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Sample records for arctic national wildlife

  1. Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Ted Stevens that the Energy Information Administration provide an assessment of federal oil and natural gas leasing in the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Alaska.

  2. Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact on future oil imports and expenditures of opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to petroleum development. High, low, and mean ANWR oil resource case projections were compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case. The study also examined whether potential synergies exist in opening ANWR to petroleum development and the construction of an Alaska gas pipeline from the North Slope to the lower 48 states.

  3. Potential Oil Production from Coastal Plain of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) received a letter (dated March 10, 2000) from Senator Frank H. Murkowski as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requesting an EIA Service Report with plausible scenarios for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey resource assessments. This service report is prepared in response to the request of Senator Murkowski. It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currently restricted from exploration and development, and updates EIA's 1987 ANWR assessment.

  4. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, DOE/EIA-0383(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999), Table A11. Energy Information Administration, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, SR/RNGD/87-01 (Washington, DC, September 1987). U.S. Department of Interior, Arctic National

  5. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS: Alaskan North Slope ANWR: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BBbls: billion barrels Bbls: barrels Daily Petroleum Production Rate: The amount of petroleum extracted per day from a well, group of wells, region, etc. (usually expressed in barrels per day) EIA: Energy Information

  6. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 1. Overview of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Background The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) 1002 Area of the Alaska North Slope represents an area of 1.5 million acres. The ANWR Coastal Plain Area includes the 1002 Area, State of Alaska lands to the 3-mile limit from the coast line, and approximately 92,000 acres of Native Inupiat lands.

  7. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska, Open File Report 98-34, 1999) provided basic information used in this study. A prior assessment was completed in 1987 by the USGS.

  8. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment, was prepared for the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources at the request of Chairman Frank H. Murkowski in a letter dated March 10, 2000. The request asked the Energy Information

  9. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment is a product of the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Reserves and Production Division. EIA, under various programs, has assessed foreign and domestic oil and gas resources, reserves, and production potential. As a policy-neutral

  10. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest unexplored, potentially productive geologic onshore basin in the United States. The primary area of the coastal plain is the 1002 Area of ANWR established when ANWR was created. A decision on permitting the exploration and development

  11. QER- Comment of National Wildlife Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mollie Simon Climate and Energy National Wildlife Federation - National Advocacy Center 901 E. Street, NW Suite 400 Washington, DC 20004 +1 202.797.6651

  12. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, ...

  13. wildlife | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    wildlife NNSA's Pantex Plant recognized for bird conservation The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's Council for the Conservation of Migratory Birds named NNSA's Pantex Plant one of five finalists for the 2016 Presidential Migratory Bird Federal Stewardship Award for its excellence in conservation of migratory birds through research collaboration. The... A look at wildlife around the Pantex Plant Approximately 17 miles northeast of Amarillo, Texas, sits the United States Department of

  14. National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: National Wildlife Refuge System...

  15. San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge Well 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Easterly, C.E.; Ketelle, R.H.; Quarles, H.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, evaluated the water production capacity of an artesian well in the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. Water from the well initially flows into a pond containing three federally threatened or endangered fish species, and water from this pond feeds an adjacent pond/wetland containing an endangered plant species.

  16. National Strategy for the Arctic Region | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Strategy for the Arctic Region National Strategy for the Arctic Region The National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR) outlines strategic priorities intended to position the United States to respond effectively to emerging opportunities in the region, while simultaneously pursuing efforts to protect and conserve its unique environment. Signed by President Obama on May 10, 2013, the National Strategy builds upon existing initiatives by federal, state, local, and tribal authorities;

  17. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: ... Section 1002 of ANILCA deferred a decision on the management of oil and gas exploration ...

  18. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil ...

  19. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the ...

  20. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: ... of technically recoverable undiscovered oil are in the ANWR coastal plain, a 5 percent ...

  1. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Barrow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  2. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Fairbanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  3. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Nome

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  4. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Bethel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  5. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Anchorage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region. The purpose of this round is to give feedback on the elements of the draft plan.

  6. National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  7. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Bethel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  8. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Nome

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  9. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Barrow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  10. Energy Department Announces Second Round of National Strategy for the Arctic Region Meetings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  11. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation and Stakeholder Outreach Session: Kotzebue

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  12. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Dutch Harbor/Unalaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  13. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Dutch Harbor/Unalaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  14. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the Pixley National WildlifeRefuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-10-01

    A hydrogeological assessment of Pixley National Wildlife Refuge was conducted using published reports from the USGS and private engineering consultants that pertained to land in close proximity to the Refuge and from monitoring conducted by refuge staff in collaboration with Reclamation. The compiled data clearly show that there are a large number of agricultural wells throughout the Basin and that water levels are responsive to rates of pumping - in some cases declining more than 100 ft in a matter of a few years. Aquifer properties support a groundwater conjunctive use solution to the provision of additional water supply to the Refuge. The report provides justification for this approach.

  15. Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R

    2007-05-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of nuisance wildlife at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Nuisance wildlife management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; and law enforcement. This plan covers the following subjects: (1) roles and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and agencies; (2) the general protocol for reducing nuisance wildlife problems; and (3) species-specific methodologies for resolving nuisance wildlife management issues for mammals, birds, snakes, and insects. Achievement of the objectives of this plan will be a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA); U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-Wildlife Services (WS); and ORNL through agreements between TWRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC; and UT-Battelle, LLC; and USDA, APHIS-WS.

  16. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) What is WILD? The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and main- tained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic power systems, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife. For the wind energy sector, WILD serves as an

  17. wildlife

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    between Pantex, West Texas A&M University, and the U.S. Geological Survey's Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Texas Tech University.

  18. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  19. The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2008-11-01

    The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside

  20. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC). The 500-acre site includes 16 buildings that accommodate education and training facilities for the USFWS. The center was designed to use passive solar and low-energy technologies that are readily available, easily maintained and cost effective.

  1. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

  2. Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  3. Arctic Climate Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Mark D.; Robinson, David G.; Boslough, Mark B.; Backus, George A.; Peterson, Kara J.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Swiler, Laura Painton; Desilets, Darin Maurice; Reinert, Rhonda Karen

    2015-03-01

    This study began with a challenge from program area managers at Sandia National Laboratories to technical staff in the energy, climate, and infrastructure security areas: apply a systems-level perspective to existing science and technology program areas in order to determine technology gaps, identify new technical capabilities at Sandia that could be applied to these areas, and identify opportunities for innovation. The Arctic was selected as one of these areas for systems level analyses, and this report documents the results. In this study, an emphasis was placed on the arctic atmosphere since Sandia has been active in atmospheric research in the Arctic since 1997. This study begins with a discussion of the challenges and benefits of analyzing the Arctic as a system. It goes on to discuss current and future needs of the defense, scientific, energy, and intelligence communities for more comprehensive data products related to the Arctic; assess the current state of atmospheric measurement resources available for the Arctic; and explain how the capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories can be used to address the identified technological, data, and modeling needs of the defense, scientific, energy, and intelligence communities for Arctic support.

  4. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  5. Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

    2005-08-28

    The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

  6. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  7. Report of the workshop on Arctic oil and gas recovery held at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, June 30-July 2, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-09-01

    This report is the result of a workshop on Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery, held at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico, on June 30-July 2, 1980. Research priorities for the technology related to Arctic offshore oil and gas production were defined. The workshop was preceded by a report entitled, A Review of Technology for Arctic Offshore Oil and Gas Recovery, authored by Dr. W. M. Sackinger. The mission of the workshop was to identify research priorities without considering whether the research should be conducted by government or by industry. Nevertheless, at the end of the meeting the general discussion did consider this, and the concensus was that environmental properties should certainly be of concern to the government, that implementation of petroleum operations was the province of industry, and that overlapping, coordinated areas of interest include both environment and interactions of the environment with structures, transport systems, and operations. An attempt to establish relative importance and a time frame was made after the workshop through the use of a survey form. The form and a summary of its results, and a discussion of its implications, are given.

  8. National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR) - 10-Year Renewable Energy Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NSAR - T en Y ear R enewable E nergy P lan - A pril 2 015 2 National S trategy f or t he A rctic R egion ( NSAR) Ten Y ear R enewable E nergy P lan Background The N ational S trategy f or t he A rctic R egion ( NSAR) o utlines t he U nited S tates G overnment's strategic p riorities f or t he A rctic r egion. T hese p riorities a re i ntended t o p osition t he U nited S tates to r espond e ffectively t o e merging o pportunities - w hile s imultaneously p ursuing e fforts t o protect a nd c

  9. Breaking Barriers Wildlife Refreshment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barriers Wildlife Refreshment Walker becomes first black battalion commander. NSTec Aviation Safety Officer, RSL team honored by DOE. NNSS helping wildlife with new watering holes. See pages 8. See page 4. NSTec and UNLV Bring Technology Community Together at PDV Workshop In June 2014, National Security Technologies (NSTec) and University Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) co- hosted a Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) Workshop at the UNLV Science and Engineering Building (SEB). More than 125 attendees

  10. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protecting Wildlife Protecting Wildlife We monitor and protect the wildlife and their habitats on Laboratory property. February 2, 2015 Mule deer on LANL property LANL has been home to mule deer since its creation in 1942 and has seasonally been home to elk since their reintroduction to New Mexico in the 1960s. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Protecting our wildlife Since the early 1940s, LANL's

  11. Picture of the Week: Climate feedbacks from a warming arctic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Climate feedbacks from a warming arctic Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists work to understand the fate of this carbon using computer simulations such as this model of snowmelt draining from polygonal ground near Barrow, Alaska. April 26, 2015 Climate feedbacks from a warming arctic x Arctic soils currently store nearly 20 years worth of human emissions of carbon in frozen permafrost, but the Arctic is warming faster than most of the rest of the Earth, meaning that this carbon may soon

  12. Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  13. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

  14. Wildlife Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildlife Studies Studying Our Environment A rich diversity of plants and animals call this area home. Through their studies, biologists help the Lab understand and protect the diversity of the land. Elk on Laboratory Land Taking Care of the Land The Lab's scientific work is balanced with our responsibility to take care of the land we're on. READ MORE Lab Biologist, Chuck Hathcock Studying the Land and Wildlife Biologists conduct annual and multi-year studies of animals and plants on Lab land.

  15. Arctic Energy Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 Arctic Energy Summit is a multi-disciplinary event expected to draw several hundred industry officials, scientists, academics, policy makers, energy professionals, and community leaders together to collaborate and share leading approaches on Arctic energy issues.

  16. Arctic Climate Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable ... Arctic Climate Measurements Global Climate Models Software Sustainable Subsurface ...

  17. Innovative Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife Innovative Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife October 27, 2015 - 9:33am Addthis Innovative Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife Jocelyn Brown-Saracino Jocelyn Brown-Saracino Environmental Research Manager, Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Thanks to a first-of-its-kind in-depth study of wildlife distribution and movements, the nation's Eastern Seaboard is better prepared than

  18. OPEN HOUSE - Climate Prisms: Arctic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An interactive exploration of Arctic climate science through prisms of the visual arts, literary arts, info-vis, scientific presentations and more. Climate Prisms: Arctic is...

  19. NREL: Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL - National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Browse By Reset All Geography Africa (45) Apply Africa filter...

  20. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R; Evans, James W.; Parr, Patricia Dreyer

    2007-10-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  1. Arctic Economics Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    AEM (Arctic Economics Model) for oil and gas was developed to provide an analytic framework for understanding the arctic area resources. It provides the capacity for integrating the resource and technology information gathered by the arctic research and development (R&D) program, measuring the benefits of alternaive R&D programs, and providing updated estimates of the future oil and gas potential from arctic areas. AEM enables the user to examine field or basin-level oil and gas recovery,more » costs, and economics. It provides a standard set of selected basin-specified input values or allows the user to input their own values. AEM consists of five integrated submodels: geologic/resource submodel, which distributes the arctic resource into 15 master regions, consisting of nine arctic offshore regions, three arctic onshore regions, and three souhtern Alaska (non-arctic) regions; technology submodel, which selects the most appropriate exploration and production structure (platform) for each arctic basin and water depth; oil and gas production submodel, which contains the relationship of per well recovery as a function of field size, production decline curves, and production decline curves by product; engineering costing and field development submodel, which develops the capital and operating costs associated with arctic oil and gas development; and the economics submodel, which captures the engineering costs and development timing and links these to oil and gas prices, corporate taxes and tax credits, depreciation, and timing of investment. AEM provides measures of producible oil and gas, costs, and ecomonic viability under alternative technology or financial conditions.« less

  2. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

  3. OPEN HOUSE - Climate Prisms: Arctic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OPEN HOUSE - Climate Prisms: Arctic OPEN HOUSE - Climate Prisms: Arctic WHEN: Jul 17, 2015 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, ...

  4. Report Wildlife Encounters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildlife Encounters Report Wildlife Encounters Report any encounters with wildlife in the Los Alamos area. April 12, 2012 A mama black bear and her cub A mama black bear and her cub in Los Alamos. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email If you find an injured bird, contact the Santa Fe Raptor Center. Have a close encounter? Report the following Any wildlife incidents or encounters Migratory bird injury or

  5. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Planning and Policy organization (EWP) in the Division of Environment, Fish & Wildlife, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and reports to the EWP manager....

  6. Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The biennial Wind Wildlife Research Meeting provides an internationally recognized forum for researchers and wind-wildlife stakeholders to hear contributed papers, view research posters, and listen...

  7. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  8. Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

    2008-09-01

    Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

  9. Climate Perspectives: Change in the Terrestrial Arctic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Perspectives: Change in the Terrestrial Arctic Climate Perspectives An interactive exploration of Arctic climate science through prisms of the visual arts, literary arts, info-vis, ...

  10. Report Wildlife Encounters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encounters Report any encounters with wildlife in the Los Alamos area. April 12, 2012 A mama black bear and her cub A mama black bear and her cub in Los Alamos. Contact...

  11. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish, Wildlife & Parks Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Name: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Address: 1420 East 6th Ave, PO Box 200701 Place:...

  12. Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Fish and Wildlife Service Name: Fish and Wildlife Service Place: Washington, DC Year Founded: 1940 Phone Number: (303) 275-2370...

  13. Tribes Provide Input on 10-Year Plan for Renewable Energy in the Arctic Region

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The DOE Office of Indian Energy hosted a second round of tribal consultations and outreach meetings throughout Alaska in February and March to gather input on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR).

  14. Using A-Train Arctic cloud observations to constrain and improve...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiation anomalies to the 2007 Arctic sea ice loss Jennifer E. Kay 1,2 Andrew Gettelman 1 , Tristan L'Ecuyer 2 ,Graeme Stephens 2 , and Chris O'Dell 2 1 National Center for...

  15. Warming increases methylmercury production in an Arctic soil

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Ziming; Fang, Wei; Lu, Xia; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Graham, David E.; Liang, Liyuan; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Gu, Baohua

    2016-04-29

    The rapid temperature rise in Arctic permafrost concerns not only the degradation of stored soil organic carbon (SOC) and climate feedback, but also the production and bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) that may endanger humans, as well as wildlife in terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Decomposition of SOC provides an energy source for microbial methylation, although little is known how rapid permafrost thaw affects Hg methylation and how SOC degradation is coupled to MeHg biosynthesis. We describe rates of MeHg production in Arctic soils from an 8-month warming microcosm experiment under anoxic conditions. MeHg production increased >10 fold in both organic-more » and the mineral-rich soil layers at a warmer temperature (8 C) compared to a sub-zero temperature ( 2 C). MeHg production was positively correlated to methane and ferrous ion concentrations, suggesting that Hg methylation is coupled with methanogenesis and iron reduction. Labile SOC, such as reducing sugars and alcohol, were particularly effective in fueling the initial rapid biosynthesis of MeHg. In freshly amended Hg we found that there was more bioavailable than existing Hg in the mineral soil. Finally, the data indicate that climate warming and permafrost thaw could greatly enhance MeHg production, thereby impacting Arctic aquatic and marine ecosystems through biomagnification in the food web.« less

  16. The U.S. Forest Service's analysis of cumulative effects to wildlife: A study of legal standards, current practice, and ongoing challenges on a National Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Courtney A.

    2012-01-15

    Cumulative effects analysis (CEA) allows natural resource managers to understand the status of resources in historical context, learn from past management actions, and adapt future activities accordingly. U.S. federal agencies are required to complete CEA as part of environmental impact assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Past research on CEA as part of NEPA has identified significant deficiencies in CEA practice, suggested methodologies for handling difficult aspects of CEA, and analyzed the rise in litigation over CEA in U.S. courts. This article provides a review of the literature and legal standards related to CEA as it is done under NEPA and then examines current practice on a U.S. National Forest, utilizing qualitative methods in order to provide a detailed understanding of current approaches to CEA. Research objectives were to understand current practice, investigate ongoing challenges, and identify impediments to improvement. Methods included a systematic review of a set of NEPA documents and semi-structured interviews with practitioners, scientists, and members of the public. Findings indicate that the primary challenges associated with CEA include: issues of both geographic and temporal scale of analysis, confusion over the purpose of the requirement, the lack of monitoring data, and problems coordinating and disseminating data. Improved monitoring strategies and programmatic analyses could support improved CEA practice.

  17. Session Papers North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Session Papers North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed: Science and Siting Strategies B. D. Zak Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico K. Stamnes University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Introduction This paper serves as a summary of the current thinking regarding the development of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's North Slope of Alaska and adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site. Ellingson et

  18. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01

    subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

  19. 3rd Annual Arctic Encounter Symposium Seattle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Arctic Encounter Symposium will convene policymakers, industry leaders, and leading experts to confront the leading issues in Arctic policy, innovation, and development. The two-day program includes two keynote luncheons, expert plenary sessions and breakout sessions.

  20. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr; Dubey, Manvendra K; Lesins, Glen; Wang, Muyin

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  1. Arctic & Offshore Technical Data System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1990-07-01

    AORIS is a computerized information system to assist the technology and planning community in the development of Arctic oil and gas resources. In general, AORIS is geographically dependent and, where possible, site specific. The main topics are sea ice, geotechnology, oceanography, meteorology, and Arctic engineering, as they relate to such offshore oil and gas activities as exploration, production, storage, and transportation. AORIS consists of a directory component that identifies 85 Arctic energy-related databases and tellsmore » how to access them; a bibliographic/management information system or bibliographic component containing over 8,000 references and abstracts on Arctic energy-related research; and a scientific and engineering information system, or data component, containing over 800 data sets, in both tabular and graphical formats, on sea ice characteristics taken from the bibliographic citations. AORIS also contains much of the so-called grey literature, i.e., data and/or locations of Arctic data collected, but never published. The three components are linked so the user may easily move from one component to another. A generic information system is provided to allow users to create their own information systems. The generic programs have the same query and updating features as AORIS, except that there is no directory component.« less

  2. Arctic & Offshore Technical Data System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1990-07-01

    AORIS is a computerized information system to assist the technology and planning community in the development of Arctic oil and gas resources. In general, AORIS is geographically dependent and, where possible, site specific. The main topics are sea ice, geotechnology, oceanography, meteorology, and Arctic engineering, as they relate to such offshore oil and gas activities as exploration, production, storage, and transportation. AORIS consists of a directory component that identifies 85 Arctic energy-related databases and tellsmorehow to access them; a bibliographic/management information system or bibliographic component containing over 8,000 references and abstracts on Arctic energy-related research; and a scientific and engineering information system, or data component, containing over 800 data sets, in both tabular and graphical formats, on sea ice characteristics taken from the bibliographic citations. AORIS also contains much of the so-called grey literature, i.e., data and/or locations of Arctic data collected, but never published. The three components are linked so the user may easily move from one component to another. A generic information system is provided to allow users to create their own information systems. The generic programs have the same query and updating features as AORIS, except that there is no directory component.less

  3. Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWildlifeResources&oldid612286" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  4. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-03

    First they had a vision: welcome people into a building embracing environmental stewardship on land that is steeped in history. The designers of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took this vision and designed a new energy-efficient and environmentally friendly visitor center for the Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge located in Sudbury, Massachusetts.

  5. ARM - International Arctic Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Information Collaborations Meetings of Interest Data Sources ARM Data Discovery Browser NSA Data Past ARM NSA campaigns NCARUCAR National Oceanic and Atmospheric ...

  6. Climate change and the Arctic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change and the Arctic Climate change and the Arctic WHEN: May 19, 2016 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Join us for convivial discussion on May 19 at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Cathy Wilson, who heads the Lab's Atmosphere, Climate and Ecosystem Science team, is working to better understand what happens when warming climate

  7. Nevada Department of Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife (NDOW) is the state agency responsible for the restoration and management of fish and wildlife resources, and the promotion of boating safety on Nevada's waters. NDOW is...

  8. Colorado Division of Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name: Colorado Parks and Wildlife Address: 1313 Sherman Street, Suite 618 Place: Denver, Colorado Zip: 80203 Phone Number: (303) 866-3437...

  9. DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DOI) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. ... "With the transfer of nearly 4,000 acres from the Department of Energy, the U.S. Fish and ...

  10. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  11. Latitudinal distribution of the recent Arctic warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr; Lesins, Glen K; Wang, Muyin

    2010-12-08

    Increasing Arctic temperature, disappearance of Arctic sea ice, melting of the Greenland ice sheet, sea level rise, increasing strength of Atlantic hurricanes are these impending climate catastrophes supported by observations? Are the recent data really unprecedented during the observational records? Our analysis of Arctic temperature records shows that the Arctic and temperatures in the 1930s and 1940s were almost as high as they are today. We argue that the current warming of the Arctic region is affected more by the multi-decadal climate variability than by an increasing concentration of carbon dioxide. Unfortunately, none of the existing coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models used in the IPCC 2007 cIimate change assessment is able to reproduce neither the observed 20th century Arctic cIimate variability nor the latitudinal distribution of the warming.

  12. Evaluating Model Parameterizations of Arctic Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model Parameterizations of Arctic Processes S. D. Greenberg, A. R. Metcalf, J. Y. Harrington, and J. Verlinde Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction An understanding of the arctic climate system has become a high priority research area because of its importance to global climate change (IPCC 1990). Unfortunately, our studies of this region are in their infancy and we lack a broad knowledge of the Arctic. This deficiency is due to the scarcity of observations and

  13. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dataset: Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic...

  14. Arctic Stratus and Tropical Deep Convection. Integrating Measurements...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Arctic Stratus and Tropical Deep Convection. Integrating Measurements and Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Arctic Stratus and Tropical Deep ...

  15. The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure ...

  16. ARM - Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These data will also help researchers gain a better understanding of the driving processes that control climate changes and determine the final state of the Arctic climate system....

  17. Distribution and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia D. A. Spangenberg and V. Chakrapani Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia Introduction Determination of cloud radiation interactions over large areas of the Arctic is possible only with the use of data from polar orbiting satellites. Cloud detection using satellite data is difficult

  18. Arctic Microclimate Activity.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Microclimates ARM Education Program Objective To identify, measure, and average microclimatic temperatures in a particular region. Materials Large white piece of paper Pencils and erasers 1 thermometer per student or group Important Points to Understand Have you ever noticed how much cooler it is in the shade than in direct sunlight? Of course! Temperature differences within a small area are indications of microclimates: very small-scale climate conditions. The following are a few examp

  19. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  20. Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Abbreviation: WDFW...

  1. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Address: 3406 Cherry Ave. NE Place: Salem,...

  2. California Department of Fish & Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    & Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Name: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Address: 1416 9th St, 12th Floor Place:...

  3. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W.

    2010-08-04

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  4. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States

    2010-09-01

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  5. Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01

    Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

  6. Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the discovered and undiscovered Arctic oil and natural gas resource base with respect to their location and concentration. The paper also discusses the cost and impediments to developing Arctic oil and natural gas resources, including those issues associated with environmental habitats and political boundaries.

  7. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  8. Ice in Arctic Mixed-phase Stratocumulus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice Nuclei Recycling in the Maintenance of Cloud Ice in Arctic Mixed-phase Stratocumulus For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

  9. Gwich'in Solar and Energy Efficiency in the Arctic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manager Dave P-M - Tanana Chiefs Conference, Rural Energy Coordinator Gwich'in Solar and Energy Efficiency in the Arctic Yukon Flats Yukon Flats Region: * Arctic Village * 10...

  10. Melting of ice wedges adds to arctic warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Can we someday predict earthquakes? Melting of ice wedges adds to arctic warming New ways of looking at seismic information and innovative laboratory experiments are offering tantalizing clues to what triggers earthquakes-and when. March 14, 2016 Ice throughout the Arctic is vanishing due to a rapidly warming climate. Ice throughout the Arctic is vanishing due to a rapidly warming climate. Melting of ice wedges adds to arctic warming Ice wedges are a particularly cool surface feature in the

  11. Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Earth’s climate is changing. In some places such as the Arctic, the change is rapid and profound, while in other areas change has been less dramatic and more gradual. But virtually everywhere,...

  12. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    2012-04-01

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  13. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    07, 2016 Articles A flash of insight: Research at Sandia's Lightning Lab A flash of insight A flash of insight: Research at Sandia's Lightning Lab A new twist on data storage Balloons help gather Arctic data on supercooled liquid water Super cool! DOE funding moves two Sandia energy projects closer to the marketplace Power investing Military students get a taste of national lab research, a win-win for them and Sandi Join Forces Sandians celebrate Pride, come together for Orlando Sandians

  15. OAR 635-100 - Wildlife Diversity Plans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Wildlife Diversity Plans used to guide the State of Oregon's Department of Fish and Wildlife when managing non-game wildlife. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

  16. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John

    2013-06-30

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  17. ARM - Arctic Meetings of Interest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Information Collaborations Meetings of Interest Data Sources ARM Data Discovery Browser NSA Data Past ARM NSA campaigns NCARUCAR National Oceanic and Atmospheric ...

  18. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations D. D. Turner University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Abstract A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance

  19. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Parks and Wildlife Department Name: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Address: 4200 Smith School Rd Place: Austin, TX Zip: 78744 Phone Number: (512) 389-4800 Website:...

  20. Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans...

  1. Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Published Publisher Not...

  2. Montana Building with Wildlife Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Provides guidance on conservation oriented development. Authors State of Montana Fish and Wildlife & Parks Organizations State of Montana Fish and Wildlife & Parks Published...

  3. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife ...

  4. New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife and climate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife and climate of Los Alamos The Bradbury Science Museum unveils a new interactive ...

  5. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural ...

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Cloud Infrared Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsArctic Cloud Infrared Imaging Campaign Links Field Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Cloud Infrared Imaging 2012.07.16 - 2014.07.31 Lead Scientist : Joseph Shaw For data sets, see below. Abstract The 3rd-generation Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) instrument was deployed close to the Great White facility at the North Slope of Alaska site and operated as

  7. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

    2008-12-31

    The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

  8. Modeling the summertime Arctic cloudy boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, J.A.; Pinto, J.O.; McInnes, K.L.

    1996-04-01

    Global climate models have particular difficulty in simulating the low-level clouds during the Arctic summer. Model problems are exacerbated in the polar regions by the complicated vertical structure of the Arctic boundary layer. The presence of multiple cloud layers, a humidity inversion above cloud top, and vertical fluxes in the cloud that are decoupled from the surface fluxes, identified in Curry et al. (1988), suggest that models containing sophisticated physical parameterizations would be required to accurately model this region. Accurate modeling of the vertical structure of multiple cloud layers in climate models is important for determination of the surface radiative fluxes. This study focuses on the problem of modeling the layered structure of the Arctic summertime boundary-layer clouds and in particular, the representation of the more complex boundary layer type consisting of a stable foggy surface layer surmounted by a cloud-topped mixed layer. A hierarchical modeling/diagnosis approach is used. A case study from the summertime Arctic Stratus Experiment is examined. A high-resolution, one-dimensional model of turbulence and radiation is tested against the observations and is then used in sensitivity studies to infer the optimal conditions for maintaining two separate layers in the Arctic summertime boundary layer. A three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model is then used to simulate the interaction of this cloud deck with the large-scale atmospheric dynamics. An assessment of the improvements needed to the parameterizations of the boundary layer, cloud microphysics, and radiation in the 3-D model is made.

  9. The Wildlife Society 22nd Annual Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wildlife Society’s 22nd Annual Conference will be held Oct. 17–21, 2015, in Winnipeg, Canada. Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Sustainability Manager Kristen Johnson will be speaking on how partnerships with key stakeholders lead to the research, development, and demonstration of technologies that produce advanced bioenergy and bioproducts from lignocellulosic and algal biomass. Several activities supported by BETO provide insights into how habitat and wildlife can be considered when designing bioenergy systems. Strong public and private collaboration can help meet simultaneous goals of expanding the bioeconomy while also incorporating the needs of wildlife, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and providing other environmental and socio-economic benefits.

  10. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability Lead Bioenergy Technologies Office U.S. Department of Energy 2 Overview * National priorities and the Renewable Fuel Standard * Overview of the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) - Mission - Key RDD&D Activities * DOE's Billion-Ton Update: National Resource Assessment * DOE's Commitment to Sustainability *

  11. Wildlife and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the wind industry receives a lot of attention for avian impacts, research shows that nuclear and fossil-fueled plants have a greater impact. The Avian and Wildlife Costs of...

  12. OpenEI Community - Fish and Wildlife

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogidaho-meeting-2comments endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 Wed, 05 Sep 2012 04:36:43 +0000 Kyoung 488...

  13. An ecosystem approach to fish and wildlife conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roeper, N.

    1995-12-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife (Service) has embraced an ecosystem approach as a more effective way to protect and conserve the nation`s wildlife and the habitat upon which it depends. This does not represent a sharp reversal in our past policies. Rather, it formalizes, builds upon, and expands past efforts that were already moving away from short-term fixes and toward long-term solutions; away from artificially mimicking natural processes and towards restoration of natural processes. The Service reorganized nationwide and established cross-program watershed-based teams to overcome internal barriers and to better incorporate input from our partners. Although watershed are an important way to delineate boundaries, boundaries are actually issue-dependent and therefore quite fluid. Two examples of an ecosystem approach demonstrate the Service`s commitment to policies, decisions, and actions that are based on ecological principles, stress prevention over restoration, support long-term solutions based on natural time scales and over large geographic areas, and consider input from our partners.

  14. Leveraging Lighting for Energy Savings: GSA Northwest/Arctic Region |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Leveraging Lighting for Energy Savings: GSA Northwest/Arctic Region Leveraging Lighting for Energy Savings: GSA Northwest/Arctic Region Case study describes how the Northwest/Arctic Region branch of the General Services Administration (GSA) improved safety and energy efficiency in its Fairbanks Federal Building parking garage used by federal employees, U.S. Marshals, and the District Court. A 74% savings was realized by replacing 220 high-pressure sodium fixtures with

  15. The Rush to Exploit an Increasingly Ice-Free Arctic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rush to Exploit an Increasingly Ice-Free Arctic - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy ...

  16. An active atmospheric methane sink in high Arctic mineral cryosols...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    conditions coupled with -omics analysis indicate (1) mineral cryosols in the Canadian high Arctic contain atmospheric CH-oxidizing bacteria; (2) the atmospheric CH uptake ...

  17. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: An Arctic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Arctic Springtime Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layer observed during SHEBA Zuidema, Paquita RSMASMPO University of Miami Han, Yong NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Intrieri,...

  18. Arctic Haze: Effect of Anthropogenic and Biomass Burning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Haze: Effect of Anthropogenic and Biomass Burning Aerosols Transported from Europe to the Arctic For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:...

  19. Liquid Water the Key to Arctic Cloud Radiative Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water the Key to Arctic Cloud Radiative Closure For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research Highlight...

  20. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic. Authors: Sullivan, Paddy ; Sloan, Victoria ; Warren, Jeff ; McGuire, Dave ; Euskirchen, Eugenie ;...

  1. Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric T. DeWeaver

    2010-01-19

    This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the

  2. A look at wildlife around the Pantex Plant | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA Blog An American bald eagle, which is common in the region during fall and spring, especially around black-tailed prairie dog colonies, wetlands and other water areas. NNSA ...

  3. A 20-year data set of surface longwave fluxes in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer Francis

    2004-06-15

    Creation of 20-year data set of surface infrared fluxes from satellite measurements. A reliable estimate of the surface downwelling longwave radiation flux (DLF) is a glaring void in available forcing data sets for models of Arctic sea ice and ocean circulation. We have developed a new method to estimate the DLF from a combination of satellite sounder retrievals and brightness temperatures from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS), which has flown on NOAA polar-orbiting satellites continuously since late 1979. The overarching goal of this project was to generate a 20-year data set of surface downwelling longwave flux measurements from TOVS data over the Arctic Ocean. Daily gridded fields of DLF were produced with a spatial resolution of (100 km){sup 2} north of 60{sup o}N for 22.5 years rather than only 20. Surface measurements from the field station at Barrow, AK--part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program --and from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) were used to validate the satellite-derived fluxes and develop algorithm improvements for conditions that had resulted in systematic errors in early versions of the algorithm. The resulting data set has already been sent to two other investigators for incorporation into their research, and we will soon complete preparations to send the products to the National Snow and Ice Data Center and ARM data archive, where it can be disseminated to the scientific community.

  4. Pesticides and their effects on wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driver, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    About 560 active ingredients are currently used as pesticides. Applications of these pesticides are made to agricultural lands and other areas inhabited by wildlife. Unfortunately, many agricultural-use pesticides also entail some measure of risk to organisms other than the pest species. Because testing of pesticides prior to registration cannot evaluate all the potential environmental-pesticide-wildlife/fish interactions, current methods of risk assessment do not always provide sufficient safety to nontarget organisms. This is evidenced by die-offs of fish and wildlife from applications of pesticides at environmentally {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} rates, the linking of population declines of some species with agrochemical use, and observations of survival-threatening behavioral changes in laboratory and field animals exposed to typical field levels of pesticides. It is important to note, however, that the majority of pesticides, when properly applied, have not caused significant injury to wildlife. A brief summary of pesticide effects on wildlife and fish are presented for the common classes of pesticides in use today.

  5. Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wullschleger, Stan [ORNL

    2013-01-22

    Stan Wullschleger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems" on March 22, 2012 at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, California.

  6. Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullschleger, Stan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-03-22

    Stan Wullschleger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems" on March 22, 2012 at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, California.

  7. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  8. TPWC 68 - Parks and Wildlife Code Endangered Species | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TPWC 68 - Parks and Wildlife Code Endangered Species Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: TPWC 68 - Parks and Wildlife...

  9. US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower Licensing webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower Licensing webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower...

  10. 2 CCR 406-9 - Wildlife Properties | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 2 CCR 406-9 - Wildlife PropertiesLegal Abstract Regulations governing all wildlife...

  11. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference October 13, 2015 8:00AM MDT to October 15,...

  12. ITEP Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attend this Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) webinar and learn the climate change challenges for fish and wildlife and what can be done to help safeguard fish, wildlife, and plants and the communities and economies that depend on them.

  13. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  14. Path to Economic Sovereignty: Arctic Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Economic Sovereignty: Arctic Opportunities Presented by Kip Knudson Office of Alaska Governor Bill Walker Slide Deck prepared by Sean Skaling, Director, Alaska Energy Authority Photo by Chuck Berray 200 remote microgrids spread over large area  Population: 735,000  Area: 660,000 sq. miles  1.2 people/sq. mile  New Jersey has 1,000 times the density  About 200 stand-alone microgrid communities 3 Alaska Electrical Generation Railbelt 72% of Pop 76% of Energy Natural Gas*

  15. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting | Department of Energy Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting This presentation was given on March 29, 2013, by Kristen Johnson to the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies and addresses BETO's work and sustainability efforts.

  16. Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2001-03-01

    This report covers calendar year 2000 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  17. Southern idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2000-04-01

    This report is for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by IDFG and SBT wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  18. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsArctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign Links Science Plan ALTOS Website Related Campaigns Supplement to Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) 2010.10.01, Verlinde, NSA Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) 2010.10.01 - 2010.12.31 Website : http://www.arm.gov/campaigns/altos/ Lead Scientist : Johannes Verlinde Abstract NOTE: An

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - Supplement to Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure (ALTOS) govCampaignsSupplement to Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Related Campaigns Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) 2010.10.01, Verlinde, NSA Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Supplement to Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) 2010.10.01 - 2010.12.31 Lead Scientist : Johannes Verlinde Abstract NOTE: An unfortunate incident in the early stages of ALTOS

  1. Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

    2008-12-31

    The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD

  2. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, Coastal Plain Resource Assessment, (Washington, DC, November, 1986). U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Minerals Management Service. ...

  3. Melting of ice wedges adds to arctic warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice wedges are a particularly cool surface feature in the Arctic tundra. And new research suggests they are melting fast, which is bad news for the ecosystem at the top of the ...

  4. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ecosystems in the Arctic. Authors: Iversen, Colleen M 1 ; Sloan, Victoria L 1 ; Sullivan, Patrick F. 2 ; Euskirchen, Eugenie S 2 ; McGuire, A. David 2 ; Norby, Richard...

  5. File:EIA-AK-NPRA-ANWR-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GAS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska and Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of...

  6. Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarquhar, Greg; Ghan, Steven J.; Verlinde, J.; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Mengistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Fan, Jiwen; Flynn, Connor J.; Gultepe, Ismail; Hubbe, John M.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander; Lawson, Paul; Leaitch, W. R.; Liu, Peter S.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lubin, Dan; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Macdonald, A. M.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.; Xie, Shaocheng; Zelenyuk, Alla; Bae, Kenny; Freer, Matthew; Glen, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) sponsored by the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and Atmospheric Science Programs. The primary aim of ISDAC was to examine indirect effects of aerosols on clouds that contain both liquid and ice water. The experiment utilized the ARM permanent observational facilities at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) in Barrow. These include a cloud radar, a polarized micropulse lidar, and an atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer as well as instruments specially deployed for ISDAC measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation and spectral shortwave radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties during ISDAC, collecting data using an unprecedented 42 cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 hours on 12 different days. Data were obtained above, below and within single-layer stratus on 8 April and 26 April 2008. These data enable a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect the microphysical and radiative properties of arctic clouds influenced by different surface conditions. Observations acquired on a heavily polluted day, 19 April 2008, are enhancing this understanding. Data acquired in cirrus on transit flights between Fairbanks and Barrow are improving our understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Ultimately the ISDAC data will be used to improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and to determine the extent to which long-term surface-based measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation and radiative heating in the Arctic.

  7. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    This preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities are analyzed: Habitat protection; Habitat enhancement; Operation and maintenance; and Monitoring and evaluation. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  8. Seasonal and Intra-annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walter; Kalhori, Aram

    2015-12-01

    In order to advance the understanding of the patterns and controls on the carbon budget in the Arctic region, San Diego State University has maintained eddy covariance flux towers at three sites in Arctic Alaska, starting in 1997.

  9. New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife and climate...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the new environment exhibit at the Bradbury Science Museum. New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife and climate of Los Alamos Families attend the new environment exhibit ...

  10. India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Environment, Forests and Wildlife1 Overview "Category Name Water Pollution Air Pollution Environment Protection Coastal Regulation Zone Delegation of Powers...

  11. EA-0928: Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project, Multnomah County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington...

  12. BPA celebrates protection of Lemhi River fish and wildlife habitat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    celebrates-protection-of-Lemhi-River-fish-and-wildlife-habitat Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives...

  13. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

  14. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of...

  15. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California...

  16. California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Hydroelectric Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California...

  17. Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation Fund Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Department of...

  18. OAR - Division 100-Wildlife Diversity Plan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    availability: http:crossref.org Citation Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOAR-Division100-WildlifeDiversityPlan&oldid792434" Feedback Contact...

  19. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability ...

  20. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on harvest methods, forest service, and more.

  1. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-06-06

    This volume contains appendices of the following: US Geological Survey Arctic operating orders, 1979; Det Noske Vertas', rules for the design, construction and inspection of offshore technology, 1977; Alaska Oil and Gas Association, industry research projects, March 1980; Arctic Petroleum Operator's Association, industry research projects, January 1980; selected additional Arctic offshore bibliography on sea ice, icebreakers, Arctic seafloor conditions, ice-structures, frost heave and structure icing.

  2. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Arctic and Subarctic Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-11-01

    Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools book detailing DOE's EnergySmart Schools Program for Arctic Climates.

  3. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi

  4. Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native

  5. Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

    2013-10-01

    This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories,Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie') and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katie's dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpson's Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

  6. Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-24

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  7. An active atmospheric methane sink in high Arctic mineral cryosols

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lau, Maggie C.Y.; Stackhouse, B.; Layton, Alice C.; Chauhan, Archana; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chourey, Karuna; Mykytczuk, N. C.S.; Bennett, Phil C.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Burton, N.; et al

    2015-01-01

    The transition of Arctic carbon-rich cryosols into methane (CH₄)-emitting wetlands due to global warming is a rising concern. However, the spatially predominant mineral cryosols and their CH₄ emission potential are poorly understood. Fluxes measured in situ and estimated under laboratory conditions coupled with -omics analysis indicate (1) mineral cryosols in the Canadian high Arctic contain atmospheric CH₄-oxidizing bacteria; (2) the atmospheric CH⁺ uptake flux increases with ground temperature; and, as a result, (3) the atmospheric CH₄ sink strength will increase by a factor of 5-30 as the Arctic warms by 5-15 °C over a century. We demonstrated that acidic mineralmore » cryosols have previously unrecognized potential of negative CH₄ feedback.« less

  8. An active atmospheric methane sink in high Arctic mineral cryosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, Maggie C.Y.; Stackhouse, B.; Layton, Alice C.; Chauhan, Archana; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chourey, Karuna; Mykytczuk, N. C.S.; Bennett, Phil C.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Burton, N.; Renholm, J.; Hettich, R. L.; Pollard, W. H.; Omelon, C. R.; Medvigy, David M.; Pffifner, Susan M.; Whyte, L. G.; Onstott, T. C.

    2015-04-14

    The transition of Arctic carbon-rich cryosols into methane (CH₄)-emitting wetlands due to global warming is a rising concern. However, the spatially predominant mineral cryosols and their CH₄ emission potential are poorly understood. Fluxes measured in situ and estimated under laboratory conditions coupled with -omics analysis indicate (1) mineral cryosols in the Canadian high Arctic contain atmospheric CH₄-oxidizing bacteria; (2) the atmospheric CH⁺ uptake flux increases with ground temperature; and, as a result, (3) the atmospheric CH₄ sink strength will increase by a factor of 5-30 as the Arctic warms by 5-15 °C over a century. We demonstrated that acidic mineral cryosols have previously unrecognized potential of negative CH₄ feedback.

  9. An active atmospheric methane sink in high Arctic mineral cryosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, Maggie C.Y.; Stackhouse, B.; Layton, Alice C.; Chauhan, Archana; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chourey, Karuna; Mykytczuk, N. C.S.; Bennett, Phil C.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Burton, N.; Renholm, J.; Hettich, R. L.; Pollard, W. H.; Omelon, C. R.; Medvigy, David M.; Pffifner, Susan M.; Whyte, L. G.; Onstott, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The transition of Arctic carbon-rich cryosols into methane (CH₄)-emitting wetlands due to global warming is a rising concern. However, the spatially predominant mineral cryosols and their CH₄ emission potential are poorly understood. Fluxes measured in situ and estimated under laboratory conditions coupled with -omics analysis indicate (1) mineral cryosols in the Canadian high Arctic contain atmospheric CH₄-oxidizing bacteria; (2) the atmospheric CH⁺ uptake flux increases with ground temperature; and, as a result, (3) the atmospheric CH₄ sink strength will increase by a factor of 5-30 as the Arctic warms by 5-15 °C over a century. We demonstrated that acidic mineral cryosols have previously unrecognized potential of negative CH₄ feedback.

  10. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  11. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP 2004.03.09 - 2004.04.09 Lead Scientist : Ed Westwater Data Availability http://www.etl.noaa.gov/programs/2004/wviop/data will contain quicklooks of all of the data. For data sets, see below. Summary During the IOP, the Ground-based Scanning Radiometer of NOAA/ETL, and the ARM MicroWave

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - FIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : FIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA 1998.05.19 - 1998.06.24 Lead Scientist : Peter Hobbs Data Availability Data from the UW Convair-580 measurements in FIRE-ACE/SHEBA have been archived at the Langley DAAC. For data sets, see below. Abstract Based in Barrow, Alaska, from May 15 through June 24, 1998, the Univ. of

  14. The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verlinde, J

    2010-10-18

    The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

  15. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  16. Indirect aerosol effect increases CMIP5 models projected Arctic warming

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chylek, Petr; Vogelsang, Timothy J.; Klett, James D.; Hengartner, Nicholas; Higdon, Dave; Lesins, Glen; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2016-02-20

    Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) climate models’ projections of the 2014–2100 Arctic warming under radiative forcing from representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5) vary from 0.9° to 6.7°C. Climate models with or without a full indirect aerosol effect are both equally successful in reproducing the observed (1900–2014) Arctic warming and its trends. However, the 2014–2100 Arctic warming and the warming trends projected by models that include a full indirect aerosol effect (denoted here as AA models) are significantly higher (mean projected Arctic warming is about 1.5°C higher) than those projected by models without a full indirect aerosolmore » effect (denoted here as NAA models). The suggestion is that, within models including full indirect aerosol effects, those projecting stronger future changes are not necessarily distinguishable historically because any stronger past warming may have been partially offset by stronger historical aerosol cooling. In conclusion, the CMIP5 models that include a full indirect aerosol effect follow an inverse radiative forcing to equilibrium climate sensitivity relationship, while models without it do not.« less

  17. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  18. turner_poster.arctic_bbhrp.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rate Profiles over the ACRF NSA Site Dave Turner 1 , Matt Shupe 2 , Dan DeSlover 1 , Eli ... National Laboratory Photo by D. Turner at NSA site, Mar 2007 Introduction A multi-sensor ...

  19. Effects of Alaska Oil and Natural Gas Provisions of H. R. 4 and S. 1766 on U.S. Energy Markets, Addendum

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This addendum provides projections on the increase in U.S. oil production from opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, the decease in net petroleum imports, and the change in net petroleum expenditures across a range of cases.

  20. Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    bytes) Source: Edited from U.S. Geological Survey, "The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska," Open File Report 98-34, 1999.

  1. Figure ES1. Map of Northern Alaska

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Geological Survey, "The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska," Open File Report 98-34, 1999. Return to the Executive Summary.

  2. igure 1. Map of N. Alaska and NW Canada Showing the Locations...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A), Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), 1002 Area, Current Productive Area, and Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) fig1.jpg (122614 bytes) ...

  3. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  4. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-09-13

    BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management

  5. Potential impacts of the Arctic on interannual and interdecadal summer precipitation over China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yuefeng; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-02-01

    After the end of the 1970s, there has been a tendency for enhanced summer precipitation over South China and the Yangtze River valley and drought over North China and Northeastern China. Coincidentally, Arctic ice concentration has decreased since the late 1970s, with larger reduction in summer than spring. However, the Arctic warming is more significant in spring than summer, suggesting that spring Arctic conditions could be more important in their remote impacts. This study investigates the potential impacts of the Arctic on summer precipitation in China. The leading spatial patterns and time coefficients of the unfiltered, interannual, and interdecadal precipitation (1960-2008) modes were analyzed and compared using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, which shows that the first three EOFs can capture the principal precipitation patterns (northern, central and southern patterns) over eastern China. Regression of the Arctic spring and summer temperature onto the time coefficients of the leading interannual and interdecadal precipitation modes shows that interdecadal summer precipitation in China is related to the Arctic spring warming, but the relationship with Arctic summer temperature is weak. Moreover, no notable relationships were found between the first three modes of interannual precipitation and Arctic spring or summer temperatures. Finally, correlations between summer precipitation and the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index from January to August were investigated, which indicate that summer precipitation in China correlates with AO only to some extent. Overall, this study suggests important relationships between the Arctic spring temperature and summer precipitation over China at the interdecadal time scale.

  6. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  7. EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

  8. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Address: 1594 W North Temple, Suite 2110, Box 146301 Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip: 84114-6301 Phone Number: 801-538-4745 Website:...

  9. Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects "Fund for the Recovery of Costs" Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  10. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  11. WAC - 232-12-014 Wildlife Classified as Endangered Species |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WAC - 232-12-014 Wildlife Classified as Endangered Species Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: WAC - 232-12-014...

  12. Title 50 CFR 17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 50...

  13. Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rules and Regulations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations Abstract This web page lists...

  14. EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

  15. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Act of 1973Legal Abstract This page links to...

  16. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Montana Kwa-Taq-Nuk Casino Resort 49708 US-93 Polson, MT 59860 The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on...

  17. FSM 2600 Wildlife, Fish, and Sensitive Plan Habitat Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FSM 2600 Wildlife, Fish, and Sensitive Plan Habitat Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: FSM 2600...

  18. EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

  19. Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainably’s...

  20. Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming Abstract Covers the basics of mitigation...

  1. Market-based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming: A Primer | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Primer Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Market-based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming: A Primer Abstract Covers the basics of...

  2. PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential | Department of Energy PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential February 24, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis This is an excerpt from the First Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Adding offshore wind to the U.S. renewable energy portfolio promises access to a

  3. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  4. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  5. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  6. Controls on Arctic sea ice from first-year and multi-year survival rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunke, Jes

    2009-01-01

    The recent decrease in Arctic sea ice cover has transpired with a significant loss of multi year ice. The transition to an Arctic that is populated by thinner first year sea ice has important implications for future trends in area and volume. Here we develop a reduced model for Arctic sea ice with which we investigate how the survivability of first year and multi year ice control the mean state, variability, and trends in ice area and volume.

  7. Indirect and semi-direct aerosol campaign: The impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ghan, Steven; Verlinde, Johannes; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Menqistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Dan; et al

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's primary aim was to examine the effects of aerosols, including those generated by Asian wildfires, on clouds that contain both liquid and ice. ISDAC utilized the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pro- gram's permanent observational facilities at Barrow and specially deployed instruments measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation, and radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties and collected data using an unprecedented 41more » stateof- the-art cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 h on 12 different days. Aerosol compositions, including fresh and processed sea salt, biomassburning particles, organics, and sulfates mixed with organics, varied between flights. Observations in a dense arctic haze on 19 April and above, within, and below the single-layer stratocumulus on 8 and 26 April are enabling a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect arctic clouds. Inhomogeneities in reflectivity, a close coupling of upward and downward Doppler motion, and a nearly constant ice profile in the single-layer stratocumulus suggests that vertical mixing is responsible for its longevity observed during ISDAC. Data acquired in cirrus on flights between Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska, are improving the understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Furthermore, ISDAC data will improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and determine the extent to which surface measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and radiative heating.« less

  8. Proceedings of the ninth international conference on offshore mechanics and Arctic engineering, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbas, S.T.; Chao, J.C.; Orgill, G.; Wang, A.T.; Wang, Y.S. ); Ayers, R.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The proceeding in the book are covered under the following headings: Pipeline Materials and Welding; Pipeline Design; Pipeline Stability; and Arctic Pipelines.

  9. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-01-13

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  10. Intercomparison of Large-eddy Simulations of Arctic Mixed-phase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Intercomparison of Large-eddy Simulations of Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds: Importance of Ice Size Distribution Assumptions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Intercomparison ...

  11. Analysis of gas chilling alternatives for Arctic pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvoiris, A.; McMillan, D.K.; Taksa, B.

    1994-12-31

    The operation of buried natural gas pipelines in Arctic regions requires installation of gas chilling facilities at compressor stations. These facilities are required in order to cool compressed pipeline gases to temperatures below that of permanently frozen surrounding soil. If these pipeline gas temperatures are too high, the frozen ground around the pipelines will eventually thaw. This is undesirable for many reasons amongst which are ground settlement and possible catastrophic failure of the pipeline. This paper presents the results of a study which compared several alternative methods of gas chilling for possible application at one of the compressor stations on the proposed new Yamal-Center gas pipeline system in the Russian Arctic. This technical and economic study was performed by Gulf Interstate Engineering (GIE) for GAZPROM, the gas company in Russia that will own and operate this new pipeline system. Geotechnical, climatical and other information provided by GAZPROM, coupled with information developed by GIE, formed the basis for this study.

  12. Tanker under retrofit for arctic service gets new propulsion design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-26

    The world's largest azimuthing propulsion drive will be installed on an oil tanker under retrofit for arctic service by a Finnish shipyard. And plans call for the drive's installation on four 135,000 cu m LNG carriers. The 11.4-mw (15,275 hp) Azipod azimuthing electric propulsion drive is being installed on Nemarc's 16,000 dwt arctic tanker M/T Uikku. The major difference between the Azipod system and traditional Z-type thrusters is that the Azipod's propulsion motor is an electric ac synchronous motor located inside the azimuthing unit. The motor drives a fixed-pitch propeller and is speed-controlled (0--100%) by a cycloconverter. The rotatable Azipod drive enables full power thrust in any desired direction.

  13. Arctic sea ice modeling with the material-point method.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2010-04-01

    Arctic sea ice plays an important role in global climate by reflecting solar radiation and insulating the ocean from the atmosphere. Due to feedback effects, the Arctic sea ice cover is changing rapidly. To accurately model this change, high-resolution calculations must incorporate: (1) annual cycle of growth and melt due to radiative forcing; (2) mechanical deformation due to surface winds, ocean currents and Coriolis forces; and (3) localized effects of leads and ridges. We have demonstrated a new mathematical algorithm for solving the sea ice governing equations using the material-point method with an elastic-decohesive constitutive model. An initial comparison with the LANL CICE code indicates that the ice edge is sharper using Materials-Point Method (MPM), but that many of the overall features are similar.

  14. New generation Arctic Drilling System: Overview of first year's performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loh, J.K.S.; Cusack, K.P.; Stamberg, J.C.

    1984-05-01

    This paper is a follow-up to OTC 4481: - Kulluk - An Arctic Exploratory Drilling Unit, presented at the 1983 OTC. A comparison between the original design basis of the rig and the first year's operational results is presented. The items compared are the towing performance, mooring system performance, the hull structure, and the drilling system. The towing and mooring system comparisons cover both open water and ice conditions. Ice management by icebreakers and logistics problems are reviewed.

  15. 05684ArcticLakes | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Artificial Barriers to Augment Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes Last Reviewed 6/26/2013 DE-NT0005684 Goal The goal of this project is to implement a snow control practice to enhance snow drift formation as a local water source to recharge a depleted lake despite possible unfavorable climate and hydrology preconditions (i.e., surface storage deficit and/or low precipitation). Performer University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK Background Snow is central to activities in

  16. University of Alaska, Fairbanks Final Report: Arctic Winds

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy Collegiate Wind Competition Written Report Final Deliverable Arctic Winds University of Alaska Fairbanks 4/28/16 2 Aerodynamics and Structure Matthew Pacheco - mtpacheco@alaska.edu Jessica Garvin - jtgarvin@alaska.edu Isaac Lammers - ijlammers@alaska.edu Gearbox and Brake Daniel Posey - dposey2@alaska.edu Elisha Dalbec - ejdalbec@alaska.edu Taylor Roth - taroth@alaska.edu Adam Becia - acbecia@alaska.edu Control and Power Systems Alexander Mitchell - ajmitchell4@alaska.edu Clay Allen -

  17. Structural monitoring helps assess deformations in Arctic pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyman, K.J.; Lara, P.F.

    1986-11-10

    Advanced structural monitoring systems can play an important role in the evaluation of arctic pipeline distortions along the alignment. These systems can influence pipeline design requirements, reduce capital costs, and improve operating reliability. Differential soil movements resulting from terrain instabilities are the main features which threaten a pipeline's structural integrity and affect the design of buried pipeline systems in the Arctic. Economic, aesthetic, and safety concerns make conventional buried construction an optimum design choice for an arctic crude-oil or gas-pipeline transportation system. However, variable frozen and thawed soil conditions underlying the pipeline along a discontinuous permafrost corridor pose a challenge to the design and operation of such systems. Crude-oil pipelines which must operate at elevated temperatures can be installed in unfrozen soils or in permafrost soils where initially frozen segments will exhibit limited settlement under the thawed conditions imposed by pipeline construction and operation. Ice-rich portions of the frozen alignment may have an unacceptable settlement potential for a warm buried pipeline. In contrast, natural-gas pipelines can be operated cold to increase throughput capability and to prevent the problems associated with thawing permafrost.

  18. Polar Gas to pick route for Arctic Y Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-26

    Polar Gas Project is considering four possible Y line routes to move gas reserves from the Arctic Islands and the MacKenzie Delta/Beaufort Sea areas to southern Canada. All four routes are west of the single line route proposed by Polar Gas Ltd. in 1977 to run from the Arctic Islands to Longlac, Ontario, and would connect with existing pipelines at either Longlac, Winnipeg, Calgary, or Edmonton. Marketable reserves in the High Arctic Islands are estimated at 12.7 trillion cubic feet, not counting 3-6 trillion cubic feet probably contained in recent discoveries; the MacKenzie Delta reserves are estimated at 5.8 trillion cubic feet. The gas will be chilled to 0C for passage through permafrost regions, to prevent thawing of the soil, but the gas will be at higher temperatures in other areas, with various construction techniques used to protect the area of discontinuous permafrost from thawing. More than $70 million has been spent on project studies. An application will be filed in 1981, and the pipeline could be completed in 7-10 years.

  19. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Iversen, Colleen M; Sloan, Victoria L; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; McGuire, A. David; Norby, Richard J; Walker, Anthony P; Warren, Jeffrey; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2015-01-01

    Arctic tundra is characterized by short-statured plant communities underlain by carbon (C)-rich soils and permafrost. Ecosystem C and nutrient cycles in tundra are driven by complex interactions between plants and their environment. However, root dynamics are one of the least understood aspects of plant growth in the Arctic. We synthesized available literature on tundra roots and discussed their representation in terrestrial biosphere models. Belowground biomass in tundra ecosystems can be an order of magnitude larger than aboveground biomass. Data on root production and turnover in tundra is sparse, limiting our understanding of the controls over root dynamics in these systems.more » Roots are shallowly distributed in the thin layer of soil that thaws each year, and are often found in the organic horizon at the soil surface. Species-specific differences in root distribution, mycorrhizal colonization, and resource partitioning may affect plant species competition under changing climatic conditions. Model representation of belowground processes has increased in complexity over recent years, but data are desperately needed to fill the gaps in model treatment of tundra roots. Future research should focus on estimates of root production and lifespan, and interactions between roots and the surrounding soil across the diversity of tundra ecosystems in the Arctic.« less

  20. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iversen, Colleen M; Sloan, Victoria L; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; McGuire, A. David; Norby, Richard J; Walker, Anthony P; Warren, Jeffrey; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2015-01-01

    Arctic tundra is characterized by short-statured plant communities underlain by carbon (C)-rich soils and permafrost. Ecosystem C and nutrient cycles in tundra are driven by complex interactions between plants and their environment. However, root dynamics are one of the least understood aspects of plant growth in the Arctic. We synthesized available literature on tundra roots and discussed their representation in terrestrial biosphere models. Belowground biomass in tundra ecosystems can be an order of magnitude larger than aboveground biomass. Data on root production and turnover in tundra is sparse, limiting our understanding of the controls over root dynamics in these systems. Roots are shallowly distributed in the thin layer of soil that thaws each year, and are often found in the organic horizon at the soil surface. Species-specific differences in root distribution, mycorrhizal colonization, and resource partitioning may affect plant species competition under changing climatic conditions. Model representation of belowground processes has increased in complexity over recent years, but data are desperately needed to fill the gaps in model treatment of tundra roots. Future research should focus on estimates of root production and lifespan, and interactions between roots and the surrounding soil across the diversity of tundra ecosystems in the Arctic.

  1. Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

  2. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soults, Scott

    2009-08-05

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

  3. sandia national labs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    sandia national labs

  4. Brookhaven National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

  5. Risk assessment of climate systems for national security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick; Brown, Theresa Jean; Cai, Ximing; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Constantine, Paul; Dalbey, Keith R.; Debusschere, Bert J.; Fields, Richard; Hart, David Blaine; Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Kerstein, Alan R.; Levy, Michael; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Najm, Habib N.; Overfelt, James Robert; Parks, Mancel Jordan; Peplinski, William J.; Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Taylor, Mark A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Villa, Daniel L.

    2012-10-01

    Climate change, through drought, flooding, storms, heat waves, and melting Arctic ice, affects the production and flow of resource within and among geographical regions. The interactions among governments, populations, and sectors of the economy require integrated assessment based on risk, through uncertainty quantification (UQ). This project evaluated the capabilities with Sandia National Laboratories to perform such integrated analyses, as they relate to (inter)national security. The combining of the UQ results from climate models with hydrological and economic/infrastructure impact modeling appears to offer the best capability for national security risk assessments.

  6. I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife Property of State--Preservation | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife Property of State--Preservation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife...

  7. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan ... Division of Migratory Bird Management U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Daniel Martin I.M. ...

  8. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and ...

  9. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    this visitor center exemplifies the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's commitment to lowering our ... dollar facility was appro- priated by Congress to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. ...

  10. File:03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife...