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1

Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Shupe, Matthew CIRES/NOAA/ETL Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Mixed-phase clouds play a unique role in the Arctic, where the delicate balance of phases in these clouds can have a profound impact on the surface radiation balance and various cloud-atmosphere-radiation-surface feedback processes. A better understanding of these clouds is clearly important and has been a recent objective of the ARM program. To this end, multiple sensors including radar, lidar, and temperature soundings, have been utilized in an automated cloud type classification scheme for clouds observed at the North Slope of Alaska site. The performance of this new algorithm at identifying mixed-phase cloud conditions is compared with an

2

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

3

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

4

Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the...

5

Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Parameterizations in Short-Range Weather Forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By making use of the in-situ data collected from the recent Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment, we have tested the mixed-phase cloud parameterizations used in the two major U.S. climate models, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory climate model (AM2), under both the single-column modeling framework and the U.S. Department of Energy Climate Change Prediction Program-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Parameterization Testbed. An improved and more physically based cloud microphysical scheme for CAM3 has been also tested. The single-column modeling tests were summarized in the second quarter 2007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement metric report. In the current report, we document the performance of these microphysical schemes in short-range weather forecasts using the Climate Chagne Prediction Program Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Parameterizaiton Testbest strategy, in which we initialize CAM3 and AM2 with realistic atmospheric states from numerical weather prediction analyses for the period when Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment was conducted.

Xie, S; Boyle, J; Klein, S; Liu, X; Ghan, S

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

7

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud and aerosol data acquired by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Convair-580 aircraft in, above, and below single-layer arctic stratocumulus cloud during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 were used to test three aerosol indirect effects hypothesized to act in mixed-phase clouds: the riming indirect effect, the glaciation indirect effect, and the cold second indirect effect. The data showed a correlation of R= 0.75 between liquid drop number concentration, Nliq, inside cloud and ambient aerosol number concentration NPCASP below cloud. This, combined with increasing liquid water content LWC with height above cloud base and the nearly constant profile of Nliq, suggested that liquid drops were nucleated from aerosol at cloud base. No strong evidence of a riming indirect effect was observed, but a strong correlation of R = 0.69 between ice crystal number concentration Ni and NPCASP above cloud was noted. Increases in ice nuclei (IN) concentration with NPCASP above cloud combined with the subadiabatic LWC profiles suggest possible mixing of IN from cloud top consistent with the glaciation indirect effect. The higher Nice and lower effective radius rel for the more polluted ISDAC cases compared to data collected in cleaner single-layer stratocumulus conditions during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment is consistent with the operation of the cold second indirect effect. However, more data in a wider variety of meteorological and surface conditions, with greater variations in aerosol forcing, are required to identify the dominant aerosol forcing mechanisms in mixed-phase arctic clouds.

Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg; Korolev, Alexei; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Lawson, R. P.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Wolde, Mengistu; Laskin, Alexander; Freer, Matthew

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

8

Parameterization of the Extinction Coefficient in Ice and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds during the ISDAC Field Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the history of attempts to directly measure cloud extinction, the current measurement device known as the Cloud Extinction Probe (CEP), specific problems with direct measurement of extinction coefficient, and the attempts made here to address these problems. Extinction coefficient is one of the fundamental microphysical parameters characterizing bulk properties of clouds. Knowledge of extinction coefficient is of crucial importance for radiative transfer calculations in weather prediction and climate models given that Earth's radiation budget (ERB) is modulated much by clouds. In order for a large-scale model to properly account for ERB and perturbations to it, it must ultimately be able to simulate cloud extinction coefficient well. In turn this requires adequate and simultaneous simulation of profiles of cloud water content and particle habit and size. Similarly, remote inference of cloud properties requires assumptions to be made about cloud phase and associated single-scattering properties, of which extinction coefficient is crucial. Hence, extinction coefficient plays an important role in both application and validation of methods for remote inference of cloud properties from data obtained from both satellite and surface sensors (e.g., Barker et al. 2008). While estimation of extinction coefficient within large-scale models is relatively straightforward for pure water droplets, thanks to Mie theory, mixed-phase and ice clouds still present problems. This is because of the myriad forms and sizes that crystals can achieve, each having their own unique extinction properties. For the foreseeable future, large-scale models will have to be content with diagnostic parametrization of crystal size and type. However, before they are able to provide satisfactory values needed for calculation of radiative transfer, they require the intermediate step of assigning single-scattering properties to particles. The most basic of these is extinction coefficient, yet it is rarely measured directly, and therefore verification of parametrizations is difficult. The obvious solution is to be able to measure microphysical properties and extinction at the same time and for the same volume. This is best done by in situ sampling by instruments mounted on either balloon or aircraft. The latter is the usual route and the one employed here. Yet the problem of actually measuring extinction coefficient directly for arbitrarily complicated particles still remains unsolved.

Korolev, A; Shashkov, A; Barker, H

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

9

A Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Gijs de Boer, Edwin W. Eloranta, Tempei Hashino, and Gregory J. Tripoli The University of Wisconsin - Madison (1) Introduction Ice formation appears to a dominant factor controlling the lifecycle of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. To date, our understanding of ice formation in these long-lasting cloud structures does not explain the formation of observed ice amounts. Particularly puzzling are observa-

10

Liquid layers were observed in the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) at temperatures down to 30C.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

down to ­30°C. S ignificant and interrelated atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial changes have been to be related to complex feedback processes unique to the Arctic. Arctic clouds have been identified | #12;playing a central role in several hypothesized feed- back processes (Curry et al. 1996; Vavrus

Eloranta, Edwin W.

11

Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds Harrington, Jerry The Pennsylvania State University Category: Modeling Mixed-phase stratus clouds are dominant in the Arctic during much of the year. These clouds typically have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Time scales for the complete glaciation of such clouds (the Bergeron process) are typically computed using the classical mass growth equations for crystals and liquid drops. However, mixed phase arctic stratus have significant infrared cooling and solar heating (during the warm season) rates that can affect the growth of water drops and ice crystals, and therefore the strength of the Bergeron process. To examine the influence of radiative heating and cooling on the Bergeron process, we incorporate a

12

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Title Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors de Boer, Gijs, William D. Collins, Surabi Menon, and Charles N. Long Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 11 Start Page 11937 Pagination 11937-11949 Abstract Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice) water paths are found to range between 11.0-366.4 (0.5-114.1) gm-2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286-2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm-2.

13

Mixed-Phase Cloud Retrievals Using Doppler Radar Spectra  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mixed-Phase Cloud Retrievals Using Mixed-Phase Cloud Retrievals Using Doppler Radar Spectra M. D. Shupe, S. Y. Matrosov, and T. L. Schneider National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado P. Kollias Rosentiel School of Marine Atmospheric Sciences University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction The radar Doppler spectrum contains a wealth of information on cloud microphysical properties. Typically, radar-based cloud retrievals use only the zeroth or first moments of the Doppler spectrum - reflectivity and mean Doppler velocity - to derive quantities such as cloud water content and particle characteristic size (e.g., Liou and Sassen 1994; Matrosov et al. 2002). When using only the moments of the Doppler spectrum, important spectral information can be lost, particularly when the spectrum is

14

Using Doppler spectra to separate hydrometeor populations and analyze ice precipitation in multilayered mixed-phase clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multimodality of cloud radar Doppler spectra is used to partition cloud particle phases and to separate distinct ice populations in the radar sample volume, thereby facilitating analysis of individual ice showers in multilayered mixed-phase clouds. A 35-GHz cloud radar located at Barrow, Alaska, during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment collected the Doppler spectra. Data from a pair of collocated depolarization lidars confirmed the presence of two liquid cloud layers reported in this study. Surprisingly, both of these cloud layers were embedded in ice precipitation yet maintained their liquid. Our spectral separation of the ice precipitation yielded two distinct ice populations: ice initiated within the two liquid cloud layers and ice precipitation formed in higher cloud layers. Comparisons of ice fall velocity versus radar reflectivity relationships derived for distinct showers reveal that a single relationship might not properly represent the ice showers during this period.

Rambukkange, Mahlon P.; Verlinde, J.; Eloranta, E. W.; Flynn, Connor J.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

DOE/SC-ARM-P-07-006 Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations with the NCAR Single Column Climate Model (SCAM) and ARM Observations Second Quarter 2007 ARM Metric Report April 2007 Xiaohong Liu and Steven J. Ghan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Shaocheng Xie Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research X. Lui, S.J. Ghan, and S. Xie, DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-006 Summary Mixed-phase stratus clouds are ubiquitous in the Arctic and play an important role in climate in this region. However, climate models have generally proven unsuccessful at simulating the partitioning of condensed water

16

Evaluation of A New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with the NCAR Climate Atmospheric Model (CAM3) and ARM Observations Fourth Quarter 2007 ARM Metric Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed-phase clouds are composed of a mixture of cloud droplets and ice crystals. The cloud microphysics in mixed-phase clouds can significantly impact cloud optical depth, cloud radiative forcing, and cloud coverage. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models is crude and the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets and ice crystals is prescribed as temperature dependent functions. In our previous 2007 ARM metric reports a new mixed-phase cloud microphysics parameterization (for ice nucleation and water vapor deposition) was documented and implemented in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3). The new scheme was tested against the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) observations using the single column modeling and short-range weather forecast approaches. In this report this new parameterization is further tested with CAM3 in its climate simulations. It is shown that the predicted ice water content from CAM3 with the new parameterization is in better agreement with the ARM measurements at the Southern Great Plain (SGP) site for the mixed-phase clouds.

X Liu; SJ Ghan; S Xie; J Boyle; SA Klein

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Mixed-phase clouds, thin cirrus clouds, and OLR over the tropics: observations, retrievals, and radiative impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of clouds are formed by deep convection and convergence of water vapor. Thus, it is very important to understand the radiative energy balance of the tropics and the effect of clouds on the radiation field. For mixed-phase clouds, error analyses pertaining...

Lee, Joonsuk

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-Phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of ice number concentration in clouds are important but still pose problems. The pattern of ice development in stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) offers an opportunity to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other ...

Damao Zhang; Zhien Wang; Andrew Heymsfield; Jiwen Fan; Tao Luo

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

E-Print Network 3.0 - arm mixed-phase arctic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for ice and ... Source: Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 95 Detection of supercooled liquid in mixedphase clouds using radar Doppler spectra Summary:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Analytical Investigation of Glaciation Time in Mixed-Phase Adiabatic Cloud Volumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Glaciation in mixed-phase adiabatic cloudy parcels is investigated analytically using two new equations: the equation for coexistence of liquid water and ice and the mass balance equation. The analysis of glaciation time is performed for a ...

M. Pinsky; A. Khain; A. Korolev

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nighttime Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Using AVHRR Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Using AVHRR Data D. A. Spangenberg, D. R. Doelling, and V. Chakrapani Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Hampton, Virginia T. Uttal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado Introduction Clouds play an important role in the Arctic energy budget. The magnitude and significance of the radiative impact of polar clouds, however, are not well known. Polar nocturnal clouds are often warmer or at the same temperature as the background snow surface, complicating cloud detection. Also, these clouds tend to be thin, with lower emittances than clouds occurring during the summer. Using only the infrared (IR) channels of satellite data to characterize cloud amount and distribution in the Arctic is

24

Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurement of ice number concentration in clouds is important but still challenging. Stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) provide a simple scenario for retrieving ice number concentration from remote sensing measurements. The simple ice generation and growth pattern in SMCs offers opportunities to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other cloud properties to infer ice number concentration quantitatively. To understand the strong temperature dependency of ice habit and growth rate quantitatively, we develop a 1-D ice growth model to calculate the ice diffusional growth along its falling trajectory in SMCs. The radar reflectivity and fall velocity profiles of ice crystals calculated from the 1-D ice growth model are evaluated with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) ground-based high vertical resolution radar measurements. Combining Ze measurements and 1-D ice growth model simulations, we develop a method to retrieve the ice number concentrations in SMCs at given cloud top temperature (CTT) and liquid water path (LWP). The retrieved ice concentrations in SMCs are evaluated with in situ measurements and with a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation with a bin microphysical scheme. These comparisons show that the retrieved ice number concentrations are within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, statistically.

Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Luo, Tao

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Z .Atmospheric Research 51 1999 4575 Cloud resolving simulations of Arctic stratus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the evolution of the simulated mixed-phase ASC layer are studied. Cloud layers either collapse through rapid glaciation and ice precipitation from the cloud layer or maintain a quasi-steady state. Sensitivity studies show that the stability of the mixed-phase cloud layer is dependent upon the temperature, ice

Harrington, Jerry Y.

26

Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations October 2011; accepted 26 October 2011; published 24 December 2011. [1] Arctic clouds simulated-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its

27

On the Representation of High-Latitude Boundary Layer Mixed-Phase Cloud in the ECMWF Global Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercooled liquid water (SLW) layers in boundary layer clouds are abundantly observed in the atmosphere at high latitudes, but remain a challenge to represent in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models. Unresolved processes such as ...

Richard M. Forbes; Maike Ahlgrimm

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: An Arctic Springtime  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Arctic Springtime Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layer observed during An Arctic Springtime Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layer observed during SHEBA Zuidema, Paquita RSMAS/MPO University of Miami Han, Yong NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Intrieri, Janet NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Key, Jeffrey Boston University Lawson, Paul SPEC Inc. Matrosov, Sergey NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Shupe, Matthew CIRES/NOAA/ETL Uttal, Taneil NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory The microphysical characteristics, radiative impact, and lifecycle of a long-lived, surface-based mixed-layer, mixed-phase cloud with an average temperature of approximately -20 C are presented and discussed. The cloud was observed during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic experiment from May 1 through May 10, 1998. Vertically-resolved properties of the liquid

29

On the Relationship between Thermodynamic Structure and Cloud Top, and Its Climate Significance in the Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inside inversion (CII)] was frequently observed at central Arctic Ocean sites, while observations from- nitudes of surface cloud warming and cooling are de- pendent upon the solar zenith angle, surface albedo-D-11-00186.1 ? 2012 American Meteor

Shupe, Matthew

30

Distribution and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Validation of Cloud Cover and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia D. A. Spangenberg and V. Chakrapani Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia Introduction Determination of cloud radiation interactions over large areas of the Arctic is possible only with the use of data from polar orbiting satellites. Cloud detection using satellite data is difficult in the Arctic due to the minimal contrast between clouds and the underlying snow surface in visible and infrared wavelengths. Polar clouds are frequently warmer or at the same brightness temperature as the background surface, complicating cloud detection. The brightness temperature differences between the

31

Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m{sup -2}. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

Liu X.; Lin W.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J.; Klein, S. A.; Shi, X.; Wang, Z.; Ghan, S. J.; Earle, M.; Liu, P. S. K.; Zelenyuk, A.

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

32

Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic clouds simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic Spring and Fall seasons performed under the Cloud- Associated Parameterizations Testbed (CAPT) framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase stratocumulus, and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level clouds, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons and cloud fraction in the Spring season. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave (LW) radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. The model with a new ice nucleation parameterization moderately improves the model simulations by increasing cloud liquid water content in mixed-phase clouds through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron- Findeisen (WBF) process. The CAM5 single column model testing shows that change in the homogeneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C has a substantial impact on the modeled liquid water content through the slowing-down of liquid and rain-related processes. In contrast, collections of cloud ice by snow and cloud liquid by rain are of minor importance for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic.

Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter; Zelenyuk, Alla

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

Relationship Between Arctic Clouds and Synoptic-Scale Variability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Alaskan coast (Curry et al. 1996; Intrieri et al. 1999). Cloud cover over the sea-ice typically maximizes in summer, whereas coastal Alaskan cloudiness typically maximizes...

34

Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

Dana E. Veron

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

35

A Synergistic Analysis of Cloud Cover and Vertical Distribution from A-Train and Ground-Based Sensors over the High Arctic Station Eureka from 2006 to 2010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Active remote sensing instruments such as lidar and radar allow one to accurately detect the presence of clouds and give information on their vertical structure and phase. To better address cloud radiative impact over the Arctic area, a combined ...

Yann Blanchard; Jacques Pelon; Edwin W. Eloranta; Kenneth P. Moran; Julien Delano; Genevive Sze

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Multiangle Observations of Arctic Clouds from FIRE ACE: June 3, 1998 Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May and June 1998 the Airborne Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (AirMISR) participated in the FIRE Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE). AirMISR is an airborne instrument for obtaining multiangle imagery similar to that of the satellite-borne MISR instrument. This paper presents a detailed analysis of the data collected on June 3, 1998. In particular, AirMISR radiance measurements are compared with measurements made by two other instruments, the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and the MODIS airborne simulator (MAS), as well as to plane-parallel radiative transfer simulations. It is found that the AirMISR radiance measurements and albedo estimates compare favorably both with the other instruments and with the radiative transfer simulations. In addition to radiance and albedo, the multiangle AirMISR data can be used to obtain estimates of cloud top height using stereoimaging techniques. Comparison of AirMISR retrieved cloud top height (using the complete MISR-based stereoimaging approach) shows excellent agreement with the measurements from the airborne Cloud Lidar System (CLS) and ground-based millimeter-wave cloud radar.

Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; King, M. D.; Moroney, C.; Davies, R.; Muller, J.-P. A. L.; Gerber, H.

2001-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

ARM - PI Product - Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsCloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent ProductsCloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals Site(s) NSA General Description Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May

38

Analysis of two independent methods for retrieving liquid water profiles in spring and summer Arctic boundary clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based remote sensing, optimal estimation, LES model with explicit microphysics, cloud liquid water algorithms Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project. An algorithm developed by Frisch et al. [1995, 1998 matrix of the LWC profile is calculated, an optimal estimation method is applied to the SHEBA data

Shupe, Matthew

39

Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

40

Charm -- a thermometer of the mixed phase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A charmed quark experiences drag and diffusion in the quark-gluon plasma, as well as strong interaction with the plasma surface. Our simulations indicate that charmed quarks created in heavy ion collisions will be trapped in the mixed phase and will come to equilibrium in it. Their momentum distribution will thus reflect the temperature at the confinement phase transition.

Benjamin Svetitsky; Asher Uziel

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Use of ARM/NSA Data to Validate and Improve the Remote Sensing Retrieval of Cloud and Surface Properties in the Arctic from AVHRR Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM/NSA Data to Validate and Improve the ARM/NSA Data to Validate and Improve the Remote Sensing Retrieval of Cloud and Surface Properties in the Arctic from AVHRR Data X. Xiong QSS Group, Inc. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service Office of Research and Applications Camp Springs, Maryland R. Storvold and C. Marty Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska K. H. Stamnes Stevens Institute of Technology Hoboken, New Jersey B. D. Zak Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Introduction Clouds in the Arctic have an important impact on the radiative energy balance. However, the effects of clouds still constitute one of the largest uncertainties in the study of climate change. Because the surface

42

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Abstract: A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic...

43

Using A-Train Arctic cloud observations to constrain and improve...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

than predicted by climate models... * * 2007 Stroeve et al., 2007 OUTLINE: 1. New A-train satellite data 2. Summer 2007 anomalies 3. Beyond Summer 2007 New cloud and radiation...

44

Electrically Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase Multiferroics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase2001). Chakhalian, J. et al. Magnetism at the interfacelocal nature of this magnetism. We find that the spontaneous

He, Q.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Mixed Phase of Charged AdS Black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the mixed phase of charged AdS black hole and radiation when the total energy is fixed below the threshold to produce a stable charged black hole branch. The phase diagram of the mixed phase is demonstrated for both fixed potential and charge ensemble. In the dual gauge picture, they correspond to the mixed phase of quark-gluon plasma~(QGP) and hadron gas in the fixed chemical potential and density ensemble respectively. In the nuclei and heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies, the mixed phase of exotic QGP and hadron gas could be produced. The mixed phase will condensate and evaporate into the hadron gas as the fireball expands.

Piyabut Burikham; Chatchai Promsiri

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - alesund arctic base Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at these locations. The Arctic, in particular, has seen concentrated aircraft- and ship-based... and Radiation The Arctic Study of Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR)...

47

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic valley findings Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

measurements Summary: : The results of this research will find use in improving models of weather and climate in the Arctic... PROJECT SUMMARY Cloud properties across the Arctic...

48

Correlation between present-day model simulation of Arctic cloud radiative forcing and sea ice consistent with positive winter convective cloud feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A positive feedback on winter sea-ice loss, based on warming due to radiative forcing caused by the onset of convective clouds in response to sea-ice loss, has recently been proposed. This feedback has thus far been ...

Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

49

Non-stoichiometric mixed-phase titania photocatalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed anatase-rutile phase, non-stoichiometric titania photocatalyst material is a highly reactive and is a UV and visible light responsive photocastalyst in the as-deposited condition (i.e. without the need for a subsequent thermal treatment). The mixed phase, non-stoichiometric titania thin film material is non-stoichiometric in terms of its oxygen content such that the thin film material shows a marked red-shift in photoresponse.

Chen, Le (Lakewood, CO); Gray, Kimberly A. (Evanston, IL); Graham, Michael E. (Evanston, IL)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

50

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic cloudy boundary Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Wisconsin at Madison Collection: Geosciences 11 Daytime Arctic Cloud Detection Based on Multi-Angle Satellite Data With Case Studies Summary: near cloud...

51

Atomic oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase Ag/Ag2O deposition...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase AgAg2O deposition. Atomic oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase AgAg2O deposition. Abstract: The flux of atomic oxygen generated in a...

52

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

during the 2004 Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) and 1997-98 Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic OceanFirst ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Clouds Experiment...

53

CAUSAL/ANTICAUSAL DECOMPOSITION FOR MIXED-PHASE DESCRIPTION OF BRASS AND BOWED STRING SOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAUSAL/ANTICAUSAL DECOMPOSITION FOR MIXED-PHASE DESCRIPTION OF BRASS AND BOWED STRING SOUNDS, in order to lo- cally model divergent oscillations in a steady way [4]. This mixed-phase representation- ous interaction instruments (CII): brass and bowed string. The aim of this work is to better

Dupont, Stéphane

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic stratospheric expedition Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Geosciences 2 STRATOSPHERIC OZONE DEPLETION: A REVIEW OF CONCEPTS AND HISTORY Summary: satellite observations of high-altitude clouds in the Antarctic and Arctic stratospheres....

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic research station Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Ecology 3 PROJECT SUMMARY Cloud properties across the Arctic Basin from surface and satellite measurements Summary: . This project will integrate and synthesize data from...

56

Laboratory Measurements of Contact Freezing by Dust and Bacteria at Temperatures of Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of freezing by aerosol particles in contact mode are presented. The fraction of particles catalyzing freezing is quantified for three mineral dusts and three strains of bacteria. This is the most comprehensive such dataset ...

Joseph Niehaus; Jennifer G. Becker; Alexander Kostinski; Will Cantrell

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The importance of feldspar for ice nucleation by mineral dust in mixed-phase clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... with a separate system in which cooling, temperature measurement and control were provided by a Stirling engine-powered flat-plate chiller (Grant-Asymptote EF600). Droplets were then deposited onto a ...

James D. Atkinson; Benjamin J. Murray; Matthew T. Woodhouse; Thomas F. Whale; Kelly J. Baustian; Kenneth S. Carslaw; Steven Dobbie; Daniel OSullivan; Tamsin L. Malkin

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

58

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Data during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment D. Spangenberg Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P....

59

Cloud Services Cloud Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Services Cloud Services In 2012 UCD IT Services launched an exciting new set of cloud solutions called CloudEdu, which includes cloud servers, cloud storage, cloud hosting and cloud network. The CloudEdu package includes a consultancy service in design, deployment, management and utilisation

60

Arctic Stratigraphy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... made in many parts of the Arctic from the previous reconnaissance level of geological knowledge (Norsk Polarinstitutt. Skrifter Nr. 135. By S. H. Buchan, A. Challiner, W ... , W. B. Harland and J. R. Parker. Pp. 92. Oslo : Norsk Polarinstitutt, 1965. 15 kr.). It is the result of work carried out ...

1966-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

Verlinde, J

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

62

WRF-SBM simulations of melting layer structure in mixed-phase precipitation events observed during LPVEx  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two mixed-phase precipitation events were observed on 21 September and 20 October 2010 over the southern part of Finland during the Light Precipitation Validation Experiment (LPVEx). These events have been simulated using the Weather Research and ...

Takamichi Iguchi; Toshihisa Matsui; Wei-Kuo Tao; Alexander P. Khain; Vaughan T. J. Phillips; Chris Kidd; Tristan LEcuyer; Scott A. Braun; Arthur Hou

63

Thermodynamically Anomalous Regions and Possible New Signals of Mixed Phase Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using an advanced version of the hadron resonance gas model we have found remarkable irregularities of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at chemical freeze-out. They include an abrupt change of the effective number of degrees of freedom at laboratory energies 8.9-11.6 AGeV and plateaus in the collision-energy dependence of the entropy per baryon, total pion number per baryon, and thermal pion number per baryon at laboratory energies 6.9-11.6 AGeV. Also at chemical freeze-out we observe a sharp peak in the dimensionless trace anomaly at laboratory energy 11.6 AGeV. On the basis of the generalized shock-adiabat model we demonstrate that these observations give evidence for the anomalous thermodynamic properties of the mixed phase at its boundary to the quark-gluon plasma. We argue that the trace anomaly peak and the local minimum of the generalized specific volume observed at a laboratory energy of 11.6 AGeV provide a signal for the formation of a mixed phase between the quark-gluon plasma and the hadron phase.

K. A. Bugaev; A. I. Ivanytskyi; D. R. Oliinychenko; V. V. Sagun; I. N. Mishustin; D. H. Rischke; L. M. Satarov; G. M. Zinovjev

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Thermodynamically Anomalous Regions and Possible New Signals of Mixed Phase Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using an advanced version of the hadron resonance gas model we have found remarkable irregularities of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at chemical freeze-out. They include an abrupt change of the effective number of degrees of freedom at laboratory energies 8.9-11.6 AGeV and plateaus in the collision-energy dependence of the entropy per baryon, total pion number per baryon, and thermal pion number per baryon at laboratory energies 6.9-11.6 AGeV. Also at chemical freeze-out we observe a sharp peak in the dimensionless trace anomaly at laboratory energy 11.6 AGeV. On the basis of the generalized shock-adiabat model we demonstrate that these observations give evidence for the anomalous thermodynamic properties of the mixed phase at its boundary to the quark-gluon plasma. We argue that the trace anomaly peak and the local minimum of the generalized specific volume observed at a laboratory energy of 11.6 AGeV provide a signal for the formation of a mixed phase between the quark-gluon plasma and the hadron phase.

Bugaev, K A; Oliinychenko, D R; Sagun, V V; Mishustin, I N; Rischke, D H; Satarov, L M; Zinovjev, G M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

PowerPoint Presentation - No Slide Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic mixed-phase clouds: Arctic mixed-phase clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms Igor Sednev (isednev@lbl.gov) and Surabi Menon (smenon@lbl.gov) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Motivation The impacts of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on climate in terms of changes in surface radiative budgets remain uncertain due to the complexities in representation of mixed-phase clouds. The environmental conditions that determine Arctic cloud properties need to be thoroughly analyzed to fully represent these clouds in climate models. To evaluate the impact of ice initiation mechanisms on cloud glaciation time and develop a simplified bulk microphysics scheme for use in GCMs we use a modified version of the GISS SCM initialized with data from the DOE Arctic

66

Dynamical and Microphysical Evolution during Mixed-Phase Cloud Glaciation Simulated Using the Bulk Adaptive Habit Prediction Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A bulk microphysics scheme predicting ice particle habit evolution has been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model. Large-eddy simulations are analyzed to study the effects of ice habit and number concentration on the bulk ice ...

Kara J. Sulia; Hugh Morrison; Jerry Y. Harrington

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weather and Forecasting During Mixed-Phase Arctic Weather and Forecasting During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment V.T. Yannuzzi, E. Clothiaux, H. Verlinde, and J. Harrington Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University Mont Alto, Pennsylvania Introduction and Important Events Prior to Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) was conducted across the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) during September 27-October 22, 2004. The experiment was funded by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) with the intention of increasing our knowledge about mixed-phase clouds in the arctic. In addition to radiosonde launches from four sites, lidar provided by the University of Wisconsin and the University of Alaska Fairbanks were used in

68

Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earths atmosphere and influence the Earths energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

69

ARM - 2009 AGU Presentations Featuring ARM Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects in Arctic Clouds D Lubin, AM Vogelmann 8:00 am, M-West 3004 Oral A31G-08, Ice Nucleation in Mixed-Phase Clouds: Parameterization Evaluation and Climate Impacts X...

70

Arctic Energy Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

S Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil CONTACTS Joel Lindstrom Arctic Energy Office National Energy Technology Laboratory 420 L Street, Suite 305 Anchorage, Alaska 99501...

71

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 68816897, 2009 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/6881/2009/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Mixed-phase clouds have water droplets and ice crystal precipitation in the 5­40 µm and 40­220 µm ranges and Physics Physical properties of High Arctic tropospheric particles during winter L. Bourdages1, T. J. Duck1-layer ice crys- tals, ice clouds, mixed-phase clouds, and aerosols. Two- dimensional histograms

Duck, Thomas J.

72

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP Campaign Links Campaign Images Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer Cloud IOP 2005.07.11 - 2005.08.07 Lead Scientist : William Shaw For data sets, see below. Description Investigators from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from a number of other institutions, carried out a month of intensive measurements at the ARM Climate Research Facility on the North Slope of Alaska in the summer of 2005. The purpose of these measurements was to determine how much the arctic land surface modifies the way low clouds reflect, absorb, and transmit solar and infrared radiation. This is an important problem because arctic clouds play a prominent role in

73

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Clouds and radiation in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Clouds and radiation in the Arctic coastal system - effects of local Clouds and radiation in the Arctic coastal system - effects of local heterogeneity Key, Erica University of Miami, RSMAS Minnett, Peter University of Miami Improving our comprehension of the influence of clouds in the polar regions is important as a prerequisite to refining our understanding of the earth's climate system. Polar clouds modulate the radiative heat loss to space in the regions that serve as the heat sink of the climate system. The local feedbacks between cloud formation and changing surface albedo that result from the ice melting and refreezing cycle, and the small space scales over which significant gradients occur, render this a very complex system to study. Difficulties in making appropriate measurements in the harsh Arctic environment lead to sparse, if not absent information on the

74

Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storm Peak Lab Cloud Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) Operated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy, the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) begins its inaugural deployment November 2010 in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment, or STORMVEX. For six months, the comprehensive suite of AMF2 instruments will obtain measurements of cloud and aerosol properties at various sites below the heavily instrumented Storm Peak Lab, located on Mount Werner at an elevation of 3220 meters. The correlative data sets that will be created from AMF2 and Storm Peak Lab will equate to between 200 and 300 in situ aircraft flight hours in liquid, mixed phase, and precipitating

75

Climate zones for maritime clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we use a commercially available lidar ceilometer to investigate how the basic structure of marine boundary-layer clouds varies for four different marine climate regimes. We obtained most of the data used in this analysis from ship-based ceilometer measurements recorded during several different atmospheric and oceanographic field programs conducted in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. For comparison, we show the results obtained at a mid-latitude continental location and at an ice camp on the Arctic ice shelf. For each analyzed case, we use an extended time series to generate meaningful cloud base and cloud fraction statistics. The Vaisala CT 12K ceilometer uses a GaAs diode laser to produce short (150 ns), high-intensity pulses of infrared radiation (904 nm wavelength). The return signals from a large number of consecutive pulses are coherently summed to boost the signal-to-noise ratio. Each resulting 30-s profile of backscattered power (15-m resolution) is analyzed to detect cloud layers using a specified cloud detection limit. In addition to measurements of cloud base, the ceilometer can also provide information on cloud fraction using a time series of the {open_quotes}cloud{close_quotes} or {open_quotes} no cloud{close_quotes} status reported in the 30-s data.

White, A.B.; Ruffieux, D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) will raise and lower a heavily instrumented tethered balloon system at regular intervals in the lower 2 kilometers of the atmosphere at Oliktok Point. Data obtained during the ALTOS campaign will provide a statistically significant set of observed in situ cloud properties for validating retrieval algorithms and help scientists reduce the uncertainty in the radiative forcing and heating rates on hourly time scales. The data will also help researchers gain a better understanding of the driving processes that control climate changes and determine the state of the Arctic climate system. Collaborators Science Team: The Pennsylvania State University, Stratton

77

Arctic energy resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is a vulnerable region with immense resources. These range from the replenishable (tidal energy, hydroelectricity, wood, biomass, fish, game, and geothermal energy) to the non-replenishable (coal, minerals, natural gas, hydrocarbon deposits). But the problems of exploiting such resources without damaging the environment of the Arctic are formidable. In this book all aspects are considered: occurrence of energy resources; the technological and economic aspects of exploration and exploitation; the environmental and social impact of technological development.

Rey, L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

6, 96559722, 2006 Arctic smoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussions Arctic smoke ­ record high air pollution levels in the European Arctic due to agricultural fires into the European Arctic and caused the most severe air pollution episodes ever recorded there. This paper confirms that biomass burning (BB) was in-5 deed the source of the observed air pollution, studies the transport

Boyer, Edmond

79

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Case Study of Horizontal Variability in Arctic Cloud Case Study of Horizontal Variability in Arctic Cloud Microphysical Properties M. Poellot and D. Brown Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota Overview The importance of arctic cloud properties to the surface radiative flux budget is well known, and accurate representation of these clouds is essential to proper modeling of the arctic environment. One of the interesting characteristics of arctic clouds is the prevalence of mixed phase cloud layers. In these mixed-phase clouds, the water content tends to dominate the radiative effects, causing them to act as all liquid clouds. Measurements have shown these clouds to be highly inhomogeneous in terms of ice and liquid water content. The horizontal dimension is important to proper interpretation of remotely sensed

80

CONTENTS Developing Alaskan Arctic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Developing Alaskan Arctic Developing Alaskan Arctic Potential ...........................................1 Commentary ...................................2 NETL Develops Strategic Partnership with the Alaska Center for Energy and Power ...8 Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater Produced Water Discharge ....10 Intelligent Production System for Ultra Deepwater with Short Hop Wireless Power and Wireless Data Transfer .........................................16 Snapshots ......................................19 CONTACTS Roy Long Technology Manager Ultra-Deepwater/Offshore 304-285-4479 roy.long@netl.doe.gov Ray Boswell Technology Manager Natural Gas Technology R&D 412-386-7614 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov Eric Smistad Technology Manager Oil Technology R&D 281-494-2619 eric.smistad@netl.doe.gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

participate in the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment in the Fall of 2004. From the UAV platform, the S-HIS measures the up and downwelling infrared radiance at high spectral...

82

Arctic & Antarctic Activity Book  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hundred animals scattered around Antarctica. 6 #12;Seals are mammals, and they have to breathe air to live seal Lemmings Orca King crab Walrus Arctic tern Ptarmigan Musk Ox Sculpin Cod Brittle star Black fly. Can you help this seal find her breathing hole in the ice sheet? 7 #12;Color Me! Male walruses have

83

Two-moment Bulk Stratiform Cloud Microphysics in the Grid-point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG (GAMIL)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-moment bulk stratiform microphysics scheme, including recently developed physically-based droplet activation/ice nucleation parameterizations has been implemented into the Grid-point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG (GAMIL) as an effort to enhance the model capability for studying aerosol indirect effects. Unlike the previous one-moment cloud microphysics scheme, the new scheme produces reasonable representation of cloud particle size and number concentration. This scheme captures the observed spatial variations in cloud droplet number concentrations. Simulated ice crystal number concentrations in cirrus clouds qualitatively agree with in-situ observations. The longwave and shortwave cloud forcing are in better agreement with observations. Sensitivity tests show that the column cloud droplet number concentrations calculated from two different droplet activation parameterizations are similar. However, ice crystal number concentration in mixed-phased clouds is sensitive to different heterogeneous freezing formulations. The simulation with high ice crystal number concentration in mixed-phase clouds has less liquid water path and weaker cloud forcing. Furthermore, ice crystal number concentration in cirrus clouds is sensitive to different ice nucleation parameterizations. Sensitivity tests also suggest that impact of pre-existing ice crystals on homogeneous freezing in old clouds should be taken into account.

Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Bin; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Minghuai

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARMST2006_mp.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterization of Arctic Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Matthew D. Shupe a , Pavlos Kollias b , Ed Luke b a Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences - University of Colorado and NOAA/ESRL/PSD and b Brookhaven National Laboratory, Atmospheric Science Division, Upton, NY Mixed-Phase Cloud Properties Cloud Occurrence. Mixed-phase clouds occur 45% +/- 10% of the time per year at the NSA site. There is a marked increase in mixed-phase cloudiness in the spring and fall transition seasons, mostly at heights below about 1 km. All mixed-phase cloud properties presented in this panel were derived from MMCR and MWR measurements at the NSA site for the time period of March 1998 through December 2004. The statistics in all plots cover this full time period. Microphysical

86

Longevity of the quark-gluon plasma and the mixed phase from intensity interferometry of high energy photons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-photon intensity interferometry is shown to provide an accurate measurement of lifetime of quark-gluon plasma created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions via the difference of outward and sidewardcorrelation radii. Under the assumption of a longitudinal, boost invariant expansion of the plasma, we obtain analytical expressions for the correlations from the quark-gluon plasma phase. A $3+1$ dimensional expansion of the plasma along with a first order phase transition to hadrons is next considered, and, leads to a source with two characteristic lifetimes, one for the quark-gluon plasma phase, and the other for the longer lived mixed phase. This may even help us to {\\em experimentally} determine the order of the phase transition.

Dinesh K. Srivastava; Charles Gale

1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of a Bulk Cloud Microphysics Model in Simulating Low-Level Evaluation of a Bulk Cloud Microphysics Model in Simulating Low-Level Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Using a New Single-Column Model Morison, H., Curry, J.A., and Mirocha, J., University of Colorado Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The MM5 NCAR/Penn State mixed-phase bulk microphysical parameterization is evaluated using a new single column model (ARCSCM) in the context of arctic low-level mixed-phase clouds. ARCSCM is developed from the Arctic Regional Climate System Model (ARCSyM). Three mixed-phase clouds over SHEBA in May 1998 are simulated using the MM5 parameterization. Liquid water path (LWP) is underpredicted by ~ 75% compared to observations for the two cases that have a significant ice content, while LWP is accurately predicted (within

88

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM M-PACE Data Used to Evaluate and Improve Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds ARM M-PACE Data Used to Evaluate and Improve Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Simulated in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Liu, and S Ghan. 2008. "Simulations of Arctic mixed-phase clouds in forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D04211, doi:10.1029/2007JD009225. Time-height cross sections of active remote sensing cloud layer (ARSCL) cloud frequency (a) and modeled cloud fraction (b) CAM3, (c) AM2, and (d) CAM3LIU at Barrow during M-PACE. The unit is %. Liquid fraction as a function of cloud height. (a) UND citation data, (b)

89

Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics J. Simmons, O. Lie-Svendsen, and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska The Arctic is a key element in determining the radiation budget of the earth. Within the polar regions, the net radiation (incoming solar radiation minus outgoing infrared radiation) is negative. To understand the role this energy deficit plays in the overall radiation budget, one must examine the prevalent atmospheric features of the Arctic. One such feature is a persistent layer of low-altitude, stratiform clouds found over the central Arctic predominantly from April to September (Tsay et al. 1984). These Arctic stratus clouds (ASC) modulate the earth's radiation budget

90

Radiative Impacts on the Growth of a Population of Drops within Simulated Summertime Arctic Stratus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of solar heating and infrared cooling on the growth of a population of drops is studied with two numerical modeling frameworks. An eddy-resolving model (ERM) simulation of Arctic stratus clouds is used to generate a dataset of 500 ...

Jerry Y. Harrington; Graham Feingold; William R. Cotton

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Distant origins of Arctic black carbon: A Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

profile, cloud temperature and amount, the seasonal cycle, and the tropopause level and accelerating polar ice melting. We use the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model to investigate is generally assumed. Citation: Koch, D., and J. Hansen (2005), Distant origins of Arctic black carbon

92

NETL: Arctic Energy Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facts/Issues Facts/Issues Average South-Central natural gas consumption in 2005 was: 13.9% gas utility 20.0% power generation 54.3% industrial-LNG sales, oil refining, and fertilizer manufacturing 7.2% field operations 4.6% other Due to a lack of natural gas deliverability, the Cook Inlet fertilizer plant terminated operations in May 2008. LNG sales are increasingly curtailed during cold weather due to peak demand shortages. The LNG export license is up for renewal in 2011. Exploration must find new reserves on the order of 500 Bcf, and that will only solve the natural gas shortage until approximately 2019. Challenges Natural gas in the Arctic, until recently, has been largely overlooked. Little is known about the possible breadth of the Arctic storehouse of natural gas apart from the resource associated with the currently producing

93

Arctic Energy Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

O O G R A M FAC T S Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil CONTACTS Joel Lindstrom Arctic Energy Office National Energy Technology Laboratory 420 L Street, Suite 305 Anchorage, Alaska 99501 907-271-3618 joel.lindstrom@contr.netl.doe.gov Albert B. Yost II Sr. Management Technical Advisor Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4479 albert.yost@netl.doe.gov

94

Cloud Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

95

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Jackson RC, GM McFarquhar, AV Korolev, ME Earle, PS Liu, RP Lawson, S Brooks, M Wolde, A Laskin, and M Freer. 2012. "The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, D15207, doi:10.1029/2012JD017668. Cloud mean ice crystal concentration Nice(D ≥ 50 micrometers) versus mean aerosol concentration (NPCASP) above cloud for all 41 vertical profiles

96

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performance of Forecasting Models Across the North Slope of Alaska Performance of Forecasting Models Across the North Slope of Alaska During the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment Victor Yannuzzi, Eugene Clothiaux, Johannes Verlinde and Jerry Harrington The Pennsylvania State University Introduction The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) was conducted across the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) from September 27 through October 22, 2004. The experiment was funded by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program to study the microphysics, radiative properties, thermodynamics, and life cycle of mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic. A focused set of observation stations and soundings were in place across the NSA (figure 1) where conditions could be expected to produce low-level mixed-phase clouds on

97

Data/model integration for vertical mixing in the stable Arctic boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a short Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Data on atmospheric trace constituents and the vertical structure of stratus clouds from a 1996 expedition to the central Arctic reveal mechanisms of vertical mixing that have not been observed in mid-latitudes. Time series of the altitude and thickness of summer arctic stratus have been observed using an elastic backscatter lidar aboard an icebreaker. With the ship moored to the pack ice during 14 data collection stations and the lidar staring vertically, the time series represent advected cloud fields. The lidar data reveal a significant amount of vertical undulation in the clouds, strongly suggestive of traveling waves in the buoyantly damped atmosphere that predominates in the high Arctic. Concurrent observations of trace gases associated with the natural sulfur cycle (dimethyl sulfide, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and aerosols show evidence of vertical mixing events that coincide with a characteristic signature in the cloud field that may be called dropout or lift out. A segment of a cloud deck appears to be relocated from the otherwise quasicontinuous layer to another altitude a few hundred meters lower or higher. Atmospheric models have been applied to identify the mechanism that cause the dropout phenomenon and connect it dynamically to the surface layer mixing.

Barr, S.; ReVelle, D.O.; Kao, C.Y.J.; Bigg, E.K.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Cloud Computing at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home R & D Archive Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Cloud computing is gaining a foothold in the business world, but can clouds meet the specialized needs of scientists?...

99

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARMST2009.shupeposter.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spring and Fall Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Spring and Fall Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Perspectives from the surface during ISDAC and MPACE Matthew Shupe a , David Turner b , Ed Eloranta b , Pavlos Kollias c p a CIRES - University of Colorado and NOAA/ESRL, b University of Wisconsin- Madison, c McGill University Summary Cloud Boundaries -Cloud top identified using radar, cloud base identified using high spectral resolution lidar or ceilometer. Phase Classification Uses phase specific signatures from radar lidar microwave radiometer and radiosonde measurements (Shupe GRL 2007) Retrieval Methods Analysis involves 6 weeks of single-layer, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud observations from the NSA site during MPACE (Sept-Nov 2004) and ISDAC (April-May 2008)  Similar structure and processes occur in Arctic stratiform

100

The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of arctic mixed-phase clouds Avramov, Alexander The Pennsylvania State University Category: Modeling Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic . Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. Previous studies have suggested that this longevity may be due to a paucity of ice nucleating aerosols (ice nuclei, or IN) in the Arctic. Such studies have shown that small changes in IN concentrations can cause large changes in the amount of liquid water within a mixed-phase stratus deck. We use the Regional

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Continuous Flow Ice Thermal Diffusion Chamber Continuous Flow Ice Thermal Diffusion Chamber Measurements of Ice Nuclei in the Arctic A.J. Prenni, P.J. DeMott, and S.M. Kreidenweis Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado D.C. Rogers National Center for Atmospheric Research EOL/RAF Broomfield, Colorado Introduction Mixed-phase stratus clouds are ubiquitous in the Arctic and play an important role in climate in this region. However, climate and regional models have generally proven unsuccessful at simulating arctic cloudiness, particularly during the colder months. Specifically, models tend to under-predict the amount of liquid water in mixed-phase clouds. This is problematic because cloud phase can greatly impact the radiative budget. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted from late

102

Cloud Computing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Cloud computing has been given a great deal of attention during recent years. Almost all the technology market leaders and leading hosting service providers (more)

Siddiqui, Muhammad Anas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

104

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Minimalist Approach to Modeling Complex Arctic Clouds Minimalist Approach to Modeling Complex Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shaw, R. A., Michigan Technological University - Physics Department Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Yang F, M Ovchinnikov, and RV Shaw. 2013. "Minimalist model of ice microphysics in mixed-phase stratiform clouds." Geophysical Research Letters, 40(14), doi:10.1002/grl.50700. Nordic winter landscape. Mixed-phase stratiform clouds are common features in the Arctic environment. They contain a mix of ice and "supercooled" water that, despite the freezing temperatures, remains in liquid form. Scientists aren't sure why these clouds exist in the Arctic for long periods of time, even while steadily losing ice particles through precipitation.

105

Cloud Computing Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the introductory chapter we define the concept of cloud computing and cloud services, and we introduce layers and types of cloud computing. We discuss the differences between cloud computing and cloud servi...

Borko Furht

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Introduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mixed-phase clouds, such as those found in the Arctic have presented quite a challenge to the modeling com- munity. Without modification, models have struggled to maintain the delicate balance between liquid and ice that must exist in order to maintain these clouds for ex- tended time periods, as they are observed in the atmo- sphere. In conjunction with the ARM Cloud Modeling

107

A 22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes in the Arctic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes 22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes in the Arctic J. Francis and J. Secora Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey Abstract Downwelling longwave fluxes (DLFs) over the Arctic surface have been generated from 22.5 years of radiances and retrievals from the TIROS (television and infrared observation satellite) operational vertical sounder (TOVS). The flux retrieval algorithm has been validated and improved using surface- based radiation and cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, and from the Surface Heat Balance of the Arctic (SHEBA) field program (1997-98) in the Beaufort Sea. The DLF product is presented on a 100 x

108

Time varying arctic climate change amplification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Editorial: Arctic marine biodiversity under change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marine biodiversity in the Arctic is changing in response...2011). The Arctic region has become warmer in the past three decades (ACIA 2005), and most global climate models indicate a continued, likely accelerate...

Haakon Hop; Tore Haug; Stig Falk-Petersen

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds During ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Avramov A, AS Ackerman, AM Fridlind, B van Diedenhoven, G Botta, K Aydin, J Verlinde, KV Alexei, W Strapp, GM McFarquhar, R Jackson, SD Brooks, A Glen, and M Wolde. 2011. "Towards ice formation closure in Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds during ISDAC." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T08, doi:10.1029/2011JD015910. Ice number size distributions as simulated (dendrites in red, aggregates in

111

Dynamic Cloud Infrastructure.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis will explore and investigate the possibility of implementing nested clouds to increase flexibility. A nested cloud is a private cloud running inside another (more)

Gundersen, Espen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Securing Cloud Storage Service.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Cloud computing brought flexibility, scalability, and capital cost savings to the IT industry. As more companies turn to cloud solutions, securing cloud based services (more)

Zapolskas, Vytautas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nondegenerate parametric generation of 2.2-mJ, few-cycle 2.05-?m pulses using a mixed phase matching scheme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the production of 2.2-mJ, ?6 optical-cycle-long mid-infrared laser pulses with a carrier wavelength of 2.05 ?m in a two-stage ?-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} nondegenerate optical parametric amplifier design with a mixed phase matching scheme, which is pumped by a standard Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse amplification system. It is demonstrated that relatively high pulse energies, short pulse durations, high stability, and excellent beam profiles can be obtained using this simple approach, even without the use of optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification.

Xu, Guibao; Wandel, Scott F.; Jovanovic, Igor, E-mail: ijovanovic@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Arctic Change 2009 Woodgate Wk 4 -Mon Typical Arctic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a cold (halocline) layer, which insulates the ice from the warm Atlantic water beneath (Shimada et al -divided into 2 channels by the Diomede Islands - split by the US- Russian border -ice covered from in the Arctic Implicated in the seasonal melt-back of ice In summer, Pacific waters are a source of near

Washington at Seattle, University of

115

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud-Top Humidity Inversions and the Maintenance of Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud-Top Humidity Inversions and the Maintenance of Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Submitter: Solomon, A., NOAA/ESRL/Physical Sciences Division Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Solomon A, MD Shupe, O Persson, and H Morrison. 2011. "Moisture and dynamical interactions maintaining decoupled Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus in the presence of a humidity inversion." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11, doi:10.5194/acp-11-10127-2011. Soundings of mid-day decoupled stratocumulus at Barrow, Alaska. (A) Measured 17:34Z 8 April 2008 at (71.33N,156.61W). (B) 50-m LES simulation 20Z 8 April 2008 at (71.33N,156.91W). Gray shading marks the extent of the

116

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation G.M. McFarquhar, M. Freer, and J. Um University of Illinois Urbana, IL R. McCoy and W. Bolton Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared

117

Mendeleev Ridge The Arctic Crossroads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

halocline" waters, which insulate the ice from the underlying warm Atlantic waters, come from the Arctic, wind, currents and ice motion in the region of the Chukchi Borderland 4. Some of the boundary current heat. Its fate can influence ice thickness. 2. The Pacific waters carry nutrients. The fate

Washington at Seattle, University of

118

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds Persist with Little Help from the Local Surface Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds Persist with Little Help from the Local Surface Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Shupe MD, OG Persson, IM Brooks, M Tjernstrom, J Sedlar, T Mauritsen, S Sjogren, and C Leck. 2013. "Cloud and boundary layer interactions over the Arctic sea ice in late summer." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 13, doi:10.5194/acp-13-9379-2013. Figure 1. Normalized profiles of (a) vertical velocity skewness and (b) variance, (c) turbulent dissipation rate, and (d) potential temperature. Black curves are all data, while red and green are for decoupled and coupled cases, respectively. Normalization is relative to the cloud top

119

Cloud Computing Adam Barker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Computing 1 Adam Barker #12;Overview · Introduction to Cloud computing · Enabling technologies · Di erent types of cloud: IaaS, PaaS and SaaS · Cloud terminology · Interacting with a cloud: management consoles · Launching an instance · Connecting to an instance · Running your application · Clouds

St Andrews, University of

120

Recent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of regional and global climate through the ice albedo feed- back, insulating effect, deep water formationRecent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO Jiping Liu; accepted 20 April 2004; published 13 May 2004. [1] Trends in the satellite-derived Arctic sea ice

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

122

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic) clouds is reviewed, with an emphasis on factors that may be expected to change in a changing climate of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

123

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

Plant, Robert

124

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic conspire to determine the statistics and cli- matology of layers of shallow (boundary layer) clouds of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

125

Cloud Computing: Rain-Clouds System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Cloud Computing is the on demand service can be provided to the users at any time. It delivers the software, data access, computing as a service rather than the product. The Cloud application simplifies the computing technology by providing pay-per-use customer relationship. It is the theory that familiar to cheaper devices with low processing power, lower storage capacities, great flexibility and many more things. The security of cloud computing is a major factor as users store sensitive and confidential information with cloud storage providers. The range of these providers may be un trusted and harmful. The purpose of adopting cloud computing in an organization is to decide between a public cloud ? and private cloud ? by means of privacy. Public clouds often known as provider clouds are administrated by third parties and services are offered on pay-per-use basis. Private clouds or internal clouds are owned by the single firm but it has some metrics such as lacking of availability of services (such as memory, server) and network resources which leads it to down. Due to this, technology moves toward the concept of Multi clouds or Rain Clouds. This paper displays the use of multi-clouds or rain clouds due to its ability to handle the huge amount of data traffic that affect the cloud computing user.

Harinder Kaur

126

Can a Convective Cloud Feedback Help to Eliminate Winter Sea Ice at High CO2 Concentrations?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have remote effects on global climate as well. Accurate forecasting of winter sea ice has significantCan a Convective Cloud Feedback Help to Eliminate Winter Sea Ice at High CO2 Concentrations? DORIAN) ABSTRACT Winter sea ice dramatically cools the Arctic climate during the coldest months of the year and may

Tziperman, Eli

127

Cloud Security by Max Garvey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Security Survey by Max Garvey #12;Cloudy Cloud is Cloudy What is the cloud? On Demand Service Network access Resource pooling Elasticity of Resources Measured Service #12;Cloud Types/Variants Iaa Cloud Public Cloud Hybrid Cloud combination. Private cloud with overflow going to public cloud. #12

Tolmach, Andrew

128

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Sednev, I., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Menon, S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: I Sednev, S Menon, and G McFarquhar. 2008. "Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion 8: 11755-11819. The vertical structure and radiative properties of persistent low-level Arctic clouds depend on their microphysics, and thus, estimation of the relative significance of the microphysical processes that occur in these

129

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterization of Mixed-Phase Clouds During Characterization of Mixed-Phase Clouds During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment from Satellite, Ground-Based, and In-Situ Data D.A. Spangenberg Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Agency - Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia S. Sun-Mack Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia M.D. Shupe Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Physical Sciences Division Boulder, Colorado M.R. Poellot University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota Introduction Stratiform clouds containing mainly liquid at their tops with increasing amounts of ice deep inside the cloud commonly occur over the Arctic. The ice crystals usually grow large enough to fall from the

130

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of a New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with Evaluation of a New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with SCAM, CAPT Forecasts and M-PACE Observations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Liu, X, S Xie, and SJ Ghan. 2007. "Evaluation of a new mixed-Phase cloud microphysics parameterization with the NCAR single column climate model (SCAM) and ARM M-PACE observations." Geophysical Research Letters 34, L23712, doi:10.1029/2007GL031446. Xie, S, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Liu and S Ghan. 2008. "Simulations of arctic mixed-phase clouds in forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research, in press.

131

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics #12;Cloud Computing: what is it? · Cloud Computing is a distributed infrastructure where resources, software, and data are provided in an on-demand fashion. · Cloud Computing abstracts infrastructure from application. · Cloud Computing should save you time the way software

Ferrara, Katherine W.

132

Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to improve representation of the Arctic in Earth System Models Topography influences snow cover, thermal

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic sediments svalbard Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: for transporting lead into the Arctic. We collected a large selection of sediment cores from around the Arctic... enters the Arctic Ocean from the Fram Strait, between...

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic european russia Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;NOAA Arctic Tiger Team Laura K. Furgione Deputy Assistant Administrator National Weather Service... Evidence of a Changing Arctic NOAA's Evolving Role in the Arctic...

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic energy technology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;NOAA Arctic Tiger Team Laura K. Furgione Deputy Assistant Administrator National Weather Service... Evidence of a Changing Arctic NOAA's Evolving Role in the Arctic...

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic spring site Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;NOAA Arctic Tiger Team Laura K. Furgione Deputy Assistant Administrator National Weather Service... Evidence of a Changing Arctic NOAA's Evolving Role in the Arctic...

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic animals-a review Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ROTHROCK... and the intensification of the cyclonic circulation in the eastern Arctic Ocean. The response of Arctic sea ice... into the eastern Arctic from the Canada Basin,...

138

Cloud Computing og availability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Computing og availability Projekt i pålidelighed Henrik Lavdal - 20010210 Søren Bardino Kaa - 20011654 Gruppe 8 19-03-2010 #12;Cloud Computing og availability Side 2 af 28 Indholdsfortegnelse ...........................................................................................5 Cloud computing

Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

139

Federal Cloud Computing: The Definitive Guide for Cloud Service Providers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Federal Cloud Computing: The Definitive Guide for Cloud Service Providers offers an in-depth look at topics surrounding federal cloud computing within the federal government, including the Federal Cloud Computing Strategy, Cloud Computing Standards, ...

Matthew Metheny

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Research Highlights Sorted by Submitter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Submitter Submitter A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Ackerman, A. Buffering of Ice Crystal Number Concentration to Ice Nucleus Abundance above Arctic Stratus ARM To Be or Not To Be Liquid? The Challenge of Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Modeling ARM Tropical Rain Clouds Still a Challenge to Cloud-Resolving Models ARM ASR Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds During ISDAC ARM Ackerman, T. P. Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models ARM Quantifying the Magnitude of Anomalous Solar Absorption ARM Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds ARM Structure of Cirrus Properties and its Coupling with the State of the Large-Scale Atmosphere ARM The k-Distribution Method for a SW Radiative Transfer Model ARM Ahlgrimm, M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toward Vehicular Service Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2 Open Mobile Cloud Requirement . . . . .3.1 Mobile Cloud

Weng, Jui-Ting

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Springtime Arctic haze contributions of submicron organic particles from European and Asian combustion sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The composition of Arctic aerosol, especially during the springtime Arctic haze, may play an important role in the radiative balance of the Arctic. The contribution of organic components to Arctic haze has only recently ...

Kroll, Jesse

143

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics EC2 and AMIs #12;Quick-starting an EC2 instance (let's get our feet wet!) Cloud Computing #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance Quick Start · On EC2 console, we can click on Launch Instance · This will let us get up and going quickly #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance

Ferrara, Katherine W.

144

Climate science: Vast costs of Arctic change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... As the amount of Arctic sea ice declines at an unprecedented rate, the thawing of offshore permafrost releases methane. A 50-gigatonne (Gt) reservoir of methane, stored in the ...

Gail Whiteman; Chris Hope; Peter Wadhams

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

145

BLM Arctic Field Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

vast area covered by the Arctic Field Office includes the 23-million-acre National Petroleum Reserve - Alaska, the largest block of federal land managed by a single agency. The...

146

ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Satellite Observation CAS Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer CCN Cloud Condensation Nuclei CIP Cloud Imaging Probe CPC Condensation Particle Counter CSPHOT Cimel sunphotometer CVI...

147

SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE VARIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE/Atmospheric Sciences Division Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Cloud-induced climate change. Cloud-radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo are three key quantities

148

Woodgate, Arctic Ocean Circulation Page 1:13 February 2012 ARCTIC OCEAN CIRCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deep) Bering Strait, through which about 0.8Sv (1Sv=106 m3 s-1 ) of water enters the Arctic. Properties: 206-221-3268 Accepted for Nature Education Knowledge Project, May 2012 Welcome to the Arctic Ocean Circle, contains deep (~ 4500m) basins, the slowest spreading ridges in the world, and about 15

Washington at Seattle, University of

149

First Observations of Tracking Clouds Using Scanning ARM Cloud Radars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large-drop formation (weather radar first echo). These measurements also complement cloud and precipitation tracking using ...

Paloma Borque; Pavlos Kollias; Scott Giangrande

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

National Strategy for the Arctic Region | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to provide input on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region 10-year plan to develop renewable energy resources in the Arctic region. DOE supports the goals and activities of...

151

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Kotzebue November 5, 2014 10:00AM to 12:00PM AKST Kotzebue, Alaska Northwest Arctic Heritage Center 171 3rd Ave. Kotzebue, AK 9975...

152

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Kotzebue November 5, 2014 1:30PM to 3:30PM AKST Kotzebue, Alaska Northwest Arctic Heritage Center 171 3rd Ave. Kotzebue, AK 9975...

153

Tuktoyaktuk : responsive strategies for a new Arctic urbanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Canadian Arctic is facing a set of compounding crises that will drastically impact the future of its coastal frontier. At a time when climate change is having a detrimental impact on the Arctic landscape, Northern ...

Ritchot, Pamela (Pamela Rae)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Carbon fixation by phytoplankton in high Arctic lakes: Implications of ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Photosynthesis vs. irradiance relationships were determined for phytoplankton communities from seven lakes in the Canadian high Arctic, including...

155

NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

156

ARM - Measurement - Cloud fraction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud fraction Fraction of sky covered by clouds, observed directly or derived from SW...

157

ARM - Measurement - Cloud size  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud size Information about the physical dimensions of a cloud, including such measurements...

158

North Australian Cloud Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A satellite classification and climatology of propagating mesoscale cloud fines in northern Australia is presented. These cloud fines range from long, narrow lines of shallow convection to extensive deep convective squall lines with mesoscale ...

W. Drosdowsky; G. J. Holland

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Marine cloud brightening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...will not be as effective in marine stratocumulus clouds that are...Engineering steps to implement marine cloud brightening (a) Introduction...brightening by increasing the CCN of marine stratus clouds (by way of...vessel and the optimum means of propulsion. In fact, both these aspects...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

XSEDE Cloud Survey Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

Walter, M.Todd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Research Cloud Computing Recommendations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Cloud Computing Recommendations SRCPAC December 3, 2014 #12;Mandate and Membership SRCPAC convened this committee in Sept 2014 to investigate the role that cloud computing should play in our & Academic Affairs (Social Work) #12;Questions discussed · What cloud resources are available? · Which kinds

Qian, Ning

162

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Speaker(s): Matthew T. Reagan Date: March 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane may have had a significant role in regulating past climate. However, the behavior of contemporary permafrost deposits and oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. A recent expedition to the west coast of Spitsbergen discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor at depths that correspond to the upper limit of the receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the

163

Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA from Multispectral MODIS Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA from Multispectral MODIS Data D. A. Spangenberg Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T. Uttal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Q. Z. Trepte and S. S.-Mack Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia Introduction Improving climate model predictions over earth's Polar Regions requires a complete knowledge of polar cloud microphysics. Over the Arctic, there is minimal contrast between the clouds and background snow surface observed in satellite data, especially for visible wavelengths. This makes it difficult to

164

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hybrid cloud combines aspects of public and private clouds: a company may build a compute cloud own its own infrastructure,

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Development of Exhibit on Arctic Climate Change Called The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely Exhibition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The exhibition, The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely, was developed at the Smithsonian Institutions National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) as a part of the museums Forces of Change exhibit series on global change. It opened to the public in Spring 2006, in conjunction with another Forces of Change exhibit on the Earths atmosphere called Change Is in the Air. The exhibit was a 2000 square-foot presentation that explored the forces and consequences of the changing Arctic as documented by scientists and native residents alike. Native peoples of the Arctic have always lived with year-to-year fluctuations in weather and ice conditions. In recent decades, they have witnessed that the climate has become unpredictable, the land and sea unfamiliar. An elder in Arctic Canada recently described the weather as uggianaqtuq an Inuit word that can suggest strange, unexpected behavior, sometimes described as that of a friend acting strangely. Scientists too have been documenting dramatic changes in the Arctic. Air temperatures have warmed over mostthough not allof the Arctic since the 1950s; Arctic precipitation may have increased by as much as 8%; seasonal melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet has increased on average by 16% since 1979; polar-orbiting satellites have measured a 1520% decline in sea ice extent since the 1970s; aircraft reconnaissance and ship observations show a steady decrease in sea ice since the 1950s. In response to this warming, plant distributions have begun to shift and animals are changing their migration routes. Some of these changes may have beneficial effects while others may bring hardship or have costly implications. And, many scientists consider arctic change to be a bell-weather for large-scale changes in other regions of the world. The exhibition included text, photos artifacts, hands-on interactives and other exhibitry that illustrated the changes being documented by indigenous people and scientists alike.

Stauffer, Barbara W.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contrasting Properties of Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Contrasting Properties of Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Arctic Stratus Sampled During the Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment G. Zhang and G.M. McFarquhar University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois J. Verlinde The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania M. Poellot University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota A. Heymsfield National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction The microphysical properties of both single-layer and multi-layer Arctic boundary layer stratus sampled during Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) are studied. In situ measurements are used to determine how cloud properties, such as phase, size distribution and shape of cloud particles, vary as a function of normalized cloud altitude (Z

168

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Putting the Pieces Together Putting the Pieces Together Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fan J, S Ghan, M Ovchinnikov, X Liu, P Rasch, and A Korolev. 2011. "Representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds and the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process in climate models: Perspectives from a cloud-resolving study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T07, doi:10.1029/2010JD015375. PNNL's Arctic mixed-phase cloud research was augmented with field observations from the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in Northern Alaska. Photo courtesy of A. Korolev, Environment Canada. Vertical cross sections of (a) the vertical velocity (the contour lines)

169

Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties Working Group Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update Low Clouds Update Jennifer Comstock Jennifer Comstock Dave Turner Dave Turner Andy Andy Vogelmann Vogelmann Instruments Instruments 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer Deployed during COPS AMF Deployed during COPS AMF Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Crewell Crewell & & L L ö ö hnert hnert ) ) See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening 183 GHz (GVR) deployed at the NSA 183 GHz (GVR) deployed at the NSA Neural network algorithm to retrieve PWV & LWP (Maria Neural network algorithm to retrieve PWV & LWP (Maria Cadeddu Cadeddu ) ) Potential VAP candidate (RPWG) Potential VAP candidate (RPWG)

170

Oil exploration ramps up in US Arctic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... run in US Arctic waters since 2000, and could mark the start of the first offshore commercial drilling in the American north, although it would take another decade to establish ... although it would take another decade to establish production wells. However, many fear that offshore drilling in the challenging conditions of the north, and around sensitive and understudied ecological ...

Nicola Jones

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

171

Carbon dioxide in Arctic and subarctic regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three year research project was presented that would define the role of the Arctic ocean, sea ice, tundra, taiga, high latitude ponds and lakes and polar anthropogenic activity on the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere. Due to the large physical and geographical differences between the two polar regions, a comparison of CO/sub 2/ source and sink strengths of the two areas was proposed. Research opportunities during the first year, particularly those aboard the Swedish icebreaker, YMER, provided additional confirmatory data about the natural source and sink strengths for carbon dioxide in the Arctic regions. As a result, the hypothesis that these natural sources and sinks are strong enough to significantly affect global atmospheric carbon dioxide levels is considerably strengthened. Based on the available data we calculate that the whole Arctic region is a net annual sink for about 1.1 x 10/sup 15/ g of CO/sub 2/, or the equivalent of about 5% of the annual anthropogenic input into the atmosphere. For the second year of this research effort, research on the seasonal sources and sinks of CO/sub 2/ in the Arctic will be continued. Particular attention will be paid to the seasonal sea ice zones during the freeze and thaw periods, and the tundra-taiga regions, also during the freeze and thaw periods.

Gosink, T. A.; Kelley, J. J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

BNL | Cloud Lifecycle Infrastructure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure An important component of any long-term atmospheric measurement program is the quality control and maintenance of the datastreams from instrument systems. Further, the raw measurements from atmospheric remote sensing instrumentation are not directly useable by the majority of the scientific community. These raw measurements must be interpreted and converted to geophysical quantities that can be more readily used by a greater number of scientists to address important questions regarding the Earth's climate system. The cloud life cycle infrastructure group at BNL is led by Dr. Michael Jensen and is responsible for the development and production of cloud-related value-added products (VAPs). The cloud life cycle infrastructure group also provides mentorships for the millimeter cloud

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean expedition Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic will lead to a better understanding of how the Summary: between the U.S. and Russia began with the expedition of the Bering and Chukchi Seas ( Arctic Ocean... . Arctic...

174

Edward Luke | BNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Edward Luke Edward Luke Advanced Applications Engineer Education Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, B.S., Electrical Engineering Membership American Geophysical Union Areas of Interest Remote sensing of the atmosphere Cloud property retrieval algorithms Computational intelligence Pattern recognition Data fusion Radar meteorology Climate modeling Parallel/GPU computing Experience Developed a range of novel techniques for observing the microphysics and dynamics of clouds and precipitation using millimeter wavelength radars, particularly their Doppler spectra, with an emphasis on improving our detailed observational capabilities of cloud-precipitation mixtures and the formation of precipitation within cloud, including drizzling stratocumulus and Arctic mixed-phase clouds. Created algorithms for the classification of cloud types and

175

Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterization...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterizations, and Indirect Aerosol Effects P. H. Daum and Y. Liu Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York...

176

ARM - Measurement - Cloud top height  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud top height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the highest level of the atmosphere where...

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic pond ecosystems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic slope annual Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ecosystem final Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean freshwater Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8. Forecasting Environmental Resilience of Arctic Freshwater Resources... and persistent ocean currents to feed energy ... Source: Wagner, Diane - Institute of Arctic Biology,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic climate change Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- 2 THE NEW ARCTIC Climate change being observed most dramatically... Spill Arctic weather or ice conditions can suddenly change - The inexperienced will certainly...

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine oil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mammals... the Arctic (Figure 3). The loss of sea ice affects marine access, regional weather, ecosystem changes... spill response and damage assessment. As the Arctic Ocean...

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic climate system Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of ecosystems around... and Detect Arctic Climate and Ecosystem Changes 3) Improve Weather and Water Forecasts and Warnings 4... ice conditions. These changes in Arctic ......

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic vegetation types Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Dynamic vegetation Figure 3: Evolution of regional arctic models. Geophysical ocean-sea ice... that can be adapted to focus resolution on the Arctic. Stand alone ASM...

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic springtail megaphorura Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Fish Resources of the Arctic Management Area... (Arctic FMP) and Amendment 29 to the Fishery Management Plan for Bering Sea Aleutian Islands King Source: NOAA Marine...

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic cooling silentium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;Abstract The Arctic is melting ...fast. 12;IMPACTS OF A WARMING ARCTIC... 's Greenhouse Effect Thesur face cools by radiating heat energyupward. ... Source: Zender, Charles -...

187

Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

188

Cloud Computing: An Architectural Perspective .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cloud Computing is a term heavily used in today's world. Not even a day passes by without hearing the words "Cloud Computing". It has become (more)

Pandya, Hetalben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Profiling clouds' inner life | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inner life Subgrid modeling pinpoints cloud transformation to uncover true reflective power An accurate understanding of clouds over the ocean is important for climate change...

190

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

191

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

Luther, Douglas S.

192

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent...

193

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

194

ARM - Measurement - Cloud extinction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

extinction extinction ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud extinction The removal of radiant energy from an incident beam by the process of cloud absorption and/or scattering. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer Field Campaign Instruments CEP : Cloud Extinction Probe CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters

195

Microsoft PowerPoint - arm_poster_luo2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

§ § Vertical Profiles of Microphysical Properties § Vertically Integrated Water Contents § Surface Downward Radiative Fluxes Mixed-phase Arctic Clouds Simulated by a Cloud-resolving Model: Comparison with Aircraft Observations and Sensitivity to Microphysics Parameterization Yali Luo 1,2 , Kuan-Man Xu 2 , Hugh Morrison 3 , Greg McFarquhar 4 1 National Institute of Aerospace; 2 NASA Langley Research Center; 3 National Center for Atmospheric Research; 4 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Objectives § To evaluate the ability of a cloud-resolving model (CRM) to simulate mixed-phase stratiform (MPS) Arctic clouds; § To explore the sensitivity of the CRM simulated MPS to microphysics parameterization. Case and Evaluation Data § Case Description: In the period 9-14 October, 2004,

196

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of mixed phase cloud and precipitation by aircraft penetration John Hallett and German Vidaurre Desert Research Institute Cloud particles Mixed phase particles Freezing...

197

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM STM_Shree_Mar08  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small Ice Crystals Small Ice Crystals In Arctic Cirrus Clouds ABSTRACT ABSTRACT Measurement of small ice crystals (D < 60 µm) remains an unsolved and controversial issue in the cloud physics community. Concentrations of small ice crystals are hard to measure due to shattering of crystals at probe inlets. However, these small ice crystals alter cirrus cloud radiative properties and may affect the cirrus cloud feedback in global climate models. To facilitate better estimation of small ice crystal concentrations in cirrus clouds, a new ground- based remote sensing technique has been used in combination with in situ aircraft measurements. That is, data from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) conducted at Barrow on the north slope of Alaska (Fall 2004) is being used to develop an Arctic

198

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use of In-Situ Observations of Arctic Clouds to Use of In-Situ Observations of Arctic Clouds to Understand Impacts of Mixed-Phase Clouds on Single- Scattering Properties: Applications to Climate Models G. M. McFarquhar and G. Zhang University of Illinois Department of Atmospheric Sciences Urbana, Illinois S. Cober Clouds Physics Research Division Meteorological Service of Canada Downsview, Ontario Introduction Complex feedback mechanisms involving sea ice, snow cover, and clouds must be better understood and characterized before large disagreements between general circulation model (GCM) simulations of Arctic conditions can be reduced and future predictions of climate change refined. Observations obtained during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional

199

Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Critical Mechanisms for the Formation of Extreme Arctic Sea-Ice Extent in the Summers of 2007 and 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A warming Arctic climate is undergoing significant e 21 nvironmental change, most evidenced by the reduction of Arctic sea-ice extent during the summer. In this study, we examine two extreme anomalies of September sea-ice extent in 2007 and 1996, and investigate the impacts of cloud fraction (CF), atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV), downwelling longwave flux (DLF), surface air temperature (SAT), pressure and winds on the sea-ice variation in 2007 and 1996 using both satellite-derived sea-ice products and MERRA reanalysis. The area of the Laptev, East Siberian and West Chukchi seas (70-90oN, 90-180oE) has experienced the largest variation in sea-ice extent from year-to-year and defined here as the Area Of Focus (AOF). The record low September sea-ice extent in 2007 was associated with positive anomalies 30 of CF, PWV, DLF, and SAT over the AOF. Persistent anti-cyclone positioned over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia induced easterly zonal and southerly meridional winds. In contrast, negative CF, PWV, DLF and SAT anomalies, as well as opposite wind patterns to those in 2007, characterized the 1996 high September sea-ice extent. Through this study, we hypothesize the following positive feedbacks of clouds, water vapor, radiation and atmospheric variables on the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007. The record low sea-ice extent during the summer 2007 is initially triggered by the atmospheric circulation anomaly. The southerly winds across the Chukchi and East Siberian seas transport warm, moist air from the north Pacific, which is not only enhancing sea-ice melt across the AOF, but also increasing clouds. The positive cloud feedback results in higher SAT and more sea-ice melt. Therefore, 40 more water vapor could be evaporated from open seas and higher SAT to form more clouds, which will enhance positive cloud feedback. This enhanced positive cloud feedback will then further increase SAT and accelerate the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007.

Dong, Xiquan; Zib, Benjamin J.; Xi, Baike; Stanfield, Ryan; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Xiangdong; Lin, B.; Long, Charles N.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cloud Computing Synopsis and Recommendations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document reprises the NIST-established definition of cloud computing, describes cloud computing benefits and open issues, presents an overview of major classes of cloud technology, and provides guidelines and recommendations on how organizations ... Keywords: cloud computing, computer security, virtualization

Mark Lee Badger; Timothy Grance; Robert Patt-Corner; Jeffery M, Voas

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

Plant, Robert

203

Floating Glacial Ice Caps in the Arctic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...obtained from isotopic studies of the Camp Century ice core. The second is based...obtained from isotopic studies of the Camp Century ice core. The second is based...Arctic Ocean Arctic region benthonic Camp Century Cenozoic cores deep-sea evidence...

Wallace S. Broecker

1975-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

Global warming triggers the loss of a key Arctic refugium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research articles 1001 69 60 Global warming triggers the loss of a key Arctic...change that is being driven by global warming. In stark contrast to the amplified...planet's last Arctic refugia from global warming, largely because of the moderating...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fjord sediments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediments Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic fjord sediments...

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean sediments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediments Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic ocean sediments...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic gas pipeline Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pipeline Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic gas pipeline...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fjord sediment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic fjord sediment...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean sediment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic ocean sediment...

210

Evaluating Model Parameterizations of Arctic Processes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

865-9026 References Clothiaux, E. E., T. P. Ackerman, G. G. Mac, K. P. Moran, R. T. Marchand, M. A. Miller, and B. E. Martner, 2000: Objective determination of cloud heights and...

211

3. New Cloud Climatology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Cloud Climatology New Cloud Climatology Computed for the summers (May-Au- gust) 2000 through 2004 (Berg and Kassianov 2008). Uses ARSCL VAP, Total Sky Imager, and radar wind profiler. * * Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site Larry Berg, William Gustafson, and Evgueni Kassianov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1. Motivation Shallow clouds are poorly predicted by current global and regional scale models. A new parameterization has been devel- oped that links the boundary-layer turbu- lence and the shallow clouds. 2. The CuP Parameterization The Cumulus Potential (CuP) param- eterization uses Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of temperature and moisture to represent the subgrid scale

212

In Clouds We Trust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......can bring. Many have realised that giving a third party control of part of the IT infrastructure can help reduce capital expenditure and maximise asset utilisation to provide a quantitative return on investment (ROI). Cloud can also remove resource......

Jim Damoulakis

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Moving into the Cloud.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cloud computing is the notion of abstracting and outsourcing hardware or software resources over the Internet, often to a third party on a pay-as-you-go basis. (more)

Mikalsen, Christian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Forecast Calls for Better Models: Examining the Core  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forecast Calls for Better Models: Examining the Core Forecast Calls for Better Models: Examining the Core Components of Arctic Clouds to Clear Their Influence on Climate For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight Predicting how atmospheric aerosols influence cloud formation and the resulting feedback to climate is a challenge that limits the accuracy of atmospheric models. This is especially true in the Arctic, where mixed-phase (both ice- and liquid-based) clouds are frequently observed, but the processes that determine their composition are poorly understood. To obtain a closer look at what makes up Arctic clouds, scientists characterized cloud droplets and ice crystals collected at the North Slope of Alaska as part of the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) field study

216

Thin Cloud Length Scales Using CALIPSO and CloudSat Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin clouds are the most difficult cloud type to observe. The recent availability of joint cloud products from the active remote sensing instruments aboard CloudSat and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) facilitates...

Solbrig, Jeremy E.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Sulfate aerosols and polar stratospheric cloud formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, it was generally assumed that gas-phase chemical reactions controlled the abundance of stratospheric ozone. However, the massive springtime ozone losses over Antarctica first reported by Farman et al in 1985 could not be explained on the basis of gas-phase chemistry alone. In 1986, Solomon et al suggested that chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) could be important for the observed ozone losses. Since that time, an explosion of laboratory, field, and theoretical research in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry has occurred. Recent work has indicated that the most important heterogeneous reaction on PSCs is ClONO[sub 2] + HCl [yields] Cl[sub 2] + HNO[sub 3]. This reaction converts inert chlorine into photochemically active Cl[sub 2]. Photolysis of Cl[sub 2] then leads to chlorine radicals capable of destroying ozone through very efficient catalytic chain reactions. New observations during the second Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition found stoichiometric loss of ClONO[sub 2] and HCl in air processed by PSCs in accordance with reaction 1. Attention is turning toward understanding what kinds of aerosols form in the stratospheric, their formation mechanism, surface area, and specific chemical reactivity. Some of the latest findings, which underline the importance of aerosols, were presented at a recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration workshop in Boulder, Colorado.

Tolbert, M.A. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States))

1994-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

218

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARMST2007_mp.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Motions in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Motions in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Matthew D. Shupe a , Pavlos Kollias b , Ola Persson a , Ed Luke b Greg McFarquhar c , Michael Poellot d , Edwin Eloranta e a CIRES - University of Colorado and NOAA/ESRL/PSD, b Brookhaven National Laboratory, c University of Illinois, d University of North Dakota, e University of Wisonsin Mixed-Phase Cloud Properties Air Motions from Doppler Spectra Funded by: ARM Grant DE-FG02-05ER63965 Summary A Conceptual Model relating air motions and microphysics A Doppler Spectrum Small liquid droplets trace vertical air motions Liquid Droplets Ice Particles Correction for spectral broadening W Aircraft comparisons during M-PACE Vertical velocity (W) and turbulent dissipation rates (ε). Retrieval data are mean (symbol) and middle 90% of data (line)

219

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

220

Droplet Number Prediction in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model Steven Ghan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Influence of Arctic Aerosol on Clouds G. McFarquhar, S. Ghan, J. Verlinde, B. Schmid, J. Tomlinson, J. Hubbe, D. Ronfeld, S. Brooks, D. Collins, D. Cziczo, M. Dubey, M. Gilles, I. Gultepe, G. Kok, A. Korolev, A. Laskin, P. Lawson, P. Liu, C. Mazzoleni, A. Macdonald, R. Moffet, W. Strapp, M. Wolde, A. Zelenyuk, C. Flynn, D. Lubin, M. Shupe, D. Turner M. Ovchinnikov, S. Xie, H. Morrison & A. Soloman Key Issues 1. How do properties of arctic aerosol in April differ from those measured in October during the Mixed Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE)? 2. To what extent do different properties of arctic aerosol during April produce differences in cloud microphysical and macrophysical properties and the surface energy balance?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lidar-Based Retrievals of the Microphysical Properties of Lidar-Based Retrievals of the Microphysical Properties of Mixed-Phase Arctic Stratus Clouds and Precipitation G. de Boer and E. Eloranta The University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin Abstract The University of Wisconsin Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar has acquired months of continuous measurements in two high Arctic locations. These measurements have been combined with those taken by a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Environmental Technological Laboratory millimeter wave cloud radar to establish a long-range data set of cloud microphysical property retrievals. These properties include effective particle size, number density, and water content. Examples from this data set for arctic stratus are reviewed here, along with the methodology used in the retrievals.

222

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds In a heated battle, ice crystals win the competition for cloud water vapor The mighty cloud ice crystal appears deceptively...

223

Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

Brodt-Giles, D.

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota · Mariusz Starzec #12;Motivation Compare University of Wyoming (UWyo) and Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT) cloud condensation nuclei condensation nuclei concentration (CCNC) at any supersaturation (SS) #12;Background Aerosols act as nuclei

Delene, David J.

225

HNCO in molecular clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a survey of 18 molecular clouds, HNCO J/sub K/-1K1..-->..J'/sub K/'-1K'1 = 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 05/ and 4/sub 04/..-->..3/sub 03/ emission was etected in seven clouds, and possibly in one other. Emission in these transitions originates in high-density regions (n> or approx. =10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/). The molecule's excitation requirements allow us to derive limits to excitation temperatures an optical depths. We discuss the possibility of clumping with respect to the beam and compare our results with data from other molecular species. The HNCO emission from Sgr A is an ordder of magnitude larger than the other detected sources as is the ratio ..delta..T +- /sub A/(HNCO 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 04/)/..delta..T +- /sub A/(C/sup 18/O 1..-->..0). HNCO is probably a constituent of most molecular clouds.

Jackson, J.M.; Armstrong, J.T.; Barrett, A.H.

1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Attribution Analysis of Cloud Feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainty on cloud feedback is the primary contributor to the large spread of equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) in climate models. In this study, we compare the short-term cloud feedback in climate models with observations, and evaluate...

Zhou, Chen

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Constrained water cloud generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fast generation of large cloudy volumes with imposed cloud cover fractions and ambient vertical profiles is very important for the realistic simulation of atmospheric scenes. The model proposed here is the second step of a two-step model composed on the one hand of a volume generator based on a Fourier filtering method and on the other hand of a physical generator filling the volume with physical parameters. After a description of the general generation scheme, this paper focuses on the simulation of vertical profiles of water content (liquid, vapour) coupled with other state parameters (temperature, pressure, vertical velocity) via thermodynamic and hydrodynamic equations by local forcing of ambient conditions. The method for solving these equations is explained and applied to practical cases. First, by assuming that the actual temperature at the cloud base is equal to the dew temperature and by imposing a moist pseudo-adiabatic temperature gradient between the cloud top and bottom, the temperature profile in the cloud is found. When conditional instability occurs, the initial temperature profile between the ground and the cloud base is iteratively shifted to lower values until absolute stability is reached. Then the liquid water content is calculated by integrating the equation of water conservation, and the water vapour content by assuming that the cloud is everywhere saturated. Eventually, the vertical velocity is estimated by integration of the momentum equation. This method gives results in good agreement with published measurements, analytical and numerical models. Eventually, further developments of the column model, including the effects of phase transitions, turbulence, horizontal motions and mixing with the surrounding medium, are proposed in the concluding section.

Roland P.H. Berton

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Opaque cloud detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

5, 60136039, 2005 FRESCO cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 5, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction cloud information over deserts from SCIAMACHY O2 A-band N. Fournier 1 , P. Stammes 1 , M. de Graaf 1 , R, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

230

3, 33013333, 2003 Cirrus cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity J. Str and Physics Discussions Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity: A comparison¨om (johan@itm.su.se) 3301 #12;ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

231

8, 96979729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval algorithm P. Wang et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions FRESCO+: an improved O2 A-band cloud retrieval algorithm for tropospheric on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 9697 #12;ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

Estalella, Robert

233

Simulating Arctic Climate Warmth and Icefield Retreat in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Devon, and Meighen ice caps in the Canadian Arctic, and possibly in Camp Century (northwest Greenland- atures markedly warmer than those in the 20th century and the late Holocene, and it also featured

Ingólfsson, ?lafur

234

Sources and sinks of carbon dioxide in the Arctic regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data base required to adequately ascertain seasonal source and sink strengths in the arctic regions is difficult to obtain. However, there are now a reasonable quantity of data for this polar region to estimate sources and sinks within the Arctic which may contribute significantly to the annual tropospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration fluctuation. The sea-ice-air and the sea-air interfaces account for most of the contribution to the sources and sinks for carbon dioxide. Although the arctic and subarctic region is small in extent, it certainly is not impervious and ice sealed. Our estimate, based on historical data and current research, indicates that the Arctic, which is about 4% of the earth's surface, is an annual net sink for approx. 10/sup 15/ g CO/sub 2/ accounting for an equivalent of approx. 3% of the annual anthropogenic contribution of CO/sub 2/ to the troposphere.

Gosink, T. A.; Kelley, J. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A New Look at the Summer Arctic Frontal Zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A notable characteristic of the summertime Arctic is the existence of a narrow band of strong horizontal temperature gradients spanning the coastlines of Siberia, Alaska, and western Canada that extends through a considerable depth of the ...

Alex Crawford; Mark Serreze

236

Intensification of Geostrophic Currents in the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous sampling of upper-ocean hydrographic data in the Canada Basin from various sources spanning from 2003 through 2011 provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe changes occurring in a major feature of the Arctic Ocean. In a 112-km-...

Miles G. McPhee

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Kotzebue  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

238

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Barrow  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

239

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Nome  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

240

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Bethel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Transatlantic Policy Options to Address the Rapidly Changing Arctic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impacts from rapidly occurring climate change in the Arctic region are creating shifts in economic priorities, especially in the energy, transport, fisheries and tourism sectors. Economic expansion combined with ...

Sandra Cavalieri; R. Andreas Kraemer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Bethel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

243

National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

244

Mitigation Possibilities in the Energy Sector An Arctic Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are vast utilisable wind energy resources in the Arctic frequently located in ... example in the Mountain areas in Sweden and Norway, and in the Northwest of Russia. Large wind resources are also found in t...

Maria Pettersson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Who is this cloud?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WHO IS THIS CLOUD? is a generative artwork in progress. It is a piece of art dedicated to the memory of a loved one and the idea of existence and transformation. The computer "Beings" will be animated according to their inner program, to weather sensors ... Keywords: Turing pattern, artificial life art, cellular automata, generative art, transhumanism

Lola B. Deswarte; Alain Lioret; Barbara Tannery

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties and Heating Cloud Properties and Heating Rates in Tropical Cloud Systems Jennifer Comstock and Sally McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Alain Protat Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research Motivation Cloud properties retrievals Cloud process understanding Cloud Radiative forcing and heating rates Model evaluation on many scales (LES, CRM, SCM...) Quantified uncertainties are needed... 2 Retrieval Algorithm Evaluation within CPWG Past intercomparisons CLOWD - Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (Turner et al. 2007) Ice Clouds - (Comstock et al. 2007) One retrieval does not fit all Present algorithm evaluation BBHRP Ice Cloud Retrievals at SGP - Microbase (Dunn, Jensen, Mace, Marchand) Arctic mixed phase clouds - BBHRP (Shupe, Turner) CLOWD - BBHRP Pt. Reyes AMF deployment

247

Chlorine Chemistry on Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles in the Arctic Winter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...O.B., CONDENSATION OF HNO3 AND...and type II (water ice) PSC particles...University, Atmospheric Research Project...formed during recovery (Fig. 4...5. Minimum atmospheric temperatures...vortex and during recovery in spring-time...Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

C. R. Webster; R. D. May; D. W. Toohey; L. M. Avallone; J. G. Anderson; P. Newman; L. Lait; M. R. Schoeberl; J. W. Elkins; K. R. Chan

1993-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

248

Process-model simulations of cloud albedo enhancement by aerosols in the Arctic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Timmreck. 2013 Sea-salt injections into the low-latitude marine boundary layer: the transient response in three Earth system models. J. Geophys. Res. 118, 12195-12206. ( doi:10.1002/2013JD020432 ) 62 Jenkins, AKL , and PM Forster...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic alaska r4d Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: arctic alaska r4d Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 revised 122010 Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Summary: . 1966. The recreational potential of the Arctic...

250

UPb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U­Pb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia-0349 Oslo, Norway Introduction The High Arctic of Scandinavia and Russia consists of a collage

Svensen, Henrik

251

An analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study used several model-based tools to analyse the dynamics of the Arctic Basin between 1997 and 2006 as a linked system of land-ocean-atmosphere C exchange. The analysis estimates that terrestrial areas of the Arctic ...

McGUIRE, A. D.

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic freshwater sediments Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;2 Holocene sedimentation in the deep Arctic Ocean... prominently in the overall sediment budget of the Arctic Ocean. While a detailed analysis of the processes... with these...

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic tundra vegetation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in arctic tundra reduced by long-term nutrient fertilization Michelle C. Mack1... in soil compared with temperate and tropical ecosystems14 . In arctic tundra, as much as 90%...

254

Mechanisms of Decadal Arctic Climate Variability in the Community Climate System Model, Version 2 (CCSM2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain natural climate variability in the Arctic. These include processes related to the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation/Arctic Oscillation (NAO/AO), anticyclonic/cyclonic regimes, changes in ...

Hugues Goosse; Marika M. Holland

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic mars analog Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

seal Pup Arctic Barrow Beck et al confirmed... 1 Ringed seal CBD Arctic Deadhorse ARCO; Rugh, D.:NMML; Confirmed-low Fdead pos. shot towed see Source: NOAA Marine Fisheries Review...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic regions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

et G... in some Arctic regions in the late 1980s and early 1990s during the decline of industrial activity... of Representatives October 18, 2007 Arctic Climate Effects of Black...

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic food web Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

food web Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic food web Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Lesson Plan Arctic Biome Summary: in the...

258

Predicting and validating the tracking of a Volcanic Ash Cloud during the 2006 Eruption of Mt. Augustine Volcano  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On 11 January 2006, Mount Augustine volcano in southern Alaska began erupting after 20-year repose. The Anchorage Forecast Office of the National Weather Service (NWS) issued an advisory on 28 January for Kodiak City. On 31 January, Alaska Airlines cancelled all flights to and from Anchorage after multiple advisories from the NWS for Anchorage and the surrounding region. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) had reported the onset of the continuous eruption. AVO monitors the approximately 100 active volcanoes in the Northern Pacific. Ash clouds from these volcanoes can cause serious damage to an aircraft and pose a serious threat to the local communities, and to transcontinental air traffic throughout the Arctic and sub-Arctic region. Within AVO, a dispersion model has been developed to track the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds. The model, Puff, was used operational by AVO during the Augustine eruptive period. Here, we examine the dispersion of a volcanic ash cloud from Mount Augustine across Alaska from 29 January through the 2 February 2006. We present the synoptic meteorology, the Puff predictions, and measurements from aerosol samplers, laser radar (or lidar) systems, and satellites. UAF aerosol samplers revealed the presence of volcanic aerosols at the surface at sites where Puff predicted the ash clouds movement. Remote sensing satellite data showed the development of the ash cloud in close proximity to the volcano and a sulfur-dioxide cloud further from the volcano consistent with the Puff predictions. Lidars showed the presence of volcanic aerosol with consistent characteristics aloft over Alaska and were capable of detecting the aerosol, even in the presence of scattered clouds and where the cloud is too thin/disperse to be detected by remote sensing satellite data. The lidar measurements revealed the different trajectories of ash consistent with the Puff predictions. Dispersion models provide a forecast of volcanic ash cloud movement that might be undetectable by any other means but are still a significant hazard. Validation is the key to assessing the accuracy of any future predictions. The study highlights the use of multiple and complementary observations used in detecting the trajectory ash cloud, both at the surface and aloft within the atmosphere.

Webley, Peter W.; Atkinson, D.; Collins, Richard L.; Dean, K.; Fochesatto, J.; Sassen, Kenneth; Cahill, Catherine F.; Prata, A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mizutani, K.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic petroleum operators Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conferences Covered Petroleum Abstracts, HH 101 Summary: PETROLEUM PRODUCTION & EXPLORATION ASSOCIATION LTD. (APPEA) ARCTIC AND MARINE OILSPILL PROGRAM (AMOP... GEOLOGICAL...

260

A Catalog of HI Clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 21 cm neutral hydrogen interferometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) combined with the Parkes multi-beam HI single-dish survey clearly shows that the HI gas is distributed in the form of clumps or clouds. The HI clouds and clumps have been identified using a thresholding method with three separate brightness temperature thresholds ($T_b$). Each catalog of HI cloud candidates shows a power law relationship between the sizes and the velocity dispersions of the clouds roughly following the Larson Law scaling $\\sigma_v \\propto R^{0.5}$, with steeper indices associated with dynamically hot regions. The clouds in each catalog have roughly constant virial parameters as a function mass suggesting that that the clouds are all in roughly the same dynamical state, but the values of the virial parameter are significantly larger than unity showing that turbulent motions dominate gravity in these clouds. The mass distribution of the clouds is a power law with differential indices between -1.6 and -2.0 for the three catalogs. In contrast, the distribution of mean surface densities is a log-normal distribution.

S. Kim; E. Rosolowsky; Y. Lee; Y. Kim; Y. C. Jung; M. A. Dopita; B. G. Elmegreen; K. C. Freeman; R. J. Sault; M. J. Kesteven; D. McConnell; Y. -H. Chu

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines for neglected northern Siberia (Russia), Arctic Alaska (USA), and the Canadian Arctic, extends over seven coastal Large.e., 770,000, 89,000, and 94,000 t by Russia, USA, and Canada, respectively for the same time period

Pauly, Daniel

262

Estimating sea ice area flux across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago using enhanced AMSR-E  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This produced a net loss of sea ice area of about 122 ? 103 km2 or roughly 174 km3 a?1 which is presumedEstimating sea ice area flux across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago using enhanced AMSR-E T. Agnew is used to estimate daily sea ice area fluxes between the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and the Arctic Ocean

Long, David G.

263

Microsoft Word - fridland_a.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Measurements and Numerical Simulations to Field Measurements and Numerical Simulations to Constrain Mechanisms of Ice Formation During the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment Intensive Operational Period A. Fridlind and A. Ackerman National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Introduction Mechanisms of ice formation in supercooled clouds that are too warm to allow the homogeneous nucleation of water remain poorly constrained by measurements (e.g., Cotton and Field 2002). Ice mass and number concentrations have long been thought to exceed what can be quantitatively explained by simultaneous measurements of ice nuclei (e.g., Koenig 1963; Beard 1992). In late 2004 at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's North Slope of Alaska site, the Mixed-Phase Arctic

264

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ovchinnikov, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Ovchinnikov M, A Korolev, and J Fan. 2011. "Effects of ice number concentration on dynamics of a shallow mixed-phase stratiform cloud." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T06, doi:10.1029/2011JD015888. The mighty cloud ice crystal appears deceptively delicate but has the power to tip the balance between ice and water in Arctic clouds. This image of an ice crystal was obtained from a Cloud Particle Imager during ISDAC. The imager was mounted on aircraft flying through clouds at a speed of 100 m/s.

265

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Size of Cloud from Shadow  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Size of Cloud from Shadow Size of Cloud from Shadow Name: mike Status: other Grade: other Location: N/A Country: USA Date: Summer 2011 Question: I see a cloud and I see its shadow in a field - knowing high sun angles - is there a way of telling how far away the cloud is or how big? - I am thinking if the shadow is 30' wide and the sun is at 2:00 pm- ? Replies: Hi Mike, Try this, draw a small circle representing the Sun. Somewhere below this circle and maybe to the right, draw an oblong, make this oblong bigger than the circle. Now connect the leftmost edge of the circle with the leftmost edge of the oblong with a straight line. Do the same for the rightmost edges. The oblong now represent the shadow of a cloud on the ground, and the lines represent the rays of the sun passing along the edges of the cloud.

267

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

268

ARM - Measurement - Cloud droplet size  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

droplet size droplet size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud droplet size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of a cloud particle Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor MIRAI : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments SPEC-CPI : Stratton Park Engineering Company - Cloud particle imager

269

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight from Landsat ETM+ G. Wen and L. Oreopoulos National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center University of Maryland Baltimore County Joint Center of Earth System Technology Greenbelt, Maryland R. F. Cahalan and S. C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Cumulus clouds attenuate solar radiation casting shows on the ground. Cumulus clouds can also enhance solar radiation in the clear region nearby. The enhancement of down-welling solar radiation has been observed at the ground level in the clear region near cumulus clouds (Mims and Frederick 1994). The additional diffuse radiation source from cumulus clouds makes the clear gaps appear to be

270

TC_CLOUD_REGIME.cdr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropical cloud properties as a function of regime Regimes? Monsoon versus Break * Different synoptic vertical velocity profiles - Changes convective inhibition, corresponding...

271

Declarative Automated Cloud Resource Orchestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

orchestration · Cloud resource orchestration constraint optimization problems 4 Provider operational] · Orchestration procedures Transactions · Either commit or abort Distributed communication and optimization

Plotkin, Joshua B.

272

Cicada: Predictive Guarantees for Cloud Network Bandwidth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In cloud-computing systems, network-bandwidth guarantees have been shown to improve predictability of application performance and cost. Most previous work on cloud-bandwidth guarantees has assumed that cloud tenants know ...

LaCurts, Katrina

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

273

DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study Kristen Powers powers:................................................................................................................... 13 Calculation of Sensor Reaching Radiance Truth Values for Cloudless & Stratus Cloud Scenes and Atmospheric Database Creation for Stratus Cloud Scene & Calculation of Associated Sensor Reaching Radiance

Salvaggio, Carl

274

Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010. From Clusters To Clouds: xCAT 2 Is Out Of The Bag.Cost of Doing Science on the Cloud: The Montage Example. Incost of doing science on the cloud: the montage example. In

Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properties In?uencing Electron Cloud Phenomena, Appl. Surf.Dissipation of the Electron Cloud, Proc. PAC03 (Portland,is no signi?cant electron-cloud under nominal operating

Furman, M.A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP 2004.03.09 - 2004.04.09 Lead Scientist : Ed Westwater Data Availability http://www.etl.noaa.gov/programs/2004/wviop/data will contain quicklooks of all of the data. For data sets, see below. Summary During the IOP, the Ground-based Scanning Radiometer of NOAA/ETL, and the ARM MicroWave Radiometer and Microwave Profiler, yielded excellent data over a range of conditions. In all, angular-scanned and calibrated radiometric data from 22.345 to 380 GHz were taken. The Precipitable Water Vapor varied about an order of magnitude from 1 to 10 mm, and surface temperatures varied from about -10 to -40 deg. Celcius. Vaisala RS90

277

A TRUSTED STORAGE SYSTEM FOR THE CLOUD.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Data stored in third party storage systems like the cloud might not be secure since confidentiality and integrity of data are not guaranteed. Though cloud (more)

Karumanchi, Sushama

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential Philip Budzik U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential Philip Budzik U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Oil and Gas Division October, 2009 Introduction The Arctic is defined as the Northern hemisphere region located north of the Arctic Circle, the circle of latitude where sunlight is uniquely present or absent for 24 continuous hours on the summer and winter solstices, respectively. The Arctic Circle spans the globe at 66.56° (66°34') north latitude (Figure 1). 1 The Arctic could hold about 22 percent of the world's undiscovered conventional oil and natural gas resources. The prospects for Arctic oil and natural gas production are discussed taking into consideration the nature of the resources, the cost of developing them, and the

279

Fraunhofer ISST CLOUD COMPUTING APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;© Fraunhofer ISST Fraunhofer Innovation Cluster »Cloud Computing for Logistics« Budget 3 * 3 Mio© Fraunhofer ISST CLOUD COMPUTING APPLICATIONS FOR LOGISTICS Jakob Rehof Professor, Chair of Software Engineering, Technical University of Dortmund Director, Fraunhofer-ISST Dortmund and Berlin First

Rajamani, Sriram K.

280

An enigmatic HI cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of an HI cloud with peculiar properties at equatorial coordinates (J2000) ra=07h49m, dec=04d30m is presented. The HI object was detected at 21cm using the 300-m NAIC Arecibo telescope. Subsequent follow-up high-resolution observations with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) telescope at L-Band revealed more details about its morphology. The most intriguing aspect of the object is the clear velocity gradient of 1 km/s, which is present in the data, an indication of either rotation or expansion. The gas appears to be cold, and its morphology is somewhat elliptical with clumpy substructure. Assuming disk rotation, the dynamical mass could be determined as a function of distance.Depending on the exact nature of the velocity gradient in the HI cloud, we can reach some preliminary conclusions about the nature of the object. Expansion would imply association with a circumstellar envelope of an evolved AGB star, while in the case of rotation, a comparison between the visible and the dynamical mass can lead...

Dedes, L; Kalberla, P W M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An enigmatic HI cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of an HI cloud with peculiar properties at equatorial coordinates (J2000) ra=07h49m, dec=04d30m is presented. The HI object was detected at 21cm using the 300-m NAIC Arecibo telescope. Subsequent follow-up high-resolution observations with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) telescope at L-Band revealed more details about its morphology. The most intriguing aspect of the object is the clear velocity gradient of 1 km/s, which is present in the data, an indication of either rotation or expansion. The gas appears to be cold, and its morphology is somewhat elliptical with clumpy substructure. Assuming disk rotation, the dynamical mass could be determined as a function of distance.Depending on the exact nature of the velocity gradient in the HI cloud, we can reach some preliminary conclusions about the nature of the object. Expansion would imply association with a circumstellar envelope of an evolved AGB star, while in the case of rotation, a comparison between the visible and the dynamical mass can lead to some preliminary conclusions. A common feature of those conclusions is the presence of a gravitational potential well, which is required to account for the rotation of the trapped HI gas. This potential well could be associated with a dark galaxy or some other exotic object.

L. Dedes; C. Dedes; P. W. M Kalberla

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

ARM - Measurement - Cloud ice particle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ice particle ice particle ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud ice particle Particles made of ice found in clouds. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation Field Campaign Instruments REPLICATOR : Balloon-borne Ice Crystal Replicator CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor LEARJET : Lear Jet PARTIMG : Particle imager UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments

283

TWP Island Cloud Trail Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pacific Island Cloud Trail Studies Pacific Island Cloud Trail Studies W. M. Porch Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico S. Winiecki University of Chicago Chicago, Illinois Introduction Images and surface temperature measurements from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Multi- spectral Thermal Imaging (MTI) satellite are combined with geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS) images during 2000 and 2001 to better understand cloud trail formation characteristics from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site. Figure 1 shows a comparison on two consecutive days in December 2000. The day for which a cloud trail developed was more moist and cooler at the altitude the cloud developed (about 600 m) and there was very little

284

ARM - Measurement - Cloud condensation nuclei  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

condensation nuclei condensation nuclei ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud condensation nuclei Small particles (typically 0.0002 mm, or 1/100 th the size of a cloud droplet) about which cloud droplets coalesce. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CCN : Cloud Condensation Nuclei Particle Counter Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System

285

ARM - Measurement - Cloud base height  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

base height base height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud base height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the lowest level of the atmosphere where cloud properties are detectable. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments BLC : Belfort Laser Ceilometer MPL : Micropulse Lidar MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RL : Raman Lidar VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NOAASURF : NOAA Surface Meteorology Data, collected by NWS and NCDC

286

Zenith Radiance Retrieval of Cloud Properties  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

retrievals of cloud properties retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Preliminary retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC The cloud optical properties of interest are: The cloud optical properties of interest are: * Cloud optical depth τ - the great unknown * Radiative cloud fraction * Cloud effective drop size, r eff * Cloud optical depth τ - the great unknown * Radiative cloud fraction * Cloud effective drop size, r eff τ = 3 2 LWP r eff r eff in μm, LWP in g/m 2 The 2-ch narrow-field-of-view radiometer (2NFOV) The 2-ch narrow-field-of-view radiometer

287

Scaling StudieS in arctic SyStem Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science (jgrebmei@umces.edu) *Lawrence Hamilton, university of new hampshire (lawrence during the april 2006 u.S. fish and Wildlife Service (uSfWS) Walrus Survey (photo by uSfWS/brad benter in 1984 by the arctic research and Policy act (Public law 98-373, July 31, 1984; amended as Public law 101

Wagner, Diane

288

Characteristics of Arctic Sea-Ice Thickness Variability in GCMs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Skillful Arctic sea ice forecasts may be possible for lead times of months or even years owing to the persistence of thickness anomalies. In this study sea ice thickness variability is characterized in fully coupled GCMs and sea iceocean-only ...

Edward Blanchard-Wrigglesworth; Cecilia M. Bitz

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

Hubbard, Susan

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

290

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Anchorage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

291

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Unalaska  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

292

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Barrow  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

293

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Nome  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

294

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Kotzebue  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

295

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Anchorage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

296

A Study to Investigate Cloud Feedback Processes and Evaluate GCM Cloud Variations Using Statistical Cloud Property Composites From ARM Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The representation of clouds in Global Climate Models (GCMs) remains a major source of uncertainty in climate change simulations. Cloud climatologies have been widely used to either evaluate climate model cloud fields or examine, in combination with other data sets, climate-scale relationships between cloud properties and dynamical or microphysical parameters. Major cloud climatologies have been based either on satellite observations of cloud properties or on surface observers views of cloud type and amount. Such data sets provide either the top-down view of column-integrated cloud properties (satellites) or the bottom-up view of the cloud field morphology (surface observers). Both satellite-based and surface cloud climatologies have been successfully used to examine cloud properties, to support process studies, and to evaluate climate and weather models. However, they also present certain limitations, since the satellite cloud types are defined using radiative cloud boundaries and surface observations are based on cloud boundaries visible to human observers. As a result, these data sets do not resolve the vertical distribution of cloud layers, an issue that is important in calculating both the radiative and the hydrologic effects of the cloud field. Ground-based cloud radar observations, on the other hand, resolve with good accuracy the vertical distribution of cloud layers and could be used to produce cloud type climatologies with vertical layering information. However, these observations provide point measurements only and it is not immediately clear to what extent they are representative of larger regimes. There are different methods that can be applied to minimize this problem and to produce cloud layering climatologies useful for both cloud process and model evaluation studies. If a radar system is run continuously over a number of years, it eventually samples a large number of dynamical and microphysical regimes. If additional data sets are used to put the cloud layering information into the context of large-scale dynamical regimes, such information can be used to study interactions among cloud vertical distributions and dynamical and microphysical processes and to evaluate the ability of models to simulate those interactions. The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has established several Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) that provide continuous, long-term observations of clouds and radiation. ARM, with its overall goal of improving the treatment of radiation and clouds in climate models has provided unique observing systems for accelerating progress on the representation of cloud processes. In this project, six and a half years (January 1998 to June 2004) of cloud observations collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Oklahoma ACRF were used to produce a cloud-type climatology. The climatology provides cloud amounts for seven different cloud types as well as information on the detailed structure of multi-layer cloud occurrences. Furthermore, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output was used to define the dynamic regimes present during the observations of the cloud conditions by the vertically pointing radars at the SGP ACRF. The cloud-type climatology and the ECMWF SGP data set were then analyzed to examine and map dynamical conditions that favor the creation of single-layer versus multi-layer cloud structures as well as dynamical conditions that favor the occurrence of drizzle in continental stratus clouds. In addition, output from the ECMWF weather model forecasts was analyzed with the objective to compare model and radar derived cloud type statistics, in order to identify the major model deficiencies in cloud vertical distribution and map their seasonal variations. The project included two primary goals. The first was to create a cloud type climatology over the Southern Great Planes site that will show how cloud vertical distribution varies with dynamic and thermodynamic regime and how these variations would affect cloud climate fe

George Tselioudis

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

297

ATLAS Cloud R&D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained...

Panitkin, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; Benjamin, D; DiGirolamo, A; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Hover, J; Kucharczuk, K; Medrano LLamas, R; Love, P; Ohman, H; Paterson, M; Sobie, R; Taylor, R; Walker, R; Zaytsev, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud with IBM Security solutions Maintain visibility and control with proven security solutions for public, private and hybrid clouds Highlights Address cloud internal and external users, data, applications and workloads as they move to and from the cloud Regain

299

CLOUD COMPUTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD COMPUTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS PROGRAM A six-week in-depth program in the architectures, infrastructure, and operations of Cloud Computing DePaul University's Cloud Computing Infrastructure and Operations Program provides specialized knowledge in Cloud infrastructure with emphasis

Schaefer, Marcus

300

Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud? There's an App for That David McConaughy Locus Technologies 1997-2014 4 #12;Cloud-based EMIS 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 5 #12; Cloud Synch data back to EIM cloud for analysis 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 9 #12;Mobile Apps for Data

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

7, 1711717146, 2007 Dependence of cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 7, 17117­17146, 2007 Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud height on temperature T. Wagner et a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud top height on surface temperature derived from spectrally resolved UV/vis satellite observations T

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

302

Cloud Computing An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Computing ­ An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian Infosys Technologies Limited #12;2Infosys Confidential Overview of cloud computing? Cloud computing* Computing in which dynamically scalable of cloud computing 1. On-demand self-service 2. Ubiquitous network access 3. Location independent resource

Rajamani, Sriram K.

303

Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup Pierre (Vrije U.). Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming (Rain for the Thirsty) #12;Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming 2 Intermezzo: Tips on how

Iosup, Alexandru

304

CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES Jasmine at the Azores provided a unique, long-term record (May 2009 to December 2010) of cloud observations in a regime dominated by low-level stratiform clouds. First, a comprehensive cloud classification scheme that utilizes

305

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical modeling of drizzle evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical I, the influence of cloud microphysics and dynamics on the shape of cloud radar Doppler spectra in warm stratiform clouds was discussed. The traditional analysis of radar Doppler moments was extended

306

Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See Paramvir Bahl Matthai Philipose argue that for computers to do more for us, we need to show the cloud what we see and embrace cloud General Terms Algorithms, Design, Human Factors, Languages, Performance, Security Keywords Camera, cloud

Zhong, Lin

307

Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud Fraction (CF) is the dominant modulator of radiative fluxes. In this study, we evaluate CF simulations in the IPCC AR4 GCMs against ARM ground measurements, with a focus on the vertical structure, total amount of cloud and its effect on cloud shortwave transmissivity, for both inter-model deviation and model-measurement discrepancy. Our intercomparisons of three CF or sky-cover related dataset reveal that the relative differences are usually less than 10% (5%) for multi-year monthly (annual) mean values, while daily differences are quite significant. The results also show that the model-observation and the inter-model deviations have a similar magnitude for the total CF (TCF) and the normalized cloud effect, and they are twice as large as the surface downward solar radiation and cloud transmissivity. This implies that the other cloud properties, such as cloud optical depth and height, have a similar magnitude of disparity to TCF among the GCMs, and suggests that a better agreement among the GCMs in solar radiative fluxes could be the result of compensating errors in either cloud vertical structure, cloud optical depth or cloud fraction. Similar deviation pattern between inter-model and model-measurement suggests that the climate models tend to generate larger bias against observations for those variables with larger inter-model deviation. The simulated TCF from IPCC AR4 GCMs are very scattered through all seasons over three ARM sites: Southern Great Plains (SGP), Manus, Papua New Guinea and North Slope of Alaska (NSA). The GCMs perform better at SGP than at Manus and NSA in simulating the seasonal variation and probability distribution of TCF; however, the TCF in these models is remarkably underpredicted and cloud transmissivity is less susceptible to the change of TCF than the observed at SGP. Much larger inter-model deviation and model bias are found over NSA than the other sites in estimating the TCF, cloud transmissivity and cloud-radiation interaction, suggesting that the Arctic region continues to challenge cloud simulations in climate models. Most of the GCMs tend to underpredict CF and fail to capture the seasonal variation of CF at middle and low levels in the tropics. The high altitude CF is much larger in the GCMs than the observation and the inter-model variability of CF also reaches maximum at high levels in the tropics. Most of the GCMs tend to underpredict CF by 50-150% relative to the measurement average at low and middle levels over SGP. While the GCMs generally capture the maximum CF in the boundary layer and vertical variability, the inter-model deviation is largest near surface over the Arctic. The internal variability of CF simulated in ensemble runs with the same model is very minimal.

Qian, Yun; Long, Charles N.; Wang, Hailong; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Xie, Shaocheng

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

308

Good morning, everyone. I'm Martin Jeffries, Principal Editor of the Arctic Report Card and a science advisor to the U.S. Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the University of Virginia, and Dr. Don Perovich of Dartmouth College. They will talk about vegetation and sea to independent peer-review organized by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) of the Arctic Council. Key highlights from the essays are presented on the front page of the Web site, where you'll also

309

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

Lettenmaier, Dennis P

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

310

Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

KB Widener; K Johnson

2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsCloud IOP govCampaignsCloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Cloud IOP 1998.04.27 - 1998.05.17 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary Monday, April 27, 1998 IOP Opening Activities: Heavy rain (nearly 2.5" since 12Z 4/26/98) at the central facility (CF) dominated the first day of the Cloud Physics/Single Column Model IOP and limited the daily activities. A 1430 GMT sonde launch commenced the 3-hour sonde launch schedule at the CF and 4 boundary facilities (BFs). Scientists/Instrumentation on Site: Citation: Has arrived and is located at the Ponca City Airport. No flights are currently planned. Flights are tentatively planned for stratus sampling when precipitation ends.

312

Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington Rob Wood, University of Washington AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager CAP-MBL Proposal Team Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate sensitivity? Cli t F db k

313

Cloud Computing for Telecom Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Context: Cloud computing is reshaping the service-delivery and business-models in Information and Communications Technology (ICT). The Information Technology (IT) sector has benefited from it in (more)

Sapkota, Sagar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Energy-Efficient Cloud Computing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Centre & IT Equipment Energy Use. Proc. Digital Power...2007. pp. 1323. ACM, New York. [7] Energy Star, http://www...pp. 164177. ACM, New York. [32] Pratt, I...Vol. 53 No. 7, 2010 Energy-Efficient Cloud Computing......

Andreas Berl; Erol Gelenbe; Marco Di Girolamo; Giovanni Giuliani; Hermann De Meer; Minh Quan Dang; Kostas Pentikousis

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Studying Altocumulus Plus Virga with Ground-based Active and Passive Remote Sensors Zhien Wang1, Kenneth Sassen2, David Whiteman3, and Belay Demoz3 1University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD 21228 2University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 E-mail: zhien@agnes.gsfc.nasa.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Boundary-layer Mixed-phase Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Boundary-layer Mixed-phase Cloud Properties Observed at the ARCF NSA site Zhien Wang, Ming Zhao, and Min Deng University of Wyoming , Laramie, Wyoming, 82071, zwang@uwyo.edu References Curry, J. et al., 1996: Overview of Arctic cloud and radiation characteristics. J. Climate., 9, 1731-1764. Wang, Z. and K. Sassen, 2002: Cirrus cloud microphysical property retrieval using lidar and radar measurements, I: algorithm description and comparison with in situ data. J. Appl. Meteor., 41, 218-229. Wang, Z., K. Sassen, D. Whiteman, and B. Demoz, 2004: Studying altocumulus plus virga with ground-based active and passive remote sensors. J. Appl. Meteor.,43, 449-460. Wang, Z., 2007: Refined Two-channel Microwave Radiometer Liquid Water Path Retrieval at Cold Regions by Using Multiple-sensor Measurements. IEEE Geoscience and Remote

316

Cloud condensation nuclei in Western Colorado : observations and model predictions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Variations in the warm cloud?active portion of atmospheric aerosols, or cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), have been shown to impact cloud droplet number concentration and subsequently (more)

Ward, Daniel Stewart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Abstract: Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud computing platforms provide introduction on Cloud Computing. We propose a Virtual Cloud Pool abstraction to logically unify cloud

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctas arctic research Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and climate. The spring portion of ARCTAS... , and radiative heating in the Arctic. The NASA Langley ... Source: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Environmental Chemistry Division,...

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic microbial ecosystems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

microbial ecosystems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Microbial ecosystem responses to rapid climate change in the Arctic Summary: COMMENTARY Microbial ecosystem responses to rapid...

320

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic offshore oil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage assessment. As the Arctic Ocean becomes seasonally passable and tourism, oil and gas... forecasting of ocean storms which have serious potential to threaten marine ......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic russia sedimentology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

russia sedimentology Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic russia sedimentology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CURRICULUM VITAE Julie...

322

Biodiversity and phylogeography of Arctic marine fauna: insights from molecular tools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Incorporation of molecular tools into biodiversity and biogeographic studies can help to address ... among extant populations. Novel discoveries in Arctic marine biodiversity and biogeography are increasing due t...

Sarah Mincks Hardy; Christina M. Carr; Michael Hardman; Dirk Steinke

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

324

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean archaeal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Switchyard. This is Ellesmere Island, here, next to Summary: to better understand the ocean currents that are moving in the Arctic Ocean towards the North Atlantic Ocean......

325

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic pilot project Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the world." Mike Steele: "The Switchyard Project is designed... to better understand the ocean currents that are moving in the Arctic Ocean towards the North ... Source:...

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic oil spill Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have to be prevented in advance ." (FI) "Cruise ships are so large... Spill Arctic weather or ice conditions can suddenly change - The inexperienced will certainly...

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine mammals Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K. FURGIONE Summary: resources. Arctic populations rely heavily on aviation and marine weather for safe transportation and access... outlets from internet to high frequency...

328

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine food Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mammals... the Arctic (Figure 3). The loss of sea ice affects marine access, regional weather, ecosystem changes... . Such a system also includes a marine Distributed...

329

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine sediments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mammals... the Arctic (Figure 3). The loss of sea ice affects marine access, regional weather, ecosystem changes... . Such a system also includes a marine Distributed...

330

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic national wildlife Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;NOAA Arctic Tiger Team Laura K. Furgione Deputy Assistant Administrator National Weather Service... goals and establishes, enhances, or leverages partnerships with other...

331

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine ecosystem Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: the Arctic (Figure 3). The loss of sea ice affects marine access, regional weather, ecosystem changes... to provide reliable predictions of the changes coming to...

332

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic boundary layer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;NOAA Arctic Tiger Team Laura K. Furgione Deputy Assistant Administrator National Weather ... Source: Kuligowski, Bob - Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division,...

333

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic vegetation damage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;NOAA Arctic Tiger Team Laura K. Furgione Deputy Assistant Administrator National Weather ... Source: Kuligowski, Bob - Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division,...

334

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic sponge haliclona Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: arctic sponge haliclona Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Summary: ). The sponges Clathrina canariensis,...

335

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ecosystems dominated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 4 Microbial ecosystem responses to rapid climate change in the Arctic Summary: COMMENTARY Microbial...

336

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic populations affects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

prohibit, commercial fishing for Arctic fish and to ensure subsistence fishing is not affected... and uncertain population dynamics and abundance. Under the ... Source: NOAA Marine...

337

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic east siberia Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sources in East Asia and Europe, with added... to Arctic sulfate from the Norilsk industrial site in ... Source: Jimenez, Jose-Luis - Department of Chemistry and...

338

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic levels sources Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... rule that implements the Fishery Management Plan for Fish Resources of the Arctic ... Source: NOAA Marine Fisheries...

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fox pups Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Mortality of arctic ... Source: Hayssen, Virginia - Department of Biological Sciences, Smith College Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Leashing the AlphaWolves:...

340

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic troposphere northeast Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the arctic front then produced an incipient surface low. Next a jet streak in the middle troposphere crossed... January-February 1991 Published by Sigma Xi ... Source:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic mammalian carnivore Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: locality Arctic Ocean, Si- Ur.w polaris Shaw, 1792:7. Renaming of marinus Pallas. Thallassnrctos... (Manning, 1971). Presumably the cline is similar across the Soviet...

342

Arctic daily temperature and precipitation extremes: Observed and simulated physical behavior.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ARCTIC DAILY TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: OBSERVED AND SIMULATED PHYSICAL BEHAVIOR Justin M. Glisan Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa (more)

Glisan, Justin Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Genome Sequence of the Arctic Methanotroph Methylobacter tundripaludum SV96  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methylobacter tundripaludum SV96(T) (ATCC BAA-1195) is a psychrotolerant aerobic methane-oxidizing gammaproteobacterium (Methylococcales, Methylococcaceae) living in High Arctic wetland soil. The strain was isolated from soil harvested in July 1996 close to the settlement Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway (78 degrees 56'N, 11 degrees 53'E), and described as a novel species in 2006. The genome includes pmo and pxm operons encoding copper membrane monooxygenases (Cu-MMOs), genes required for nitrogen fixation, and the nirS gene implicated in dissimilatory nitrite reduction to NO but no identifiable inventory for further processing of nitrogen oxides. These genome data provide the basis to investigate M. tundripaludum SV96, identified as a major player in the biogeochemistry of Arctic environments.

Svenning, Mette M [University of Tromso, Norway; Hestnes, Anne Grethe [University of Tromso, Norway; Wartiainen, Ingvild [University of Tromso, Norway; Stein, Lisa Y. [University of Alberta, Edmondton, Canada; Klotz, Martin G [University of Louisville, Louisville; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G. [University of Washington, Seattle; Spang, Anja [University of Vienna, Austria; Bringel, Francoise O. [University of Strasbourg; Vuilleumier, Stephane [University of Strasbourg; Lajus, Aurelie [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Medigue, Claudine [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Arctic sea ice modeling with the material-point method.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic sea ice plays an important role in global climate by reflecting solar radiation and insulating the ocean from the atmosphere. Due to feedback effects, the Arctic sea ice cover is changing rapidly. To accurately model this change, high-resolution calculations must incorporate: (1) annual cycle of growth and melt due to radiative forcing; (2) mechanical deformation due to surface winds, ocean currents and Coriolis forces; and (3) localized effects of leads and ridges. We have demonstrated a new mathematical algorithm for solving the sea ice governing equations using the material-point method with an elastic-decohesive constitutive model. An initial comparison with the LANL CICE code indicates that the ice edge is sharper using Materials-Point Method (MPM), but that many of the overall features are similar.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Unalaska  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven tribal consultation sessions and seven stakeholder outreach meetings between October and December 2014.

346

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Fairbanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven tribal consultation sessions and seven stakeholder outreach meetings between October and December 2014.

347

Framing and Identity in the Gwichin Campaign against Oil Development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1995). Time to permit oil drilling in the Arctic Refuge (campaignagainstoildrillingintheArcticNationalcase. Althoughoilexplorationanddrillinghas,tothis

Graybeal, Pam M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

ARM - Measurement - Cloud optical depth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

optical depth optical depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud optical depth Amount of light cloud droplets or ice particles prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites Field Campaign Instruments EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites

350

Changes in Food Web Structure Alter Trends of Mercury Uptake at Two Seabird Colonies in the Canadian Arctic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Changes in Food Web Structure Alter Trends of Mercury Uptake at Two Seabird Colonies in the Canadian Arctic ... Publication Date (Web): November 4, 2014 ... Arctic ecosystems are changing in response to climate change and some Arctic food web structures are being affected in ways which may have potential consequences for the biomagnification of environmental contaminants. ...

Birgit M. Braune; Anthony J. Gaston; Keith A. Hobson; H. Grant Gilchrist; Mark L. Mallory

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

351

Draft Genome Sequence of Moritella dasanensis Strain ArB 0140, a Psychrophilic Bacterium Isolated from the Arctic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...isolated from the Arctic Ocean, exhibited ice-pitting...organism in the Arctic Ocean. Nucleotide sequence...described in this paper is the first version, AKXQ01000000...Delcher AL , KA Bratke, EC Powers, and SL Salzberg. 2007...isolated from the Arctic ocean. Int. J. Syst. Evol...

Sung Gu Lee; Hye Yeon Koh; Jun Hyuck Lee; Sung-Ho Kang; Hak Jun Kim

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

ARM - Field Campaign - Spring Cloud IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Spring Cloud IOP 2000.03.01 - 2000.03.26 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program conducted a Cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in March 2000 that was the first-ever effort to document the 3-dimensional cloud field from observational data. Prior numerical studies of solar radiation propagation through the atmosphere in the presence of clouds have been limited by the necessity to use theoretical representations of clouds. Three-dimensional representations of actual clouds and their microphysical properties, such as the distribution of ice and water, had previously not been possible

353

Ground-based Microwave Cloud Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microwave Cloud Tomography Microwave Cloud Tomography Experiment, SGP, May 15-June 15, 2009 Lead Scientist Dong Huang, BNL Co-Investigators Al Gasiewski, UC Boulder Maria Cadeddu, ANL Warren Wiscombe, BNL Radiation Processes Working Group March 30, 2009 multiple radiometers All good cloud radiation modelers should close their airplane window shades so as not to be corrupted by the spectacle of real 3D clouds. - Roger Davies In case you forget to do this, you see 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 2 Effects of cloud structure on radiation 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 3 Typical climate model - Cloud fraction & mean water content - Horizontally uniform clouds, no side radiation - Assumption on overlap Courtesy of Bernhard Mayer Cloud structure important to radiation - Cumulus (Benner & Evans 2001, Pincus et al. 2005), deep convection (DiGiuseppe &

354

Widget:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Widget Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Widget:LogoCloud Jump to: navigation, search This widget adds css selectors and javascript for the Template:LogoCloud. For...

355

Multiscale Models for Cumulus Cloud Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cumulus clouds involve processes on a vast range of scalesincluding cloud droplets, turbulent mixing, and updrafts and downdraftsand it is often difficult to determine how processes on different scales interact with each other. In this article, ...

Samuel N. Stechmann; Bjorn Stevens

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Template:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TODO: Would be nice if logos could be vertically centered within each line of the cloud TODO: Provide a way to toggle the mouse-over behavior Usage For rendering a cloud of logos....

357

IBM research division cloud computing initiative  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud computing represents the latest phase in the evolution of Internet-based computing. In this paper, we describe the fundamental building blocks of cloud computing and the initiative undertaken by the IBM Research Division in this area, which includes ...

M. Naghshineh; R. Ratnaparkhi; D. Dillenberger; J. R. Doran; C. Dorai; L. Anderson; G. Pacifici; J. L. Snowdon; A. Azagury; M. VanderWiele; Y. Wolfsthal

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Disruptive technology business models in cloud computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud computing, a term whose origins have been in existence for more than a decade, has come into fruition due to technological capabilities and marketplace demands. Cloud computing can be defined as a scalable and flexible ...

Krikos, Alexis Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus hygroscopic aerosols were introduced into a solid marine stratocumulus cloud (200 m thick) by burning hygroscopic flares mounted on an aircraft. The cloud microphysical response in two parallel seeding plumes

Miami, University of

360

Cloud Service Security Requirements Questionnaire 1. What Cloud service will you be providing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Service Security Requirements Questionnaire Exhibit G 1. What Cloud service will you) as Low/Moderate/High? If so, which? 4. Has your cloud service been audited by any eternal agencies for security and quality control? If so, please provide evidence. 5. Has your cloud service been industry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1 1 Department of Meteorology, University. INTRODUCTION In recent years Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) have become an increasingly important tool for CRM data, which allows one to investigate statistical prop- erties of the lifecycles of the "clouds

Plant, Robert

362

HPI Cloud Symposium ,Operating The Cloud` 25.09.2013, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Auditorium Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agenda HPI Cloud Symposium ,Operating The Cloud` 25.09.2013, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Auditorium Building 09:30h Registration 10:00h Opening Prof. Dr. Christoph Meinel, HPI Potsdam 10:30h Cloud-RAID: Eine Methode zur Bereitstellung zuverlässiger Speicherressourcen in ?ffentlichen Clouds Maxim Schnajkin, HPI

Weske, Mathias

363

The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise Ali Khajeh-Hosseini, David Greenwood, James W. Smith, Ian Sommerville Cloud Computing Co-laboratory, School of Computer Science University of St Andrews, UK {akh, dsg22, jws7, ifs}@cs.st-andrews.ac.uk Abstract Cloud computing

Sommerville, Ian

364

Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman Security Architecture University Park, PA, USA yus138,hvijay,tjaeger@cse.psu.edu Abstract--Cloud computing has commoditized compute paradigm, its adoption has been stymied by cloud platform's lack of trans- parency, which leaves customers

Jaeger, Trent

365

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing broadening and drizzle growth in shallow liquid clouds remain not well understood. Detailed, cloudscale. Profiling, millimeterwavelength (cloud) radars can provide such observations. In particular, the first three

366

CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy: Computing in a Policy Cloud? Forthcoming in the Journal of Information Technology and Politics, 5(3). Paul T. Jaeger University of Maryland Jimmy Lin University of Maryland Justin M. Grimes University of Maryland #12;CLOUD

Lin, Jimmy

367

Cloud networking and communications Cloud computing is having an important impact on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Editorial Cloud networking and communications Cloud computing is having an important impact attention has been devoted to system aspects of Cloud computing. More recently, however, the focus is shifting towards Cloud net- working and communications with evolutionary and revo- lutionary propositions

Boutaba, Raouf

368

Securely Managing Cryptographic Keys used within a Cloud Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to rapidly develop/host cloud applications Infrastructure as a Service (Iaas) - Networked access to processing power, storage Cloud Deployment Models Public Cloud Private Cloud Community Cloud Hybrid administers the Cloud Infrastructure? Who has access to my data? My activity history? Key Management Where

369

Arctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec-edented low extents in the summer of 2007,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling, ice extent remains far below normal. Understanding Sea Ice Loss Key factors behind this recordArctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec- edented low extents in the summer of 2007, raising concern that the Arctic may be on the verge of a fundamental transition toward a seasonal ice cover

Clements, Craig

370

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database. INTRODUCTION................................................................................. 33 2. HISTORY

371

The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the continued ice melt [Polyakov et al., 2005], and recent work shows that heat from the Atlantic layer can91 The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies Uma S. Bhatt,1 and Robert A. Tomas3 The impact of reduced Arctic summer sea ice on the atmosphere is investigated by forcing

Bhatt, Uma

372

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice cover suppresses the development of thermal insulation during the ice formation processNAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study Aixue The variability of net sea ice production and sea ice exchange between the Arctic and its adjacent seas

Hu, Aixue

373

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suppresses the development of thermal insulation during the ice formation process. The North AtlanticNAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu National Center of the net sea ice production and the sea ice exchanges between the Arctic and its adjacent seas are studied

Hu, Aixue

374

A continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the atmosphere and ocean. In particular, sea ice affects the polar climate by insulating the ocean fromA continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1 and Daniel L. Feltham1 the Northern Hemisphere summer, absorbed solar radiation melts snow and the upper surface of Arctic sea ice

Feltham, Daniel

375

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David are estimated based on results from six different coupled ice- ocean models. The components of the kinetic of potential and kinetic energies. The models produce arctic boundary undercurrents controlled by the non

Zhang, Jinlun

376

A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice. In the summer the upper layers of sea ice and snow melts producing meltwater that accumulatesA model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface

Feltham, Daniel

377

Scale Dependence and Localization of the Deformation of Arctic Sea Ice David Marsan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and internal stress gradients, producing spatial gradients in the ice velocity that we refer to as deformationScale Dependence and Localization of the Deformation of Arctic Sea Ice David Marsan Laboratoire de of Arctic sea ice over a 3-day time period is performed for scales of 10 to 1000 km. The deformation field

378

Seasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service and the U. S. National Ice Center) produces summer outlooks of ice conditions for specific regionsSeasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1 J. Zhang,1 A. J. Schweiger,1 29 February 2008. [1] How well can the extent of arctic sea ice be predicted for lead periods of up

Zhang, Jinlun

379

Multiple equilibria and abrupt transitions in Arctic summer sea ice extent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, version 3 (CCSM3). The resulting nonlinear equations produce abrupt sea ice transitions resembling thoseMultiple equilibria and abrupt transitions in Arctic summer sea ice extent William J. Merryfield monograph "Arctic Sea Ice Decline", 19 October 2007 Corresponding author address: Dr. William Merryfield

Monahan, Adam Hugh

380

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

Moore, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Water balance of the Arctic drainage system using GRACE1 gravimetry products2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Arctic basins (0.49 to 0.8). Then32 changes in land waters storage have been compared to precipitation volume of seawater, it receives 11% of the world's44 freshwater input (Lammers et al., 2001). The Arctic and magnitude of northern river streamflow are51 mostly influenced by winter snow mass storage and its

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

382

Paleoecological evidence for abrupt cold reversals during peak Holocene warmth on Baffin Island, Arctic Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Arctic Canada Yarrow Axford a, , Jason P. Briner b , Gifford H. Miller a , Donna R. Francis c a Institute sediments is used to infer temperature changes at a small lake in Arctic Canada through the Holocene. Early). Superimposed over known changes in solar insolation through the Holocene are a number of less understood

Briner, Jason P.

383

Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= 1000 µm Typical values of BC in Arctic snow (ppb): Greenland 2-3 Canada 10 Siberia 20-25 #12 = 1000 µm Typical values of BC in Arctic snow (ppb): Greenland 2-3 Canada 10 Siberia 20-25 Snow grain large areas of snow are exposed to significant solar energy (snow albedo is less important in winter

384

6, 93519388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

Cloud Microphysics Spring 2013 **odd years?**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATS724 Cloud Microphysics (2-0-0) Spring 2013 **odd years?** Prerequisites: ATS620, ATS621; Ph, as the class will involve designing and building a simple cloud microphysical model. Course Description: **Sue and observations of nucleation, mechanisms of cloud droplet-spectra broadening, precipitation particle growth

386

Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong A Thesis Submitted;Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong This is to certify that I have implementations on unstructured point cloud 15 3.1 Level set initialization

Duncan, James S.

387

Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Pierangela Samarati*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Authors Pierangela Samarati* Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy sabrina.decapitani@unimi.it Keywords cloud security confidentiality integrity availability secure data storage and processing Summary The cloud has emerged as a successful computing paradigm

Samarati, Pierangela

388

Cloud Computing: Centralization and Data Sovereignty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cloud Computing: Centralization and Data Sovereignty Primavera De Filippi, Smari McCarthy Abstract: Cloud computing can be defined as the provision of computing resources on-demand over and elasticity of costs, problems arise concerning the collection of personal information in the Cloud

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

389

Political risks of hydrocarbon deposit development in the Arctic seas of the Russian Federation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nowadays the process of Arctic development has a long-term international cooperation character. Economic and geopolitical interests of both arctic and non-arctic countries meet in the region. Apart from resource development issues, there are problems concerning security, sustainable development and some others issues conditioned by climate and geographical characteristics of the region. Strategic analysis of political risks for the Russian Federation is carried out. The analysis reveals that political risks of hydrocarbon deposits development in the RF arctic seas appear as lack of coordination with arctic countries in solving key regional problems, failure to follow international agreements. Such inconsistency may lead to political risks, which results in strained situation in the region.

Y A Bolsunovskaya; G Yu Boyarko; L M Bolsunovskaya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Electron cloud observations : a retrospective.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A growing number of observations of electron cloud effects (ECEs) have been reported in positron and proton rings. Low-energy, background electrons ubiquitous in high-intensity particle accelerators. Amplification of electron cloud (EC) can occur under certain operating conditions, potentially giving rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade accelerator performance. EC observations and diagnostics have contributed to a better understanding of ECEs, in particular, details of beam-induced multipacting and cloud saturation effects. Such experimental results can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters for modeling efforts and analytical calculations to improve prediction capability. Electron cloud effects are increasingly important phenomena in high luminosity, high brightness, or high intensity machines - Colliders, Storage rings, Damping rings, Heavy ion beams. EC generation and instability modeling increasingly complex and benchmarked against in situ data: {delta}, {delta}{sub 0}, photon reflectivity, and SE energy distributions important. Surface conditioning and use of solenoidal windings in field-free regions are successful cures: will they be enough? What are new observations and how do they contribute to body of work and understanding physics of EC?

Harkay, K.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

Exploiting Virtualization and Cloud Computing in ATLAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concept of grid computing; since the start of data-taking, this model has proven very successful in the federated operation of more than one hundred Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) sites for offline data distribution, storage, processing and analysis. However, new paradigms in computing, namely virtualization and cloud computing, present improved strategies for managing and provisioning IT resources that could allow ATLAS to more flexibly adapt and scale its storage and processing workloads on varied underlying resources. In particular, ATLAS is developing a "grid-of-clouds" infrastructure in order to utilize WLCG sites that make resources available via a cloud API. This work will present the current status of the Virtualization and Cloud Computing R&D project in ATLAS Distributed Computing. First, strategies for deploying PanDA queues on cloud sites will be discussed, including the introduction of a "cloud factory" for managing cloud VM instances. Nex...

Barreiro Megino, FH; The ATLAS collaboration; De, K; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Panitkin, S; Paterson, M; De Silva, A; van der Ster, D; Taylor, R; Vitillo, RA; Walker, R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 30, 2008 [Facility News] April 30, 2008 [Facility News] Arctic Aerosol Study Flies By Bookmark and Share Ending its mission with a final flight on April 30, 2008, the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) flew a total of 103 research hours, completing 27 science flights primarily in the region around the ARM North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow. These flights included several golden cases where both cloud and aerosol measurements were obtained above, within, and below mixed-phase cloud layers. In addition, the campaign successfully demonstrated first-time airborne deployments of key instruments for measuring aerosol properties. All of the campaign's primary objectives were met, plus some secondary objectives, to help answer the team's science questions related to Arctic cloud and aerosol interactions.

394

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Buffering of Ice Crystal Number Concentration to Ice Nucleus Abundance Buffering of Ice Crystal Number Concentration to Ice Nucleus Abundance Above Arctic Stratus Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fridlind AM, B van Diedenhoven, AS Ackerman, A Avramov, A Mrowiec, H Morrison, P Zuidema, and MD Shupe. 2012. "A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA case study of mixed-phase Arctic boundary-layer clouds: Entrainment rate limitations on rapid primary ice nucleation processes." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 69(1), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-052.1. Observed and simulated histograms of MMCR radar reflectivity (left) and

395

The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2004 North Slope of Alaska 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment E. R. Westwater, M. A. Klein, and V. Leuski Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado A. J. Gasiewski, T. Uttal, and D. A. Hazen National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Cimini Remote Sensing Division, CETEMPS Universita' dell'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy V. Mattioli Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettronica e dell'Informazione Perugia, Italy B. L. Weber and S. Dowlatshahi Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado J. A. Shaw Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

396

Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds that develop on the surface of sea ice floes during the late spring and summer largely determine their albedo $-$ a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a simple sea ice climate model passing through a bifurcation point $-$ an irreversible critical threshold as the system warms, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a nonlinear phase transition model for melt ponds, and bifurcation analysis of a simple climate model with ice - albedo feedback as the key mechanism driving the system to a potential bifurcation point.

Sudakov, Ivan; Golden, Kenneth M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud 2: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to authorize the expenditure of federal funds by Cloud County Community College (CCCC) for a wind energy project. CCCC has installed three wind turbines and proposes to install a fourth turbine on their campus in Concordia, Kansas, for use in their wind energy training curriculum and to provide electricity for their campus. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download January 10, 2011 EA-1852: Notice of Scoping Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Technology Project, Cloud

398

Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling ?? Application to the wavelet variability model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

TROPIC: Transactional Resource Orchestration Platform In the Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TROPIC: Transactional Resource Orchestration Platform In the Cloud Changbin Liu, Yun Mao*, Xu Chen ­ InfrastructureasaService (IaaS) Cloud · Provide cloud infrastructure services: virtual machines (VMs), virtual block devices, VPNs · Widely adopted, e.g. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) ­ Cloud resource

Plotkin, Joshua B.

400

International Cloud Workshop, Locarno, Switzerland, 3 Feb 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Cloud Workshop, Locarno, Switzerland, 3 Feb 2009 Impact of broken and inhomogeneous clouds on satellite cloud-phase retrieval Erwin Wolters ­ KNMI Hartwig Deneke ­ KNMI/University of Bonn;Contents Introduction CM-SAF cloud-phase retrieval method The problem ­ research question Broken clouds

Haak, Hein

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Interconnecting Federated Clouds by Using Publish-Subscribe Service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud Federation is an emerging computing model where multiple resources from independent Cloud providers are leveraged to create large-scale distributed virtual computing clusters, operating as into a single Cloud organization. This model enables the ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Cloud Federation, Denial of Service, Intercommunication, Publish/Subscribe Service, Reliability

Christian Esposito; Massimo Ficco; Francesco Palmieri; Aniello Castiglione

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

ARM - Measurement - Cloud particle size distribution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

size distribution size distribution ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud particle size distribution The number of cloud particles present in any given volume of air within a specified size range, including liquid and ice. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments WSACR : Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, tuned to W-Band (95GHz) Field Campaign Instruments CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties

403

Organizational challenges in cloud adoption and enablers of cloud transition program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the proliferation of cloud computing, organizations have been able to get access to never seen before computing power and resources. Cloud computing has revolutionized the utilization of computing resources through ...

Rajendran, Sneha

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Global Climatology of Outgoing Longwave Spectral Cloud Radiative Effect and Associated Effective Cloud Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Longwave (LW) spectral flux and cloud radiative effect (CRE) are important for understanding the earths radiation budget and cloudradiation interaction. Here, the authors extend their previous algorithms to collocated Atmospheric Infrared ...

Xianglei Huang; Xiuhong Chen; Gerald L. Potter; Lazaros Oreopoulos; Jason N. S. Cole; Dongmin Lee; Norman G. Loeb

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

CloudML : A DSL for model-based realization of applications in the cloud.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cloud Computing offers a vast amount of resources, available for end users on a pay-as-you-go basis. The opportunity to choose between several cloud providers is (more)

Brandtzg, Eirik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LES Simulations of Roll Clouds Observed During Mixed- LES Simulations of Roll Clouds Observed During Mixed- Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment S.D. Greenberg and J Y. Harrington The Pennsylvania State University Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania A. Prenni and P. DeMott Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction Roll clouds and associated roll convection, are fairly common features of the atmospheric boundary layer. While these organized cumuliform clouds are found over many regions of the planet, they are quite ubiquitous near the edge of the polar ice sheets. In particular, during periods of off-ice flow, when cold polar air flows from the ice pack over the relatively warm ocean water, strong boundary layer convection develops along with frequent rolls. According to Brümmer and Pohlman (2000), most of the

407

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determination of Thermodynamic Cloud Phase and Determination of Thermodynamic Cloud Phase and Reflective Field from Radiance Measurements J. Um and G.M. McFarquhar Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois Introduction The thermodynamic cloud phase and composition have substantial impacts on vertical profiles of radiative heating. However, reliable retrievals of these quantities from remote sensing measurements are still difficult. Furthermore, retrieval techniques using satellite radiance measurements are limited to at most a few viewing angles. During the 2004 Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) at the North Slope of Alaska site, the Diffuse Field Camera (DFC) was mounted on the Proteus aircraft and measured cloud radiance fields in an effort to retrieve information about thermodynamic phase and

408

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Validation of infrared  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Validation of infrared cloud radiative transfer simulations and spectral Validation of infrared cloud radiative transfer simulations and spectral cloud properties retrievals using S-HIS, AERI and HSRL measurements from M-PACE Holz, Robert University of Wisconsin, CIMMS DeSlover, Daniel University of Wisconsin Revercomb, Henry University Of Wisconsin-Madison Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Turner, David Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Eloranta, Edwin University of Wisconsin As part of the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) the Scanning High spectral resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) flew on the Proteus high altitude aircraft with the ARM-UAV instrumentation. The University of North Dakota Cessna Citation capable of cloud situ measurements was coordinated with the Proteus to obtain coincident down looking and situ

409

Prediction of Cloud Points of Biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of Cloud Points of Biodiesel ... Despite the lack of accurate data for the cloud points of biodiesel, the results obtained here allow for an adequate evaluation of the model proposed, showing that it can produce good predictions of the cloud points of mixtures of fatty acid esters. ... Because of its environmental benefits, resulting from a decrease in CO2 emissions, its origin from renewable resources, and the increase in crude oil costs, biodiesel is become increasingly attractive. ...

J. C. A. Lopes; L. Boros; M. A. Krhenbhl; A. J. A. Meirelles; J. L. Daridon; J. Pauly; I. M. Marrucho; J. A. P. Coutinho

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

410

Analysis of cloud layer structure in Shouxian, China using RS92 radiosonde aided by 95 GHz cloud radar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of cloud layer structure in Shouxian, China using RS92 radiosonde aided by 95 GHz cloud to analyze cloud vertical structure over this area by taking advantage of the first direct measurements of cloud vertical layers from the 95 GHz radar. Singlelayer, twolayer, and threelayer clouds account for 28

Li, Zhanqing

411

Technical Sessions Parameterization of Convective Clouds, Mesoscale...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Convective-Generated Clouds W. R. Cotton Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 This presentation is a summary of research...

412

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and Geometric Association Over the Tropical Western Pacific Warm Pool X. Wu National Center for Atmospheric Research (a) Boulder, Colorado...

413

The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supported images and site security policies. A cloud systemcertain implications on site security policies. Our securityactivitiesboth in terms of site security policy as well as

Coghlan, Susan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

An Analysis of Cloud Absorption During  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis of Cloud Absorption During ARESE II (Spring 2000) D. M. Powell, R. T. Marchand, and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction...

415

Automated Security Compliance Tool for the Cloud.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Security, especially security compliance, is a major concern that is slowing down the large scale adoption of cloud computing in the enterprise environment. Business (more)

Ullah, Kazi Wali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Cloud Computing and Sustainability: Energy Efficiency Aspects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Cloud computing promises a new era of service delivery and deployment in such a way that every person can access any kind of services (more)

Gholamhosseinian, Ashkan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National...

418

Cloud Computing Organizational Benefits: A Managerial concern.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Context: Software industry is looking for new methods and opportunities to reduce the project management problems and operational costs. Cloud Computing concept is providing answers (more)

Mandala, Venkata

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Cloud Computing - Trends and Performance Issues.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Context: Cloud Computing is a very fascinating concept these days, it is attracting so many organiza-tions to move their utilities and applications into a dedicated (more)

Al-Refai, Ali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cloud computing has emerged as a model for hosting computing infrastructure and outsourcing management of that infrastructure. It offers the promise of simplified provisioning and (more)

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A COMPARISON OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICAL QUANTITIES WITH FORECASTS FROM CLOUD PREDICTION MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program, Bethesda, MD March 15-19, 2010 Environmental Sciences Department/Atmospheric Plains (SGP) site. Cloud forecasts generated by the models are compared with cloud microphysical and radiosonde) are used to derive the cloud microphysical quantities: ice water content, liquid water content

422

Testing a cloud application: IBM SmartCloud inotes: methodologies and tools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

IBM SmartCloud is a branded collection of Cloud products and solutions from IBM. It includes Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), and Platform as a Service (PaaS) offered through public, private and hybrid cloud delivery ... Keywords: Software testing, methodology, tool

Michael Lynch; Thomas Cerqueus; Christina Thorpe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

AirCloud: a cloud-based air-quality monitoring system for everyone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the design, implementation, and evaluation of AirCloud -- a novel client-cloud system for pervasive and personal air-quality monitoring at low cost. At the frontend, we create two types of Internet-connected particulate matter (PM2:5) ... Keywords: PM2.5, air quality, client-cloud calibration system

Yun Cheng, Xiucheng Li, Zhijun Li, Shouxu Jiang, Yilong Li, Ji Jia, Xiaofan Jiang

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Cloud-Top Temperatures for Precipitating Winter Clouds JAY W. HANNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cloud-Top Temperatures for Precipitating Winter Clouds JAY W. HANNA NOAA/NESDIS Satellite for each precipitation type, as well as light, moderate and heavy snow and rain. The light the cloud microphysics in producing precipitation. For example, ice will only nucleate from the vapor phase

Schultz, David

425

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, DOE/EIA-0383(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999), Table A11. Energy Information Administration, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, SR/RNGD/87-01 (Washington, DC, September 1987). U.S. Department of Interior, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, Coastal Plain Resource Assessment, (Washington, DC, November, 1986). U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Minerals Management Service. Northeast National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Final Integrated Activity Plan / Environmental Impact Statement, (Anchorage , Alaska, August, 1998).

426

Simulated Response of the Arctic Freshwater Budget to Extreme NAO Wind Forcing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors investigate the response of the Arctic Ocean freshwater budget to changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) using a regional-ocean configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology GCM (MITgcm) and carry out several ...

Alan Condron; Peter Winsor; Chris Hill; Dimitris Menemenlis

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ozone hole Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The discovery of the ozone hole in the Southern Hemi- sphere... (Chubachi, 1984; Farman et al., 1985), winter ozone losses over the Arctic (e.g. Brune et al., 1991... .,...

428

The Detection of Large HNO3-Containing Particles in the Winter Arctic Stratosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the same atmospheric conditions...most current atmospheric model simulations...HNO 3 and water removal...this case, recovery of Arctic...Center for Atmospheric Research...the co-condensation of water and HNO3...

D. W. Fahey; R. S. Gao; K. S. Carslaw; J. Kettleborough; P. J. Popp; M. J. Northway; J. C. Holecek; S. C. Ciciora; R. J. McLaughlin; T. L. Thompson; R. H. Winkler; D. G. Baumgardner; B. Gandrud; P. O. Wennberg; S. Dhaniyala; K. McKinney; Th. Peter; R. J. Salawitch; T. P. Bui; J. W. Elkins; C. R. Webster; E. L. Atlas; H. Jost; J. C. Wilson; R. L. Herman; A. Kleinbhl; M. von Knig

2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

429

Proceedings of OMAE07 26th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of OMAE07 26th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering to quantify induced loads on sub- merged engineering constructions (such as oil platforms and rail and road

Kalisch, Henrik

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic lake sediments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALEXANDER P. WOLFE (awolfe@ualberta.ca) Summary: cover and low productivity is that sediment accumulation rates in non-glacial arctic lakes and ponds... from the sediment record....

431

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic science conference Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

science conference Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic science conference Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 RECIEL 17 (1) 2008. ISSN...

432

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic weather conditions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

weather conditions Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic weather conditions Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A Concept from a Concern:...

433

Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

Quirk, Laura Marie

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

434

Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 2 Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model with a combination of satellite observations (Fig. 2.1) and field mea- surements, as projected by simulation modeling

Bhatt, Uma

435

Moored observations of shelfbreak processes at the inflow to and outflow from the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two high-resolution mooring arrays extending from the outer shelf to the mid continental slope are used to elucidate shelf-basin exchange at the inflow to and the outflow from the Arctic Ocean. Pacific Water entering the ...

Von Appen, Wilken-Jon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A Characterization of the Present-Day Arctic Atmosphere in CCSM4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation of key features of the Arctic atmosphere in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) is evaluated against observational and reanalysis datasets for the present-day (19812005). Surface air temperature, sea level pressure, ...

Gijs de Boer; William Chapman; Jennifer E. Kay; Brian Medeiros; Matthew D. Shupe; Steve Vavrus; John Walsh

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Real-time processing of remote sensor data as applied to Arctic ice classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an earth observations system [4]; remote sensor measurements (radar measurements) from an environmental situation (the Arctic surface) are processed and analyzed at a real-time rate to yield a usable output data product (ice statistics) which in turn...REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by JAMES AUSTIN PERMENTER partial ! Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

Permenter, James Austin

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Contribution of Microbial Activity to Carbon Chemistry in Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of their atmospheric transport that atmospheric particles...undergo several condensation-evaporation...in cloud water. Clouds...of cloud water, precipitation...Microbiology and atmospheric processes...resource recovery. IWA Publishing...

Mickal Vatilingom; Pierre Amato; Martine Sancelme; Paolo Laj; Maud Leriche; Anne-Marie Delort

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

439

V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities December 6, 2012 - 4:01am Addthis PROBLEM: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple...

440

Building mobile multimedia services: a hybrid cloud computing approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Second, we use a hybrid cloud computing...strategy. That means the i5Cloud takes advantage of in-house commodity hardware infrastructure which is usually available in most organizations, ... , i5Cloud can automat...

Dejan Kovachev; Yiwei Cao; Ralf Klamma

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

E-Cloud Build-up in Grooved Chambers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and F. Zimmermann, LC e-Cloud Activities at CERN, talkal. , Simulations of the Electron Cloud for Vari- ous Con?E-CLOUD BUILD-UP IN GROOVED CHAMBERS ? M. Venturini LBNL,

Venturini, Marco

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

A cloud-assisted design for autonomous driving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents Carcel, a cloud-assisted system for autonomous driving. Carcel enables the cloud to have access to sensor data from autonomous vehicles as well as the roadside infrastructure. The cloud assists autonomous ...

Suresh Kumar, Swarun

443

Deriving cloud velocity from an array of solar radiation measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K. , 2011. US20110060475. Cloud tracking. U.S. Patent Bedka,technique for obtaining cloud motion from geosynchronouson advection of a frozen cloud field (Chow et al. (2011);

Bosch, J.L.; Zheng, Y.; Kleissl, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow (Preliminary analysis of 2008-2009 data) Outline * Receptor modeling overview * Results from 2007 data set * New goals arising from analysis of 2007 data * New data for 2008 * New data for 2009 * Tentative conclusions * Future analysis i Factor profiles from 2007 analysis Source attribution of Black Carbon from 2007 analysis Goals/Issues suggested by the analysis of the 2007 data set * Are there seasonal differences in the source strengths? * Are there other LAA chemical components besides black carbon. What are their sources? * Can the various data sets available (e.g., 2007, 2008, 2009) be combined in a single large PMF analysis 2008 Data Set For Receptor Analysis * 42 samples from Eastern Siberia including 4 depth profiles

446

Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire ?ECLOUD? series [1?22]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series [24] contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC [25].

Furman, M.A.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Physical Properties of High-Level Cloud over Land and Ocean from CloudSatCALIPSO Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unlike other cloud types, high-level clouds play an important role, often imposing a warming effect, in the earthatmosphere radiative energy budget. In this paper, macro- and microphysical characteristics of cirrus clouds, such as their ...

Juan Huo; Daren Lu

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Network Performance of a Video Application in the Cloud.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cloud computing is a technology that uses the internet and central remote servers to maintain data and applications. There are different cloud services of which (more)

NARISETTY, SHRAVAN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Detecting Cirrus-Overlapping-Water Clouds and Retrieving their...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

channel (0.6 m) to retrieve cloud optical depth. Both channels are common to all weather satellite sensors. Because cirrus clouds are mostly semitransparent at infrared...

451

Overview of the COPS Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics (ACM) Subgroup...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

properties of orographically induced clouds and how do these depend on dynamics, thermodynamics, and aerosol microphysics? * What is the role of aerosols and changing cloud...

452

Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the center of the bubble cloud. Credit: Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory, ETH Zurich, Switzerland Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud...

453

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Champaign, Illinois Introduction Improving the representation of cloud-radiation interaction is a major challenge for the global climate simulation. The development of cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and the extensive Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARMs) provide a unique opportunity for shading some lights on this problem. Current general circulation models (GCMs) predict cloud cover fractions and hydrometeor concentra- tions only in individual model layers, where clouds are assumed to be horizontally homogeneous in a

454

Smoking Rain Clouds over the Amazon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...processes affect the water cycle, the pollution...the dynamics of atmospheric circulation. Several...concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the...transport cloud water in deep convection...concentrations result in recovery of drop size. However...background. Stronger atmospheric instability and a...

M. O. Andreae; D. Rosenfeld; P. Artaxo; A. A. Costa; G. P. Frank; K. M. Longo; M. A. F. Silva-Dias

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

455

2, 20952131, 2002 Below-cloud aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). In addition, the understanding of wet removal processes remains crucial in local and regional pollutionACPD 2, 2095­2131, 2002 Below-cloud aerosol removal C. Andronache Title Page Abstract Introduction-cloud aerosol removal by rainfall for observed aerosol size distributions C. Andronache Boston College, Chestnut

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

456

Cloud Properties and Precipitation Formation Processes Observed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of spring time precipitation that develops in the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia region. · What are the cloud properties for developing cloud in the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia region. Research Objective #12;#12;Quality is based on calibration conducted by Kelly bosch and Dennis Afseth at Weather Modification Inc. (WMI) on 22

Delene, David J.

457

Atmospheric chemistry: Thwarting the seeds of clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The ephemeral cloud of tiny drops that you see above the spout of your teapot forms in the same way as clouds in the sky by the condensation of ... the number of nanometre-sized particles formed through nucleation, similar to what happens above the teapot, except that organic molecules rather than water molecules are involved. ...

Paul J. Ziemann

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

458

Public Cloud B CarbonEmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors, Demand Prediction Power Capping, Green Software Services such as energy-efficient scientific) Request a Cloud service 4) Allocate service 5) Request service allocation 3) Request energy efficiency information Green Offer Directory 2) Request any `Green Offer' Routers Internet Green Broker #12;Cloud

Buyya, Rajkumar

459

The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nets Network Virtualization Architecture Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de 05. Februar, 2014 Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture #12;..... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture #12

Schmid, Stefan

460

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. The examination of present-day climate also includes diagnostic intercomparison of model simulations and observed mean climate and climate variability using reanalysis and satellite datasets. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A further objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES: CHARACTERIZING SIMULATED VERSUS OBSERVED CLOUD CATALOGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a study of simulated giant molecular clouds (GMCs) formed in a Milky Way-type galactic disk with a flat rotation curve. This simulation, which does not include star formation or feedback, produces clouds with masses ranging between 10{sup 4} M{sub ?} and 10{sup 7} M{sub ?}. We compare our simulated cloud population to two observational surveys: the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey and the BIMA All-Disk Survey of M33. An analysis of the global cloud properties as well as a comparison of Larson's scaling relations is carried out. We find that simulated cloud properties agree well with the observed cloud properties, with the closest agreement occurring between the clouds at comparable resolution in M33. Our clouds are highly filamentarya property that derives both from their formation due to gravitational instability in the sheared galactic environment, as well as to cloud-cloud gravitational encounters. We also find that the rate at which potentially star-forming gas accumulates within dense regionswherein n{sub thresh} ? 10{sup 4} cm{sup 3}is 3% per 10 Myr, in clouds of roughly 10{sup 6} M{sub ?}. This suggests that star formation rates in observed clouds are related to the rates at which gas can be accumulated into dense subregions within GMCs via filamentary flows. The most internally well-resolved clouds are chosen for listing in a catalog of simulated GMCsthe first of its kind. The cataloged clouds are available as an extracted data set from the global simulation.

Benincasa, Samantha M.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Wadsley, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Tasker, Elizabeth J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

462

Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight A research team led by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory identified specific strengths and weaknesses of four different ice cloud retrieval algorithms. Their comparisons tested the ability of the algorithms to obtain cloud properties from radar and lidar observational measurements. The team noted the sometimes large variances in heating/cooling measurements compared to the observed data. Identifying specific weaknesses will help scientists improve our understanding of cloud properties in the atmosphere, which can be used for climate model development and evaluation. "Measuring the effective size and mass of ice crystals impacts our understanding

463

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

464

Multi Cloud Architecture to Provide Data Security And Integrity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract-- Cloud servers are being used to store data and application but its security is a major issue in current context. To solve the data security problems in public environment we propose an effective model for security and integrity of data stored in a cloud, through data segmentation followed by data encryption programs in a multiple cloud architecture. This architecture forms a multi cloud system where primary cloud is available for multiple users for data storage offering lesser load on client systems thereby using the cloud computing architecture. This architecture introduces a secondary cloud controlled by a single administrator which provides the data backup for primary cloud after undergoing specific segmentation and encryption algorithms to ensure security and integrity of data. The proposed system also offers protection against virus attacks by using linux as the base OS. Keywords-- Encryption, Linux, Multi cloud system, Primary cloud, Secondary cloud, Segmentation.

Nikhil Dutta; Himanshu Bakshi; Mujammill Mulla; Viraj Shinde

465

ISLAND AND SHIP TRAIL CLOUDS: THE ROSETTA STONE OF CLOUDS, POLLUTION, AND CLIMATE?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud/Climate Feedback is a combination of words known to be important but extremely difficult to quantify or even assign a direction. A 4 % increase in boundary layer clouds would cool the earth as much as a doubling of CO{sub 2} would warm it (Randall et al, 1984). Studies have shown that warmer sea surface temperatures are associated with fewer clouds (Oreopoulos and Davies, 1992). We do not know how much of this effect is due to direct solar warming of surface water in the absence of clouds. We also know there are more eastern ocean marine boundary layer clouds in summer than winter. Do warmer sea surface temperatures or more summer-like conditions best represent global warming? Twomey, 1974 has proposed that increasing aerosol pollution would lead to brighter clouds (indirect aerosol effect). This relationship does have determined sign (i.e. cooling) but is very difficult to quantify. Cloud trails from ships and islands hold the potential of addressing Cloud/Climate Feedback by observing atmospheric response to large perturbations in turbulence and aerosol. However, before cloud trails can be used as a Rosetta Stone connecting pollution and climate, much more needs to be understood about the micro- and macrophysics of cloud trails.

W. PORCH; S. WINIECKI; L. O'STEEN

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained...

Panitkin, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; Benjamin, D; DiGirolamo, A; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Hover, J; Kucharczuk, K; Medrano LLamas, R; Ohman, H; Paterson, M; Sobie, R; Taylor, R; Walker, R; Zaytsev, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Cluster Formation in Contracting Molecular Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore, through a simplified, semi-analytic model, the formation of dense clusters containing massive stars. The parent cloud spawning the cluster is represented as an isothermal sphere. This sphere is in near force balance between self-gravity and turbulent pressure. Self-gravity, mediated by turbulent dissipation, drives slow contraction of the cloud, eventually leading to a sharp central spike in density and the onset of dynamical instability. We suggest that, in a real cloud, this transition marks the late and rapid production of massive stars. We also offer an empirical prescription, akin to the Schmidt law, for low-mass star formation in our contracting cloud. Applying this prescription to the Orion Nebula Cluster, we are able to reproduce the accelerating star formation previously inferred from the distribution of member stars in the HR diagram. The cloud turns about 10 percent of its mass into low-mass stars before becoming dynamically unstable. Over a cloud free-fall time, this figure drops to 1 percent, consistent with the overall star formation efficiency of molecular clouds in the Galaxy.

Eric Huff; Steven Stahler

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

468

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

469

Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD participants believe that the platform concept could have far-reaching applications in the Arctic as a drilling and production platform, as originally intended, and as a possible staging area. The overall objective of this project was to document various potential applications, locations, and conceptual designs for the inland platform serving oil and gas operations on the Alaska North Slope. The University of Alaska Fairbanks assisted the HARC/TerraPlatforms team with the characterization of potential resource areas, geotechnical conditions associated with continuous permafrost terrain, and the potential end-user evaluation process. The team discussed the various potential applications with industry, governmental agencies, and environmental organizations. The benefits and concerns associated with industry's use of the technology were identified. In this discussion process, meetings were held with five operating companies (22 people), including asset team leaders, drilling managers, HSE managers, and production and completion managers. Three other operating companies and two service companies were contacted by phone to discuss the project. A questionnaire was distributed and responses were provided, which will be included in the report. Meetings were also held with State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources officials and U.S. Bureau of Land Management regulators. The companies met with included ConcoPhillips, Chevron, Pioneer Natural Resources, Fairweather E&P, BP America, and the Alaska Oil and Gas Association.

Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

470

ArcticN O A A ' s A r c t i c A c t i O N P l A N Supporting the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service Kate Clark National Ocean Service Pablo Clemente-Colon National Environmental Satellite directly supports the National Strategy. Advancing U.s. security interests in the Arctic requires improvedArcticN O A A ' s A r c t i c A c t i O N P l A N Supporting the national Strategy for the arctic

471

Cloud-Based Transportation Management System Delivers Savings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOEs cloud based transportation management system (ATLAS) offers dramatically enhanced capabilities and modernization.

472

Virtual Cloud: Rent Out the Rented Resources Sheheryar Malik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtual Cloud: Rent Out the Rented Resources Sheheryar Malik Research Team OASIS INRIA Sophia.huet@inria.fr Abstract--With the advent in cloud computing technologies, use of cloud computing infrastructure to the cloud infrastructure. Over a small period of time, it has substantiated to be an attractive choice

Boyer, Edmond

473

CLOUD PHYSICS From aerosol-limited to invigoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD PHYSICS From aerosol-limited to invigoration of warm convective clouds Ilan Koren,1 * Guy Dagan,1 Orit Altaratz1 Among all cloud-aerosol interactions, the invigoration effect is the most elusive. Most of the studies that do suggest this effect link it to deep convective clouds with a warm base

Napp, Nils

474

CLOUD DROPLET NUCLEATION AND ITS CONNECTION TO AEROSOL PROPERTIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD DROPLET NUCLEATION AND ITS CONNECTION TO AEROSOL PROPERTIES STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ Environmental in cloud-free conditions and indirectly, by increasing concentratiol1S of cloud droplets thereby enhancing cloud shortwave reflectivity. These effecls are thought to be significant in the context of changes

475

Low Cost, Scalable Proteomics Data Analysis Using Amazon's Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Cost, Scalable Proteomics Data Analysis Using Amazon's Cloud Computing Services and Open and maintain. #12;Cloud Computing · Distributed or Cloud computing allows for the use of virtual computers Web Services (AWS) · EC2 ­ Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud "a web service that provides resizable compute

476

Cloud Computing Ch Zh XCheng-Zhong Xu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cloud Computing ECE7650 Ch Zh XCheng-Zhong Xu Outline What is cloud computing CharacteristicsCharacteristics (word processing and spreadsheets) Google video for business Google sites (intranet sites and wikis) "It/2010 Autonomic Cloud Management 6 #12;4 Essential Characteristics C. Xu @ Wayne State Cloud Computing 7 Essential

Xu, Cheng-Zhong

477

Depolarisation cooling of an atomic cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a cooling scheme based on depolarisation of a polarised cloud of trapped atoms. Similar to adiabatic demagnetisation, we suggest to use the coupling between the internal spin reservoir of the cloud and the external kinetic reservoir via dipolar relaxation to reduce the temperature of the cloud. By optical pumping one can cool the spin reservoir and force the cooling process. In case of a trapped gas of dipolar chromium atoms, we show that this cooling technique can be performed continuously and used to approach the critical phase space density for BEC

S. Hensler; A. Greiner; J. Stuhler; T. Pfau

2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

478

Global distribution of total cloud cover and cloud type amounts over the ocean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fourth of a series of atlases to result from a study of the global cloud distribution from ground-based observations. The first two atlases (NCAR/TN-201+STR and NCAR/TN-241+STR) described the frequency of occurrence of each cloud type and the co-occurrence of different types, but included no information about cloud amounts. The third atlas (NCAR/TN-273+STR) described, for the land areas of the earth, the average total cloud cover and the amounts of each cloud type, and their geographical, diurnal, seasonal, and interannual variations, as well as the average base heights of the low clouds. The present atlas does the same for the ocean areas of the earth.

Warren, S.G.; Hahn, C.J.; London, J.; Chervin, R.M.; Jenne, R.L. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (USA). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences; Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Dept. of Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences; National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (USA))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Air monitoring in the Arctic: Results for selected persistent organic pollutants for 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is generally considered to be a pristine environment and has few direct inputs of organochlorine compounds (OCs), including pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In spite of this, airborne concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are comparable to those in more populated and industrialized regions of North America and Europe. Atmospheric transport and condensation of compounds at low temperature conditions are important factors contributing to the presence of contaminants in the Arctic. A long-term program has been established to measure the airborne concentrations of POPs in the Arctic. The first station at Alert was established in January 1992. The concentrations measured in the first year of monitoring for 18 compounds that are representative of different compound classes are presented. Seasonal variations for PAHs are similar to those for Arctic haze and peak during winter. For example, in the coldest period, october to April, benzo[a]pyrene concentrations were found to average 20 pg/m{sup 3}, whereas, in contrast, during the relatively warm May to September period, average levels were 1.0 pg/m{sup 3}. For OCs, the seasonal cycle was not as pronounced as that for PAH compounds. For example, {alpha}-hexachlorocyclohexane was found at Alert at average concentrations of 62 and 57 pg/m{sup 3}, respectively, during cold and warm periods. It is postulated that air concentrations are influenced by advection from distant source regions as well as exchange with local (Arctic Ocean) surfaces.

Fellin, P.; Dougherty, D. [BOVAR Environmental, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Barrie, L.A.; Toom, D. [Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Muir, D.; Grift, N.; Lockhart, L.; Billeck, B. [Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Atmospheric Circulation and Its Effect on Arctic Sea Ice in CCSM3 Simulations at Medium and High Resolution*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Canadian archipelago, where the T85 winds produce thicker ice than their T42 counterparts. Seasonal forcingAtmospheric Circulation and Its Effect on Arctic Sea Ice in CCSM3 Simulations at Medium and High) ABSTRACT The simulation of Arctic sea ice and surface winds changes significantly when Community Climate

Bitz, Cecilia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "arctic mixed-phase clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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481

1 Copyright 2014 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2014 33rd International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Offshore and Arctic Engineering OMAE2014 June 8-13, 2014, San Francisco, California, USA OMAE2014 and icebergs present significant challenges for the development of arctic and subarctic oil and gas resources in northern regions. Offshore structures and vessels must be designed to withstand interaction with such ice

Bruneau, Steve

482

Ice Mass Balance Buoys: A tool for measuring and attributing changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Mass Balance Buoys: A tool for measuring and attributing changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover Jacqueline A. Richter-Menge1 , Donald K. Perovich1 , Bruce C. Elder1 , Keran Claffey1 Abstract Recent observational and modeling studies indicate that the Arctic sea ice cover is undergoing

Rigor, Ignatius G.

483

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 50, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2012 3317 Multiyear Arctic Sea Ice Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, QuikSCAT, sea ice. I. INTRODUCTION THE HIGH albedo and insulating properties of sea ice make Arctic Sea Ice Classification Using QuikSCAT Aaron M. Swan and David G. Long, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Long-term trends in Arctic sea ice are of particular interest in studies of global temperature, climate change

Long, David G.

484

Effects of Changes in Arctic Lake and River Ice Terry Prowse, Knut Alfredsen, Spyros Beltaos, Barrie R. Bonsal,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice in the Arctic are projected to produce a variety of effects on hydrologic, ecological, and socio impacts that are directly produced by changes in freshwater ice. The details and diversityEffects of Changes in Arctic Lake and River Ice Terry Prowse, Knut Alfredsen, Spyros Beltaos

Vincent, Warwick F.

485

Application of cellular automata approach for cloud simulation and rendering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current techniques for creating clouds in games and other real time applications produce static, homogenous clouds. These clouds, while viable for real time applications, do not exhibit an organic feel that clouds in nature exhibit. These clouds, when viewed over a time period, were able to deform their initial shape and move in a more organic and dynamic way. With cloud shape technology we should be able in the future to extend to create even more cloud shapes in real time with more forces. Clouds are an essential part of any computer model of a landscape or an animation of an outdoor scene. A realistic animation of clouds is also important for creating scenes for flight simulators, movies, games, and other. Our goal was to create a realistic animation of clouds.

Christopher Immanuel, W. [Department of Physics, Vel Tech High Tech Dr. Rangarajan Dr. Sakunthala Engineering College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 062 (India)] [Department of Physics, Vel Tech High Tech Dr. Rangarajan Dr. Sakunthala Engineering College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 062 (India); Paul Mary Deborrah, S. [Research Department of Physics, The American College, Tamil Nadu, Madurai 625 002 (India)] [Research Department of Physics, The American College, Tamil Nadu, Madurai 625 002 (India); Samuel Selvaraj, R. [Research Department of Physics, Presidency College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 005 (India)] [Research Department of Physics, Presidency College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 005 (India)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

NIST Cloud Computing Strategy working paper, April 2011 1 of 25 NIST Strategy to build a USG Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIST Cloud Computing Strategy working paper, April 2011 1 of 25 NIST Strategy to build a USG Cloud of United States Government (USG) secure and effective adoption of the Cloud Computing2 model to reduce costs and improve services. The working document describes the NIST Cloud Computing program efforts

487

Cloud Service Analysis - Choosing between an on-premise resource and a cloud computing service.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cloud computing is a concept that has become increasingly popular in recent years through an increase in Internet connection capabilities, virtualization possibilities, and commercial successes. (more)

Augustsson, Keith

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Pre-Cloud Aerosol, Cloud Droplet Concentration, and Cloud Condensation Nuclei from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere Land Study (VOCALS) Field Campaign First Quarter 2010 ASR Program Metric Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this, the first of a series of Program Metric Reports, we (1) describe archived data from the DOE G-1 aircraft, (2) illustrate several relations between sub-cloud aerosol, CCN, and cloud droplets pertinent to determining the effects of pollutant sources on cloud properties, and (3) post to the data archive an Excel spreadsheet that contains cloud and corresponding sub-cloud data.

Kleinman, LI; Springston, SR; Daum, PH; Lee, Y-N; Sedlacek, AJ; Senum, G; Wang, J

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

489

Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo $\\alpha$. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snow melt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freeze up. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at $\\alpha \\gtrsim $ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the $\\alpha$ distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained pro...

Agarwal, S; Wettlaufer, J S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

What economic support is needed for Arctic offshore wind power?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wind power is increasingly being installed in cold climates and in offshore locations. It is generally recognised that installing wind power to offshore locations is more expensive than onshore. The additional challenges from Arctic conditions with annual sea icing are still poorly known. We reviewed the existing knowledge of offshore wind power costs and developed a calculation model for the economics of offshore wind turbines in Finland, including taxes and sea base rent, to obtain a base case for determining the required tariff support. The model was tested with different production and cost rates to obtain a tariff price, which would make offshore wind power on Finnish territory economically viable for the producer. The main developers of planned offshore projects in Finland were interviewed to obtain a comparison between the created model and industry expectations. The cost of erected turbines was estimated to be 2750/kW. With this cost of capacity, it was clear that a higher than the current tariff price (83.5/MWh) will be required for offshore developments. Our analysis indicated a price level of about 115/MWh to be required. We found that even rather small changes in cost or production rates may lead to excess profits or economic losses and further research and pilot projects are required to define a more reliable tariff level.

Olli Salo; Sanna Syri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterizaton  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterization Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterization in NCAR CCM3 D. Zurovac-Jevtic, G. J. Zhang, and V. Ramanathan Center for Atmospheric Sciences Scripps Institute of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Cirrus cloud cover and ice water content (IWC) are the two most important properties of cirrus clouds. However, in general circulation models (GCMs), their treatment is very crude. For example, in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM3), IWC is prescribed as a function of column-integrated water vapor and height (Hack 1998). The in situ observations in the tropics indicate that the cirrus IWC is an order of magnitude larger than what is prescribed in the model (McFarquhar and Heymsfield 1996). The comparison with the International

492

Flying Cloud Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flying Cloud Wind Farm Flying Cloud Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Flying Cloud Wind Farm Facility Flying Cloud Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer Clipper Windpower Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location West of Spirit Lake IA Coordinates 43.416975°, -95.422282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.416975,"lon":-95.422282,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

493

A Global Cloud Resolving Model Goals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Resolving Model Cloud Resolving Model Goals Uniform global horizontal grid spacing of 4 km or better ("cloud permitting") 100 or more layers up to at least the stratopause Parameterizations of microphysics, turbulence (including small clouds), and radiation Execution speed of at least several simulated days per wall-clock day on immediately available systems Annual cycle simulation by end of 2011. Motivations Parameterizations are still problematic. There are no spectral gaps. The equations themselves change at high resolution. GCRMs will be used for NWP within 10 years. GCRMs will be used for climate time-slices shortly thereafter. It's going to take some time to learn how to do GCRMs well. Scaling Science Length, Spatial extent, #Atoms, Weak scaling Time scale

494

NASA's Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystems (ACE) Mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plans for NASAs Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystem (ACE) mission is described. Recommended by Earth Science Decadal Survey in 2007, ACE is nominally planned for a 2021 launch. ACE is...

Starr, David O'C

495

EVENT CLOUDS : lighter than air architectural structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVENT CLOUD is a versatile covering system that allows events to happen independently to weather conditions. It consists of a lighter than air pneumatic structure, filled either with helium or hot air, that covers spaces ...

Peydro Duclos, Ignacio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

ARM Cloud Properties Working Group: Meeting Logistics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties WG Breakout Session 2008 ARM Science Team Meeting Mar. 10, 2008, Norfolk, VA Monday March 10, 2008 1500 to 1515: R. Hogan - A Proposal for ARM support of Cloudnet...

497

Hydrated sulphuric acid in dense molecular clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......anthropogenically from combustion of fuels. Oxidized...forms readily in hydrocarbon combustion where sulphur is...dense clouds. From heat of vaporization...3 Observational Data Absorption spectra...peak absorption data in mum (cm1) for......

Flavio Scappini; Cesare Cecchi-Pestellini; Harvey Smith; William Klemperer; Alexander Dalgarno

2003-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

498

Interactive physically-based cloud simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

computational fluid solver. This allows us to simulate the complex air motion that contributes to cloud formation in our atmosphere. Among the natural processes that we simulate are buoyancy, relative humidity, and condensation. Because we have built...

Overby, Derek Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

499

Cloud Platform Support for API Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

more cloud-like model, digital assets (code, data and software environments) increasingly require curation as web-accessible services. Service-izing digital assets consists of encapsulating assets in software that exposes them to web and mobile applications via well-defined yet flexible, network accessible, application programming interfaces (APIs). In this paper, we postulate that recent advances in cloud computing make cloud platforms as-aservice (PaaS) ideal for deployment, lifecycle management, and policy-based control i.e. API governance for extant and future digital assets. Toward this end, we overview API governance as a PaaS technology and outline some early results generated by our investigation of a prototype we are developing, called EAGER, for implementing API governance at scale. Index TermsAPI Governance; PaaS; cloud platforms; API similarity;

Ra Krintz; Hiranya Jayathilaka; Stratos Dimopoulos; Er Pucher; Rich Wolski; Tevfik Bultan

500

A Quest for Effective Hygroscopic Cloud Seeding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown here that hygroscopic seeding requires two orders of magnitude more hygroscopic agent than can be delivered by flare technology for producing raindrop embryos in concentrations to detect by cloud physics aircraft the microphysical ...

Daniel Rosenfeld; Duncan Axisa; William L. Woodley; Ronen Lahav

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z