used to quantify the flux of heat from the upper pycnocline to the surface mixed layer. The upper ...

Igor V. Polyakov; Andrey V. Pnyushkov; Robert Rember; Laurie Padman; Eddy C. Carmack; Jennifer M. Jackson

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by order 12% per decade, with smaller reductions in winter. Coupled models suggest that under greenhouse-gasThe ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and ozone forcing John Marshall, Kyle Armour, Jeffery Scott and Yavor Kostov (MIT) David Ferreira

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

82

Eddies in the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean, Observed from Ice-Tethered Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five ice-tethered profilers (ITPs), deployed between 2004 and 2006, have provided detailed potential temperature ? and salinity S profiles from 21 anticyclonic eddy encounters in the central Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean. The 12–35-m-thick ...

M-L. Timmermans; J. Toole; A. Proshutinsky; R. Krishfield; A. Plueddemann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Dynamics in the Deep Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean, Inferred by Thermistor Chain Time Series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 50-day time series of high-resolution temperature in the deepest layers of the Canada Basin in the Arctic Ocean indicates that the deep Canada Basin is a dynamically active environment, not the quiet, stable basin often assumed. Vertical ...

M-L. Timmermans; H. Melling; L. Rainville

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Evolution of the Deep Water in the Canadian Basin in the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overflow of magnitude 0.25 Sv (Sv ? 106 m?3 s?1) has been predicted to enter the Makarov Basin (part of the Canadian Basin in the Arctic Ocean) from the Eurasian Basin via a deep gap in the dividing Lomonosov ridge. The authors argue that this ...

M-L. Timmermans; Chris Garrett

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Retrieval of Stratus Cloud Droplet Effective Radius with Cloud Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ samples of cloud droplets by aircraft in Oklahoma in 1997, the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA)/First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE)-Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE) in 1998, and various other locations around the world were ...

Shelby Frisch; Matthew Shupe; Irina Djalalova; Graham Feingold; Michael Poellot

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Arctic Cloud Characteristics as Derived from MODIS, CALIPSO, and CloudSat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Cloud–Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), and CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) set of sensors, all in the Afternoon Constellation (A-Train), has been regarded as among ...

Mark Aaron Chan; Josefino C. Comiso

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

ARM - Field Campaign - FIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

g-meter, the Pilewskie Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR), the NASA-GoddardU. of Wash. Spectral Scanning Radiometer, and the SPEC Inc. Cloud Particle Imager. This was the...

88

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

89

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

90

The Structure of Low-Altitude Clouds over the Southern Ocean as Seen by CloudSat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climatology of the structure of the low-altitude cloud field (tops below 4 km) over the Southern Ocean (40°–65°S) in the vicinity of Australia (100°–160°E) has been constructed with CloudSat products for liquid water and ice water clouds. ...

Yi Huang; Steven T. Siems; Michael J. Manton; Luke B. Hande; John M. Haynes

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Evolution of the Arctic Ocean Salinity, 2007–08: Contrast between the Canadian and the Eurasian Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigate the variability of salinity in the Arctic Ocean and in the Nordic and Labrador Seas over recent years to see how the freshwater balance in the Arctic and the exchanges with the North Atlantic have been affected by the ...

Camille Lique; Gilles Garric; Anne-Marie Treguier; Bernard Barnier; Nicolas Ferry; Charles-Emmanuel Testut; Fanny Girard-Ardhuin

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Arctic Sea Ice and Freshwater Changes Driven by the Atmospheric Leading Mode in a Coupled Sea Ice–Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational and modeling studies have indicated recent large changes of sea ice and hydrographic properties in the Arctic Ocean. However, the observational database is sufficiently sparse that the mechanisms responsible for the recent changes ...

Xiangdong Zhang; Moto Ikeda; John E. Walsh

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A One-Dimensional Time-Dependent Model for the Vertical Stratification of the Upper Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional time-dependent model of the upper Arctic Ocean is presented. It describes the circulation above a dynamically passive reservoir of Atlantic water. The model is driven by freshwater runoff from land, ice production and export, ...

Göran Björk

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Wind-Driven Variability of the Large-Scale Recirculating Flow in the Nordic Seas and Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The varying depth-integrated currents in the Nordic seas and Arctic Ocean are modeled using an integral equation derived from the shallow-water equations. This equation assumes that mass divergence in the surface Ekman layer is balanced by ...

Pål E. Isachsen; J. H. LaCasce; C. Mauritzen; S. Häkkinen

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

ARM - Field Campaign - Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

g-meter, the Pilewskie Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR), the NASA-GoddardU. of Wash. Spectral Scanning Radiometer, and the SPEC Inc. Cloud Particle Imager. This was the...

96

Low Cloud Type over the Ocean from Surface Observations. Part II: Geographical and Seasonal Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synoptic surface cloud observations primarily made by volunteer observing ships are used to construct global climatologies of the frequency of occurrence of individual low cloud types over the ocean for daytime during summer and winter seasons ...

Joel R. Norris

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Interannual Variability of the Upper Ocean in the Southeast Pacific Stratus Cloud Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persistent stratus/stratocumulus cloud decks in the southeast Pacific near the coasts of Peru and northern Chile play an important role in regional and global climate variability. Interannual variability of the upper ocean under stratus cloud ...

Toshiaki Shinoda; Jialin Lin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Relationship between Cloud Radiative Forcing and Sea Surface Temperatures over the Entire Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite measurements from January 1985 to December 1989 show that warmer tropical oceans as a whole are associated with less longwave greenhouse effect of clouds and less cloud reflection of solar radiation to the space. The regression slopes ...

M. H. Zhang; R. D. Cess; S. C. Xie

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The 1990 Valentine's Day Arctic Outbreak. Part I: Mesoscale and Microscale Structure and Evolution of a Colorado Front Range Shallow Upslope Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mesoscale and microscale structure and evolution of a shallow, upslope cloud is described using observations obtained during the Winter Icing and Storms Project (WISP) and model stimulations. The upslope cloud formed within a shallow arctic ...

Roy M. Rasmussen; Ben C. Bernstein; Masataka Murakami; Greg Stossmeister; Jon Reisner; Boba Stankov

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Insights from a 3-D Cloud-Resolving Model with Size-Resolved Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics  

SciTech Connect

The single-layer mixed-phase clouds observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) are simulated with a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) coupled with an explicit bin microphysics scheme and a radar-lidar simulator. Two possible ice enhancement mechanisms – activation of droplet evaporation residues by condensation-followed-by-freezing and droplet freezing by contact freezing inside-out, are scrutinized by extensive comparisons with aircraft and radar and lidar measurements. The locations of ice initiation associated with each mechanism and the role of ice nuclei (IN) in the evolution of mixed-phase clouds are mainly addressed. Simulations with either mechanism agree well with the in-situ and remote sensing measurements on ice microphysical properties but liquid water content is slightly underpredicted. These two mechanisms give very similar cloud microphysical, macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative properties, although the ice nucleation properties (rate, frequency and location) are completely different. Ice nucleation from activation of evaporation nuclei is most efficient near cloud top areas concentrated on the edges of updrafts, while ice initiation from the drop freezing process has no significant location preference (occurs anywhere that droplet evaporation is significant). Both enhanced nucleation mechanisms contribute dramatically to ice formation with ice particle concentration of 10-15 times higher relative to the simulation without either of them. The contribution of ice nuclei (IN) recycling from ice particle evaporation to IN and ice particle concentration is found to be very significant in this case. Cloud can be very sensitive to IN initially and form a nonquilibrium transition condition, but become much less sensitive as cloud evolves to a steady mixed-phase condition. The parameterization of Meyers et al. [1992] with the observed MPACE IN concentration is able to predict the observed mixed-phase clouds reasonably well. This validation may facilitate the application of this parameterization in the cloud and climate models to simulate Arctic clouds.

Fan, Jiwen; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Khain, Alexander

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Simulations of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds in Forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE  

SciTech Connect

Simulations of mixed-phase clouds in short-range forecasts with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) climate model (AM2) for the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) are performed under the DOE CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT), which initializes the climate models with analysis data produced from numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers. It is shown that CAM3 significantly underestimates the observed boundary layer mixed-phase clouds and cannot realistically simulate the variations with temperature and cloud height of liquid water fraction in the total cloud condensate based an oversimplified cloud microphysical scheme. In contrast, AM2 reasonably reproduces the observed boundary layer clouds while its clouds contain much less cloud condensate than CAM3 and the observations. Both models underestimate the observed cloud top and base for the boundary layer clouds. The simulation of the boundary layer mixed-phase clouds and their microphysical properties is considerably improved in CAM3 when a new physically based cloud microphysical scheme is used. The new scheme also leads to an improved simulation of the surface and top of the atmosphere longwave radiative fluxes in CAM3. It is shown that the Bergeron-Findeisen process, i.e., the ice crystal growth by vapor deposition at the expense of coexisting liquid water, is important for the models to correctly simulate the characteristics of the observed microphysical properties in mixed-phase clouds. Sensitivity tests show that these results are not sensitive to the analysis data used for model initializations. Increasing model horizontal resolution helps capture the subgrid-scale features in Arctic frontal clouds but does not help improve the simulation of the single-layer boundary layer clouds. Ice crystal number density has large impact on the model simulated mixed-phase clouds and their microphysical properties and needs to be accurately represented in climate models.

Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

102

Short-Term Arctic Cloud Statistics at NSA from the Infrared Cloud...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. A. Shaw and B. Thurairajah Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University Bozeman, Montana Introduction The infrared cloud imager (ICI) is a...

103

Geochemistry of clathrate-derived methane in Arctic Ocean waters  

SciTech Connect

Alterations to the composition of seawater are estimated for microbial oxidation of methane from large polar clathrate destabilizations, which may arise in the coming century. Gas fluxes are taken from porous flow models of warming Arctic sediment. Plume spread parameters are then used to bracket the volume of dilution. Consumption stoichiometries for the marine methanotrophs are based on growth efficiency and elemental/enzyme composition data. The nutritional demand implied by extra CH{sub 4} removal is compared with supply in various high latitude water masses. For emissions sized to fit the shelf break, reaction potential begins at one hundred micromolar and falls to order ten a thousand kilometers downstream. Oxygen loss and carbon dioxide production are sufficient respectively to hypoxify and acidify poorly ventilated basins. Nitrogen and the monooxygenase transition metals may be depleted in some locations as well. Deprivation is implied relative to existing ecosystems, along with dispersal of the excess dissolved gas. Physical uncertainties are inherent in the clathrate abundance, patch size, outflow buoyancy and mixing rate. Microbial ecology is even less defined but may involve nutrient recycling and anaerobic oxidizers.

Elliott, S.M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

Wood, Robert [VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington; Bretherton, Christopher [GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington; Huebert, Barry [SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii; Mechoso, Roberto C. [VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA; Weller, Robert [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

105

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

Influence of Humidified Aerosol on Lidar Depolarization Measurements below Ice-Precipitating Arctic Stratus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lidar measurements obtained during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment under a mixed-phase stratus cloud that was lightly precipitating ice show a range of surprisingly low depolarization ratios (4%–23%), despite an ...

Bastiaan van Diedenhoven; Ann M. Fridlind; Andrew S. Ackerman

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Representation of Arctic Mixed-Phase clouds and the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen Process in Climate Models: Perspectives from a Cloud-Resolving Study  

SciTech Connect

Two types of Arctic mixed-phase clouds observed during the ISDAC and M-PACE field campaigns are simulated using a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) with size-resolved cloud microphysics. The modeled cloud properties agree reasonably well with aircraft measurements and surface-based retrievals. Cloud properties such as the probability density function (PDF) of vertical velocity (w), cloud liquid and ice, the regime of ice growth at the expense of liquid water (i.e., Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process), and the inherent relationships among cloud properties/processes in the mixed-phase layers are examined to gain insights for improving the representation of the mixed-phase processes in General Circulation Models (GCMs). We find that, the WBF process only occurs in about 50% of the mixed-phase regime with the vast majority occurring in the downdrafts. In updrafts both liquid and ice grow simultaneously. But in GCMs, it is not necessary to treat the WBF process at the subgrid scale. Our CRM results produce a w distribution well represented by a Gaussian normal function, validating, at least for arctic clouds, the subgrid treatment used in GCMs. Our CRM results also support the assumption frequently used in GCMs that mixed phase clouds maintain water vapor very near liquid saturation. A Gamma function with a fixed variance does not accurately represent the subgrid variability of cloud liquid. The PDFs of cloud liquid and cloud ice can be fitted with Gamma functions, and a normal function can be used for total water, but the variance should not be fixed. The relationship between the ice depositional growth rate and cloud ice strongly depends on the capacitance of ice particles. The assumption for the capacitance of ice particles (e.g., 1.0 for spheres) used in GCMs could lead to a large deviation in ice depositional growth. At large sales, the maximum overlap assumption looks appropriate.

Fan, Jiwen; Ghan, Steven J.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Liu, Xiaohong; Rasch, Philip J.; Korolev, Alexei

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

108

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

109

Bailey, D. A., P. B. Rhines, and S. Hkkinen, 2005: Formation and pathways of North Atlantic Deep Water in a coupled ice-ocean model of the Arctic-North Atlantic Oceans. Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water in a coupled ice-ocean model of the Arctic-North Atlantic Oceans. Climate Dyn., 25, doi:10.1007/s. P. Shen, World Scientific, Singapore, 360pp. Yeh, S.- W., and B. P. Kirtman, 2005: Pacific decadal

110

ARM - Field Campaign - 2008 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmos-Land Study (VOCALS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmos-Land Study (VOCALS) 8 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmos-Land Study (VOCALS) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2008 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmos-Land Study (VOCALS) 2008.10.14 - 2008.11.13 Lead Scientist : Peter Daum For data sets, see below. Description The DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to Arica, Chile as part of the NSF VAMOS Ocean-Cloud- Atmospheric-Land Study (VOCALS). The purpose of VOCALS is to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical processes central to the climate system of the Southeast Pacific. In this region, extensive areas of marine clouds exist (coverage about 70% in October). The ASP component of VOCALS focused on aerosols, and how their chemical and microphysical properties, and their ability to act as CCN differ between

111

The role of clouds and oceans in global greenhouse warming. Part 1, Progress report  

SciTech Connect

During the past three years we have conducted several studies using models and a combination of satellite data, in situ meteorological and oceanic data, and paleoclimate reconstructions, under the DoE program, ``Quantifying the Link Between Change in Radiative Balance and Atmospheric Temperature``. Our goals were to investigate effects of global cloudiness variations on global climate and their implications for cloud feedback and continue development and application of NYU transient climate/ocean models, with emphasis on coupled effects of greenhouse warming and feedbacks by both the clouds and oceans. Our original research plan emphasized the use of cloud, surface temperature and ocean data sets interpreted by focused climate/ocean models to develop a cloud radiative forcing scenario for the past 100 years and to assess the transient climate response; to narrow key uncertainties in the system; and to identify those aspects of the climate system most likely to be affected by greenhouse warming over short, medium and long time scales.

Hoffert, M.I.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Arctic Stratus Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing Derived from Ground-Based Data Collected at Barrow, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A record of single-layer and overcast low-level Arctic stratus cloud properties has been generated using data collected from May to September 2000 at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) (71.3°N, 156.6°W) site ...

Xiquan Dong; Gerald G. Mace

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Polar Stratospheric Cloud Observations in the 2006/07 Arctic Winter by Using an Improved Micropulse Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential of a new improved version of micropulse lidar (MPL-4) on polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) detection is evaluated in the Arctic over Ny-Ålesund (79°N, 12°E), Norway. The campaign took place from January to February 2007 in the frame ...

Carmen Cordoba-Jabonero; Manuel Gil; Margarita Yela; Marion Maturilli; Roland Neuber

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transports as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports on energy fluxes across the surface of the ocean as simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models in which ocean surface temperatures and sea-ice boundaries are prescribed. The oceanic meridional energy transport that would be required to balance these surface fluxes is computed, and is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean energy transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions.

Gleckler, P.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Randall, D.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Boer, G. [Canadian Climate Centre, Victoria (Canada)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC  

SciTech Connect

Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

116

Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Interactions in the Southeastern Pacific: The VOCALS Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper describes the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study (VOCALS), an international research program focused on the improved understanding and modeling of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) climate system on diurnal to interannual timescales. ...

C. R. Mechoso; R. Wood; R. Weller; C. S. Bretherton; A. D. Clarke; H. Coe; C. Fairall; J. T. Farrar; G. Feingold; R. Garreaud; C. Grados; J. McWilliams; S. P. de Szoeke; S. E. Yuter; P. Zuidema

117

A Modeling Case Study of Mixed-Phase Clouds over the Southern Ocean and Tasmania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud structure associated with two frontal passages over the Southern Ocean and Tasmania is investigated. The first event, during August 2006, is characterized by large quantities of supercooled liquid water and little ice. The second case, ...

Anthony E. Morrison; Steven T. Siems; Michael J. Manton; Alex Nazarov

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effect of Marine Stratocumulus Clouds on the Ocean-Surface Heat Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixed-layer stratocumulus model first developed by Lilly is extended to include liquid-water-dependent solar optical properties and infrared radiative fluxes. The ocean-surface heat budget under these clouds is discussed as a function of ...

Howard P. Hanson; Patricia L. Gruber

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Major Characteristics of Southern Ocean Cloud Regimes and Their Effects on the Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clouds over the Southern Ocean are often poorly represented by climate models, but they make a significant contribution to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation balance, particularly in the shortwave portion of the energy spectrum. This study ...

John M. Haynes; Christian Jakob; William B. Rossow; George Tselioudis; Josephine Brown

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The dissolved Beryllium isotope composition of the Arctic Ocean M. Frank a,b,*, D. Porcelli c  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissolved Beryllium isotope composition of the Arctic Ocean M. Frank a,b,*, D. Porcelli c , P Institute of Marine Research, IFM-GEOMAR, Wischhofstrasse 1-3, 24148 Kiel, Germany b Institute for Isotope Geology and Mineral Resources, Department of Earth Sciences, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland c

Baskaran, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Relative Importance of Clouds and Sea Ice for the Solar Energy Budget of the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of clouds and sea ice on the solar radiation budget are determined for the Southern Ocean around Antarctica between latitudes 50° and 80°S. Distributions of cloud optical depth are used, together with distributions of surface albedo, ...

Melanie F. Fitzpatrick; Stephen G. Warren

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Parameterizations in Short-Range Weather Forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect

By making use of the in-situ data collected from the recent Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment, we have tested the mixed-phase cloud parameterizations used in the two major U.S. climate models, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory climate model (AM2), under both the single-column modeling framework and the U.S. Department of Energy Climate Change Prediction Program-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Parameterization Testbed. An improved and more physically based cloud microphysical scheme for CAM3 has been also tested. The single-column modeling tests were summarized in the second quarter 2007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement metric report. In the current report, we document the performance of these microphysical schemes in short-range weather forecasts using the Climate Chagne Prediction Program Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Parameterizaiton Testbest strategy, in which we initialize CAM3 and AM2 with realistic atmospheric states from numerical weather prediction analyses for the period when Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment was conducted.

Xie, S; Boyle, J; Klein, S; Liu, X; Ghan, S

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The role of clouds and oceans in global greenhouse warming. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This research focuses on assessing connections between anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and global climatic change. it has been supported since the early 1990s in part by the DOE ``Quantitative Links`` Program (QLP). A three-year effort was originally proposed to the QLP to investigate effects f global cloudiness on global climate and its implications for cloud feedback; and to continue the development and application of climate/ocean models, with emphasis on coupled effects of greenhouse warming and feedbacks by clouds and oceans. It is well-known that cloud and ocean processes are major sources of uncertainty in the ability to predict climatic change from humankind`s greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions. And it has always been the objective to develop timely and useful analytical tools for addressing real world policy issues stemming from anthropogenic climate change.

Hoffert, M.I.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Gridded Climatology of Clouds over Land (1971-1996) and Ocean (1954-2008)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Gridded Climatology of Clouds over Land (1971-1996) and Ocean (1954-2008) A Gridded Climatology of Clouds over Land (1971-1996) and Ocean (1954-2008) from Surface Observations Worldwide (NDP-026E)* PDF PDF File data Data (NDP-026E) Date of Publication Original date of publication: December 2007. *Updated August, 2010: This page and the global cloudiness dataset and documentation were updated to reflect an additional 11 years (through 2008) of ocean data added by the investigators in December, 2009. Also, two new data directories (cat_55-70 and cat_71-82) were added containing the updated data and additional ancillary files were added to the directory: ancillary_ocean_files. Please see the new APPENDIX U in ndp026e.pdf containing information on this update. The recommended citation reflecting the updating of this database is:

125

Operational Ocean Search and Rescue Using AVHRR: Cloud Limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea surface currents can be derived from sequential Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) images. However, the operational feasibility of deriving ocean surface currents from AVHRR is severely limited by the inability of AVHRR to ...

J. E. Dick O’Donnell

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Transmission of Solar Radiation by Clouds over Snow and Ice Surfaces. Part II: Cloud Optical Depth and Shortwave Radiative Forcing from Pyranometer Measurements in the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downward solar irradiance at the sea surface, measured on several voyages of an icebreaker in the Southern Ocean, is used to infer transmittance of solar radiation by clouds. Together with surface albedo estimated from coincident hourly sea ice ...

Melanie F. Fitzpatrick; Stephen G. Warren

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE  

SciTech Connect

Cloud and aerosol data acquired by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Convair-580 aircraft in, above, and below single-layer arctic stratocumulus cloud during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 were used to test three aerosol indirect effects hypothesized to act in mixed-phase clouds: the riming indirect effect, the glaciation indirect effect, and the cold second indirect effect. The data showed a correlation of R= 0.75 between liquid drop number concentration, Nliq, inside cloud and ambient aerosol number concentration NPCASP below cloud. This, combined with increasing liquid water content LWC with height above cloud base and the nearly constant profile of Nliq, suggested that liquid drops were nucleated from aerosol at cloud base. No strong evidence of a riming indirect effect was observed, but a strong correlation of R = 0.69 between ice crystal number concentration Ni and NPCASP above cloud was noted. Increases in ice nuclei (IN) concentration with NPCASP above cloud combined with the subadiabatic LWC profiles suggest possible mixing of IN from cloud top consistent with the glaciation indirect effect. The higher Nice and lower effective radius rel for the more polluted ISDAC cases compared to data collected in cleaner single-layer stratocumulus conditions during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment is consistent with the operation of the cold second indirect effect. However, more data in a wider variety of meteorological and surface conditions, with greater variations in aerosol forcing, are required to identify the dominant aerosol forcing mechanisms in mixed-phase arctic clouds.

Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg; Korolev, Alexei; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Lawson, R. P.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Wolde, Mengistu; Laskin, Alexander; Freer, Matthew

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

128

Using A-Train Arctic cloud observations to constrain and improve...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation anomalies to the 2007 Arctic sea ice loss Jennifer E. Kay 1,2 Andrew Gettelman 1 , Tristan L'Ecuyer 2 ,Graeme Stephens 2 , and Chris O'Dell 2 1 National Center for...

129

Cloud Liquid Water Path from Satellite-Based Passive Microwave Observations: A New Climatology over the Global Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes a new climatology of cloud liquid water path (LWP), termed the University of Wisconsin (UWisc) climatology, derived from 18 yr of satellite-based passive microwave observations over the global oceans. The climatology is based ...

Christopher W. O’Dell; Frank J. Wentz; Ralf Bennartz

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A Simplified Model of the Walker Circulation with an Interactive Ocean Mixed Layer and Cloud-Radiative Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud–climate feedbacks between precipitation, radiation, circulation strength, atmospheric temperature and moisture, and ocean temperature are studied with an idealized model of the Walker circulation in a nonrotating atmosphere coupled to an ...

Matthew E. Peters; Christopher S. Bretherton

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Arctic mixed-phase cloud properties derived from surface-based sensors at SHEBA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixed-phase clouds are an understudied component of global cloudiness and are thus poorly represented in models at all scales, which typically partition cloud phase as a function of temperature. The proper partitioning of cloud phase is particularly important considering the unique radiative properties of liquid droplets and ice particles, the impact of phase on precipitation processes, and the sensitivity of phase

M. D. Shupe; S. Y. Matrosov; T. Uttal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Influence of Solar Zenith Angle and Cloud Type on Cloud Radiative Forcing at the Surface in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the long- and shortwave incident radiation taken from the USCGC Polar Sea during a research cruise to the Northeast Water Polynya during the summer of 1993 are analyzed together with observations of cloud type and amount to ...

Peter J. Minnett

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Why sequence arctic algae for alternative energy?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

arctic algae for alternative energy? Five different protists representing different algal classes isolated from the Arctic Ocean are being investigated for adaptation to perennial...

134

ARM tropical pacific experiment (ATPEX): Role of cloud, water vapor and convection feedbacks in the coupled ocean/atmosphere system  

SciTech Connect

We have initiated studies that include radiation model validation, improved treatment of the three-dimensional structure of cloud-radiation interactions, and sensitivity runs that will unravel the role of cloud-convection-radiation interactions in the Pacific Sear Surface Temperatures and the overlying Walker and Hadley circulation. The research program is divided into three phases: (1) radiation, (2) cloud parameterization issues; (3) feedback and ocean-atmosphere interactions.

Ramanathan, V.; Barnett, T.P.

1992-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

135

Effects of diurnal variation on a tropical coupling system: a 2-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere modeling study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of diurnal variation on tropical atmospheric and oceanic variability are investigated with a two-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere model. The experiment with a time-invariant solar zenith angle is compared to the control ... Keywords: diurnal variation, tropical coupling system

Shouting Gao; Yushu Zhou

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Sea Surface Temperature Biases under the Stratus Cloud Deck in the Southeast Pacific Ocean in 19 IPCC AR4 Coupled General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines systematic biases in sea surface temperature (SST) under the stratus cloud deck in the southeast Pacific Ocean and upper-ocean processes relevant to the SST biases in 19 coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) participating ...

Yangxing Zheng; Toshiaki Shinoda; Jia-Lin Lin; George N. Kiladis

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 1 -Woodgate What makes the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"? Decreasing Ice cover Local communities subsistence Arctic Shipping Routes? Oil/Gas Exploration Links INPUTS/OUTPUTS ­ E-P, rivers RIVERS (Russian and US) - order 3000 km3/yr freshwater Evaporation-Precipitation - order 2000 km3/yr freshwater Ice Export through the Fram Strait - equivalent to order 2000 km3/yr

Washington at Seattle, University of

138

The rotation model for the opening of the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean pre-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stromatolites, giant wave rip- ples, and decameters of pseudomorphosed former aragonite crystal fans, rests Katakturuk Dolomite, as the Cam- brian Saline River Formation rests on the ca. 723 Ma Natkusiak Formation) away from the Cana- dian Arctic islands about a pole in the Mack- enzie River Delta (Hamilton, 1970

Schrag, Daniel

139

Impact of variable atmospheric and oceanic form drag on simulations of Arctic sea ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over Arctic sea ice, pressure ridges, floe and melt pond edges all introduce discrete obstructions to the flow of air or water past the ice, and are a source of form drag. In current climate models form drag is only accounted for by tuning the air-...

Michel Tsamados; Daniel L. Feltham; David Schroeder; Daniela Flocco; Sinead L. Farrell; Nathan Kurtz; Seymour W. Laxon; Sheldon Bacon

140

Aerosol Effects on Cloud Emissivity and Surface Longwave Heating in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increases in anthropogenic aerosols in the atmosphere tend to increase the reflectance of solar (shortwave) radiation from water clouds, which can lead to lower surface temperatures. Here an opposing effect whereby aerosols increase the longwave ...

Timothy J. Garrett; Lawrence F. Radke; Peter V. Hobbs

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Numerical Simulations of Observed Arctic Stratus Clouds Using a Second-Order Turbulence Closure Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution one-dimensional version of a second-order turbulence closure radiative-convective model, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is used to simulate the interactions among turbulence, radiation, and bulk cloud parameters in ...

W. S. Smith; C-Y. J. Kao

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. : Role of a parameterized ice-phase mi- crophysics in anof contact nucleation in ice phase initiation in clouds, J.simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing

Sednev, I.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

An Improved Parameterization for Simulating Arctic Cloud Amount in the CCSM3 Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple alternative parameterization for predicting cloud fraction in the Community Climate System Model, version 3 (CCSM3) global climate model is presented. This formula, dubbed “freeezedry,” is designed to alleviate the bias of excessive low ...

Steve Vavrus; Duane Waliser

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulation that is in the ice-phase. Note that the y-axis isradiative properties of ice and mixed-phase clouds. Quart.include liquid-phase only, ice-phase only, and mixed-phase.

Klein, Stephen A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Sensitivity of the Arctic Climate to Leads in a Coupled Atmosphere-Mixed Layer Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic sea ice code in a coupled atmosphere-mixed layer ocean GCM has been altered to allow the presence of open water within an ice pack (leads) and a prescribed turbulent oceanic heat flux at the ice bottom. Two experiments with the ...

Stephen J. Vavrus

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Summertime Low-Level Jets over the High-Latitude Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of a simple analytic boundary layer model developed by Thorpe and Guymer did not produce good agreement with observational data for oceanic low-level jet observations even though this model has worked well for the predictions of ...

Douglas O. ReVelle; E. Douglas Nilsson

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Basalt petrogenesis beneath slow- and ultraslow-spreading Arctic mid-ocean ridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To explore the ability of melting mafic lithologies to produce alkaline ocean-island basalts (OIB), an experimental study was carried out measuring clinopyroxene (Cpx)melt and garnet (Gt)-melt partition coefficients during ...

Elkins, Lynne J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Uranium-series radionuclide records of paleoceanographic and sedimentary changes in the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radionuclides ²³¹Pa and ²³?Th, produced in the water column and removed from the ocean by particle scavenging and burial in sediments, offer a means for paleoceanographers to examine past dynamics of both water column ...

Hoffmann, Sharon Susanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Status of and Outlook for Large-Scale Modeling of Atmosphere–Ice–Ocean Interactions in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arctic air masses have direct impacts on the weather and climatic extremes of midlatitude areas such as central North America. Arctic physical processes pose special and very important problems for global atmospheric models used for climate ...

David Randall; Judith Curry; David Battisti; Gregory Flato; Robert Grumbine; Sirpa Hakkinen; Doug Martinson; Ruth Preller; John Walsh; John Weatherly

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

DOE/EA-1193: Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Artic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site (February 1997)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the ARM/CART program is to collect and analyze atmospheric data for the development and validation of global climate change models. The program involves construction of several small facilities and operation of sensing equipment. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultura.l resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Separate studies (summarized in the EA) were also conducted to ensure that the operation of the facilities would not

151

Observational and Model Estimates of Cloud Amount Feedback over the Indian and Pacific Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constraining intermodel spread in cloud feedback with observations is problematic because available cloud datasets are affected by spurious behavior in long-term variability. This problem is addressed by examining cloud amount in three independent ...

Katinka Bellomo; Amy C. Clement; Joel R. Norris; Brian J. Soden

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Arctic Surface, Cloud, and Radiation Properties Based on the AVHRR Polar Pathfinder Dataset. Part I: Spatial and Temporal Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With broad spectral coverage and high spatial and temporal resolutions, satellite sensors can provide the data needed for the analysis of spatial and temporal variations of climate parameters in data-sparse regions such as the Arctic and ...

Xuanji Wang; Jeffrey R. Key

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

ARM tropical pacific experiment (ATPEX): Role of cloud, water vapor and convection feedbacks in the coupled ocean/atmosphere system. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

We have initiated studies that include radiation model validation, improved treatment of the three-dimensional structure of cloud-radiation interactions, and sensitivity runs that will unravel the role of cloud-convection-radiation interactions in the Pacific Sear Surface Temperatures and the overlying Walker and Hadley circulation. The research program is divided into three phases: (1) radiation, (2) cloud parameterization issues; (3) feedback and ocean-atmosphere interactions.

Ramanathan, V.; Barnett, T.P.

1992-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Seasonal Variability of the Arctic Ocean Ekman Transport and Its Role in the Mixed Layer Heat and Salt Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oceanic Ekman transport and pumping are among the most important parameters in studying the ocean general circulation and its variability. Upwelling due to the Ekman transport divergence has been identified as a leading mechanism for the ...

Jiayan Yang

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations  

SciTech Connect

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

156

Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heated by the sun, produces rising columns of air in which the moisture condenses into tall fleecy white clouds At night, when the sky is clear, the earth cools to give those...

157

Brine-Driven Eddies under Sea Ice Leads and Their Impact on the Arctic Ocean Mixed Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eddy generation induced by a line-shaped salt flux under a sea ice lead and associated salt transport are investigated using a three-dimensional numerical model. The model is designed to represent a typical condition for the wintertime Arctic ...

Yoshimasa Matsumura; Hiroyasu Hasumi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Estimations of Cloud Optical Thickness from Ground-Based Measurements of Incoming Solar Radiation in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for evaluation of cloud optical thickness (plant-parallel, homogeneous layer) from ground-based measurements of incoming solar irradiance using a simple radiation model is introduced. The sensitivities of downward and upward fluxes of ...

E. Leontyeva; K. Stamnes

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Pre-Cloud Aerosol, Cloud Droplet Concentration, and Cloud Condensation Nuclei from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere Land Study (VOCALS) Field Campaign First Quarter 2010 ASR Program Metric Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this, the first of a series of Program Metric Reports, we (1) describe archived data from the DOE G-1 aircraft, (2) illustrate several relations between sub-cloud aerosol, CCN, and cloud droplets pertinent to determining the effects of pollutant sources on cloud properties, and (3) post to the data archive an Excel spreadsheet that contains cloud and corresponding sub-cloud data.

Kleinman, LI; Springston, SR; Daum, PH; Lee, Y-N; Sedlacek, AJ; Senum, G; Wang, J

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

8, 1175511819, 2008 mixed-phase Arctic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of25 supercooled water in both saturatedACPD 8, 11755­11819, 2008 Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds I. Sednev et al. Title Page.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Parameterization of the Extinction Coefficient in Ice and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds during the ISDAC Field Campaign  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the history of attempts to directly measure cloud extinction, the current measurement device known as the Cloud Extinction Probe (CEP), specific problems with direct measurement of extinction coefficient, and the attempts made here to address these problems. Extinction coefficient is one of the fundamental microphysical parameters characterizing bulk properties of clouds. Knowledge of extinction coefficient is of crucial importance for radiative transfer calculations in weather prediction and climate models given that Earth's radiation budget (ERB) is modulated much by clouds. In order for a large-scale model to properly account for ERB and perturbations to it, it must ultimately be able to simulate cloud extinction coefficient well. In turn this requires adequate and simultaneous simulation of profiles of cloud water content and particle habit and size. Similarly, remote inference of cloud properties requires assumptions to be made about cloud phase and associated single-scattering properties, of which extinction coefficient is crucial. Hence, extinction coefficient plays an important role in both application and validation of methods for remote inference of cloud properties from data obtained from both satellite and surface sensors (e.g., Barker et al. 2008). While estimation of extinction coefficient within large-scale models is relatively straightforward for pure water droplets, thanks to Mie theory, mixed-phase and ice clouds still present problems. This is because of the myriad forms and sizes that crystals can achieve, each having their own unique extinction properties. For the foreseeable future, large-scale models will have to be content with diagnostic parametrization of crystal size and type. However, before they are able to provide satisfactory values needed for calculation of radiative transfer, they require the intermediate step of assigning single-scattering properties to particles. The most basic of these is extinction coefficient, yet it is rarely measured directly, and therefore verification of parametrizations is difficult. The obvious solution is to be able to measure microphysical properties and extinction at the same time and for the same volume. This is best done by in situ sampling by instruments mounted on either balloon or aircraft. The latter is the usual route and the one employed here. Yet the problem of actually measuring extinction coefficient directly for arbitrarily complicated particles still remains unsolved.

Korolev, A; Shashkov, A; Barker, H

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

162

Parameterization of the Extinction Coefficient in Ice and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds during the ISDAC Field Campaign  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the history of attempts to directly measure cloud extinction, the current measurement device known as the Cloud Extinction Probe (CEP), specific problems with direct measurement of extinction coefficient, and the attempts made here to address these problems. Extinction coefficient is one of the fundamental microphysical parameters characterizing bulk properties of clouds. Knowledge of extinction coefficient is of crucial importance for radiative transfer calculations in weather prediction and climate models given that Earth's radiation budget (ERB) is modulated much by clouds. In order for a large-scale model to properly account for ERB and perturbations to it, it must ultimately be able to simulate cloud extinction coefficient well. In turn this requires adequate and simultaneous simulation of profiles of cloud water content and particle habit and size. Similarly, remote inference of cloud properties requires assumptions to be made about cloud phase and associated single-scattering properties, of which extinction coefficient is crucial. Hence, extinction coefficient plays an important role in both application and validation of methods for remote inference of cloud properties from data obtained from both satellite and surface sensors (e.g., Barker et al. 2008). While estimation of extinction coefficient within large-scale models is relatively straightforward for pure water droplets, thanks to Mie theory, mixed-phase and ice clouds still present problems. This is because of the myriad forms and sizes that crystals can achieve, each having their own unique extinction properties. For the foreseeable future, large-scale models will have to be content with diagnostic parametrization of crystal size and type. However, before they are able to provide satisfactory values needed for calculation of radiative transfer, they require the intermediate step of assigning single-scattering properties to particles. The most basic of these is extinction coefficient, yet it is rarely measured directly, and therefore verification of parametrizations is difficult. The obvious solution is to be able to measure microphysical properties and extinction at the same time and for the same volume. This is best done by in situ sampling by instruments mounted on either balloon or aircraft. The latter is the usual route and the one employed here. Yet the problem of actually measuring extinction coefficient directly for arbitrarily complicated particles still remains unsolved.

Korolev, A; Shashkov, A; Barker, H

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

163

A Combined Multisensor Optimal Estimation Retrieval Algorithm for Oceanic Warm Rain Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complicated interactions between cloud processes in the tropical hydrologic cycle and their responses to changes in environmental variables have been the focus of many recent investigations. Most studies that examine the response of the ...

Anita D. Rapp; G. Elsaesser; C. Kummerow

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Model Rain and Clouds over Oceans: Comparison with SSM/I Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of global model cloud and rain parameterization output with satellite observed radiances was carried out. Hydrometeor profiles from ECMWF operational short-range forecasts were combined with a microwave radiative transfer model to ...

Frédéric Chevallier; Peter Bauer

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Phenomenological Description of Tropical Clouds Using CloudSat Cloud Classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two years of tropical oceanic cloud observations are analyzed using the operational CloudSat cloud classification product and Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) lidar. Relationships are examined between ...

Ali Behrangi; Terry Kubar; Bjorn Lambrigtsen

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Surface Downwelling Solar Radiation Surplus over the Southern Ocean in the Met Office Model: The Role of Midlatitude Cyclone Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors study the role of clouds in the persistent bias of surface downwelling shortwave radiation (SDSR) in the Southern Ocean in the atmosphere-only version of the Met Office model. The reduction of this bias in the atmosphere-only version ...

A. Bodas-Salcedo; K. D. Williams; P. R. Field; A. P. Lock

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Source and Pathway of the Western Arctic Upper Halocline in a Data-Constrained Coupled Ocean and Sea Ice Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A coupled ocean and sea ice model is used to investigate dense water (DW) formation in the Chukchi and Bering shelves and the pathways by which this water feeds the upper halocline. Two 1992–2008 data-constrained solutions ...

Nguyen, An T.

168

Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) AMF Deployment Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington CAP-MBL Proposal Team AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate sensitivity? Climate Feedbacks Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) 12 slab ocean models 2xCO 2 - control Correlation of global mean CRF with local values Mark Webb, Hadley Center 90 N 45 N 0 45 S 90S 0 90 E 180 90 W 0

169

An Evaluation of WRF Simulations of Clouds over the Southern Ocean with A-Train Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representation of the marine boundary layer (BL) clouds remains a formidable challenge for start-of-the-art simulations. A recent study by Bodas-Salcedo et al. (2012) using the UK Met Office Unified Model highlights that the underprediction of ...

Yi Huang; Steven T. Siems; Michael J. Manton; Gregory Thompson

170

Review of Science Issues, Deployment Strategy, and Status for the ARM North Slope of Alaska–Adjacent Arctic Ocean Climate Research Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent climate modeling results point to the Arctic as a region that is particularly sensitive to global climate change. The Arctic warming predicted by the models to result from the expected doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide is two to three ...

K. Stamnes; R. G. Ellingson; J. A. Curry; J. E. Walsh; B. D. Zak

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Model for the Thickness and Salinity of the Upper Layer in the Arctic Ocean and the Relationship between the Ice Thickness and Some External Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a dynamical model for the salinity and thickness of the upper layer in the Arctic. The parameters are the river runoff to the Arctic, the buoyancy supply through the Bering Strait, the export of ice from the Arctic and a ...

Anders Stigebrandt

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Effect of the Melting Layer on the Microwave Emission of Clouds over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was carried out in order to estimate the effect of melting particles on simulated brightness temperatures at microwave frequencies between 10.7 and 85.5 GHz for precipitation over the ocean. The meteorological model framework is based on ...

P. Bauer; J. P. V. Poiares Baptista; M. de Iulis

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Development of a Regional Climate Model of the Western Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Arctic region climate system model has been developed to simulate coupled interactions among the atmosphere, sea ice, ocean, and land surface of the western Arctic. The atmospheric formulation is based upon the NCAR regional climate model ...

Amanda H. Lynch; William L. Chapman; John E. Walsh; Gunter Weller

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Small Cloud Particle Shapes in Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shapes of cloud particles with maximum dimensions Dmax between 35 and 60 ?m in mixed-phase clouds were studied using high-resolution particle images collected by a cloud particle imager (CPI) during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-...

Greg M. McFarquhar; Junshik Um; Robert Jackson

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The Sensitivity of the Arctic Ocean Sea Ice Thickness and Its Dependence on the Surface Albedo Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the response of sea ice thickness to changes in the external forcing is investigated and particularly how this response depends on the surface albedo formulation by means of a one-dimensional coupled ocean–ice–atmosphere model. The ...

Göran Björk; Christian Stranne; Karin Borenäs

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Source and Pathway of the Western Arctic Upper Halocline in a Data-Constrained Coupled Ocean and Sea Ice Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled ocean and sea ice model is used to investigate dense water (DW) formation in the Chukchi and Bering shelves and the pathways by which this water feeds the upper halocline. Two 1992–2008 data-constrained solutions at 9- and 4-km ...

An T. Nguyen; Ronald Kwok; Dimitris Menemenlis

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Consequences of the Large-Scale Subsidence Rate on the Stably Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over the Arctic Ocean, as seen in Large-Eddy Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of surface heat fluxes and sounding profiles from SHEBA indicated possible significant effects of subsidence on the structure of stably-stratified ABLs (Mirocha et al. 2005). In this study the influence of the large-scale subsidence rate on the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over the Arctic Ocean during clear sky, winter conditions is investigated using a large-eddy simulation model. Simulations are conducted while varying the subsidence rate between 0, 0.001 and 0.002 ms{sup -1}, and the resulting quasi-equilibrium ABL structure and evolution are examined. Simulations conducted without subsidence yield ABLs that are deeper, more strongly mixed, and cool much more rapidly than were observed. The addition of a small subsidence rate significantly improves agreement between the simulations and observations regarding the ABL height, potential temperature profiles and bulk heating rates. Subsidence likewise alters the shapes of the surface-layer flux, stress and shear profiles, resulting in increased vertical transport of heat while decreasing vertical momentum transport. A brief discussion of the relevance of these results to parameterization of the stable ABL under subsiding conditions in large-scale numerical weather and climate prediction models is presented.

Mirocha, J D; Kosovic, B

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Simulations of Arctic mixed-phase clouds using a new aerosol-linked ice nuclei parameterization in a prognostic ice prediction scheme.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite the nearly universally-accepted notion that the Arctic is one of the most important areas to fully understand in the face of a changing global… (more)

Carpenter, James Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Stable isotopes in benthic foraminiferal calcite from a river-influenced Arctic marine environment, Kara and Pechora Seas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the World Ocean [e.g., Aagard and Car- mack, 1994]. During glacial periods, the Arctic hydro- graphic

Howat, Ian M.

180

Initialization of a Cloud-Resolving Model with Airborne Doppler Radar Observations of an Oceanic Tropical Convective System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doppler radar–derived fields of wind and reflectivity, retrieved temperature perturbations, estimated water vapor, and cloud water contents are used to initialize a nonhydrostatic cloud-resolving model. Airborne Doppler data collected in a ...

Soline Bielli; Frank Roux

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Objective Assessment of the Information Content of Visible and Infrared Radiance Measurements for Cloud Microphysical Property Retrievals over the Global Oceans. Part I: Liquid Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of accurately representing the role of clouds in climate change studies has become increasingly apparent in recent years, leading to a substantial increase in the number of satellite sensors and associated algorithms that are ...

Tristan S. L’Ecuyer; Philip Gabriel; Kyle Leesman; Steven J. Cooper; Graeme L. Stephens

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Properties Derived from Surface-Based Sensors at SHEBA MATTHEW D. SHUPE AND SERGEY Y. MATROSOV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, cloud-top liquid layer from which ice particles formed and fell, although deep, multilayered mixed-phase. These values are all larger than those found in single-phase ice clouds at SHEBA. Vertically resolved cloud phases can coexist is in question. A re- view of model parameterizations shows the lower tem- perature

Shupe, Matthew

183

Improvements in Representations of Cloud Microphysics for BBHRP and Models using Data Collected during M-PACE and TWP-ICE  

SciTech Connect

In our research we proposed to use data collected during the 2004 Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) and the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) to improve retrievals of ice and mixed-phase clouds, to improve our understanding of how cloud and radiative processes affect cloud life cycles, and to develop and test methods for using ARM data more effectively in model. In particular, we proposed to: 1) use MPACE in-situ data to determine how liquid water fraction and cloud ice and liquid effective radius (r{sub ei} and r{sub ew}) vary with temperature, normalized cloud altitude and other variables for Arctic mixed-phase clouds, and to use these data to evaluate the performance of model parameterization schemes and remote sensing retrieval algorithms; 2) calculate rei and size/shape distributions using TWP-ICE in-situ data, investigate their dependence on cirrus type (oceanic or continental anvils or cirrus not directly traced to convection), and develop and test representations for MICROBASE; 3) conduct fundamental research enhancing our understanding of cloud/radiative interactions, concentrating on effects of small crystals and particle shapes and sizes on radiation; and 4) improve representations of microphysical processes for models (fall-out, effective density, mean scattering properties, rei and rew) and provide them to ARM PIs. In the course of our research, we made substantial progress on all four goals.

Greg M. McFarquhar

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

184

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA from Multispectral MODIS Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA from Multispectral MODIS Data D. A. Spangenberg Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T. Uttal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Q. Z. Trepte and S. S.-Mack Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia Introduction Improving climate model predictions over earth's Polar Regions requires a complete knowledge of polar cloud microphysics. Over the Arctic, there is minimal contrast between the clouds and background snow surface observed in satellite data, especially for visible wavelengths. This makes it difficult to

186

Recovery mechanisms of Arctic summer sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We examine the recovery of Arctic sea ice from prescribed ice?free summer conditions in simulations of 21st century climate in an atmosphere–ocean general circulation model. We find that ice extent recovers typically within two years. The excess oceanic heat that had built up during the ice?free summer is rapidly returned to the atmosphere during the following autumn and winter, and then leaves the Arctic partly through increased longwave emission at the top of the atmosphere and partly through reduced atmospheric heat advection from lower latitudes. Oceanic heat transport does not contribute significantly to the loss of the excess heat. Our results suggest that anomalous loss of Arctic sea ice during asinglesummerisreversible,astheice–albedo feedback is alleviated by large?scale recovery mechanisms. Hence, hysteretic threshold behavior (or a “tipping point”) is unlikely to occur during the decline of Arctic summer sea?

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Latitudinal distribution of the recent Arctic warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing Arctic temperature, disappearance of Arctic sea ice, melting of the Greenland ice sheet, sea level rise, increasing strength of Atlantic hurricanes are these impending climate catastrophes supported by observations? Are the recent data really unprecedented during the observational records? Our analysis of Arctic temperature records shows that the Arctic and temperatures in the 1930s and 1940s were almost as high as they are today. We argue that the current warming of the Arctic region is affected more by the multi-decadal climate variability than by an increasing concentration of carbon dioxide. Unfortunately, none of the existing coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models used in the IPCC 2007 cIimate change assessment is able to reproduce neither the observed 20th century Arctic cIimate variability nor the latitudinal distribution of the warming.

Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen K [DALLHOUSIE UNIV.; Wang, Muyin [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

Ocean Frontal Effects on the Vertical Development of Clouds over the Western North Pacific: In Situ and Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A suite of shipboard and satellite observations are analyzed and synthesized to investigate the three-dimensional structure of clouds and influences from sea surface temperature fronts over the western North Pacific. Sharp transitions are ...

Hiroki Tokinaga; Youichi Tanimoto; Shang-Ping Xie; Takeaki Sampe; Hiroyuki Tomita; Hiroshi Ichikawa

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The Influence of Local Feedbacks and Northward Heat Transport on the Equilibrium Arctic Climate Response to Increased Greenhouse Gas Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses coupled climate model experiments to identify the influence of atmospheric physics [Community Atmosphere Model, versions 4 and 5 (CAM4; CAM5)] and ocean model complexity (slab ocean, full-depth ocean) on the equilibrium Arctic ...

Jennifer E. Kay; Marika M. Holland; Cecilia M. Bitz; Edward Blanchard-Wrigglesworth; Andrew Gettelman; Andrew Conley; David Bailey

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Thin Liquid Water Clouds: Their Importance and Our Challenge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the clouds important to the Earth's energy balance, from the Tropics to the Arctic, contain small amounts of liquid water. Longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes are very sensitive to small perturbations of the cloud liquid water path (...

D. D. Turner; A. M. Vogelmann; K. Johnson; M. Miller; R. T. Austin; J. C. Barnard; C. Flynn; C. Long; S. A. McFarlane; K. Cady-Pereira; S. A. Clough; J. C. Chiu; M. M. Khaiyer; J. Liljegren; B. Lin; P. Minnis; A. Marshak; S. Y. Matrosov; Q. Min; W. O'Hirok; Z. Wang; W. Wiscombe

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.  

SciTech Connect

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Arctic house  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently available housing in the Arctic is limited to solutions that have been adapted from designs for less severe climates. This thesis has developed a new manner of residential construction designed specifically for ...

Turkel, Joel A. (Joel Abram), 1969-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cloud Clearing over the Ocean in the Processing of Data from the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrared radiometric measurements of surface parameters are prone to error if clouds are present in the observation path. The along-track scanning radiometer (ATSR) with its novel dual-view feature is able to correct for absorption effects in the ...

Albin M. Závody; Christopher T. Mutlow; David T. Llewellyn-Jones

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Multiparameter AVHRR-Derived Products for Arctic Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generation and sample applications of an integrated set of remotely sensed products for investigations of Arctic climate are described. Cloud fraction, ice surface temperature, surface albedo, downwelling radiative fluxes, ice motion vectors, and ...

Walter N. Meier; James A. Maslanik; Charles W. Fowler; Jeffrey R. Key

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Simulated Response of the Arctic Freshwater Budget to Extreme NAO Wind Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigate the response of the Arctic Ocean freshwater budget to changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) using a regional-ocean configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology GCM (MITgcm) and carry out several ...

Alan Condron; Peter Winsor; Chris Hill; Dimitris Menemenlis

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Near-Inertial Wave Propagation in the Western Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From October 1997 through October 1998, the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) ice camp drifted across the western Arctic Ocean, from the central Canada Basin over the Northwind Ridge and across the Chukchi Cap. During much of this period, ...

Robert Pinkel

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Arctic Precipitation and Evaporation: Model Results and Observational Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational estimates of precipitation and evaporation over the Arctic Ocean and its terrestrial watersheds are compared with corresponding values from the climate model simulations of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). ...

John E. Walsh; Vladimir Kattsov; Diane Portis; Valentin Meleshko

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

CDIAC Cloud Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Period of Record A Gridded Climatology of Clouds over Land (1971-1996) and Ocean (1954-2008) from Surface Observations Worldwide (CDIAC NDP-026E) C.J. Hahn and S.G. Warren...

199

Improved global bathymetry, global sea floor roughness, and deep ocean mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) Hom. http://Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO). http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/in the South Atlantic ocean, Tectonophysics, 210, 235-253.

Becker, Joseph Jeffrey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Improved Global Bathymetry, Global Sea Floor Roughness, and Deep Ocean Mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) Hom. http://Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO). http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/in the South Atlantic ocean, Tectonophysics, 210, 235-253.

Becker, Joseph J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Generation and Separation of Mesoscale Eddies from Surface Ocean Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is motivated by Arctic Ocean observations of sub-mixed layer eddies found at large distances from their assumed formation region of a surface ocean front. We explore eddy formation through high resolution numerical simulations of ...

Georgy E. Manucharyan; Mary-Louise Timmermans

202

The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign  

SciTech Connect

The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

Verlinde, J

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

203

CloudSat as a Global Radar Calibrator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calibration of the CloudSat spaceborne cloud radar has been thoroughly assessed using very accurate internal link budgets before launch, comparisons with predicted ocean surface backscatter at 94 GHz, direct comparisons with airborne cloud ...

A. Protat; D. Bouniol; E. J. O’Connor; H. Klein Baltink; J. Verlinde; K. Widener

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The FGGE Arctic Data Buoy Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An array of about 20 drifting data buoys was established in the Arctic Ocean during the early months of 1979. The position of each buoy and the surface pressure and temperature are measured several times daily. The program expands our capability ...

A. S. Thorndike

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

On the Annual Cycle, Variability, and Correlations of Oceanic Low-Topped Clouds with Large-Scale Circulation Using Aqua MODIS and ERA-Interim  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eight years of Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level-3 cloud data in conjunction with collocated Interim ECMWF Re-Analysis are used to investigate relationships between isolated low-topped cloud fraction (LCF) and ...

Terence L. Kubar; Duane E. Waliser; J.-L. Li; Xianan Jiang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A Land and Ocean Microwave Cloud Classification Algorithm Derived from AMSU-A and -B, Trained Using MSG-SEVIRI Infrared and Visible Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical cloud classification and cloud mask algorithm is developed based on Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A and -B) microwave (MW) observations. The visible and infrared data from the Meteosat Third Generation-Spinning Enhanced ...

Filipe Aires; Francis Marquisseau; Catherine Prigent; Geneviève Sèze

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Simultaneous Occurrence of Different Cloud Types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud observations from land stations and from ships in the ocean are used to investigate the frequency of observation and the co-occurrence of different cloud types, and the geographical and seasonal variations of these co-occurrences. Ground-...

Stephen G. Warren; Carole J. Hahn; Julius London

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A Coordinated Effort to Improve Parameterization of High-Latitude Cloud and Radiation Processes  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of improved parameterization of arctic cloud and radiation processes and implementation of the parameterizations into a climate model. Our research focuses specifically on the following issues: (1) continued development and evaluation of cloud microphysical parameterizations, focusing on issues of particular relevance for mixed phase clouds; and (2) evaluation of the mesoscale simulation of arctic cloud system life cycles.

J. O. Pinto, A.H. Lynch

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

Measurements of Ocean Surface Backscattering Using an Airborne 94-GHz Cloud Radar—Implication for Calibration of Airborne and Spaceborne W-Band Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Backscattering properties of the ocean surface have been widely used as a calibration reference for airborne and spaceborne microwave sensors. However, at millimeter-wave frequencies, the ocean surface backscattering mechanism is still not well ...

Lihua Li; Gerald M. Heymsfield; Lin Tian; Paul E. Racette

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Observations from TOGA COARE: Selected Results and Lightning Location Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, observations of electrified oceanic convection and associated cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning were obtained over the tropical western Pacific Ocean during TOGA COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response ...

Walter A. Petersen; Steven A. Rutledge; Richard E. Orville

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Dynamic and Thermodynamic Regulation of Ocean Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative roles of clouds, surface evaporation, and ocean heat transport in limiting maximum sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the western Pacific warm pool are investigated by means of simple and intermediate coupled ocean–atmosphere models. ...

Tim Li; Timothy F. Hogan; C-P. Chang

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase ice loss by enhancing ice-albedo feedbacks [Kay et al., 2008]. Arctic clouds are often mixed-phase (i-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its

213

The Arctic Haze Phenomenon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The arctic atmosphere is the repository for surprisingly high concentrations of pollutants throughout the winter months. The polluted air mass in question includes virtually all the atmosphere above the Arctic Circle and also two great lobes that ...

Glenn E. Shaw

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Speaker(s): Matthew T. Reagan Date: March 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane may have had a significant role in regulating past climate. However, the behavior of contemporary permafrost deposits and oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. A recent expedition to the west coast of Spitsbergen discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor at depths that correspond to the upper limit of the receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the

215

The Role of Ice–Ocean Interactions in the Variability of the North Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simulated influence of Arctic sea ice on the variability of the North Atlantic climate is discussed in the context of a global coupled ice–ocean–atmosphere model. This coupled system incorporates a general circulation ocean model, an ...

Marika M. Holland; Cecilia M. Bitz; Michael Eby; Andrew J. Weaver

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP Campaign Links Campaign Images Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer Cloud IOP 2005.07.11 - 2005.08.07 Lead Scientist : William Shaw For data sets, see below. Description Investigators from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from a number of other institutions, carried out a month of intensive measurements at the ARM Climate Research Facility on the North Slope of Alaska in the summer of 2005. The purpose of these measurements was to determine how much the arctic land surface modifies the way low clouds reflect, absorb, and transmit solar and infrared radiation. This is an important problem because arctic clouds play a prominent role in

217

Verification of Cloud Forecasts over the Eastern Pacific Using Passive Satellite Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operational cloud forecasts generated by the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) were verified over the eastern Pacific Ocean. The study focused on the accuracy of cloud forecasts associated with extratropical cyclone ...

Jason E. Nachamkin; Jerome Schmidt; Cristian Mitrescu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Precipitation Characteristics of Trade Wind Clouds during RICO Derived from Radar, Satellite, and Aircraft Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation characteristics of trade wind clouds over the Atlantic Ocean near Barbuda are derived from radar and aircraft data and are compared with satellite-observed cloud fields collected during the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) ...

Eric R. Snodgrass; Larry Di Girolamo; Robert M. Rauber

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Diurnal Variations and Modulation by Easterly Waves of the Size Distribution of Convective Cloud Clusters over West Africa and the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using Metecosat satellite data in the atmospheric infrared window, the authors study short time-scale fluctuations of the size distribution of tropical convective cloud clusters for July to September 1989. A cluster at a given brightness-...

L. A. Toledo Machado; J-Ph Duvel; M. Desbois

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Top-of-Atmosphere Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols over the Tropical Oceans from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Satellite Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nine months of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES)/Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) broadband fluxes combined with the TRMM visible infrared scanner (VIRS) high-resolution imager measurements are used to estimate ...

Norman G. Loeb; Seiji Kato

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Impact of Daily Arctic Sea Ice Variability in CAM3.0 during Fall and Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate projections suggest that an ice-free summer Arctic Ocean is possible within several decades and with this comes the prospect of increased ship traffic and safety concerns. The daily sea ice concentration tendency in five Coupled Model ...

Dyre O. Dammann; Uma S. Bhatt; Peter L. Langen; Jeremy R. Krieger; Xiangdong Zhang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Sensitivity of Arctic Climate Variability to Mean State: Insights from the Cretaceous  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates Arctic climate variability during a period of extreme warmth using the Community Climate System Model, version 3 (CCSM3) coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model. Four mid-Cretaceous simulations were completed ...

Christopher J. Poulsen; Jing Zhou

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Gijs de Boer, Edwin W. Eloranta, Tempei Hashino, and Gregory J. Tripoli The University of Wisconsin - Madison (1) Introduction Ice formation appears to a dominant factor controlling the lifecycle of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. To date, our understanding of ice formation in these long-lasting cloud structures does not explain the formation of observed ice amounts. Particularly puzzling are observa-

224

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Clouds and radiation in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clouds and radiation in the Arctic coastal system - effects of local Clouds and radiation in the Arctic coastal system - effects of local heterogeneity Key, Erica University of Miami, RSMAS Minnett, Peter University of Miami Improving our comprehension of the influence of clouds in the polar regions is important as a prerequisite to refining our understanding of the earth's climate system. Polar clouds modulate the radiative heat loss to space in the regions that serve as the heat sink of the climate system. The local feedbacks between cloud formation and changing surface albedo that result from the ice melting and refreezing cycle, and the small space scales over which significant gradients occur, render this a very complex system to study. Difficulties in making appropriate measurements in the harsh Arctic environment lead to sparse, if not absent information on the

225

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: An Arctic Springtime  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Arctic Springtime Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layer observed during An Arctic Springtime Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layer observed during SHEBA Zuidema, Paquita RSMAS/MPO University of Miami Han, Yong NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Intrieri, Janet NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Key, Jeffrey Boston University Lawson, Paul SPEC Inc. Matrosov, Sergey NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Shupe, Matthew CIRES/NOAA/ETL Uttal, Taneil NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory The microphysical characteristics, radiative impact, and lifecycle of a long-lived, surface-based mixed-layer, mixed-phase cloud with an average temperature of approximately -20 C are presented and discussed. The cloud was observed during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic experiment from May 1 through May 10, 1998. Vertically-resolved properties of the liquid

226

Factors Influencing Simulated Changes in Future Arctic Cloudiness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study diagnoses the changes in Arctic clouds simulated by the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) in a transient 2 × CO2 simulation. Four experiments—one fully coupled and three with prescribed SSTs and/or sea ice cover—are used ...

Stephen J. Vavrus; Uma S. Bhatt; Vladimir A. Alexeev

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Warming Trends in the Arctic from Clear Sky Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite thermal infrared data on surface temperatures provide pan-Arctic coverage from 1981 to 2001 during cloud-free conditions and reveal large warming anomalies in the 1990s compared to the 1980s and regional variability in the trend. The ...

Josefino C. Comiso

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

IC cloud: Enabling compositional cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud computing has attracted great interest from both academic and industrial communities. Different paradigms, architectures and applications based on the concept of cloud have emerged. Although many of them have been quite successful, efforts are ... Keywords: Cloud computing, cloud elasticity, cloud service, compositional cloud, infrastructure as a service (IaaS)

Yi-Ke Guo; Li Guo

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Comparison of Airborne In Situ, Airborne Radar–Lidar, and Spaceborne Radar–Lidar Retrievals of Polar Ice Cloud Properties Sampled during the POLARCAT Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study illustrates the high potential of RALI, the French airborne radar–lidar instrument, for studying cloud processes and evaluating satellite products when satellite overpasses are available. For an Arctic nimbostratus ice cloud collected ...

Julien Delanoë; Alain Protat; Olivier Jourdan; Jacques Pelon; Mathieu Papazzoni; Régis Dupuy; Jean-Francois Gayet; Caroline Jouan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Spectral Density of Cloud Liquid Water Content at High Frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft measurements of liquid water content (LWC) made at sampling frequencies of 1 and 2 kHz with a particle volume monitor (PVM) probe from horizontal traverses in stratocumulus clouds during the Southern Ocean Cloud Experiment and cumulus ...

H. Gerber; J. B. Jensen; A. B. Davis; A. Marshak; W. J. Wiscombe

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

NETL: Arctic Energy Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Arctic Energy Office image showing Alaska landscape Alaska North Slope Resources Alaska Unconventional Resources ChallengesShortages AEO Program Fact Sheet Alaskas fossil...

232

SST Sensitivities in Multiday TOGA COARE Cloud-Resolving Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) was used to simulate the evolution of convection over the western Pacific between 19 and 26 December 1992, during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment. A ...

Alexandre A. Costa; William R. Cotton; Robert L. Walko; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; Hongli Jiang

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Thermodynamic phase profiles of optically thin midlatitude clouds and their relation to temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameterizations of cloud phase in general circulation models. However, other aircraft campaigns and different in the Arctic. The relationship between ice phase occurrence and temperature only slightly changes between cloud interest, as they occur in a temperature range where cloud phase can either be liquid, ice, or mixed

234

Atmospheric Radon Measurements in the Arctic; Fronts, Seasonal Observations, and Transport of Continental Air to Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon was determined in the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean in flights of a United States Naval Research Laboratory aircraft in April and May 1974. Simultaneously collected air samples were analyzed for carbon monoxide, methane, ...

P. E. Wilkniss; R. E. Larson

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) will raise and lower a heavily instrumented tethered balloon system at regular intervals in the lower 2 kilometers of the atmosphere at Oliktok Point. Data obtained during the ALTOS campaign will provide a statistically significant set of observed in situ cloud properties for validating retrieval algorithms and help scientists reduce the uncertainty in the radiative forcing and heating rates on hourly time scales. The data will also help researchers gain a better understanding of the driving processes that control climate changes and determine the state of the Arctic climate system. Collaborators Science Team: The Pennsylvania State University, Stratton

236

Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington Rob Wood, University of Washington AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager CAP-MBL Proposal Team Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate sensitivity? Cli t F db k

237

The Impact of Polar Stratospheric Clouds on the Heating Rates of the Winter Polar Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have computed the perturbation to the infrared radiative heating rates of the lower stratosphere due to the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) during the winter season in the Antarctic and Arctic regions. The calculations were ...

James B. Pollack; Christopher P. McKay

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Long-Term Behavior of Cloud Systems in TOGA COARE and Their Interactions with Radiative and Surface Processes. Part I: Two-Dimensional Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-dimensional cloud-resolving modeling of tropical cloud systems was performed for a 39-day period (5 December 1992 through 12 January 1993) during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE)...

Xiaoqing Wu; Wojciech W. Grabowski; Mitchell W. Moncrieff

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The minimum of Arctic sea ice extent in the summer of 2007 was unprecedented in the historical record. A coupled ice–ocean model is used to determine the state of the ice and ocean over the past 29 yr to investigate the causes of this ice extent minimum within a historical perspective. It is found that even though the 2007 ice extent was strongly anomalous, the loss in total ice mass was not. Rather, the 2007 ice mass loss is largely consistent with a steady decrease in ice thickness that began in 1987. Since then, the simulated mean September ice thickness within the Arctic Ocean has declined from 3.7 to 2.6 m at a rate of ?0.57 m decade ?1. Both the area coverage of thin ice at the beginning of the melt season and the total volume of ice lost in the summer have been steadily increasing. The combined impact of these two trends caused a large reduction in the September mean ice concentration in the Arctic Ocean. This created conditions during the summer of 2007 that allowed persistent winds to push the remaining ice from the Pacific side to the Atlantic side of the basin and more than usual into the Greenland Sea. This exposed large areas of open water, resulting in the record ice extent anomaly. 1.

R. W. Lindsay; J. Zhang; A. Schweiger; M. Steele; H. Stern

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Arctic Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Arctic Solar Place G"LLIVARE, Sweden Zip SE- 98228 Product manufacturers of PV modules References Arctic Solar1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Aerosol Size Distribution, Particle Concentration, and Optical Property Variability near Caribbean Trade Cumulus Clouds: Isolating Effects of Vertical Transport and Cloud Processing from Humidification Using Aircraft Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the effect of trade wind cumulus clouds on aerosol properties in the near-cloud environment using data from the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) campaign. Aerosol size distributions, particle concentrations, and optical ...

Robert M. Rauber; Guangyu Zhao; Larry Di Girolamo; Marilé Colón-Robles

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Remote sensing of total integrated water vapor, wind speed, and cloud liquid water over the ocean using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A modified D-matrix retrieval method is the basis of the refined total integrated water vapor (TIWV), total integrated cloud liquid water (CLW), and surface wind speed (WS) retrieval methods that are developed. The 85 GHZ polarization difference is used to restrict the application of the geophysical retrieval algorithms which are developed to handle specific atmospheric absorptive situations. An improved semi-empirical sea surface emissivity model is integrated into this refined D-matrix procedure that is being developed for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Radiometer (AMSR). The purpose of this work is to test the refined geophysical parameter retrieval methods using data from the Special Sensor Microwave / Imager (SSM/I). When comparing the statistical performance of the TIWV, WS, and CLW retrieval methods presented to the statistical performance of published retrieval methods for each geophysical parameter, the retrieval methods developed for this study perform only slightly better. However, it is demonstrated that the new retrieval methods are more physically valid than the comparison retrieval methods. The utilization of the polarization difference of the 85 GHZ channels to restrict the application of specifically-derived retrieval algorithms proves to be a valuable and reliable geophysical parameter retrieval tool.

Manning, Norman Willis William

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Stratocumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the current knowledge of the climatological, structural, and organizational aspects of stratocumulus clouds and the physical processes controlling them. More of Earth’s surface is covered by stratocumulus clouds than by any ...

Robert Wood

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE Observations  

SciTech Connect

Arctic clouds simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic Spring and Fall seasons performed under the Cloud- Associated Parameterizations Testbed (CAPT) framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase stratocumulus, and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level clouds, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons and cloud fraction in the Spring season. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave (LW) radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. The model with a new ice nucleation parameterization moderately improves the model simulations by increasing cloud liquid water content in mixed-phase clouds through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron- Findeisen (WBF) process. The CAM5 single column model testing shows that change in the homogeneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C has a substantial impact on the modeled liquid water content through the slowing-down of liquid and rain-related processes. In contrast, collections of cloud ice by snow and cloud liquid by rain are of minor importance for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic.

Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter; Zelenyuk, Alla

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations  

SciTech Connect

Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m{sup -2}. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

Liu X.; Lin W.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J.; Klein, S. A.; Shi, X.; Wang, Z.; Ghan, S. J.; Earle, M.; Liu, P. S. K.; Zelenyuk, A.

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics J. Simmons, O. Lie-Svendsen, and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska The Arctic is a key element in determining the radiation budget of the earth. Within the polar regions, the net radiation (incoming solar radiation minus outgoing infrared radiation) is negative. To understand the role this energy deficit plays in the overall radiation budget, one must examine the prevalent atmospheric features of the Arctic. One such feature is a persistent layer of low-altitude, stratiform clouds found over the central Arctic predominantly from April to September (Tsay et al. 1984). These Arctic stratus clouds (ASC) modulate the earth's radiation budget

247

CONTENTS Developing Alaskan Arctic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Alaskan Arctic Developing Alaskan Arctic Potential ...........................................1 Commentary ...................................2 NETL Develops Strategic Partnership with the Alaska Center for Energy and Power ...8 Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater Produced Water Discharge ....10 Intelligent Production System for Ultra Deepwater with Short Hop Wireless Power and Wireless Data Transfer .........................................16 Snapshots ......................................19 CONTACTS Roy Long Technology Manager Ultra-Deepwater/Offshore 304-285-4479 roy.long@netl.doe.gov Ray Boswell Technology Manager Natural Gas Technology R&D 412-386-7614 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov Eric Smistad Technology Manager Oil Technology R&D 281-494-2619 eric.smistad@netl.doe.gov

248

Ocean Skeletal Structures Hypotheses and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss hypotheses on formation of ocean skeletal structures. These structures entered the ocean together with atmospheric precipitation and were assembled from fragments of skeletal structures present in clouds. We base interpretation of this phenomenon on surface tension forces between fundamental tubular blocks of the investigated structures that may also occur beneath the ocean surface. A capillary model is presented to explain formation of a network of interacting tubes. Data about the nature of ocean skeletal structures can be instrumental in modeling many processes associated with physics of the ocean.

Rantsev-Kartinov, V A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ocean Skeletal Structures Hypotheses and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss hypotheses on formation of ocean skeletal structures. These structures entered the ocean together with atmospheric precipitation and were assembled from fragments of skeletal structures present in clouds. We base interpretation of this phenomenon on surface tension forces between fundamental tubular blocks of the investigated structures that may also occur beneath the ocean surface. A capillary model is presented to explain formation of a network of interacting tubes. Data about the nature of ocean skeletal structures can be instrumental in modeling many processes associated with physics of the ocean.

V. A. Rantsev-Kartinov; C. G. Parigger

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ship-Based Observations of the Diurnal Cycle of Southeast Pacific Marine Stratocumulus Clouds and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal cycle of marine stratocumulus in cloud-topped boundary layers is examined using ship-based meteorological data obtained during the 2008 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx). The high temporal and ...

Casey D. Burleyson; Simon P. de Szoeke; Sandra E. Yuter; Matt Wilbanks; W. Alan Brewer

251

Scale Dependence of the Thermodynamic Forcing of Tropical Monsoon Clouds: Results from TRMM Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clouds exert a thermodynamic forcing on the ocean–atmosphere column through latent heating, owing to the production of rain, and through cloud radiative forcing, owing to the absorption of terrestrial infrared energy and the reflection of solar ...

Eric M. Wilcox; V. Ramanathan

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds  

SciTech Connect

PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2004 North Slope of Alaska 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment E. R. Westwater, M. A. Klein, and V. Leuski Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado A. J. Gasiewski, T. Uttal, and D. A. Hazen National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Cimini Remote Sensing Division, CETEMPS Universita' dell'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy V. Mattioli Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettronica e dell'Informazione Perugia, Italy B. L. Weber and S. Dowlatshahi Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado J. A. Shaw Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

254

Evaluation of ERA-interim and MERRA Cloudiness in the Southern Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The southern ocean cloud cover modeled by the ERA-interim and MERRA reanalyses are compared against MODIS and MISR observations. ERA-interim monthly mean cloud amounts match the observations within 5%, while MERRA significantly underestimates the ...

Catherine M. Naud; James F. Booth; Anthony D. Del Genio

255

Radiative Impacts on the Growth of a Population of Drops within Simulated Summertime Arctic Stratus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of solar heating and infrared cooling on the growth of a population of drops is studied with two numerical modeling frameworks. An eddy-resolving model (ERM) simulation of Arctic stratus clouds is used to generate a dataset of 500 ...

Jerry Y. Harrington; Graham Feingold; William R. Cotton

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Cloud Chmabers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video - (Requires Windows Media Player) Build your own cloud chamber - Instructions Project Contact: Tom Jordan Web Maintainer: qnet-webmaster@fnal.gov Last Update: May 31, 2011...

257

Plant roots in arctic tundra  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

Colleen Iversen, Victoria Sloan, Paddy Sullivan, Eugenie Euskirchen, Dave McGuire, Richard Norby, Anthony Walker, Jeff Warren, Stan Wullschleger,

258

Cellular clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper progresses an analysis of what it means to be a cellular network operator and what form the ownership and control of future cellular networks may take. Alternative modes of ownership may allow for the creation of more flexible cellular networking ... Keywords: Cellular Cloud, Cellular network, Cloud Computing, Cognitive radio, DSA, LTE, MVNO, Services, Utility Cellular Network

Tim Forde; Linda Doyle

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NETL: Arctic Energy Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facts/Issues Facts/Issues Average South-Central natural gas consumption in 2005 was: 13.9% gas utility 20.0% power generation 54.3% industrial-LNG sales, oil refining, and fertilizer manufacturing 7.2% field operations 4.6% other Due to a lack of natural gas deliverability, the Cook Inlet fertilizer plant terminated operations in May 2008. LNG sales are increasingly curtailed during cold weather due to peak demand shortages. The LNG export license is up for renewal in 2011. Exploration must find new reserves on the order of 500 Bcf, and that will only solve the natural gas shortage until approximately 2019. Challenges Natural gas in the Arctic, until recently, has been largely overlooked. Little is known about the possible breadth of the Arctic storehouse of natural gas apart from the resource associated with the currently producing

260

Arctic Energy Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

O O G R A M FAC T S Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil CONTACTS Joel Lindstrom Arctic Energy Office National Energy Technology Laboratory 420 L Street, Suite 305 Anchorage, Alaska 99501 907-271-3618 joel.lindstrom@contr.netl.doe.gov Albert B. Yost II Sr. Management Technical Advisor Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4479 albert.yost@netl.doe.gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A 20-Year Dataset of Downwelling Longwave Flux at the Arctic Surface from TOVS Satellite Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20-Year Dataset of Downwelling Longwave Flux 20-Year Dataset of Downwelling Longwave Flux at the Arctic Surface from TOVS Satellite Data J. Francis Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey A. Schweiger Polar Science Center University of Washington Seattle, Washington J. Key National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service Madison, Wisconsin Introduction This paper summarizes the progress of a study under way to generate a 20-year dataset of surface downwelling longwave flux (DLF) retrievals from satellite data over the Arctic Ocean. We will produce daily fields between late 1979 and late 1998 on a grid with a spatial resolution of 100 km x 100 km 2 north of 60°N. Surface measurements from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) and the

262

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Sensitivity of Arctic Climate Variability to Mean State: Insights from the Cretaceous  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates Arctic climate variability during a period of extreme warmth using the CCSM3 coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. Four mid-Cretaceous simulations were completed with different CO2 levels (1x, 10x, and 16x pre-...

Christopher J. Poulsen; Jing Zhou

264

Comparison of Arctic Climate Simulations by Uncoupled and Coupled Global Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of present-day Arctic climate are assessed from suites of 1) 13 global atmosphere-only models from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-II) and 2) 8 coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice models from the Data Distribution Center ...

John E. Walsh; Vladimir M. Kattsov; William L. Chapman; Veronika Govorkova; Tatyana Pavlova

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Ocean Terracing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artworks can improve humanity ability to apply macro-engineering principles which skirt or correct oceanographic problems impairing the economic usefulness of coastal land, the overhead airshed, and seawater temperature and salinity stability. A new form of Art, Ocean Art, is here proposed which centers on deliberate terracing of appropriate regions of our world ocean; a proposed example of macro-engineered useful Ocean Art is the technically possible 21-st Century terracing of the Mediterranean Sea. Ocean Art is applicable worldwide to places that might be practically improved by its judicious employment. Such Ocean Art may constitute an entirely unique category of solutions to coastal disaster prevention planning.

Richard Cathcart; Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Effects of Precipitation on Cloud Droplet Measurement Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft in situ observations of precipitation during the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) field project are used to study and parameterize the effects of precipitation on cloud probes. Specifically, the effects of precipitation on the ...

Brad Baker; Qixu Mo; R. Paul Lawson; Darren O’Connor; Alexei Korolev

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A 3-GHz Profiler for Precipitating Cloud Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3-GHz profiler has been developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Aeronomy Laboratory to observe the evolution and vertical structure of precipitating cloud systems. The profiler is very portable, robust, and relatively ...

Warner L. Ecklund; Christopher R. Williams; Paul E. Johnston; Kenneth S. Gage

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Eight Years of High Cloud Statistics Using HIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last 8 yr frequency and location of cloud observations have been compiled using multispectral High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration polar-orbiting satellites; this ...

Donald P. Wylie; W. Paul Menzel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Sensitivity of Simulated Global Climate to Perturbations in Low Cloud Microphysical Properties. Part II: Spatially Localized Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the global climate to spatially localized (20°–70°N) perturbations in the microphysical properties of low clouds is investigated using a general circulation model coupled to a mixed layer ocean with fixed cloud distributions. ...

C-T. Chen; V. Ramaswamy

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Nonlinear threshold behavior during the loss of Arctic sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In light of the rapid recent retreat of Arctic sea ice, a number of studies have discussed the possibility of a critical threshold (or "tipping point") beyond which the ice-albedo feedback causes the ice cover to melt away in an irreversible process. The focus has typically been centered on the annual minimum (September) ice cover, which is often seen as particularly susceptible to destabilization by the ice-albedo feedback. Here we examine the central physical processes associated with the transition from ice-covered to ice-free Arctic Ocean conditions. We show that while the ice-albedo feedback promotes the existence of multiple ice cover states, the stabilizing thermodynamic effects of sea ice mitigate this when the Arctic Ocean is ice-covered during a sufficiently large fraction of the year. These results suggest that critical threshold behavior is unlikely during the approach from current perennial sea ice conditions to seasonally ice-free conditions. In a further warmed climate, however, we find that a ...

Eisenman, I; 10.1073/pnas.0806887106

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Predictions and Studies with a One-Dimensional Ice–Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled one-dimensional ice-ocean model is used for studies of Arctic phenomena. The ice-snow system is represented by the simplified thermodynamic ice model of Semtner and a dynamic approximation that neglects the internal stresses. The ocean ...

Shelley H. Riedlinger; Alex Warn-Varnas

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds Harrington, Jerry The Pennsylvania State University Category: Modeling Mixed-phase stratus clouds are dominant in the Arctic during much of the year. These clouds typically have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Time scales for the complete glaciation of such clouds (the Bergeron process) are typically computed using the classical mass growth equations for crystals and liquid drops. However, mixed phase arctic stratus have significant infrared cooling and solar heating (during the warm season) rates that can affect the growth of water drops and ice crystals, and therefore the strength of the Bergeron process. To examine the influence of radiative heating and cooling on the Bergeron process, we incorporate a

273

Physical Characterization of Tropical Oceanic Convection Observed in KWAJEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX) was designed to obtain an empirical physical characterization of precipitating convective clouds over the tropical ocean. Coordinated datasets were collected by three ...

Sandra E. Yuter; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Eric A. Smith; Thomas T. Wilheit; Edward Zipser

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Inferring Optical Depth of Broken Clouds from Landsat Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical depths ?pp for broken, shallow clouds over ocean were inferred from Landsat cloud reflectances Rcld (0.83 ?m) with horizontal resolution of 28.5 m. The values ?pp were obtained by applying an inverse, homogeneous, plane-parallel radiance ...

Howard W. Barker; Damin Liu

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Deep Convection to Inform Cloud Parmaterizations in Large-Scale Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations Using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Deep Convection to Inform Cloud Parameterizations in Large-Scale Models S. A. Klein National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton, New Jersey R. Pincus National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science Climate Diagnostics Center Boulder, Colorado K. -M. Xu National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Abstract Cloud parameterizations in large-scale models struggle to address the significant non-linear effects of radiation and precipitation that arise from horizontal inhomogeneity in cloud properties at scales smaller than the grid box size of the large-scale models. Statistical cloud schemes provide an attractive

276

Cloud computing beyond objects: seeding the cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud computing is an emerging computing milieu which dynamically enables scalable and virtually unlimited resources. This panel will discuss emerging tools, skills and technologies that will ""seed the cloud"" - enabling improved interoperability, security, ... Keywords: cloud computing, skills, technologies, tools

Steven Fraser; Robert Biddle; Scott Jordan; Kate Keahey; Bob Marcus; E. Michael Maximilien; Dave Thomas

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.  

SciTech Connect

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Using Doppler spectra to separate hydrometeor populations and analyze ice precipitation in multilayered mixed-phase clouds  

SciTech Connect

Multimodality of cloud radar Doppler spectra is used to partition cloud particle phases and to separate distinct ice populations in the radar sample volume, thereby facilitating analysis of individual ice showers in multilayered mixed-phase clouds. A 35-GHz cloud radar located at Barrow, Alaska, during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment collected the Doppler spectra. Data from a pair of collocated depolarization lidars confirmed the presence of two liquid cloud layers reported in this study. Surprisingly, both of these cloud layers were embedded in ice precipitation yet maintained their liquid. Our spectral separation of the ice precipitation yielded two distinct ice populations: ice initiated within the two liquid cloud layers and ice precipitation formed in higher cloud layers. Comparisons of ice fall velocity versus radar reflectivity relationships derived for distinct showers reveal that a single relationship might not properly represent the ice showers during this period.

Rambukkange, Mahlon P.; Verlinde, J.; Eloranta, E. W.; Flynn, Connor J.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

ISLAND AND SHIP TRAIL CLOUDS: THE ROSETTA STONE OF CLOUDS, POLLUTION, AND CLIMATE?  

SciTech Connect

Cloud/Climate Feedback is a combination of words known to be important but extremely difficult to quantify or even assign a direction. A 4 % increase in boundary layer clouds would cool the earth as much as a doubling of CO{sub 2} would warm it (Randall et al, 1984). Studies have shown that warmer sea surface temperatures are associated with fewer clouds (Oreopoulos and Davies, 1992). We do not know how much of this effect is due to direct solar warming of surface water in the absence of clouds. We also know there are more eastern ocean marine boundary layer clouds in summer than winter. Do warmer sea surface temperatures or more summer-like conditions best represent global warming? Twomey, 1974 has proposed that increasing aerosol pollution would lead to brighter clouds (indirect aerosol effect). This relationship does have determined sign (i.e. cooling) but is very difficult to quantify. Cloud trails from ships and islands hold the potential of addressing Cloud/Climate Feedback by observing atmospheric response to large perturbations in turbulence and aerosol. However, before cloud trails can be used as a Rosetta Stone connecting pollution and climate, much more needs to be understood about the micro- and macrophysics of cloud trails.

W. PORCH; S. WINIECKI; L. O' STEEN

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Springtime Visibility in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the Ptarmigan flights in the 1950s, the springtime visibility reduction in the Arctic has been identified with pollution aerosol. However, observed values of the dry aerosol extinction coefficient are too small to explain the observed ...

F. G. Meyer; J. A. Curry; C. A. Brock; L. F. Radke

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Synoptically Driven Arctic Winter States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dense network of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) observations is used to assess relationships between winter surface and atmospheric variables as the SHEBA site came under the influence of cyclonic and anticyclonic atmospheric ...

Kirstie Stramler; Anthony D. Del Genio; William B. Rossow

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A 22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes in the Arctic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes 22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes in the Arctic J. Francis and J. Secora Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey Abstract Downwelling longwave fluxes (DLFs) over the Arctic surface have been generated from 22.5 years of radiances and retrievals from the TIROS (television and infrared observation satellite) operational vertical sounder (TOVS). The flux retrieval algorithm has been validated and improved using surface- based radiation and cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, and from the Surface Heat Balance of the Arctic (SHEBA) field program (1997-98) in the Beaufort Sea. The DLF product is presented on a 100 x

283

ARM - PI Product - Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsCloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent ProductsCloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals Site(s) NSA General Description Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May

284

Mechanisms of Low Cloud–Climate Feedback in Idealized Single-Column Simulations with the Community Atmospheric Model, Version 3 (CAM3)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the physical mechanism of low cloud feedback in the Community Atmospheric Model, version 3 (CAM3) through idealized single-column model (SCM) experiments over the subtropical eastern oceans. Negative cloud feedback is ...

Minghua Zhang; Christopher Bretherton

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Deployment of a Tethered-Balloon System for Microphysics and Radiative Measurements in Mixed-Phase Clouds at Ny-Ålesund and South Pole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tethered-balloon system capable of making microphysical and radiative measurements in clouds is described and examples of measurements in boundary layer stratus clouds in the Arctic and at the South Pole are presented. A 43-m3 helium-filled ...

R. Paul Lawson; Knut Stamnes; Jakob Stamnes; Pat Zmarzly; Jeff Koskuliks; Chris Roden; Qixu Mo; Michael Carrithers; Geoffrey L. Bland

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Properties of the Arctic 2-Meter Air Temperature Field for 1979 to the Present Derived from a New Gridded Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the behavior of the Arctic Ocean surface air temperature field for 1979–93. Temperatures are derived from a new gridded 6-h, 2-m air temperature dataset called POLES. These gridded air temperatures are estimated from optimal ...

Seelye Martin; Esther A. Munoz

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Global Simulations of Ice nucleation and Ice Supersaturation with an Improved Cloud Scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process-based treatment of ice supersaturation and ice-nucleation is implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The new scheme is designed to allow (1) supersaturation with respect to ice, (2) ice nucleation by aerosol particles and (3) ice cloud cover consistent with ice microphysics. The scheme is implemented with a 4-class 2 moment microphysics code and is used to evaluate ice cloud nucleation mechanisms and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloud occurrence better than previous versions of the model. Simulations indicate heterogeneous freezing and contact nucleation on dust are both potentially important over remote areas of the Arctic. Cloud forcing and hence climate is sensitive to different formulations of the ice microphysics. Arctic radiative fluxes are sensitive to the parameterization of ice clouds. These results indicate that ice clouds are potentially an important part of understanding cloud forcing and potential cloud feedbacks, particularly in the Arctic.

Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Morrison, H.; Park, Sungsu; Conley, Andrew; Klein, Stephen A.; Boyle, James; Mitchell, David; Li, J-L F.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

288

Cloud Computing Operations Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper argues that the cloud computing industry faces many decision problems where operations research OR could add tremendous value. To this end, we provide an OR perspective on cloud computing in three ways. First, we compare the cloud computing ... Keywords: cloud IT, cloud computing, green IT, operations research, supply chain

Ilyas Iyoob, Emrah Zarifoglu, A. B. Dieker

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Geochemistry of clathrate-derived methane in Arctic Ocean waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

venting in the eastern Aleutian subduction zone, J. Geophys.Pacific North Pacific Aleutians Bear Island Hakon Mosby

Elliott, S.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ocean Datasets | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Datasets Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Ocean, Coast, and Great Lakes Planning...

291

Cloud Condensation Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state of knowledge of the particles upon which liquid droplets condense to form atmospheric water clouds is presented. The realization of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) as a distinct aerosol subset originated with the cloud microphysical ...

James G. Hudson

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Forecasting of Supercooled Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using parameterizations of cloud microphysics, a technique to forecast supercooled cloud events is suggested. This technique can be coupled on the mesoscale with a prognostic equation for cloud water to improve aircraft icing forecasts. The ...

André Tremblay; Anna Glazer; Wanda Szyrmer; George Isaac; Isztar Zawadzki

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Polar Cloud and Surface Classification Using AVHRR Imagery: An Intercomparison of Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer local area coverage (AVHPR LAC) arctic scenes are classified into ten classes. These include water, solid sea ice, broken sea ice, snow-covered mountains, snow-free land, and five cloud types. Three ...

R. M. Welch; S. K. Sengupta; A. K. Goroch; P. Rabindra; N. Rangaraj; M. S. Navar

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Stratocumulus Cloud Field Reflected Fluxes: The Effect of Cloud Shape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflected fluxes are calculated for stratocumulus cloud fields as a function of sky cover, cloud aspect ratio, and cloud shape. Cloud liquid water volume is held invariant as cloud shape is varied so that the results can be utilized more ...

R. M. Welch; B. A. Wielicki

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Study of ice cloud properties using infrared spectral data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research presented in this thesis involves the study of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties using both hyperspectral and narrowband infrared spectral data. First, ice cloud models are developed for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instrument onboard the METOP-A satellite, which provide the bulk-scattering properties of these clouds for the 8461 IASI channels between 645 and 2760 cm-1. We investigate the sensitivity of simulated brightness temperatures in this spectral region to the bulk-scattering properties of ice clouds containing individual ice crystal habits as well as for one habit distribution. The second part of this thesis describes an algorithm developed to analyze the sensitivity of simulated brightness temperatures at 8.5 and 11.0 µm to changes in effective cloud temperature by adjusting cloud top height and geometric thickness in a standard tropical atmosphere. Applicability of using these channels in a bi-spectral approach to retrieve cirrus cloud effective particle size and optical thickness is assessed. Finally, the algorithm is applied to the retrieval of these ice cloud properties for a case of single-layered cirrus cloud over a tropical ocean surface using measurements from the Moderate Resolution Infrared Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Cloud top height and geometric thickness in the profile are adjusted to assess the influence of effective cloud temperature on the retrieval.

Garrett, Kevin James

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Necklace around the Arctic Arctic indigenous peoples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

national choir). #12;The economies of the Arctic settlements invariably involve fish, oil or gas: natural in the 1002 area. This work was undertaken by a private exploration firm and funded by a group of oil exploration apparently began abruptly in A.D. 793 with an attack on Lindesfarne, an island off the NE

297

Glossary Term - Cloud Chamber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ceres Previous Term (Ceres) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Composition of the Earth's Atmosphere) Composition of the
Earth's Atmosphere Cloud Chamber A cloud chamber showing the...

298

ARM - Measurement - Cloud phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

property that captures the state o f the hydrometeors within a cloud (liquid, ice, or mixed-phase). This is distinct from cloud type that involves property descriptors...

299

Climatological Data for Clouds Over the Globe from Surface Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Clouds Over the Globe from Surface Observations for Clouds Over the Globe from Surface Observations (1988) (NDP-026) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.ndp026 data Data Investigators C. J. Hahn, S. G. Warren, J. London, R. L. Jenne, and R. M. Chervin With some data from as early as 1930, global long-term monthly and/or seasonal total cloud cover, cloud type amounts and frequencies of occurrence, low cloud base heights, harmonic analyses of annual and diurnal cycles, interannual variations and trends, and cloud type co-occurrences have been compiled and presented in two atlases (Warren et al. 1988, 1990). These data were derived from land and ship synoptic weather reports from the "SPOT" archive of the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center (FNOC) and from Release 1 of the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) for

300

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

European Geosciences Union Ocean Science Formulation of an ocean model for global climate simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper summarizes the formulation of the ocean component to the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory’s (GFDL) climate model used for the 4th IPCC Assessment (AR4) of global climate change. In particular, it reviews the numerical schemes and physical parameterizations that make up an ocean climate model and how these schemes are pieced together for use in a state-of-the-art climate model. Features of the model described here include the following: (1) tripolar grid to resolve the Arctic Ocean without polar filtering, (2) partial bottom step representation of topography to better represent topographically influenced advective and wave processes, (3) more accurate equation of state, (4) three-dimensional flux limited tracer advection to reduce overshoots and undershoots, (5) incorporation of regional climatological variability in shortwave penetration,

B. L. Samuels; M. J. Spelman; M. Winton; R. Zhang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations with the NCAR Single Column Climate Model (SCAM) and ARM Observations  

SciTech Connect

Mixed-phase stratus clouds are ubiquitous in the Arctic and play an important role in climate in this region. However, climate models have generally proven unsuccessful at simulating the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets and ice crystals in these Arctic clouds, which affect modeled cloud phase, cloud lifetime and radiative properties. An ice nucleation parameterization and a vapor deposition scheme were developed that together provide a physically-consistent treatment of mixed-phase clouds in global climate models. These schemes have been implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3). This report documents the performance of these schemes against ARM Mixed-phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) observations using the CAM single column model version (SCAM). SCAM with our new schemes has a more realistic simulation of the cloud phase structure and the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets against observations during the M-PACE than the standard CAM simulations.

Liu, X; Ghan, SJ; Xie, S

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site http:energy.govnepadownloads...

304

Alaska | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site May 1, 1994 EIS-0186: Mitigation Action Plan Alaska...

305

Short-Term Climatic Variability of the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The circulation of the Arctic atmosphere undergoes large fluctuations about its monthly and annual means. The statistics of Arctic sea level pressure and temperature are evaluated in order to place Arctic atmospheric variability into the context ...

John E. Walsh; William L. Chapman

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Gijs de Boer,Edwin W.Eloranta,Tempei Hashino,and Gregory J.Tripoli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a dominant factor controlling the lifecycle of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. To date, our understanding of ice Stratus from M-PACE Mixed-Phase Layer Ice Precipitation "Bursts" Time (UT) Altitude(km) Lidar backscatter. - Additionally, Shupe illustrated that ice water content and liquid water content seem to vary in phase with each

Eloranta, Edwin W.

307

Interactions between North Atlantic Clouds and the Large-Scale Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of understanding and predicting the presence of clouds and their effects on the atmosphere in the midlatitudes of the North Atlantic Ocean. The European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting initialized ...

Rong-Shyang Sheu; Judith A. Curry

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effect of Aerosol on Cloud–Environment Interactions in Trade Cumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the role of aerosol in mediating interactions between a warm trade cumulus cloud system and the environment that spawns it. Numerical simulations of the observed and well-studied Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) field ...

Seoung-Soo Lee; Graham Feingold; Patrick Y. Chuang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Response of Tropical Clouds to the Interannual Variation of Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Connections between the large-scale interannual variations of clouds, deep convection, atmospheric winds, vertical thermodynamic structure, and SSTs over global tropical oceans are examined over the period July 1983-December 1990. The SST warming ...

Rong Fu; W. Timothy Liu; Robert E. Dickinson

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems in a simulated a regional high resolution model simulation, this study documents the environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and ...

Samson Hagos; Zhe Feng; Sally McFarlane; L. Ruby Leung

311

Microwave Simulations of a Tropical Rainfall System with a Three-Dimensional Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional cloud model-microwave radiative transfer model combination is used to study the relations among the precipitation and other microphysical characteristics of a tropical oceanic squall line and the upwelling radiance at ...

Robert F. Adler; Hwa-Young M. Yeh; N. Prasad; Wei-Kuo Tao; Joanne Simpson

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By applying a cloud-tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems in a regional high-resolution model simulation, this study documents the environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by ...

Samson Hagos; Zhe Feng; Sally McFarlane; L. Ruby Leung

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Reproducibility by Climate Models of Cloud Radiative Forcing Associated with Tropical Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, cloud radiative forcing (CRF) associated with convective activity over tropical oceans is analyzed for monthly mean data from twentieth-century simulations of 18 climate models participating in phase 3 of the Coupled Model ...

Hiroki Ichikawa; Hirohiko Masunaga; Yoko Tsushima; Hiroshi Kanzawa

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Global Energy Transports and the Influence of Clouds on Transport Requirements—A Satellite Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the impact of differential net radiative heating on two-dimensional energy transports within the atmosphere-ocean system and the role of clouds on this process. Nimbus-7 earth radiation budget data show basic energy surpluses ...

Byung-Ju Sohn; Eric A. Smith

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A Climatology of Surface Cloud Radiative Effects at the ARM Tropical Western Pacific Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud radiative effects on surface downwelling fluxes are investigated using datasets from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) sites in the tropical western Pacific Ocean (TWP) region. The Nauru Island (Republic of Nauru) and ...

Sally A. McFarlane; Charles N. Long; Julia Flaherty

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Impact of Ice Phase Cloud Parameterizations on Tropical Cyclone Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of ice phase cloud microphysical processes on prediction of tropical cyclone environment is examined for two microphysical parameterizations using the Coupled Ocean / Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System –Tropical Cyclone model. An ...

Yi Jin; Shouping Wang; Jason Nachamkin; James D. Doyle; Gregory Thompson; Louis Grasso; Teddy Holt; Jon Moskaitis; Hao Jin; Richard M. Hodur; Qingyun Zhao; Ming Liu; Mark DeMaria

317

Moisture Transport, Lower-Tropospheric Stability, and Decoupling of Cloud-Topped Boundary Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decoupling during the “Lagrangian” evolution of a cloud-topped boundary layer advected equatorward by the trade winds in an idealized eastern subtropical ocean is studied using a mixed-layer model (MLM). The sea surface temperature is gradually ...

Christopher S. Bretherton; Matthew C. Wyant

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Spatial Variability of Liquid Water Path in Marine Low Cloud: The Importance of Mesoscale Cellular Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid water path (LWP) mesoscale spatial variability in marine low cloud over the eastern subtropical oceans is examined using two months of daytime retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the NASA Terra ...

Robert Wood; Dennis L. Hartmann

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Clouds, Radiation, and the Diurnal Cycle of Sea Surface Temperature in the Tropical Western Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship among clouds, surface radiation flux, and the sea surface temperature (SST) of the tropical western Pacific Ocean over the diurnal cycle is addressed in the context of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program ...

Peter J. Webster; Carol Anne Clayson; Judith A. Curry

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

CO2 Retrieval over Clouds from the OCO Mission: Model Simulations and Error Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectral characteristics of the future Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) sensor, which will be launched in January 2009, were used to infer the carbon dioxide column-averaged mixing ratio over liquid water clouds over ocean by means of radiative ...

Jérôme Vidot; Ralf Bennartz; Christopher W. O’Dell; René Preusker; Rasmus Lindstrot; Andrew K. Heidinger

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Measurements with an Automatically Recording Inverted Echo Sounder; ARIES and the Bubble Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report here analysis of the first observations with a new instrument, ARIES, designed to record the acoustic backscatter from bubble clouds at several levels below the surface of the ocean. The instrument is deployed on a subsurface mooring ...

S. A. Thorpe

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Absorption of Solar Radiation by Stratocumulus Clouds: Aircraft Measurements and Theoretical Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft observations of shortwave radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds were carried out over the western North Pacific Ocean during January 1991. Two aircraft were equipped with a pair of pyranometers and near-infrared pyranometers. ...

Tadahiro Hayasaka; Nobuyuki Kikuchi; Masayuki Tanaka

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Posters Ship-Based Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Ship-Based Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment A. B. White Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado at Boulder National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado C. W. Fairall National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Research Laboratories Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX), conducted in June 1992, was designed with the broad goal of improving the dynamical, radiative, and microphysical models of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds. This goal was pursued by combining measurements from a number of different platforms including aircraft,

324

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1. Overview of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Background. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) 1002 Area of the Alaska North Slope represents an area ...

325

Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune's deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be ~ 0.8 g/cm^3. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager flyby. As Neptune cools, the probability of a liquid ocean increases. Extrasolar "hot Neptunes," which presumably migrate inward toward their parent stars, cannot harbor liquid water oceans unless they have lost almost all of the hydrogen and helium from their deep interiors.

Sloane J. Wiktorowicz; Andrew P. Ingersoll

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

326

The ecology of Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) and interactions with seabirds, seals, and whales in the Canadian Arctic.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the foraging of Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) and its predators during the summer in the Canadian Arctic. Findings included the identification of… (more)

Matley, Jordan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluation of the MODIS Aerosol Retrievals over Ocean and Land during CLAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chesapeake Lighthouse Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) experiment took place from 10 July to 2 August 2001 in a combined ocean–land region that included the Chesapeake Lighthouse [Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (...

R. C. Levy; L. A. Remer; J. V. Martins; Y. J. Kaufman; A. Plana-Fattori; J. Redemann; B. Wenny

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Estimating Meridional Energy Transports by the Atmospheric and Oceanic General Circulations Using Boundary Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual-mean meridional energy transport in the atmosphere–ocean system (total transport) is estimated using 4-yr mean net radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) calculated from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology ...

Y-C. Zhang; W. B. Rossow

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Intercalibrated Passive Microwave Rain Products from the Unified Microwave Ocean Retrieval Algorithm (UMORA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Unified Microwave Ocean Retrieval Algorithm (UMORA) simultaneously retrieves sea surface temperature, surface wind speed, columnar water vapor, columnar cloud water, and surface rain rate from a variety of passive microwave radiometers ...

K. A. Hilburn; F. J. Wentz

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Origins of the solar radiation biases over the Southern Ocean in CFMIP2 models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current climate models generally reflect too little solar radiation over the Southern Ocean, which may be the leading cause of the prevalent sea-surface temperature biases in climate models. We study the role of clouds the radiation biases in ...

A. Bodas-Salcedo; K. D. Williams; M. A. Ringer; I. Beau; J. N. S. Cole; J.-L. Dufresne; T. Koshiro; B. Stevens; Z. Wang; T. Yokohata

331

Characteristics of Landfalling Atmospheric Rivers Inferred from Satellite Observations over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Narrow elongated regions of moisture transport known as atmospheric rivers (ARs), which affect the West Coast of North America, were simultaneously observed over the eastern North Pacific Ocean by the polar orbiting CloudSat and Aqua satellites. ...

Sergey Y. Matrosov

332

Airborne Measurements of Surface, Layer Turbulence over the Ocean during Cold Air Outbreaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements of atmospheric turbulence spectra and cospectra made at the 50 m level above the western Atlantic Ocean during cold air outbreaks have been studied. The data cover nearshore areas of cloud streets or roll vortices. In the ...

Shu-Hsien Chou; Eueng-Nan Yeh

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Structural Characteristics of Deep Convective Systems over Tropical Africa and the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural properties of convective cloud clusters of tropical Africa and the Atlantic Ocean are studied using six summers of Meteosat satellite data in the atmospheric infrared window. A cluster at a given brightness temperature threshold is ...

L. A. Toledo Machado; M. Desbois; J-Ph Duvel

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Ocean Map | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Map Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Map Gallery Planning for ocean, coastal, and Great...

335

turner_poster.arctic_bbhrp.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into different classes: "single-layer" and "double-layer" clouds of liquid-only, mixed-phase, and ice-only clouds. * A cloud layer is a vertically continuous region of the...

336

Observations of Cloud, Radiation, and Surface Forcing in the Equatorial Eastern Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors report on a study of cloud and surface flux processes in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean based on a series of ship-based cloud and flux measurements made during fall (1999–2002) and spring (2000–02) maintenance ...

C. W. Fairall; Taneil Uttal; Duane Hazen; Jeffrey Hare; Meghan F. Cronin; Nicholas Bond; Dana E. Veron

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Changes in dimethyl sulfide oceanic distribution due to climate change  

SciTech Connect

Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here we report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. We find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associated with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

Elliott, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Erickson III, David J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

339

Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

Dana E. Veron

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

340

Mixed-Phase Cloud Retrievals Using Doppler Radar Spectra  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed-Phase Cloud Retrievals Using Mixed-Phase Cloud Retrievals Using Doppler Radar Spectra M. D. Shupe, S. Y. Matrosov, and T. L. Schneider National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado P. Kollias Rosentiel School of Marine Atmospheric Sciences University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction The radar Doppler spectrum contains a wealth of information on cloud microphysical properties. Typically, radar-based cloud retrievals use only the zeroth or first moments of the Doppler spectrum - reflectivity and mean Doppler velocity - to derive quantities such as cloud water content and particle characteristic size (e.g., Liou and Sassen 1994; Matrosov et al. 2002). When using only the moments of the Doppler spectrum, important spectral information can be lost, particularly when the spectrum is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Ventilated Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adiabatic theories of ocean circulation and density structure have a long tradition, from the concept of the ventilated thermocline to the notion that deep ocean ventilation is controlled by westerly winds over the Southern Ocean. This study ...

Patrick Haertel; Alexey Fedorov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

On Scatterometer Ocean Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scatterometers estimate the relative atmosphere–ocean motion at spatially high resolution and provide accurate inertial-scale ocean wind forcing information, which is crucial for many ocean, atmosphere, and climate applications. An empirical ...

M. Portabella; A. Stoffelen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Global Circuit Model with Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) database have been introduced into the global circuit model developed by Tinsley and Zhou. Using the cloud-top pressure data and cloud type information, the authors ...

Limin Zhou; Brian A. Tinsley

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Arctic Inversion Strength in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work indicates that climate models have a positive bias in the strength of the wintertime low-level temperature inversion over the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere. It has been argued this bias leads to underestimates of the Arctic’s ...

Brian Medeiros; Clara Deser; Robert A. Tomas; Jennifer E. Kay

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

A 20-year data set of surface longwave fluxes in the Arctic  

SciTech Connect

Creation of 20-year data set of surface infrared fluxes from satellite measurements. A reliable estimate of the surface downwelling longwave radiation flux (DLF) is a glaring void in available forcing data sets for models of Arctic sea ice and ocean circulation. We have developed a new method to estimate the DLF from a combination of satellite sounder retrievals and brightness temperatures from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS), which has flown on NOAA polar-orbiting satellites continuously since late 1979. The overarching goal of this project was to generate a 20-year data set of surface downwelling longwave flux measurements from TOVS data over the Arctic Ocean. Daily gridded fields of DLF were produced with a spatial resolution of (100 km){sup 2} north of 60{sup o}N for 22.5 years rather than only 20. Surface measurements from the field station at Barrow, AK--part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program --and from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) were used to validate the satellite-derived fluxes and develop algorithm improvements for conditions that had resulted in systematic errors in early versions of the algorithm. The resulting data set has already been sent to two other investigators for incorporation into their research, and we will soon complete preparations to send the products to the National Snow and Ice Data Center and ARM data archive, where it can be disseminated to the scientific community.

Jennifer Francis

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop II. Purpose: On May 20, 2010, NIST hosted the first Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop. ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

ISCCP Cloud Algorithm Intercomparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) will provide a uniform global climatology of satellite-measured radiances and derive an experimental climatology of cloud radiative properties from these radiances. A pilot study to ...

W. B. Rossow; F. Mosher; E. Kinsella; A. Arking; M. Desbois; E. Harrison; P. Minnis; E. Ruprecht; G. Seze; C. Simmer; E. Smith

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Automated cloud resource orchestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Realizing Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud requires a control platform for orchestrating the provisioning, configuration, management and decommissioning of a distributed set of diverse cloud resources (i.e., compute, storage, network) serving ...

Changbin Liu / Boon Thau Loo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

ARM - Measurement - Cloud type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

type ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud type Cloud type such as...

350

Entrainment in Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Entrainment of dry air into cumulus clouds influences the development of the clouds in a major way. The many aspects of the entrainment process are examined in this paper by critically reviewing the literature from the time when investigations ...

Alan M. Blyth

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Clouds in Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clouds within the inner regions of tropical cyclones are unlike those anywhere else in the atmosphere. Convective clouds contributing to cyclogenesis have rotational and deep intense updrafts but tend to have relatively weak downdrafts. Within ...

Robert A. Houze Jr.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

North Australian Cloud Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A satellite classification and climatology of propagating mesoscale cloud fines in northern Australia is presented. These cloud fines range from long, narrow lines of shallow convection to extensive deep convective squall lines with mesoscale ...

W. Drosdowsky; G. J. Holland

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Clouds in Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clouds within the inner regions of tropical cyclones are unlike those anywhere else in the atmosphere. Convective clouds contributing to cyclogenesis have rotational and deep intense updrafts but tend to have relatively weak downdrafts. Within the ...

Robert A. Houze Jr.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

355

Ocean | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Ocean Thermal Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOcean&oldid273467"...

356

Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part I: Cloud Radiative Kernels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study proposes a novel technique for computing cloud feedbacks using histograms of cloud fraction as a joint function of cloud-top pressure (CTP) and optical depth (?). These histograms were generated by the International Satellite Cloud ...

Mark D. Zelinka; Stephen A. Klein; Dennis L. Hartmann

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Cloud Computing at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Computing Energy Efficient Computing Exascale Computing Performance & Monitoring Tools Petascale Initiative Science Gateway Development Storage and IO Technologies Testbeds...

358

Nearest Neighbor Spacing of Fair Weather Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Histograms of nearest neighbor spacings of fair weather cumulus at 15 locations Over the world's oceans are presented based on the analysis of high resolution LANDSAT 3 Multispectral Scanner images for amounts of cloud cover ranging from 0.6% to ...

Joachim H. Joseph; Robert F. Cahalan

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Rope Cloud over Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite imagery is used to document several rope clouds over the southeastern Unites States. Surface and upper-air data are examined for one of the rope clouds and possible reasons for the development and maintenance of this type cloud line are ...

Von S. Woods

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

User Centric Community Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the evolution in cloud technologies, users are becoming acquainted with seamless service provision. Nevertheless, clouds are not a user centric technology, and users become completely dependent on service providers. We propose a novel concept for ... Keywords: Cloud infrastructure, Identity management, User-centric systems

João Paulo Barraca; Alfredo Matos; Rui L. Aguiar

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Turbulent molecular clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stars form within molecular clouds but our understanding of this fundamental process remains hampered by the complexity of the physics that drives their evolution. We review our observational and theoretical knowledge of molecular clouds trying to confront the two approaches wherever possible. After a broad presentation of the cold interstellar medium and molecular clouds, we emphasize the dynamical processes with special focus to turbulence and its impact on cloud evolution. We then review our knowledge of the velocity, density and magnetic fields. We end by openings towards new chemistry models and the links between molecular cloud structure and star--formation rates.

Hennebelle, Patrick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Evaluation of a New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with CAM3 Single-Column Model and M-PACE Observations  

SciTech Connect

Most global climate models generally prescribe the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets and ice crystals in mixed-phase clouds according to a temperature-dependent function, which affects modeled cloud phase, cloud lifetime and radiative properties. This study evaluates a new mixed-phase cloud microphysics parameterization (for ice nucleation and water vapor deposition) against the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) observations using the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3) single column model (SCAM). It is shown that SCAM with the new scheme produces a more realistic simulation of the cloud phase structure and the partitioning of condensed waterinto liquid droplets against observations during the M-PACE than the standard CAM. Sensitivity test indicates that ice number concentration could play an important role in the simulated mixed-phase cloud microphysics, and thereby needs to be realistically represented in global climate models.

Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Ghan, Steven J.

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Title Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors de Boer, Gijs, William D. Collins, Surabi Menon, and Charles N. Long Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 11 Start Page 11937 Pagination 11937-11949 Abstract Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice) water paths are found to range between 11.0-366.4 (0.5-114.1) gm-2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286-2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm-2.

364

Evaluating Low-Cloud Simulation from an Upgraded Multiscale Modeling Framework Model. Part II: Seasonal Variations over the Eastern Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eastern Pacific is a climatologically important region. Conventional coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation models produce positive sea surface temperature biases of 2–5 K in this region because of insufficient stratocumulus clouds. In ...

Kuan-Man Xu; Anning Cheng

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Cloud displays for mobile users in a display cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The display cloud model allows users to select local and remote programmable displays, and add them to a user specific cloud display where the user can arrange them freely. On a cloud display, the abstraction representing remote graphical content is ... Keywords: cloud displays, display clouds, ubiquitous displays

Lars Tiede; John Markus Bjørndalen; Otto J. Anshus

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties Working Group Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update Low Clouds Update Jennifer Comstock Jennifer Comstock Dave Turner Dave Turner Andy Andy Vogelmann Vogelmann Instruments Instruments 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer Deployed during COPS AMF Deployed during COPS AMF Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Crewell Crewell & & L L ö ö hnert hnert ) ) See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening 183 GHz (GVR) deployed at the NSA 183 GHz (GVR) deployed at the NSA Neural network algorithm to retrieve PWV & LWP (Maria Neural network algorithm to retrieve PWV & LWP (Maria Cadeddu Cadeddu ) ) Potential VAP candidate (RPWG) Potential VAP candidate (RPWG)

367

Impact of Explicit Atmosphere–Ocean Coupling on MJO-Like Coherent Structures in Idealized Aquaplanet Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the impact of the atmosphere–ocean coupling on the large-scale organization of tropical convection simulated by an idealized global model applying the Cloud-Resolving Convection Parameterization (CRCP; superparameterization). ...

Wojciech W. Grabowski

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Diurnal Variation of Atlantic Ocean Tropical Cyclone aoud DistributionInferred from Geostationary Satellite Infrared Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-measured equivalent blackbody temperatures of Atlantic Ocean tropical cyclones are used to describe the associated convection and cloud patterns. Average equivalent blackbody temperatures were developed from 538 geostationary satellite ...

Joseph Steranka; Edward B. Rodgers; R. Cecil Gentry

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Aerosol Optical Depth over Oceans: High Space- and Time-Resolution Retrieval and Error Budget from Satellite Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to retrieve aerosol vertical optical depth at 0.64 ?m from satellite observations of cloud-free scenes over oceans with high spatial resolution (1°) and instantaneous temporal resolution is described and evaluated. The observed radiance ...

Richard Wagener; Seth Nemesure; Stephen E. Schwartz

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Retrieval of Surface Wind Speed and Aerosol Optical Depth over the Oceans from AVHRR Images of Sun Glint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the feasibility of recovering both the tropospheric aerosol loading and the surface wind speed from satellite measurements of the radiance within cloud free regions of sun glint over the ocean surface. The method relies on ...

D. M. O'Brien; R. M. Mitchell

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.  

SciTech Connect

The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Storm Studies in the Arctic (STAR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Storm Studies in the Arctic (STAR) network (2007–2010) conducted a major meteorological field project from 10 October–30 November 2007 and in February 2008, focused on southern Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada—a region that experiences intense ...

John Hanesiak; Ronald Stewart; David Barber; George Liu; Justin Gilligan; Danielle Desjardins; Robyn Dyck; Shannon Fargey; Klaus Hochheim; Rebekah Martin; Peter Taylor; Sumita Biswas; Mark Gordon; Marna Albarran Melzer; Kent Moore; Robert Field; Carling Hay; Shunli Zhang; Gordon McBean; Walter Strapp; David Hudak; John Scott; Mengistu Wolde; Ron Goodson; Edward Hudson; Gabrielle Gascon; Heather Greene; William Henson; Alex Laplante

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Climatological Data For Clouds Over the Globe From Surface Observations,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Clouds Over the Globe From Surface Observations, For Clouds Over the Globe From Surface Observations, 1982-1991: The Total Cloud Edition (1994) (NDP-026a) data Data Investigators C. J. Hahn, S. G. Warren, and J. London Routine, synoptic surface weather reports from ships and land stations over the entire globe, for the10-year period December 1981 through November 1991, were processed for total cloud cover and the frequencies of occurrence of clear sky, sky-obscured due to precipitation, and sky-obscured due to fog. Archived data, consisting of various annual, seasonal and monthly averages, are provided in grid boxes that are typically 2.5° × 2.5° for land and 5° × 5° for ocean. Day and nighttime averages are also given separately for each season. Several derived quantities, such as interannual variations and annual and diurnal

374

About Ocean Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Ocean Community Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean About Ocean Community This...

375

BNL | Cloud Lifecycle Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure An important component of any long-term atmospheric measurement program is the quality control and maintenance of the datastreams from instrument systems. Further, the raw measurements from atmospheric remote sensing instrumentation are not directly useable by the majority of the scientific community. These raw measurements must be interpreted and converted to geophysical quantities that can be more readily used by a greater number of scientists to address important questions regarding the Earth's climate system. The cloud life cycle infrastructure group at BNL is led by Dr. Michael Jensen and is responsible for the development and production of cloud-related value-added products (VAPs). The cloud life cycle infrastructure group also provides mentorships for the millimeter cloud

376

Ocean Technical | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Technical Community of Practice Through a variety of...

377

Objective Determination of Cloud Heights and Radar Reflectivities Using a Combination of Active Remote Sensors at the ARM CART Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is deploying sensitive, millimeter-wave cloud radars at its Cloud and Radiation Test Bed (CART) sites in Oklahoma, Alaska, and the tropical western Pacific Ocean. The ...

Eugene E. Clothiaux; Thomas P. Ackerman; Gerald G. Mace; Kenneth P. Moran; Roger T. Marchand; Mark A. Miller; Brooks E. Martner

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Posters Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties Measured  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties Measured by Combined Lidar, Radar, and Infrared Radiometer W. L. Eberhard and J. M. Intrieri National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. P. Chan and G. Feingold Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences Boulder, Colorado also an order of magnitude smaller. These features make simple approximations in scattering calculations adequate for some applications, e.g., Eberhard (1993a). They also provide some unique capabilities, especially the technique described below for measuring drop sizes. One of the four IDP tasks is to characterize cloud signatures obtained by CO 2 lidar. For instance, our earlier work discovered that depolarization from ice particles was almost

379

BNL | Cloud Lifecycle Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to be one of the major sources of uncertainty in numerical simulations of climate and weather. Improvement of the representation of clouds in numerical models requires fundamental...

380

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction Most studies of the effect of aerosols on cloud radiative properties have considered only changes in the cloud droplet...

382

Cloud Classification Before Luke Howard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief outline of the history of cloud painting prior to the first cloud classification schemes of Luke Howard and Lamarck is presented. It is shown that European painters had accurately represented most of the different cloud forms between ...

Stanely David Gedzelman

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Radar Reflectivity of Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between the radar reflectivity factor Z and significant physical cloud parameters are studied from a dataset collected with an instrumented aircraft in non- or very weakly precipitating warm clouds. The cloud droplet populations ...

Henri Sauvageot; Jilani Omar

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Ocean shell noises  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean shell noises Name: Rick A Cazzato Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do you here noises when you put a ocean shell to your ear? Does this happen because of...

385

Ocean Energy Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even...

386

Mixing by ocean eddies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mesoscale eddies mix and transport tracers such as heat and potential vorticity laterally in the ocean. While this transport plays an important role in the climate system, especially in the Southern Ocean, we lack a, ...

Abernathey, Ryan (Ryan Patrick)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

ORNL DAAC, Arctic Tundra Flux Data, February 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atmospheric fluxes in the Arctic tundra are now available on-line. The newly released data set "Arctic Tundra Flux Study in the Kuparuk River Basin (Alaska), 1994-1996" contains...

388

Is A Sleeping Climate Giant Stirring in the Arctic?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is A Sleeping Climate Giant Stirring in the Arctic? Print E-mail Is a sleeping climate giant stirring in the arctic? Wednesday, June 12, 2013 Featured by NASA a member of the U.S....

389

Arctic Climate Change as Manifest in Cyclone Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic region has exhibited dramatic changes in recent times. Many of these are intimately tied up with synoptic activity, but little research has been undertaken on how the characteristics of Arctic cyclones have changed. This paper presents ...

Ian Simmonds; Craig Burke; Kevin Keay

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Comments on “Current GCMs' Unrealistic Negative Feedback in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In contrast to prior studies showing a positive lapse-rate feedback associated with the Arctic inversion, Boé et al. reported that strong present-day Arctic temperature inversions are associated with stronger negative longwave feedbacks and thus ...

Felix Pithan; Thorsten Mauritsen

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Comments on “Current GCMs’ Unrealistic Negative Feedback in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contrasting our expectation of a positive lapse-rate feedback associated with the Arctic inversion, Boé et al. (2009) report that strong present-day Arctic temperature inversions are associated with stronger negative longwave feedbacks and thus ...

Felix Pithan; Thorsten Mauritsen

392

Tuktoyaktuk : responsive strategies for a new Arctic urbanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Canadian Arctic is facing a set of compounding crises that will drastically impact the future of its coastal frontier. At a time when climate change is having a detrimental impact on the Arctic landscape, Northern ...

Ritchot, Pamela (Pamela Rae)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Western Arctic Linkage Experiment (WALE): Overview and Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Western Arctic Linkage Experiment (WALE) was to better understand uncertainties of simulated hydrologic and ecosystem dynamics of the western Arctic in the context of 1) uncertainties in the data available to drive the ...

A. D. McGuire; J. E. Walsh; J. S. Kimball; J. S. Clein; S. E. Euskirchen; S. Drobot; U. C. Herzfeld; J. Maslanik; R. B. Lammers; M. A. Rawlins; C. J. Vorosmarty; T. S. Rupp; W. Wu; M. Calef

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Cloud Feedbacks on Climate: A Challenging Scientific Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One reason it has been difficult to develop suitable social and economic policies to address global climate change is that projected global warming during the coming century has a large uncertainty range. The primary physical cause of this large uncertainty range is lack of understanding of the magnitude and even sign of cloud feedbacks on the climate system. If Earth's cloudiness responded to global warming by reflecting more solar radiation back to space or allowing more terrestrial radiation to be emitted to space, this would mitigate the warming produced by increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Contrastingly, a cloud response that reduced solar reflection or terrestrial emission would exacerbate anthropogenic greenhouse warming. It is likely that a mixture of responses will occur depending on cloud type and meteorological regime, and at present, we do not know what the net effect will be. This presentation will explain why cloud feedbacks have been a challenging scientific problem from the perspective of theory, modeling, and observations. Recent research results on observed multidecadal cloud-atmosphere-ocean variability over the Pacific Ocean will also be shown, along with suggestions for future research.

Norris, Joel (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego)

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

395

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV. ... NIST announces the Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV to be held on November 2, 3 and 4, 2011. ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

397

Cirrus Cloud Properties from a Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Compared to Cloud Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud radar data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains site were used to evaluate the properties of cirrus clouds that occurred in a cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation of the 29-day summer ...

Yali Luo; Steven K. Krueger; Gerald G. Mace; Kuan-Man Xu

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Infrared Cloud Imager Deployment at the North Slope of Alaska During Early 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Cloud Imager Deployment Infrared Cloud Imager Deployment at the North Slope of Alaska During Early 2002 J. A. Shaw and B. Thurairajah Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University Bozeman, Montana E. Edqvist National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. Mizutani Communications Research Laboratory Koganei, Tokyo, Japan Introduction Starting in February 2002, we deployed a new cloud-radiation sensor called the infrared cloud imager (ICI) at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site near Barrow, Alaska (71.32 N, 156.62 W). ICI records radiometrically calibrated images of the thermal infrared sky radiance in the 8µm to 14 µm wavelength band, from which spatial cloud statistics and spatially resolved cloud radiance can be determined.

399

CONTRIBUTED Green Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

widely dis- cussed, the shift in energy usage in a cloud computing model has received little attention cloud computing services typically operate. We consider energy consumption models of the transport of energy per bit also allows the results to be easily scaled to any usage level. We consider both public

Tucker, Rod

400

Cryptographic cloud storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of building a secure cloud storage service on top of a public cloud infrastructure where the service provider is not completely trusted by the customer. We describe, at a high level, several architectures that combine recent and ...

Seny Kamara; Kristin Lauter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ARM - Measurement - Cloud extinction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

extinction extinction ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud extinction The removal of radiant energy from an incident beam by the process of cloud absorption and/or scattering. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer Field Campaign Instruments CEP : Cloud Extinction Probe CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters

402

Simulating Future Changes in Arctic and Subarctic Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic is a sensitive system undergoing dramatic changes related to recent warming trends. Vegetation dynamics—increases in the quantity of green vegetation and a northward migration of trees into the arctic tundra—are a component of ... Keywords: Arctic, biogeography, boreal forest, climate change, forest migration, shrub encroachment, subarctic, tundra, vegetation dynamics models

Howard E. Epstein; Jed O. Kaplan; Heike Lischke; Qin Yu

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Model analysis of the anthropogenic aerosol effect on clouds over East Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecast model coupled with Chemistry) was used to conduct a pair of simulations with present-day (PD) and preindustrial (PI) emissions over East Asia to examine the aerosol indirect effect on clouds. As a result of an increase in aerosols in January, the cloud droplet number increased by 650 cm{sup -3} over the ocean and East China, 400 cm{sup -3} over Central and Southwest China, and less than 200 cm{sup -3} over North China. The cloud liquid water path (LWP) increased by 40-60 g m{sup -2} over the ocean and Southeast China and 30 g m{sup -2} over Central China; the LWP increased less than 5 g m{sup -2} or decreased by 5 g m{sup -2} over North China. The effective radius (Re) decreased by more than 4 {mu}m over Southwest, Central, and Southeast China and 2 {mu}m over North China. In July, variations in cloud properties were more uniform; the cloud droplet number increased by approximately 250-400 cm{sup -3}, the LWP increased by approximately 30-50 g m{sup -2}, and Re decreased by approximately 3 {mu}m over most regions of China. In response to cloud property changes from PI to PD, shortwave (SW) cloud radiative forcing strengthened by 30 W m{sup -2} over the ocean and 10 W m{sup -2} over Southeast China, and it weakened slightly by approximately 2-10 W m{sup -2} over Central and Southwest China in January. In July, SW cloud radiative forcing strengthened by 15 W m{sup -2} over Southeast and North China and weakened by 10 W m{sup -2} over Central China. The different responses of SW cloud radiative forcing in different regions was related to cloud feedbacks and natural variability.

Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

404

Ocean | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Ocean Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean Welcome to our COMMUNITY This is the National Ocean Council's portal for data, information, and decision tools to support people engaged in regional marine planning for the future use of the ocean, our coasts, and the Great Lakes. Our goal is to enhance discovery of and access to data and information for planners, stakeholders, and the public. Please visit our Feedback page to tell us what would make the site most useful to you as we expand our content. Start Here! Previous Pause Next PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager View More West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework View More Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal

405

COLORS OF A SECOND EARTH. II. EFFECTS OF CLOUDS ON PHOTOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF EARTH-LIKE EXOPLANETS  

SciTech Connect

As a test bed for future investigations of directly imaged terrestrial exoplanets, we present the recovery of the surface components of the Earth from multi-band diurnal light curves obtained with the EPOXI spacecraft. We find that the presence and longitudinal distribution of ocean, soil, and vegetation are reasonably well reproduced by fitting the observed color variations with a simplified model composed of a priori known albedo spectra of ocean, soil, vegetation, snow, and clouds. The effect of atmosphere, including clouds, on light scattered from surface components is modeled using a radiative transfer code. The required noise levels for future observations of exoplanets are also determined. Our model-dependent approach allows us to infer the presence of major elements of the planet (in the case of the Earth, clouds, and ocean) with observations having signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) {approx}> 10 in most cases and with high confidence if S/N {approx}> 20. In addition, S/N {approx}> 100 enables us to detect the presence of components other than ocean and clouds in a fairly model-independent way. Degradation of our inversion procedure produced by cloud cover is also quantified. While cloud cover significantly dilutes the magnitude of color variations compared with the cloudless case, the pattern of color changes remains. Therefore, the possibility of investigating surface features through light-curve fitting remains even for exoplanets with cloud cover similar to Earth's.

Fujii, Yuka; Suto, Yasushi; Turner, Edwin L. [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kawahara, Hajime [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Fukuda, Satoru; Nakajima, Teruyuki [Center of Climate System Research, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8568 (Japan); Livengood, Timothy A., E-mail: yuka.fujii@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

406

Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud Resolving and a Global Climate Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Comparison of the Vertical Velocity used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud-Resolving and a Global Climate Model H. Guo, J. E. Penner, M. Herzog, and X. Liu Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Introduction Anthropogenic aerosols are effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The availability of CCN affects the initial cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and droplet size; therefore, cloud optical properties (the so-called first aerosol indirect effect). However, the estimate of CDNC from a mechanistic treatment shows significant differences from the empirical schemes mainly due to the large bias of the large-scale vertical velocity (w) (Ghan et al. 1993, 1995; Boucher and Lohmann 1995;

407

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Cycle of Arctic Cloud Microphysics Annual Cycle of Arctic Cloud Microphysics M. D. Shupe Science and Technology Corporation National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado T. Uttal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado S. Y. Matrosov Cooperative Institute for Research National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction Clouds are important in determining the radiative balance of the earth's atmosphere, particularly in the Arctic where there are low temperatures, low atmospheric moisture, and highly reflective ice/snow- covered surfaces. Several studies have demonstrated the importance of specific cloud microphysical

408

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiative Heating Rate Forcing Using Profiles of Radiative Heating Rate Forcing Using Profiles of Retrieved Arctic Cloud Microphysics M. D. Shupe Science and Technology Corporation National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado P. Zuidema National Research Council National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado T. Uttal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction Clouds and their radiative impacts are of primary importance to the Arctic climate and, therefore, global climate. Clouds dominate the radiation balance within the cold, dry Arctic atmosphere, and cloud- radiation feedbacks are closely linked with the snow/ice-albedo feedback. Despite the importance of

409

Evaluation of A New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with the NCAR Climate Atmospheric Model (CAM3) and ARM Observations Fourth Quarter 2007 ARM Metric Report  

SciTech Connect

Mixed-phase clouds are composed of a mixture of cloud droplets and ice crystals. The cloud microphysics in mixed-phase clouds can significantly impact cloud optical depth, cloud radiative forcing, and cloud coverage. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models is crude and the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets and ice crystals is prescribed as temperature dependent functions. In our previous 2007 ARM metric reports a new mixed-phase cloud microphysics parameterization (for ice nucleation and water vapor deposition) was documented and implemented in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3). The new scheme was tested against the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) observations using the single column modeling and short-range weather forecast approaches. In this report this new parameterization is further tested with CAM3 in its climate simulations. It is shown that the predicted ice water content from CAM3 with the new parameterization is in better agreement with the ARM measurements at the Southern Great Plain (SGP) site for the mixed-phase clouds.

X Liu; SJ Ghan; S Xie; J Boyle; SA Klein

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Cloud Computing Forensic Science Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud Computing Forensic Science Workshop. Purpose: The New Frontiers in IT and Measurement Science Rapid advances ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

411

A marketplace for cloud resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud computing is an emerging paradigm aimed to offer users pay-per-use computing resources, while leaving the burden of managing the computing infrastructure to the cloud provider. We present a new programming and pricing model that gives the cloud ... Keywords: cloud computing, iaas, large-scale scheduling, pricing models, worst-case execution time

Thomas A. Henzinger; Anmol V. Singh; Vasu Singh; Thomas Wies; Damien Zufferey

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Comparison of Model-Predicted Transport and Diffusion of Seeding Material with NOAA Satellite-Observed Seeding Track in Supercooled Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From 0615 to 0749 UTC 14 March 2000, an operation of cloud seeding for precipitation enhancement by aircraft was carried out in the middle part of Shaanxi Province, China. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-14 satellite ...

Xing Yu; Jin Dai; Daniel Rosenfeld; Hengchi Lei; Xiaohong Xu; Peng Fan; Zhengqi Chen

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Scientific Basis and Initial Evaluation of the CLAVR-1 Global Clear/Cloud Classification Algorithm for the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm for the remote sensing of global cloud cover using multispectral radiance measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on board National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting ...

Larry L. Stowe; Paul A. Davis; E. Paul McClain

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface synoptic weather reports for the entire globe, gathered from various available data sets, were processed, edited, and rewritten to provide a single data set of individual observations of clouds, spanning the 44 years 1952-1995 for ship data and the 26 years 1971-1996 for land station data. In addition to the cloud portion of the synoptic report, each edited report also includes the associated pressure, present weather, wind, air temperature, and dew point (and sea surface temperature over oceans).

Hahn, C.J.; Warren, S.G.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

3. New Cloud Climatology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Cloud Climatology New Cloud Climatology Computed for the summers (May-Au- gust) 2000 through 2004 (Berg and Kassianov 2008). Uses ARSCL VAP, Total Sky Imager, and radar wind profiler. * * Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site Larry Berg, William Gustafson, and Evgueni Kassianov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1. Motivation Shallow clouds are poorly predicted by current global and regional scale models. A new parameterization has been devel- oped that links the boundary-layer turbu- lence and the shallow clouds. 2. The CuP Parameterization The Cumulus Potential (CuP) param- eterization uses Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of temperature and moisture to represent the subgrid scale

416

ISCCP Cloud Data Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operational data collection phase of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) began in July 1983. Since then, visible and infrared images from an international network of weather satellites have been routinely processed ...

William B. Rossow; Robert A. Schiffer

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Cloud Transmissivities for Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transmissivities are determined for different cloud types using nine years of hourly irradiance measurements under overcast skies at six Canadian stations. Values for individual stations and for pooled data using irradiances uncorrected for ...

J. A. Davies; M. Abdel-Wahab; J. E. Howard

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Marine Cloud Brightening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could - subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein - have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seedparticle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, H.; Connolly, P.; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Philip J.; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Robert

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

Development of Exhibit on Arctic Climate Change Called The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely Exhibition  

SciTech Connect

The exhibition, The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely, was developed at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) as a part of the museum’s Forces of Change exhibit series on global change. It opened to the public in Spring 2006, in conjunction with another Forces of Change exhibit on the Earth’s atmosphere called Change Is in the Air. The exhibit was a 2000 square-foot presentation that explored the forces and consequences of the changing Arctic as documented by scientists and native residents alike. Native peoples of the Arctic have always lived with year-to-year fluctuations in weather and ice conditions. In recent decades, they have witnessed that the climate has become unpredictable, the land and sea unfamiliar. An elder in Arctic Canada recently described the weather as uggianaqtuq —an Inuit word that can suggest strange, unexpected behavior, sometimes described as that of “a friend acting strangely.” Scientists too have been documenting dramatic changes in the Arctic. Air temperatures have warmed over most—though not all—of the Arctic since the 1950s; Arctic precipitation may have increased by as much as 8%; seasonal melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet has increased on average by 16% since 1979; polar-orbiting satellites have measured a 15¬–20% decline in sea ice extent since the 1970s; aircraft reconnaissance and ship observations show a steady decrease in sea ice since the 1950s. In response to this warming, plant distributions have begun to shift and animals are changing their migration routes. Some of these changes may have beneficial effects while others may bring hardship or have costly implications. And, many scientists consider arctic change to be a ‘bell-weather’ for large-scale changes in other regions of the world. The exhibition included text, photos artifacts, hands-on interactives and other exhibitry that illustrated the changes being documented by indigenous people and scientists alike.

Stauffer, Barbara W.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evolution of the Population of Precipitating Convective Systems over the Equatorial Indian Ocean in Active Phases of the Madden–Julian Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional radar reflectivity fields from a dual-wavelength Doppler polarimetric radar (S-PolKa) deployed in the equatorial Indian Ocean are used to evaluate the composition of the population of convective cloud elements during active ...

Manuel D. Zuluaga; Robert A. Houze Jr.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Evolution of the Population of Precipitating Convective Systems over the Equatorial Indian Ocean in Active Phases of the Madden-Julian Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional radar-reflectivity fields from a dual-wavelength Doppler polarimetric radar (S-PolKa) deployed in the equatorial Indian Ocean are used to evaluate the composition of the population of convective cloud elements during active ...

Manuel D. Zuluaga; Robert A. Houze; Jr.

423

FORMATION OF MASSIVE MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES BY CLOUD-CLOUD COLLISION  

SciTech Connect

Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

Inoue, Tsuyoshi [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Fukui, Yasuo, E-mail: inouety@phys.aoyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

oceans - Geodata icon | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oceans - Geodata icon Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean...

426

Oceanic Heat Flux Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors review the procedure for the direct calculation of oceanic heat flux from hydrographic measurements and set out the full “recipe” that is required.

Sheldon Bacon; Nick Fofonoff

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Resources Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource...

428

Snow Depth on Arctic Sea Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow depth and density were measured at Soviet drifting stations on multiyear Arctic sea ice. Measurements were made daily at fixed stakes at the weather station and once- or thrice-monthly at 10-m intervals on a line beginning about 500 m from ...

Stephen G. Warren; Ignatius G. Rigor; Norbert Untersteiner; Vladimir F. Radionov; Nikolay N. Bryazgin; Yevgeniy I. Aleksandrov; Roger Colony

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Arctic Sea Ice Albedo from AVHRR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal cycle of surface albedo of sea ice in the Arctic is estimated from measurements made with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the polar-orbiting satellites NOAA-10 and NOAA-11. The albedos of 145 200-km-square ...

R. W. Lindsay; D. A. Rothrock

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

NOAAINMFS Developments Arctic Marine Research Contracts Awarded  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on tunal porpoise, and the economic and biolog- August 1977 pacts of gas and oil exploration pre- dict the probable ecological impacts of oil and gas development on Alaska's outer continental mammals, and birds, and smaller organisms which oc- cupy the two Arctic coastal areas prior to oil and gas

431

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron, manganese and lead at Hawaii Ocean Time-series stationof beryllium to the oceans, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. , 114,organic carbon fluxes in the ocean based on the quantitative

Han, Qin; Moore, J. Keith; Zender, Charles; Measures, Chris; Hydes, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN Activity of Aerosols Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN Activity of Aerosols 2014.01.01 - 2014.12.31 Lead Scientist : Jian Wang Description Aerosol indirect effects, which represent the impact of aerosols on climate through influencing the properties of clouds, remain one of the main uncertainties in climate predictions (IPCC, 2007). Reducing this large uncertainty requires both improved understanding and representation of aerosol properties and processes in climate models, including the cloud

433

Ocean Health and Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2002. Indicators of ocean health and human health:Nature 423:280–283. Oceans and Human Health Act. 2003. S.Editorial Guest Editorial Ocean Health and Human Health

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Cirrus Clouds. Part I: A Cirrus Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional (x, z), time-dependent, numerical cloud model is developed for the purpose of investigating the role of various physical processes involved in the maintenance of cirriform clouds. In addition to accounting for dynamic and ...

David O'C. Starr; Stephen K. Cox

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

On the Use of Cloud Forcing to Estimate Cloud Feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainty in cloud feedback is the leading cause of discrepancy in model predictions of climate change. The use of observed or model-simulated radiative fluxes to diagnose the effect of clouds on climate sensitivity requires an accurate ...

Brian J. Soden; Anthony J. Broccoli; Richard S. Hemler

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Comparisons of CCN with Supercooled Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 140 supercooled clouds were compared with corresponding out-of-cloud cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements. In spite of significant differences in altitude, temperature, distances from cloud base, updraft velocity (W), ...

James G. Hudson; Stephen Noble; Vandana Jha

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Effects of CCN Concentrations on Stratus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons between cloud-base CCN concentrations and cloud droplet concentrations in stratus clouds over San Diego and 100 km out to sea showed a positive correlation. The supersaturation in these clouds, as derived from the matching of the CCN ...

James G. Hudson

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Ocean General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Energy Basics: Ocean Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

440

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ocean Thermal Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Ocean Thermal Incentives...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ETSI CLOUD - initial standardization requirements for cloud services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the technological basis for cloud services is relatively mature, the development of the market is still at an early stage. There is considerable potential, but also a number of widely held concerns which are inhibiting mainstream adoption of cloud ... Keywords: ETSI, cloud services, standardization

Karsten Oberle; Mike Fisher

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

More Observations of Small Funnel Clouds and Other Tubular Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this brief contribution, photographic documentation is provided of a variety of small, tubular-shaped clouds and of a small funnel cloud pendant from a convective cloud that appears to have been modified by flow over high-altitude mountains in ...

Howard B. Bluestein

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Observations of Cloud-Top Entrainment in Marine Stratocumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of entrainment events in marine stratocumulus are used to explain why cloud-top entrainment instability may not lead to the breakup of the clouds and to define the role of cloud-top ...

Qing Wang; Bruce A. Albrecht

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resources. 1. Finding Tropical Cyclones on a Cloud Computing2010 2. Finding Tropical Cyclones on Clouds, D. Hasenkamp

Coghlan, Susan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Internet ware cloud computing :Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After decades of engineering development and infrastructural investment, Internet connections have become commodity product in many countries, and Internet scale "cloud computing" has started to compete with traditional software business through its technological advantages and economy of scale. Cloud computing is a promising enabling technology of Internet ware Cloud Computing is termed as the next big thing in the modern corporate world. Apart from the present day software and technologies, cloud computing will have a growing impact on enterprise IT and business activities in many large organizations. This paper provides an insight to cloud computing, its impacts and discusses various issues that business organizations face while implementing cloud computing. Further, it recommends various strategies that organizations need to adopt while migrating to cloud computing. The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of cloud computing in the modern world and its impact on organizations and businesse...

Qamar, S; Singh, Mrityunjay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Mechanisms of Banner Cloud Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Banner clouds are clouds in the lee of steep mountains or sharp ridges. Their formation has previously been hypothesized as due to three different mechanisms: (i) vertical uplift in a lee vortex (which has a horizontal axis), (ii) adiabatic ...

Matthias Voigt; Volkmar Wirth

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Remote Sensing of Cloud Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Day and night mapping of the global distributions of the horizontal cloud covers and the corresponding cloud-top pressure levels are derived from the same set of infrared radiance data used to retrieve clear-column temperature profiles. General ...

Moustafa T. Chahine

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

A Computer for the Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer for the Clouds A Computer for the Clouds August 1, 2008 By PHILIP E. ROSS Columnist IEEE Spectrum: Inside Technology In May an IBM-built supercomputer called Roadrunner...

449

Supersaturation Intermittency in Turbulent Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is hypothesized that bursts of high supersaturation are produced in turbulent, convective clouds through interactions between cloud droplets and the small-scale structure of atmospheric turbulence. This hypothesis is based on the observation ...

Raymond A. Shaw

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Ash cloud aviation advisories  

SciTech Connect

During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S. [EG and G, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1992-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

451

NIST Cloud Computing Related Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Challenging Security Requirements for US Government Cloud Computing Adoption", December 2012 C. Dabrowski and K. Mills, "VM Leakage and ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Polyethylene Pipe Failure in the Arctic - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the current study, a new high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe in the Arctic region of ... Heat Tint Effects on General Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steels .

453

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic...

454

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS:...

455

profiles of optical Extinction Coefficients Calculated from Droplet Spectra Observed in Marine Stratus Cloud Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements of droplet spectra n(r) where r is droplet radius were made in stratus cloud layers over the ocean 130 km southwest of San Diego. Optical extinction coefficients ?e were calculated at selected wavelengths (?= 0.53, 3.75 and ...

V. Ray Noonkester

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Contract RBAC in cloud computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud computing is a fast growing field, which is arguably a new computing paradigm. In cloud computing, computing resources are provided as services over the Internet and users can access resources based on their payments. The issue of access control ... Keywords: Cloud computing, Contract, Contract RBAC, Datacenter, RBAC

Hsing-Chung (Jack) Chen, Marsha Anjanette Violetta, Cheng-Ying Yang

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Improving Utilization of Infrastructure Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key advantage of infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) clouds is providing users on-demand access to resources. To provide on-demand access, however, cloud providers must either significantly overprovision their infrastructure (and pay a high price for ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Infrastructure-as-a-Service, High Throughput Computing

Paul Marshall; Kate Keahey; Tim Freeman

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Parameterizing Vertically Coherent Cloud Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parameterization for specifying subgrid-scale cloud distributions in atmospheric models is developed. The fractional area of a grid-scale column in which clouds from two levels overlap (i.e., the cloud overlap probability) is described in terms ...

John W. Bergman; Philip J. Rasch

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Microbial metabolism in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon flux through the ocean’s twilight zone. Science 316:sinking particle flux in the ocean’s twilight zone. LimnolRespiration in the dark ocean. Geophys Res Lett 30:doi:

Hansman, Roberta Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Microbial Metabollism in the Deep Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon flux through the ocean’s twilight zone. Science 316:sinking particle flux in the ocean’s twilight zone. LimnolRespiration in the dark ocean. Geophys Res Lett 30:doi:

Hansman, Roberta L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Moore, Keith

462

SOME OCEAN MODEL FUNDAMENTALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of these lectures is to present elements of the equations and algorithms used in numerical models of the large-scale ocean circulation. Such models generally integrate the ocean’s primitive equations, which are based on Newton’s Laws applied to a continuum fluid under hydrostatic balance in a spherical geometry, along with linear irreversible thermodynamics and subgrid scale (SGS) parameterizations. During formulations of both the kinematics and dynamics, we highlight issues related to the use of a generalized vertical coordinate. The vertical coordinate is arguably the most critical element determining how a model is designed and applications to which a model is of use.

Stephen M. Griffies

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Ocean bottom seisometer  

SciTech Connect

An improved ocean bottom seismometer is described comprising: a spherical-shaped main housing having a seismic acquisition portion and a ballast portion below the acquisition portion. The ballast portion controls the ascent and descent of the ocean bottom seismometer; a conical skirt fixed to the main housing elevating the main housing above a horizontal plane coincident with a base of the skirt. The skirt is capable of confining fluid under the main housing when the base rests on an ocean bottom; spherical compartments mounted inside the skirt; and a lifting hook mounted on the outside of the main housing.

Neeley, W.P.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

464

EA-1193: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93: Final Environmental Assessment 93: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1193: Final Environmental Assessment Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultural resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site, DOE/EA-1193 (February 1997) More Documents & Publications

465

Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Spatial and Temporal Variability of Aerosol Particles in Arctic Spring  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to investigate the variability in the particle number concentration that may affect climate change assessment for Arctic regions. The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) was conducted in April 2008, in the vicinities of Fairbanks and Barrow, Alaska. Measurements of particle number concentrations and size distributions were conducted using a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-100X) mounted under the Convair-580 aircraft wing. Total number concentration of particles (Na) with diameters in the range 0.12-3 ?m was determined for polluted and clean air masses during times when the air was free of clouds and/or precipitation. Variability in Na was considered for both vertical profiles and constant altitude (horizontal) flight legs. This variability can have important implications for estimates of particle properties used in global climate model (GCM) simulations. When aerosol particle layers were encountered, Na rapidly increased from 25 cm-3 up to 550 cm-3 within relatively clean air masses, and reached up to 2200 cm-3 within polluted air masses, dominated by biomass burning pollution. When averaging Na over different distance scales, it was found that Na=140 cm-3 represent an average value for the majority of the encountered clean cases; while Na=720 cm-3 is a mean for polluted cases dominated by biomass burning plumes. These estimates, however, would not capture the details of particle layers encountered during most of the flights. Average aerosol particle characteristics can be difficult to interpret, especially during polluted cases, due to small-scale spatial and temporal variability.

Shantz, Nicole C.; Gultepe, Ismail; Liu, Peter; Earle, Michael; Zelenyuk, Alla

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

A Smooth Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a large-eddy “smooth” cloud (SC) model will be presented with smooth implying that the entire model converges under a Newton-based solution procedure or that time scales within the SC model are being resolved. Besides ensuring that ...

J. M. Reisner; C. A. Jeffery

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale Modeling Framework Global Climate Model with CloudSat Cloud Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last few years a new type of global climate model (GCM) has emerged in which a cloud-resolving model is embedded into each grid cell of a GCM. This new approach is frequently called a multiscale modeling framework (MMF) or superparameterization. In this article we present a comparison of MMF output with radar observations from the NASA CloudSat mission, which uses a near-nadir-pointing millimeter-wavelength radar to probe the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. We account for radar detection limits by simulating the 94 GHz radar reflectivity that CloudSat would observe from the high-resolution cloud-resolving model output produced by the MMF. Overall, the MMF does a good job of reproducing the broad pattern of tropical convergence zones, subtropical belts, and midlatitude storm tracks, as well as their changes in position with the annual solar cycle. Nonetheless, the comparison also reveals a number of model shortfalls including (1) excessive hydrometeor coverage at all altitudes over many convectively active regions, (2) a lack of low-level hydrometeors over all subtropical oceanic basins, (3) excessive low-level hydrometeor coverage (principally precipitating hydrometeors) in the midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres during the summer season (in each hemisphere), and (4) a thin band of low-level hydrometeors in the Southern Hemisphere of the central (and at times eastern and western) Pacific in the MMF, which is not observed by CloudSat. This band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels.

Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stephens, Graeme L.

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

469

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal Variability in Cloud Cover, Cloud Base Height, and Cloud Liquid Seasonal Variability in Cloud Cover, Cloud Base Height, and Cloud Liquid Water Content at the North Slope of Alaska and the Adjacent Arctic Ocean Storvold, R. (a), Stamnes, K. (b), Marty, C. (a), and Zak, B.D. (c), University of Alaska Fairbanks (a), Stevens Institute of Technology (b), Sandia National Laboratories (c) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting There is great seasonal variability in cloud cover, cloud base height, and cloud liquid water in the Arctic. This seasonal variability in cloud properties has been quantified based on a full year of data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Sites in Barrow and Atqasuk during 1999-2000. We compare these results with similar results obtained in the Arctic Ocean during the one-year SHEBA experiment. We also compare the

470

Cumulus Cloud Properties Derived Using Landsat Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) digital data are used to remotely sense cumulus cloud properties such as cloud fraction and cloud reflectance, along with the distribution of cloud number and cloud fraction as a function of cloud size. The ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; Ronald M. Welch

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Carbon in Atlantic Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Atlantic Ocean About CARINA NDP-091: CARINA Data Synthesis Project The CARINA Group CARINA Cruise Summary Table and Data CARINA Data Products CARINA Database V1.2 ODV Collection...

472

Nonlinear Midlatitude Ocean Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean adjustment on annual to interdecadal scales to variable forcing is considered for a more nonlinear general circulation than has previously been studied. The nature of the response is a strong function of forcing frequency and importantly ...

William K. Dewar

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Global Ocean Meridional Overturning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decade-mean global ocean circulation is estimated using inverse techniques, incorporating air–sea fluxes of heat and freshwater, recent hydrographic sections, and direct current measurements. This information is used to determine mass, heat, ...

Rick Lumpkin; Kevin Speer

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Tropical Ocean Circulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primitive equation model of the equatorial Pacific Ocean was forced by realistic wind stress distributions over decades. Results were presented for a set of two experiments. In the first experiment the model was forced by an objectively ...

Mojib Latif

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Modeling the Pacific Ocean  

SciTech Connect

Two numerical models utilizing primitive equations (two momentum equations and a mass continuity equation) simulate the oceanography of the Pacific Ocean from 20{degrees}S to 50{degrees}N. The authors examine the abundant model data through visualization , by animating the appropriate model fields and viewing the time history of each model simulation as a color movie. The animations are used to aid understanding of ocean circulation.

Johnson, M.A.; O' Brien, J.J. (Mesoscale Air-Sea Interaction Group, Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Many people in the Indian region still live in rural areas where domestic energy consumption largely large-scale subsidence and cloud free conditions. Unless international control measures are taken, air1 The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia J. Lelieveld1

Dickerson, Russell R.

477

The Wind Stress Patterns over the Indian Ocean During the Summer Monsoon of 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed analysis of the wind stress patterns over the Indian Ocean was made from 1 May to 31 July 1979. A combination of cloud motion and ship data obtained once per day was used to diagnose the surface-wind patterns to a degree of detail not ...

Donald P. Wylie; Barry B. Hinton

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Global Oceanic Precipitation from the MSU during 1979—91 and Comparisons to Other Climatologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oceanic precipitation is estimated on a 2.5° grid for the period 1979–1991 from Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) channels 1, 2, and 3 data gathered by seven separate TIROS-N satellites. Precipitation is diagnosed when cloud water and rainwater-...

Roy W. Spencer

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Arctic Sea Ice Decline: Observations, Projections, Mechanisms, and Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or phase space. In this work we con- sider the trajectory of sea ice in the ice thickness phase space. We175 Arctic Sea Ice Decline: Observations, Projections, Mechanisms, and Implications Geophysical Is the Trajectory of Arctic Sea Ice? Harry L. Stern and Ronald W. Lindsay Polar Science Center, Applied Physics

Lindsay, Ron

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic ocean cloud" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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481

Semantic-based web service discovery and chaining for building an Arctic spatial data infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing interests in a global environment and climate change have led to studies focused on the changes in the multinational Arctic region. To facilitate Arctic research, a spatial data infrastructure (SDI), where Arctic data, information, and services ... Keywords: Arctic, Crawler, Hydrology, Knowledge base, Ontology, SDI, Semantic, Service chain

W. Li; C. Yang; D. Nebert; R. Raskin; P. Houser; H. Wu; Z. Li

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Statistical cloud coverage as a function of cloud optical thickness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-averaged, daylight fractional statistical cloud coverages as a function of cloud optical thickness and selected values of cloud transmission were determined for various geographic areas using D1 data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). The regions of interest chosen for this report are: global earth, global sea, global land, global coast, and the six 30{degree}-latitude bands over sea, over land, and over coast with longitude 0{degree}--360{degree}. This statistical information is deduced from data determined from satellite measurements of terrestrial, atmospheric and cloud properties by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. In particular the results are based on the ISCCP D1 data base.

Brower, K.L.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Hupmobile cloud chamber parameters  

SciTech Connect

The accompanying table lists the presently selected parameters for the twelve cloud chambers. The chambers are numbered consecutively from 4 through 15 as they are lined up in the bunker. The lowest number is closest to the source. All except the first chamber have some thin metal filters to attenuate the flux and harden the spectrum. Cloud chambers 10, 12, and 14 are shielded by a collimator with about 200 pinholes in it. The flux in these chambers is attenuated by the ratio of the pinhole area to total beam area which is a factor of 50. Various gases and gas pressures are used to obtain suitable track lengths and interaction cross sections. Neon, argon, and krypton are used to obtain photo electrons. Hydrogen is used to obtain Compton electrons.

Hansen, N. E.

1967-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

484

Aircraft Observations of Convective Systems in the Indian Ocean [EVS Event]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aircraft Observations of Convective Systems in the Indian Ocean Aircraft Observations of Convective Systems in the Indian Ocean August 23, 2013 Speaker: Bradley Nicholas Guy National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory Date: Friday, August 23, 2013 Time: 11:00 a.m. Location: Argonne National Laboratory TCS Building 240 Room 4301 In the DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) field experiment, a large number of measurement platforms were deployed to study environmental and convective cloud system characteristics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) initiation region in the Indian Ocean. A mobile platform, the NOAA P-3 instrumented aircraft, sampled intense convective cloud systems, along with the surrounding environment. This presentation will explore the characteristics of mesoscale convective

485

An Automated Cirrus Cloud Detection Method for a Ground-Based Cloud Image  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud detection is a basic research for achieving cloud-cover state and other cloud characteristics. Because of the influence of sunlight, the brightness of sky background on the ground-based cloud image is usually nonuniform, which increases the ...

Jun Yang; Weitao Lu; Ying Ma; Wen Yao

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

A Cloud-Resolving Model with an Adaptive Vertical Grid for Boundary Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate cloud-resolving model simulations of cloud cover and cloud water content for boundary layer clouds are difficult to achieve without vertical grid spacing well below 100 m, especially for inversion-topped stratocumulus. The need for fine ...

Roger Marchand; Thomas Ackerman

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Preliminary definition of Barstow standard cloud model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The motion of cloud shadows across a collector field for a central receiver solar power plant can affect the design of such a facility. Cloud models were developed to be used for basis of design in technology areas. The first effect, that of the temperature gradient, is simulated by postulating the worst case cloud situation. The cyclic effects require realistic cloud shadow time histories for simulation. Cloud shadow models were developed to determine probable cloud type, the cloud area and shape, cloud velocity and cloud-to-cloud spacing. The probability of cloud occurrence is estimated. A collector field computer program is run to determine the effect of cloud variables on collector field power delivery capability. Recommendation of cloud models to be used for basis of design are then made.

None

1978-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

488

Marine low cloud sensitivity to an idealized climate change: The CGILS LES intercomparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low low cloud sensitivity to an idealized climate change: The CGILS LES intercomparison Peter N. Blossey, 1 Christopher S. Bretherton, 1 Minghua Zhang, 2 Anning Cheng, 3 Satoshi Endo, 4 Thijs Heus, 5 Yangang Liu, 4 Adrian P. Lock, 6 Stephan R. de Roode, 7 and Kuan-Man Xu 8 Received 31 July 2012; revised 4 February 2013; accepted 20 February 2013. [1] Subtropical marine low cloud sensitivity to an idealized climate change is com- pared in six large-eddy simulation (LES) models as part of CGILS. July cloud cover is simulated at three locations over the subtropical northeast Pacific Ocean, which are typified by cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs) under well-mixed stratocumulus, cool SSTs under decoupled stratocumulus, and shallow cumulus clouds overlying warmer SSTs. The idealized climate change includes a uniform 2 K SST increase with corre- sponding moist-adiabatic warming aloft and

489

CARINA (Carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean) Data from CDIAC  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The idea for CARINA developed at a workshop (CO2 in the northern North Atlantic) that was held at the HANSE-Wissenschaftskolleg (HANSE Institute for Advanced Study) in Delmenhorst, Germany from June 9 to 11, 1999. While the main scientific focus is the North Atlantic, some data from the South Atlantic have been included in the project, along with data from the Arctic Ocean. Data sets go back to 1972, and more than 100 are currently available. The data are also being used in conjunction with other projects and research groups, such as the Atlantic Ocean Carbon Synthesis Group. See the inventory of data at http://store.pangaea.de/Projects/CARBOOCEAN/carina/data_inventory.htm See a detailed table of information on the cruises at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/CARINA/Carina_table.html and also provides access to data files. The CARBOOCEAN data portal provides a specialized interface for CARINA data, a reference list for historic carbon data, and password protected access to the "Data Underway Warehouse.".

490

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-scale features in ocean winds. Science, 303, Chelton,of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO. Borealstress dependence on ocean surface velocity: implications

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-scale features in ocean winds. Science, 303, Chelton,of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO. Borealstress dependence on ocean surface velocity: implications

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Ocean - Community Practice Block | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Practice Block Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean...

493

Mesozooplankton trophic variability in a changing ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trends in contemporary ocean productivity. Nature 444: 752-Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change.biomass from satellite ocean colour. J. Mar. Syst. 78: 18-

Décima, Moira

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Ocean Map National | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Featured Maps The following maps are from data...

495

Ocean Feedback Form | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feedback Form Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Comments or Suggestions Name * Email Topic...

496

CloudCast: Cloud Computing for Short-Term Weather Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CloudCast provides clients with personalized short-term weather forecasts based on their current location using cloud services

Dilip Kumar Krishnappa; David Irwin; Eric Lyons; Michael Zink

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight from Landsat ETM+ G. Wen and L. Oreopoulos National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center University of Maryland Baltimore County Joint Center of Earth System Technology Greenbelt, Maryland R. F. Cahalan and S. C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Cumulus clouds attenuate solar radiation casting shows on the ground. Cumulus clouds can also enhance solar radiation in the clear region nearby. The enhancement of down-welling solar radiation has been observed at the ground level in the clear region near cumulus clouds (Mims and Frederick 1994). The additional diffuse radiation source from cumulus clouds makes the clear gaps appear to be

498

Size of Cloud from Shadow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Size of Cloud from Shadow Size of Cloud from Shadow Name: mike Status: other Grade: other Location: N/A Country: USA Date: Summer 2011 Question: I see a cloud and I see its shadow in a field - knowing high sun angles - is there a way of telling how far away the cloud is or how big? - I am thinking if the shadow is 30' wide and the sun is at 2:00 pm- ? Replies: Hi Mike, Try this, draw a small circle representing the Sun. Somewhere below this circle and maybe to the right, draw an oblong, make this oblong bigger than the circle. Now connect the leftmost edge of the circle with the leftmost edge of the oblong with a straight line. Do the same for the rightmost edges. The oblong now represent the shadow of a cloud on the ground, and the lines represent the rays of the sun passing along the edges of the cloud.

499

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

500

ARM - Measurement - Cloud droplet size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

droplet size droplet size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud droplet size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of a cloud particle Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor MIRAI : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments SPEC-CPI : Stratton Park Engineering Company - Cloud particle imager