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Sample records for arctic coastal plain

  1. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre...

  2. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS:...

  3. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

  4. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent...

  5. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of the geology of the Coastal Plain is based on outcrops and geophysical data from seismic surveys of the area. The extrapolation of known geology and information from wells...

  6. Potential Oil Production from Coastal Plain of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) received a letter (dated March 10, 2000) from Senator Frank H. Murkowski as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requesting an EIA Service Report with plausible scenarios for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey resource assessments. This service report is prepared in response to the request of Senator Murkowski. It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currently restricted from exploration and development, and updates EIA's 1987 ANWR assessment.

  7. Phosphorus fertilization of alfalfa on Coastal Plain soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beedy, Tracy Lyn

    2000-01-01

    Grazing tolerant varieties of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) are being introduced to improve the quality of pastures in the southern Coastal Plain. 'Alfagraze' alfalfa was planted on eight soils near Overton, Texas to determine the P requirement...

  8. Seasonal dynamics of bacterial biomass and production in a coastal arctic ecosystem: Franklin Bay, western Canadian Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    Seasonal dynamics of bacterial biomass and production in a coastal arctic ecosystem: Franklin Bay 2008. [1] The Canadian Arctic Shelf Exchange Study (CASES) included the overwintering deployment biomass and production in a coastal arctic ecosystem: Franklin Bay, western Canadian Arctic, J. Geophys

  9. Field Testing Protocol Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Regional Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Field Testing Protocol Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Regional Supplement Organization of field the field testing of the draft Regional Supplement. Field testing will be done in cooperation with regional, the District coordinator will provide team members with an introduction to the Regional Supplement

  10. Retention of Riverine Sediment and Nutrient Loads by Coastal Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retention of Riverine Sediment and Nutrient Loads by Coastal Plain Floodplains Gregory B. Noe for their cumulative retention of the annual river loads of nutrients or sediments. Here we report measurements of sediment accretion and associated carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus accu- mulation as sedimentation over

  11. Much of the North Carolina Coastal Plain is wet and supports plant communities that are domi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    Much of the North Carolina Coastal Plain is wet and supports plant communities that are domi- nated, the North Caro- lina State University Herbarium. 1 Department of Botany, North Carolina State University.S.A. WINTER KEYS TO COMMON, WETLAND TREES, SHRUBS, AND WOODY VINES OF THE NORTH CAROLINA COASTAL PLAIN JON M

  12. Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

    1990-12-31

    The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  13. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    foreign and domestic oil and gas resources, reserves, and production potential. As a policy-neutral agency, EIAs standard analysis of the potential of the Alaska North Slope...

  14. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (Washington, DC, November, 1986). U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Minerals Management Service. Northeast National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Final...

  15. Recovery of Soil Carbon Stocks on Disturbed Coastal Plain Soils Through Secondary Forest SuccessionPlain Soils Through Secondary Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Recovery of Soil Carbon Stocks on Disturbed Coastal Plain Soils Through Secondary Forest SuccessionPlain Soils Through Secondary Forest Succession Recovery of soil carbon stocks in historically Contact and Environmental Research 50 µm Recovery of soil carbon stocks in historically degraded soils provides a means

  16. North Carolina Coastal Plain savannas rank among the most species rich communities in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    North Carolina Coastal Plain savannas rank among the most species rich communities in the world floristic inventory of a North Carolina savanna: Big Savannah (Pender Co.) (Shelingoski et al. 2005 & Shunk (1928), AK thanks: Donna Wright (North Carolina State University) for thoughtful discussions

  17. NITRATE MOVEMENT IN SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN SOILS UNDER CONSERVATION-TILLED VEGETABLE PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    NITRATE MOVEMENT IN SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN SOILS UNDER CONSERVATION-TILLED VEGETABLE PRODUCTION G.D. Hoyt1 , D.C. Sanders2 , J.T. D.R. Decoteau3 , ABSTRACT Movement of soil nitrates by leaching. This study measured soil nitrate-N with depth at planting and after cucumber harvest at Clinton, NC, Florence

  18. Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Ted Stevens that the Energy Information Administration provide an assessment of federal oil and natural gas leasing in the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Alaska.

  19. Active deformation front delineated by drainage pattern analysis and vertical movement rates, southwestern Coastal Plain of Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen-Shan

    , southwestern Coastal Plain of Taiwan Chih-Cheng Barry Yang a,*, Wen-Shan Chen a , Leh-Chyun Wu b , Chii-Wen Lin c a Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan b Department of Geology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan c Central Geological Survey, MOEA, Taipei, Taiwan

  20. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic coastal plain and outer Continental Shelf in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1982-11-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region increased in 1981. Eight wells were drilled, 5 of which were completed for a total footage of 71,439 ft (21,780 m). Four of the wells were located in the Baltimore Canyon Trough area and 4 were located in the Georges Bank basin. No exploratory wells were drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment or in the onshore portion of this region in 1981. The 5 completed wells were reported as dry holes. Two lease sales were held in 1981: OCS Lease Sale 56 drew bids on 47 tracts for a total of $342,766,174 in the South Atlantic and OCS Lease Sale 59 drew bids on 50 tracts for a total of $321,981,000 in the Mid-Atlantic. Geophysical activity provided a total of 24,470 line-mi (39,380 line-km) of seismic data.

  1. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and outer continental shelf in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    Exploratory drilling on the Atlantic outer continental shelf remained at about the same level as in 1983. Two wells were spudded in the Baltimore Canyon Trough. Three were completed and announced as dry holes, one in a world record water depth of 6,952 ft (2,119 m). Onshore in the Atlantic coastal plain, a dry hole was drilled in Colleton County, South Carolina, and another well, drilled in 1982 in Lee County, North Carolina, was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole. North Atlantic Lease Sale 82, which was to be held in 2 parts, was cancelled in late 1984. The International Court of Justice determined the United States-Canada boundary line in the North Atlantic. Seismic data acquisition decreased 41% below the 1983 level to 7,223 line-mi(11,625 line-km).

  2. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and Outer Continental Shelf in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Carpenter, G.B.; Amato, R.V.

    1984-10-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region declined slightly in 1983. Four wells were spudded during the year: 2 in the offshore Baltimore Canyon area and 2 onshore in Lee County, North Carolina. One North Carolina well was drilled, and the other was being tested at year end. In April, 4050 tracts were offered in the mid-Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 76), the first area-wide offering of offshore oil and gas leases under the Department of the Interior's new streamlined leasing system. Bids of $86,822,680 were exposed on 40 tracts, and 37 tracts were subsequently leased. In July 3, 082 tracts were offered in the south Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 78). Bids of $14,562,040 were exposed on 11 tracts, and all high bids were accepted. Seismic data acquisition decreased 64% below the 1982 level to 13,166 line-mi (21,189 line-km). 3 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  4. INSTITUTE FOR COASTAL SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalakrishnan, K.

    plain, and barrier island systems Social Science and Coastal Policy: Examine politics and public policy

  5. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet) Year Jan4.PDFWildlife Refuge: Updated

  6. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet) Year Jan4.PDFWildlife Refuge:

  7. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet) Year Jan4.PDFWildlife Refuge:Wildlife

  8. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet) Year Jan4.PDFWildlife

  9. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet) Year Jan4.PDFWildlifeWildlife Refuge:

  10. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet) Year Jan4.PDFWildlifeWildlife

  11. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160 October 2015 Table 44. PAD075Wildlife

  12. The effect of global warming scenarios on soybean and peanut yields in the Coastal Plain region of Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laitta, M.T.; Huebner, N.J. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This study is an evaluation of peanut and soybean yield in the Coastal Plain of Georgia as a function of seasonal water deficit scenarios. An analytical model of the Thornthwaite water balance model, based on historical temperature and precipitation data, is used to evaluate the probable response of crop productivity to climate changes in selected counties in South Georgia. The input of temperature and precipitation values for each site is based on the results of three general circulation models (GCM), which were regionally tailored to the Southeastern United States. A regression analysis was preformed to establish a numerical relationship between historical yield and moisture deficits. This model, in association with projected GCM model deficits, was used to predict future crop yields. Our results showed that given all GCM models evaluated, deficit periods for the selected sites will increase both the intensity and duration droughts in the southeastern U.S. Of the two crops analyzed, it was found that soybeans showed a higher sensitivity to moisture deficits than did peanuts.

  13. Seasonal and multiannual roost use by Rafinesque's Big-eared Bats in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeb, Susan, C.; Zarnoch, Stanley, J.

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about factors affecting year-round use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) or the long-term fidelity of this species to anthropogenic or natural roosts. The objectives of this study were to test whether seasonal use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats varied with roost type and environmental conditions within and among seasons and to document multiannual use of natural and anthropogenic structures by this species. We inspected 4 bridges, 1 building, and 59 tree roosts possessing basal cavity openings; roosts were inspected at least once per week from May through October in every year from 2005 through 2008 and once a month from November through April in every year from 2005 through 2009. We found that use of anthropogenic roosts was significantly greater than the use of tree roosts in summer but that the use of structure types did not differ in other seasons. There was significant seasonal variation in use of anthropogenic and tree roosts. Anthropogenic roost use was higher in summer than in all other seasons. There was no significant difference in tree use among spring, summer, and fall, but use in winter was significantly lower in 2 years of the study. Overall use of anthropogenic and tree roosts was positively related to minimum temperature, but the relationship between use of roosts and minimum temperature varied among seasons. Bats showed multiannual fidelity ({ge} 4 years) to all anthropogenic roosts and to some tree roosts, but fidelity of bats to anthropogenic roosts was greater and more consistent than to tree roosts. Our data indicate that Rafinesque's big-eared bats responded differently to environmental conditions among seasons; thus, a variety of structure types and characteristics are necessary for conservation of these bats. We suggest long-term protection of roost structures of all types is necessary for conservation of Rafinesque's big-eared bats in the southeast Coastal Plain.

  14. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior parameters represent reasonably identifiable stand conditions, being: (1) pine dominated stands with more litter and down woody debriscomponents than other stands, (2) hardwood and pine stands with no shrubs, (3) hardwood dominated stands with low shrub and high non-woody biomass and high down woody debris, (4) stands with high grass and forb (i.e., non-woody) biomass as well as substantial shrub biomass, (5) stands with both high shrub and litter biomass, (6) pine-mixed hardwood stands with moderate litter biomass and low shrub biomass, and (7) baldcypress-tupelo stands. Models representing these stand clusters generated flame lengths from 0.6 to 2.3 musing a 30 km h{sub 1} wind speed and fireline intensities of 100-1500 kW m{sub 1} that are typical within the range of experience on this landscape. The fuel models ranked 1 < 2 < 7 < 5 < 4 < 3 < 6 in terms of both flame length and fireline intensity. The method allows for ecologically complex data to be utilized in order to create a landscape representative of measured fuel conditions and to create models that interface with geospatial fire models.

  15. Tuktoyaktuk : responsive strategies for a new Arctic urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchot, Pamela (Pamela Rae)

    2011-01-01

    The Canadian Arctic is facing a set of compounding crises that will drastically impact the future of its coastal frontier. At a time when climate change is having a detrimental impact on the Arctic landscape, Northern ...

  16. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-12-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  17. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  18. Arctic house

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkel, Joel A. (Joel Abram), 1969-

    1999-01-01

    Currently available housing in the Arctic is limited to solutions that have been adapted from designs for less severe climates. This thesis has developed a new manner of residential construction designed specifically for ...

  19. Sandia Energy - Arctic Climate Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Climate Measurements Home Climate & Earth Systems Climate Measurement & Modeling Arctic Climate Measurements Arctic Climate Measurementscwdd2015-05-08T01:51:20+00:00 A...

  20. Potential DOC production from size-fractionated Arctic tundra soils Chunhao Xu a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Laodong

    and available for biogeochemical cycling through coastal erosion (Rachold et al., 2000; Guo et al., 2004 of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA b International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Permafrost Alaska Soil organic carbon (SOC) accumulated inthe Arctic regions has beensubject to impacts

  1. Mobilization pathways of organic carbon from permafrost to arctic rivers in a changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Laodong

    Mobilization pathways of organic carbon from permafrost to arctic rivers in a changing climate rivers and Arctic coastal regions. To elucidate the transport pathways of SOC, radiocarbon composition is more readily influenced by modern terrestrial biomass, especially in large river basins which also

  2. Arctic Energy Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 Arctic Energy Summit is a multi-disciplinary event expected to draw several hundred industry officials, scientists, academics, policy makers, energy professionals, and community leaders together to collaborate and share leading approaches on Arctic energy issues.

  3. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-12-31

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  4. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-01-01

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  5. Plain Language Training Class

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Registration link: Click Here to RegisterThe link will bring you to the Plain Writing Powerpedia page, where you can register for the class that works for you. Alternatively, please contact Michael...

  6. Plain Language Training Class

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Registration link: Click Here to RegisterThe link will bring you to the Plain Writing Powerpedia page, where you can register for the class that works for you. Alternatively, please contact Michael...

  7. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management and salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afton, Alan D.

    Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management: impoundments, marsh sediments, ponds, salinity Abstract Physical characteristics of sediments in coastal marsh compositions of waterbird communities. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain potentially

  8. Coal petrographic genetic units in deltaic-plain deposits of the Campanian Mesa Verde Group (New Mexico, USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Coal petrographic genetic units in deltaic-plain deposits of the Campanian Mesa Verde Group (New stratigraphy; Coal; Maceral analysis; Microlithotype Abstract The Campanian rocks of the Mesa Verde Group units, i.e. intermediate term cycles. The continental facies consist of coastal-plain deposits (coals

  9. Coastal Conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2014-12-23

    Book review of Coastal Conservation Edited by Brooke Maslo and Julie L. Lockwood Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2014, 382 pages ISBN 978-1-107-60674-6,

  10. Carbon dynamics in arctic vegetation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Street, Lorna Elizabeth

    2011-11-24

    Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the Arctic land surface and the global climate system. A large amount of organic carbon (C) is currently stored in Arctic soils; if ...

  11. Arctic Climate Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Mark D.; Robinson, David G.; Boslough, Mark B.; Backus, George A.; Peterson, Kara J.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Swiler, Laura Painton; Desilets, Darin Maurice; Reinert, Rhonda Karen

    2015-03-01

    This study began with a challenge from program area managers at Sandia National Laboratories to technical staff in the energy, climate, and infrastructure security areas: apply a systems-level perspective to existing science and technology program areas in order to determine technology gaps, identify new technical capabilities at Sandia that could be applied to these areas, and identify opportunities for innovation. The Arctic was selected as one of these areas for systems level analyses, and this report documents the results. In this study, an emphasis was placed on the arctic atmosphere since Sandia has been active in atmospheric research in the Arctic since 1997. This study begins with a discussion of the challenges and benefits of analyzing the Arctic as a system. It goes on to discuss current and future needs of the defense, scientific, energy, and intelligence communities for more comprehensive data products related to the Arctic; assess the current state of atmospheric measurement resources available for the Arctic; and explain how the capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories can be used to address the identified technological, data, and modeling needs of the defense, scientific, energy, and intelligence communities for Arctic support.

  12. The influence of sea-level changes on tropical coastal lowlands; the Pleistocene Coropina Formation, Suriname

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    of Paleocene­Eocene bauxites. This study deals with the stratigraphy, sedimentology and chronology A general problem in terrestrial and coastal sedimentology and stratigraphy is the common lack of precise the sedimentology of a Pleistocene­Holocene succession in the coastal plain of Suriname and use palaeomagnetic

  13. Arctic energy resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rey, L.

    1983-01-01

    The Arctic is a vulnerable region with immense resources. These range from the replenishable (tidal energy, hydroelectricity, wood, biomass, fish, game, and geothermal energy) to the non-replenishable (coal, minerals, natural gas, hydrocarbon deposits). But the problems of exploiting such resources without damaging the environment of the Arctic are formidable. In this book all aspects are considered: occurrence of energy resources; the technological and economic aspects of exploration and exploitation; the environmental and social impact of technological development.

  14. The Necklace around the Arctic Arctic indigenous peoples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    national choir). #12;The economies of the Arctic settlements invariably involve fish, oil or gas: natural and Wildlife Service ( http://arctic.fws.gov/ ), and other sources. #12;Faroe Islands (~Denmark) Shetland

  15. Representation of tundra vegetation by pollen in lake sediments of northern Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Feng Sheng

    Coastal Plain, Arctic Foothills, modern pollen, North Slope, palynology, paleoecology, pollen accumulation been an important objective in paleoecology (Iversen, 1952; Livingstone, 1955; Colinvaux, 1964; Ritchie

  16. Flood Plain Management. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeely, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1976-01-01

    are the soils that lie within th~ 500-year flood plain. Technical descriptions, general ae. ricultural uses, and locations of these soils are displa!ed in narrative and map form. These data are presented much like a standard county soil survey but in les... that will minimize flood damage. 3) adeauate ", 1 drainage for new subdivisions, and 4) new or replace- ment utility systems located and designed to preclude flood loss (24). The Texas Water Development Board listed 438 cities and 40 counties in Texas...

  17. Partners for Profit... Coastal Bermudagrass, Fertilizer, and Management. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, J. Neal; Lovell, Ashley C.

    1979-01-01

    is expressed to the Tennessee Valley Authority for providing partial funds for printing. J S 111'1 I c.;l~ I 8 -/:);).3 (l a. '"A I JvJ(Y PARTNERS FOR PROFIT ... COASTAL BERMUDAGRASS, FERTILIZER AND MANAGEMENT J. Neal Pratt and Ashley C. Lovell* Coastal... in improved animal performances. L-771 Crop Fertilization on East Texas Soils L-772 L-983 Crop Fertilization on Coast Prairie and Coastal 8end Soils Crop Fertilization on Rolling Plains, Central Prairies and Cross Timber Soils L-1411 Field and Forage...

  18. Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain and continuing with the still- ongoing volcanism in the High Lava Plains (HLP) and eastern Snake River Plain (SRP waves; shear wave splitting; high lava plains; Snake River Plain; Yellowstone. Index Terms: 8137

  19. 6, 96559722, 2006 Arctic smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Discussions Arctic smoke ­ record high air pollution levels in the European Arctic due to agricultural fires into the European Arctic and caused the most severe air pollution episodes ever recorded there. This paper confirms that biomass burning (BB) was in-5 deed the source of the observed air pollution, studies the transport

  20. Reliant Coastal Plains Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield1989) JumpLiteratureReidReliant

  1. GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COMPACT COOPERATIVE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN 2011 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 2 of 31 2011 Great Plains Forest Fire Compact AOP Table of Contents I. Intentionally Left Blank 28 K. Public Law 110-79 29 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 3 of 31

  2. Plain Language Training Class 01

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Registration link:  CHRIS https://mis.doe.gov/ess/index.cfm   002357/0017 and https://powerpedia.energy.gov/wiki/Plain_Writing_Training_Class_October_...Course Type: Classroom   Course Location:...

  3. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and...

  4. NGEE Arctic Data Catalog

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFromJune 2013TECNGEE Arctic - Data

  5. Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  6. Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, John

    2014-05-01

    Welcome to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site is managed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). It is very important that all visitors comply with all DOE and ANL safety requirements, as well as those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the National Fire Protection Association, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with other requirements as applicable.

  7. Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project March 2012. [1] Six Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project model simulations are compared and Assimilation System models. Citation: Johnson, M., et al. (2012), Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness

  8. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  9. DOT WEB PAGES (plain text) 1 DOT WWW Pages --Plain Text Copy June 17, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    DOT WEB PAGES (plain text) 1 DOT WWW Pages -- Plain Text Copy ­ June 17, 2015 http . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 8 pdf copies of these pages 29 Welcome to the DOT web pages! The Dutch Open Telescope on La Palma observing: wiki external usage webcam #12;DOT WEB PAGES (plain text) 2 1 DOT news · January 2012: Utrecht

  10. Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

  11. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Marshall Hughes Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Marshall Hughes Comment submitted on...

  12. Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean...

  13. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-01-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  14. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2004-10-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  15. The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2008-11-01

    The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

  16. Latitudinal distribution of the recent Arctic warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr; Lesins, Glen K; Wang, Muyin

    2010-12-08

    Increasing Arctic temperature, disappearance of Arctic sea ice, melting of the Greenland ice sheet, sea level rise, increasing strength of Atlantic hurricanes are these impending climate catastrophes supported by observations? Are the recent data really unprecedented during the observational records? Our analysis of Arctic temperature records shows that the Arctic and temperatures in the 1930s and 1940s were almost as high as they are today. We argue that the current warming of the Arctic region is affected more by the multi-decadal climate variability than by an increasing concentration of carbon dioxide. Unfortunately, none of the existing coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models used in the IPCC 2007 cIimate change assessment is able to reproduce neither the observed 20th century Arctic cIimate variability nor the latitudinal distribution of the warming.

  17. Regional Service Planning for the Coastal Bend 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coastal Bend Council of Governments

    2006-12-01

    -Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ?R?E?G?I?O?N?A?L? ?S?E?R?V?I?C?E? ?P?L?A?N?N?I?N?G ?F?O?R? ?T?H?E? ?C?O?A?S?T?A?L? ?B?E?N?D ?R?e?g?i?o?n?a?l? ?P?u?b?l?i?c? ?T?r?a?n?s?p?o?r?t?a?t?i?o?n ?C?o?o?r?d?i?n?a?t?i?o?n? ?S?t?u?d?y ?w...?w?w?.?r?e?g?i?o?n?a?l?s?e?r?v?i?c?e?p?l?a?n?n?i?n?g?.?o?r?g ?D?e?c?e?m?b?e?r? ?1?,? ?2?0?0?6 Regional Service Planning for the Coastal Bend Regional Public Transportation Coordination Study This study was funded by financial grant from the Texas...

  18. INTRODUCTION Mesopotamia is the broad, flat alluvial plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deMenocal, Peter B.

    in upper right with the Mesopotamian flood- plain (star), Zagros Moun- tain (circle) and Indus River

  19. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-04-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) and provided information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 2 efforts also included preparation of a draft topical report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region'', which is nearing completion. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The video will be completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in the next quarter. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. The addition of the Canadian province of Alberta to the PCOR Partnership region expanded the decision support system (DSS) geographic information system database. Task 5 screened and qualitatively assessed sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  20. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Lisa S. Botnen

    2005-07-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership characterization work is nearing completion, and most remaining efforts are related to finalizing work products. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) has developed a Topical Report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region''. Task 3 (Public Outreach) has developed an informational Public Television program entitled ''Nature in the Balance'', about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The program was completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in this quarter. Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) efforts are nearing completion, and data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation are being incorporated into a series of topical reports. The expansion of the Decision Support System Geographic Information System database has continued with the development of a ''save bookmark'' feature that allows users to save a map from the system easily. A feature that allows users to develop a report that summarizes CO{sub 2} sequestration parameters was also developed. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options and developing economic estimates for important regional CO{sub 2} sequestration strategies.

  1. Environmental perceptions in Great Plains novels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardee, Celeste Frances

    1976-01-01

    to environmental influ- ences on the overall settlement process. Finally, con- clusions are drawn on the contribution of novels to the study of environmental perception during the settlement period and to an understanding of Great Plains culture history...ENVIRONMENTAL PERCEPT10NS IN GREAT PLAINS NOVELS A Thesis CELESTE FRANCES PARDEE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major...

  2. Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the discovered and undiscovered Arctic oil and natural gas resource base with respect to their location and concentration. The paper also discusses the cost and impediments to developing Arctic oil and natural gas resources, including those issues associated with environmental habitats and political boundaries.

  3. Mineral resources of Cactus Plain and East Cactus Plain Wilderness Study Areas, La Paz County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tosdal, R.M.; Eppinger, R.G.; Erdman, J.A.; Hanna, W.F.; Pitkin, J.A.; Blank, H.R. Jr.; O'Leary, R.M.; Watterson, J.R. (US Geological Survey (US)); Kreidler, T.J. (US Bureau of Mines (US))

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on geologic, geochemical, and geophysical studies in the Cactus Plain and East Cactus Plain Wilderness Study Areas outlined in areas with moderate to high potential for gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, barite, fluorite, manganese, and sand suitable for foundry, fracturing, and abrasive uses and low resource potential for beryllium, uranium and bentonitic clays.

  4. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to improve representation of the Arctic in Earth System Models Topography influences snow cover, thermal

  5. NOAA's Role in the Arctic Presentation by Kathleen Crane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interact with the rest of the Arctic (marine, ice and terrestrial) system? · Which recent changes Fresh water In the Arctic Ocean The sources and pathways of fresh water into and out of the Arctic Ocean shape of the Beaufort Gyre, Surface Transport Pathways in Response to the Arctic Oscillation. #12

  6. Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

    2013-10-01

    This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories,Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie') and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katie's dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpson's Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

  7. Springtime Arctic haze contributions of submicron organic particles from European and Asian combustion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Jesse

    The composition of Arctic aerosol, especially during the springtime Arctic haze, may play an important role in the radiative balance of the Arctic. The contribution of organic components to Arctic haze has only recently ...

  8. The case for the plain packaging of tobacco products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becky Freeman, BSc, MSc; Simon Chapman, BA, PhD; Matthew Rimmer, BA, LLB, PhD

    2007-01-01

    65-7. The case for the plain packaging of tobacco productsH. The effect of plain packaging on response to healthAnon. Opportunities in packaging innovation. March http://

  9. Geothermal features of Snake River plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1987-08-01

    The Snake River plain is the track of a hot spot beneath the continental lithosphere. The track has passed through southern Idaho as the continental plate has moved over the hot spot at a rate of about 3.5 cm/yr. The present site of the hot spot is Yellowstone Park. As a consequence of the passage, a systematic sequence of geologic and tectonic events illustrates the response of the continental lithosphere to this hotspot event. The three areas that represent various time slices in the evolution are the Yellowstone Plateau, the Eastern Snake River plain downwarp, and the Western Snake River plain basin/Owhyee Plateau. In addition to the age of silicic volcanic activity, the topographic profile of the Snake River plain shows a systematic variation from the high elevations in the east to lowest elevations on the west. The change in elevation follows the form of an oceanic lithosphere cooling curve, suggesting that temperature change is the dominant effect on the elevation.

  10. SHORT COMMUNICATION A rare fight in female plains zebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Daniel I.

    SHORT COMMUNICATION A rare fight in female plains zebra Ilya R. Fischhoff · Siva R. Sundaresan and Springer 2009 Abstract We describe a fight between two female plains zebra (Equus burchelli). Plains zebra observed. The fight immediately followed the birth of a foal to one of the females. The initiating female

  11. An introduction to coastal geomorphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pethick, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book is an introduction to wave and tidally dominated coastal forms, including beaches, cliffs, dunes, estuaries, mudflats and marshlands. The book emphasises the physical mechanisms by which this variety of landforms is produced and maintained. It introduces the energy outputs - waves, currents, tides - into the coastal 'machine', examines the way in which this energy is converted into water and sediment movement, and leads to an account of coastal landform development.

  12. Bacterial production and microbial food web structure in a large arctic river and the coastal Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    in the surface waters decreased across the salinity gradient, dropping from 51,000 (river) to 30 (sea) cells m. Glucose enrichment experiments indicated that bacterial metabolism was carbon limited in the Mackenzie

  13. Proceedings of Coastal Zone 07 Portland, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    MODEL FOR PUGET SOUND: A CLASSROOM EXPERIENCE Timothy Nyerges, Scott Dudgeon, Tyanne Faulkes information systems, coastal zone management INTRODUCTION Coastal zone management (CZM) requires robust about how to management coastal resources (Wright and Scholz 2005). CZM applications of geographic

  14. Economic feasibility of shipping containers through the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Russell (Russell Clayton)

    2009-01-01

    As the Arctic ice cover continues to retreat, the possibility of regular transit through the Arctic becomes an increasing reality. Liner companies could take advantage of distance savings (up to 4000 nautical miles less ...

  15. The seasonal dynamics of Arctic surface hydrology in permafrost environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trofaier, Anna Maria

    2014-11-11

    Climate-induced landscape evolution is resulting in changes to biogeochemical and hydrologi- cal cycling. In the Arctic and sub-Arctic permafrost zones, rising air temperatures are warming, and in some regions even thawing, the frozen ground...

  16. Cotton and Manpower - Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ducoff, Louis J.; Metzler, William H.; Motheral, Joe R.

    1953-01-01

    . DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 49103 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS Figure 1. DIGEST This report presents the results of a study of farm labor employed in the cotton crop of the Texas High Plains. Made in Lubbock and Crosby counties by the Texas... Agricultural Experiment Station and the Bureau of Agricultural Econom- ics of the United States Department of Agriculture, the study covered the experience of 324 farm operators in the 1951 crop. It was focused on the types, sources and utilization of labor...

  17. Science Serving Hawaii's Coastal Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of their coastal habitats and ecosystems. UH Sea Grant is a unit of the prestigious School of Ocean and Earth, and opportunities. Commitment to Educating Tomorrow's Workforce The UH Sea Grant graduate trainee program supports the excellence of Sea Grant and its longstanding commitment to coastal sustainability by awarding it seven new

  18. Biogeochemistry of the Western Gulf Coastal Plain as Impacted by Forest Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foote, Julie

    2014-01-29

    Plantation forestry is central to supplying the global demand for forest products and sustainable production will rely on information regarding the effects of disturbance on soil biogeochemistry. The extent of ecosystem disturbance will dictate...

  19. Geothermal energy market study on the Atlantic Coastal Plain: Ocean City, Maryland geothermal energy evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, C.E.

    1981-08-01

    This report is one of a series of studies that have been made by the Applied Physics Laboratory, or its subcontractors, to examine the technical and economic feasibility of the utilization of geothermal energy at the request of potential users.

  20. Fish assemblage structure along environmental gradients in a coastal plain drainage: influences from a reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Matthew Earl

    1999-01-01

    &0. 1-0. 4 0-0. 01 0-27 0- I 0 0-61 0-2. 5 0-0. 4 0-0. 5 0-0. 1 0 98-151 38-52 122-152 2. 6-2. 9 0. 8-0. 8 0. 5-0. 5 (0. 01-0. 02 0-78 0-15 0-51 3. 7-4. 2 0. 6-0. 6 0-0. 4 0-0. 22 56-139 15-23 64-77 3. 7-5. 0 0. 6-0. 7 0. 5...

  1. Utilization of Home Grown Feeds in Producing Slaughter Cattle in the Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada, Hugo Jose

    1960-01-01

    )y YN?ec kcouLTC Aoc IN A00000 NIYN 10?V louo TNIALO AT 1+0 STATIONI IN NNION TNC rc?OINO Ot ONAIN YO uclrcko NNILC CAASINO Oa'fc vAO Nof FONNO 0?NCFIOIALV TN? 0Afo 100T'Ieco ?%0?LL?NT oea?INO oukleo TNIO 1??loop uNION NAT oc TNC NSAOON FOR foc LAON...AIN PN40LCH IS NOU 14 USC SONPLCNCH f ANT SONOKNTNAVC I'CCOS 'Ul'Va OHACIN4 SNOPO ANO FONASCS f4 NANC 'f?C HOST NC'1 PNOFIT ~ lac Aaa?af OF OoaeKHTAAfcs fo sc Fcs Oval?0 fac saOUtae AHO FAVTCNIHO PCNtOOV AS UCLL AS Tae Ahouaf Or OoacCHTNATKS TO OC...

  2. A Geographical Approach to Tracking Escherichia coli and Nutrients in a Texas Coastal Plains Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harclerode, Cara

    2011-02-22

    Carters Creek in Brazos County, Texas, like many surface water reaches in the Texas Gulf Coast region, has been identified for bacteria and nutrient impairment on the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) 303(d) ...

  3. Settlement Fluctuations and Environmental Changes in Israel's Coastal Plain During the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    , Israel; email: fausta@mail.biu.ac.il 2 Yosef Ashkenazy, Department of Solar Energy and Environmental activity, and for our understanding of the relationship between Egypt and the Levant in the late 4th to 3rd

  4. Integrated stratigraphic studies of Paleocenelowermost Eocene sequences, New Jersey Coastal Plain: Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) sites on the New Jersey deepwater continental slope (Sites 605 and 612 (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 150X, 174AX) and analyze benthic foraminiferal assemblages to assess estimates of Haq et al. [1987]. However, their study was limited to discontinuous drill sections

  5. Feeding Bone Meal to Range Cattle on the Coastal Plains of Texas : Preliminary Report. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, H.

    1926-01-01

    .. Chref I FAR L. B. G. v. * *T. **J. M AND RANCH ECONOMICS: P GABBARD b1 S Chief YOUNGBLOO~, M.'s., Ph. D., Farm d . Ranch Economrst. , L. CRAWFORD, M.-S., Research Mark& Specralrst L. CORY, M. S.. Grazing Research Botanil L. GASTON, JR., B...~on with U. S. Department.of Agriculture ***In cooperation with the School of Agriculture. SYNOPSIS X is Bulletin reports results obtained by feeding bone meal and salt mixtures and finely ground rock phosphate mixed with bone meal and salt to cattle...

  6. Petrology and Geochemistry of Neoproterozoic Arc Plutons Beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain, SRS, SC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maryak, M.

    1998-10-21

    In this report is presented first a brief review of the regional geologic setting of the Savannah River Site, descriptions of the plutonic rock units sampled here, whole rock geochemical data on the plutonic igneous rocks, and finally, a discussion of how the crystalline basement rocks of the Savannah River Site formed and how they may correlate with other terranes exposed in the Piedmont of the Carolinas, Georgia, and Virginia.

  7. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Potassium Release from Sandy Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    , medium, and fine sand fractions were studied using a H-saturated resin and0.01 Moxalic acid. Potassium,and significantly moreK was released with the resin than with oxalic acid. The K release that occurred from the sand

  8. Potassium in Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils: I. Soil Characterization and Distribution of Potassium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    ). Potassium can react with Al-hydrox- ides and acid calcium phosphate solutions to form taranakite (Taylor et al., 1963). In addition, K could be coprecipitated with Al and sulfate to form alunite in acid soils

  9. Modeling and Optimization of Seawater Intrusion Barriers in Southern California Coastal Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, William W-G.; Bray, Ben

    2006-01-01

    measurements of hydraulic conductivity as well as head andexisting injection wells, or designated for hydraulic targetmaintain hydraulic head targets while one well is shut off

  10. Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrecengost, J., D.; Kilgo, J., C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H., S.; Miller, K., V.

    2008-07-01

    Abstract - Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

  11. Clonal Diversity in an Expanding Community of Arctic Salix spp. and a Model for Recruitment Modes of Arctic Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Greg

    Clonal Diversity in an Expanding Community of Arctic Salix spp. and a Model for Recruitment Modes identity in a population of Salix spp. shrubs at an arctic site with a known history of woody shrub

  12. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  13. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    2012-04-01

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  14. Section 1222 Program - Proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Policy Coordination and Implementation Transmission Planning Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 Proposed Project: Plains & Eastern Clean Line ...

  15. ARM - Southern Great Plains Newsletter Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPressExtended Facility8PlainsInstrumentsSources of

  16. Western Plains Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland:EnergyWeVirginiaElectric Assn IncWesternPlains

  17. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3performedValleySouthern Great Plains Ice Nuclei

  18. Plain Language Training | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnership forHydrogen Storage »of5) Plain

  19. Plain Writing Implementation Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnership forHydrogen Storage »of5) PlainWriting

  20. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

    2008-12-31

    The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

  1. Computational Arctic Research at ARSC/UAF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newby, Gregory B.

    Supercomputing Center ­ Ph.D. Syracuse 1993, "Information Transfer" ­ Research interests in data Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources across Alaska and the Hawaiian Islands" · PI: Buck Sharpton Supercomputing Center University of Alaska Fairbanks U.S. Arctic Research Commission Meeting October 7, 2010 #12

  2. High-K alkali basalts of the Western Snake River Plain: Abrupt transition from tholeiitic to mildly alkaline plume-derived basalts, Western Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervais, John W.

    High-K alkali basalts of the Western Snake River Plain: Abrupt transition from tholeiitic to mildly alkaline plume-derived basalts, Western Snake River Plain, Idaho John W. Shervais a, , Scott K. Vetter b Snake River Plain SRP Yellowstone plume hotspots Basaltic volcanism in the western Snake River Plain

  3. Paleomagnetic results from the Snake River Plain: Contribution to the time-averaged field global database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tauxe, Lisa; Luskin, C; Selkin, P; Gans, P; Calvert, A

    2004-01-01

    of the eastern Snake River plain, Idaho, Memoir- Geol. Soc.et al. : Paleomagnetism of Snake River Plain Tauxe, L. , C.geology of the eastern Snake river plain Idaho, Guidebook to

  4. Factors influencing the road mortality of snakes on the Upper Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochimsen, Denim M.

    2005-01-01

    loop on the upper Snake River Plain in southeastern Idahoof snakes on the upper Snake River Plain; (2) measure anyedge of the upper Snake River Plain located in southeastern

  5. Implications of Nutritional Potential of Anadromous Fish Resources of the Western Snake River Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plew, Mark G.

    1983-01-01

    Fishing on the Western Snake River Plain. Paper presented atResources of the Western Snake River Plain^ MARK G. PLEW HEon the western Snake River Plain, are energy expenditures of

  6. Henrikson: Prehistoric Cold Storage on the Snake River Plain: Archaeological Investigations at Bobcat Cave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Dennis L

    1997-01-01

    Cold Storage on the Snake River Plain: Archaeologicaland Owl Cave on the Snake River Plain in Idaho. Reported toresponses to it in the Snake River Plain re- gion. This

  7. FLOOD-PLAIN DELINEATION IN ICE JAM PRONE REGIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    methodology is introduced for incorporating the risk of icejams into flood-plain delineations in northern in the computation of annual maximum flood elevation distributions and flood risk in icejam prone regionsFLOOD-PLAIN DELINEATION IN ICE JAM PRONE REGIONS By Richard M. Vogel,1 S. M. ASCE and Jery R

  8. Water balance of the Arctic drainage system using GRACE gravimetry products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frappart, F; Ramillien, G; Famiglietti, JS

    2011-01-01

    of the Arctic Ocean freshwater balance and their interannualInteractions, 2, pp. 1–37. Water balance of the Arctic usingEWG climatology. Water balance of the Arctic using GRACE

  9. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  10. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 54 Environmental Sciences arctic; tundra; fine roots; root biomass; root production; root turnover; plant-soil, model Word Cloud More Like This Dataset...

  11. Coastal and Waterfront Smart Growth and Hazard Mitigation Roundtable Report Coastal and Waterfront Smart Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Coastal and Waterfront Smart Growth and Hazard Mitigation Roundtable Report Coastal and Waterfront Smart Growth and Hazard Mitigation Roundtable Report Achieving Hazard-Resilient Coastal & Waterfront Smart Growth #12;2 Achieving Hazard-Resilient Coastal & Waterfront Smart Growth www

  12. Characterization of Siberian Arctic coastal sediments: Implications for terrestrial organic carbon export

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Laodong

    pyrolysis-GC/MS of the sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) indicated an increase in the freshness for carbon. As such, large quantities of soil organic carbon are stored in the region. It is estimated

  13. Allochthonous inputs of riverine picocyanobacteria to coastal waters in the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    strains along this gradient showed that the cyanobacterial sequences were divided into eight operational, includ- ing geothermal and sulphide-rich anoxic waters, as well as nutrient-poor open ocean waters

  14. Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

    2008-09-01

    Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

  15. The Maine Coastal Current: Spring Climatological Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Maine Coastal Current: Spring Climatological Circulation Daniel R. Lynch, Monica J. Holboke in the Gulf of Maine, with special emphasis on its coastal current in the periods March­April and May of Maine cyclonic circulation is persistent, with significant bimonthly modulation of key Maine Coastal

  16. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the EERC, in collaboration with Meridian Environmental Services, developed and demonstrated the efficacy of a wind energy forecasting system for use in scheduling energy output from wind farms for a regional electrical generation and transmission utility. With the increased interest at the time of project award in the production of hydrogen as a critical future energy source, many viewed hydrogen produced from wind-generated electricity as an attractive option. In addition, many of the hydrogen production-related concepts involve utilization of energy resources without the need for additional electrical transmission. For this reason, under Task 4, the EERC provided a summary of end uses for hydrogen in the region and focused on one end product in particular (fertilizer), including several process options and related economic analyses.

  17. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directi

  18. An Economic Analysis of Cotton Gin Plants -- High Plains, Rolling Plains and Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Russell G.; Ward, J. M.

    1964-01-01

    volumes of cotton had much lower costs than those ginning relatively small volumes. For com- parable volumes, single-battery gins on the High Plains had lower costs per bale than multiple- battery gins. Costs per bale were considerably greater... in the Lower Rio Grande Valley than at comparable gin plants on the Plains. Costs per bale ranged from $8.41 to $16.49 at single-battery gin plants and from $9.72 to $16.66 at multiple- battery gin plants on the High Plains. Total costs ranged from $13...

  19. Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

  20. Economically Optimum Irrigation Patternsfor Grain Sorghum Production: Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, L. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Taylor, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    Agricultural production and associated economic effects of irrigation on the Texas High Plains are seriously threatened by a rapidly declining groundwater supply and a swift upward trend in energy costs. To optimize the ...

  1. Biological studies and characterization of the High Plains Disease pathogen 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirabile, Joanna

    2001-01-01

    High Plains Disease (HPD), which is a recently recognized affliction causing up to 80% yield losses in corn and wheat, has been suspected to be of viral origin, however no clear evidence existed to validate this claim. ...

  2. Larger Black Flour Beetle in Southern High Plains Homes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Patrick; McIntyre, Nancy E.

    2007-04-09

    Larger black flour beetles have invaded homes and other buildings in some Southern High Plains counties in Texas. This publication explains how to identify the beetles, find and eliminate the source, and exclude the insects from the house....

  3. Center for Sustainable Coastal Tourism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 34 No. 3 Beach Nourishment at Waikïkï Beach Seawater Air Conditioning in Waikïkï: What Does climate change could impact the state's tourism industry, the community's perceptions about seawater air conditioning in Waikïkï, the inaugural sustainable coastal tourism fellows, and much more. Cindy Knapman

  4. Virginia coastal resources management program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    Approval of a coastal management plan for coastal land and water use activities on the coast of Virginia is proposed. The coastal management area would embrace all of Tidewater Virginia, approximately 5000 miles long, and would extend to the three-mile outer limit of the United States territorial sea. The core regulatory program would include fisheries management, subaqueous lands management, wetland management, dunes management, nonpoint source pollution control, point source pollution control, shoreline sanitation, and air pollution control. Geographic areas of particular concern would be designated as worthy of special consideration in any planning or management process. These areas would include natural resource areas, such as wetlands, spawning areas, coastal sand dunes, barrier islands, and special wildlife management areas. Natural hazard areas would include areas vulnerable to erosion and areas subject to damage from wind, tides, and storm-related events. Geographic areas of special concern would include those with particular conservation, recreational, ecological, and aesthetic values. Waterfront development areas would include ports, commercial fishing piers, and community waterfronts. Shorefront access planning would provide access to the shoreline and water for recreational activities. Each year, two additional boat ramps would be planned for construction. Energy facility planning would focus on facilities involved in the production of electricity and petroleum, and in the export of coal. Shoreline erosion mitigation planning would identify, control, and mitigate erosion.

  5. New Trans-Arctic shipping routes navigable by midcentury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of additional ice reductions in the future, have fueled speculations of potential new trans-Arctic shippingNew Trans-Arctic shipping routes navigable by midcentury Laurence C. Smith1 and Scott R. Stephenson changes in sea ice will realistically impact ship navigation are lacking. To address this deficiency, we

  6. An Arctic Terrestrial Food-Chain Bioaccumulation Model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gobas, Frank

    An Arctic Terrestrial Food-Chain Bioaccumulation Model for Persistent Organic Pollutants B A R R Y tarandus), and wolf (Canis lupus) food-chains of Canada's central and western arctic region from measured concentrations of 25 organic chemicals forecasted for caribou and wolves from Cambridge Bay (69°07 N 105°03 W

  7. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Nome

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  8. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Barrow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  9. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Barrow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  10. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Nome

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  11. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Bethel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  12. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Bethel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  13. National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  14. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Fairbanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  15. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Anchorage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region. The purpose of this round is to give feedback on the elements of the draft plan.

  16. December 2013 www.arctic.noaa.gov/reportcard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Oslo, Department of Geosciences, 0316 Oslo, Norway Y. Cao, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China J Centre in Svalbard, UNIS, Norway Institute of Geography and Geology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark J.S. Christiansen, Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway B

  17. Plain, Asiago, Chocolate Chip, Blueberry, Cin Sugar, Cin Raisin, Sesame, Everything, Sourdough, Honey Wheat, Plain Thin, Wheat Thin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Applewood Bacon and Cheddar Egg Sandwich: Plain Bagel, Egg, Bacon and Cheddar Cheese, Bacon, Ancho-Mayo, Lettuce, Tomato, Red Onion, Spinach. $6.99 Turkey BAT: Honey Wheat Bagel, Turkey, Bacon, Avocado, Roasted Tomato Sauce, Lettuce, Tomato. $6

  18. Modeling Cotton and Winter Wheat Growth and Yield Responses to Irrigation Management in the Texas High Plains and Rolling Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attia Mohamed, Ahmed

    2014-12-17

    were negatively correlated. A modeling study was performed using the cotton growth simulation model, Cotton2K, to investigate the lint yield, WUE, and economic return responses using 31 years weather records (1980 – 2010) from the Texas Rolling Plains...

  19. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O'Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

    2006-01-01

    During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

  20. Characterizing Arctic Mixed-phase Cloud Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network ShapingDate:Characterization ofArctic Mixed-phase

  1. BLM Arctic Field Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump|LineMaine:Ayuda:NavegacionBARC09-167Arctic Field

  2. Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D; Parsons, D; Geerts, B

    2015-03-01

    The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment is a large field campaign that is being supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with contributions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Atmospheric and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The overarching goal of the PECAN experiment is to improve the understanding and simulation of the processes that initiate and maintain convection and convective precipitation at night over the central portion of the Great Plains region of the United States (Parsons et al. 2013). These goals are important because (1) a large fraction of the yearly precipitation in the Great Plains comes from nocturnal convection, (2) nocturnal convection in the Great Plains is most often decoupled from the ground and, thus, is forced by other phenomena aloft (e.g., propagating bores, frontal boundaries, low-level jets [LLJ], etc.), (3) there is a relative lack of understanding how these disturbances initiate and maintain nocturnal convection, and (4) this lack of understanding greatly hampers the ability of numerical weather and climate models to simulate nocturnal convection well. This leads to significant uncertainties in predicting the onset, location, frequency, and intensity of convective cloud systems and associated weather hazards over the Great Plains.

  3. National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks February 19, 2015 9:30AM to 10:30AM AKST Fairbanks, Alaska BLM...

  4. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Dutch HarborUnalaska February 27, 2015 10:00AM to 12:00PM EST Unalaska, Alaska Unalaska Public Library 64 Eleanor Dr. Unalaska, AK 99685...

  5. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Dutch HarborUnalaska February 27, 2015 1:30PM to 3:30PM EST Unalaska, Alaska Unalaska Public Library 64 Eleanor Dr. Unalaska, AK 99685...

  6. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Consultation and Stakeholder Outreach Session: Kotzebue February 23, 2015 10:00AM to 12:00PM AKST Kotzebue, Alaska Northwest Arctic Heritage Center 171 3rd Ave. Kotzebue, AK 9975...

  7. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Bethel February 25, 2015 1:30PM to 3:30PM AKST Bethel, Alaska AVCP Regional Housing Authority 411 Ptarmigan St. Bethel, AK 99559...

  8. Sheepdogs and Barbed Wire: An Environmental History of Grazing on the High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerr, Daniel Stewart

    2010-05-31

    An environmental history of High Plains grazing that focused on transhumant sheepherding of New Mexico, watershed cattle ranching of the open range, and barbed-wire stock-farming of the privatized plains--all systems of agroecology practiced...

  9. TRANSPORT PATHWAYS OF THE MAINE COASTAL CURRENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRANSPORT PATHWAYS OF THE MAINE COASTAL CURRENT Monica J. Holboke and Daniel R. Lynch September 1996 Abstract The Maine Coastal Current(MCC) is initiated off the eastern coast of Maine and circuits the Gulf of Maine in a counterclockwise direction transporting various nu­ trients, biological species

  10. The Feasibility of Outsourced Database Search in the Plain Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    The Feasibility of Outsourced Database Search in the Plain Model Carmit Hazay Hila Zarosim Abstract. In this paper, we focus on the outsourced database search problem which is highly motivated in the context of delegatable computing since it offers storage alternatives for massive databases, that may contain

  11. Profitable Grain Sorghum Production in the Rolling Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, U.U.; Coffman, Cloyce G.; Boring, Emory P. III; McCoy, Norman; Weaver, Dave

    1987-01-01

    ? The Texa. A&M University System ? College Station, Texas PROFITABLE GRAIN SORGHUM PRODUCTION IN THE ROLLING PLAINS v.v. Alexander, Cloyce G. Coffman, Emory P. Boring III, Norman McCoy and Dave Weaver? Grain sorghum is grown on about 250,000 acres...

  12. Texas High Plains Vegetable & Weed Control Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    of Plastic Mulch Type on Tomato Vigor and Yield (2004) 60 Effects of Postemergence Herbicides on Crop Injury (2005) 102 CROP PRODUCTION AND VARIETY TRIALS Transplanted Watermelon Production with Colored Plastic Mulches on the Texas High Plains (2005) 106 Yield and Quality Evaluation for Selected Tomato Varieties

  13. Upscaling carbon fluxes over the Great Plains grasslands: Sinks and sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of net ecosystem production (NEP) to various climatic conditions across the U.S. Great Plains grasslands NEP at 250 m spatial resolution over the Great Plains from 2000 to 2008. The results showed that the Great Plains was a net sink with an averaged annual NEP of 24 ± 14 g C m-2 yr-1 , ranging from a low

  14. Flood Plain Management Services Program U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUILDING STRONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Plain Management Services Program U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUILDING STRONG® ® People that live and work in the flood plain need to know about the flood hazard and the actions that they can take to reduce property damage and to prevent the loss of life caused by flooding. The Flood Plain Management

  15. Large-volume Rhyolite Genesis in Caldera Complexes of the Snake River Plain: Insights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindeman, Ilya N.

    Large-volume Rhyolite Genesis in Caldera Complexes of the Snake River Plain: Insights from-volume rhyolites in the shallow crust is an im- portant, yet enigmatic, process in the Snake River Plain and world; rhyolite; Snake River Plain, zircon *Corresponding author. E-mail: kwatts@uoregon.edu y E-mail: address

  16. Origin and Evolution of the Western Snake River Plain: Implications From Stratigraphy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervais, John W.

    Origin and Evolution of the Western Snake River Plain: Implications From Stratigraphy, Faulting.J. McGee, 2002, Origin and evolution of the western Snake River Plain: Implications from stratigraphy, and Michael McCurry, eds., Tectonic and Magmatic Evolution of the Snake River Plain Volcanic Province: Idaho

  17. Late Quaternary constructional development of the Axial Volcanic Zone, eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetmore, Paul H.

    Late Quaternary constructional development of the Axial Volcanic Zone, eastern Snake River Plain volcanic ridge that trends northeast across the middle of the eastern Snake River Plain, and acts Snake River Plain: the AVZ, the Big Lost Trough to the north, and the Arco-Big Southern Butte (ABSB

  18. An analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, A. D.

    This study used several model-based tools to analyse the dynamics of the Arctic Basin between 1997 and 2006 as a linked system of land-ocean-atmosphere C exchange. The analysis estimates that terrestrial areas of the Arctic ...

  19. Distribution and drivers of ectomycorrhizal fungal communities across the North American Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Lee

    of the North American Arctic. We collected roots from two principal arctic ectomycorrhizal host plants, Salix, and Pyronemataceae. Both host plants showed similar species richness, with 176 OTUs on Salix arctica and 154 OTUs

  20. A Climatology of the Arctic on Mid-Tropospheric Temperature Regulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony, Jeremy Patrick

    2014-06-24

    The Arctic is a unique and complex environment. Many factors play a role in determining the long-term climate of the Arctic, including mesoscale weather systems and many complex ice-albedo feedback mechanisms. Previous studies determined using real...

  1. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-06-06

    This volume contains appendices of the following: US Geological Survey Arctic operating orders, 1979; Det Noske Vertas', rules for the design, construction and inspection of offshore technology, 1977; Alaska Oil and Gas Association, industry research projects, March 1980; Arctic Petroleum Operator's Association, industry research projects, January 1980; selected additional Arctic offshore bibliography on sea ice, icebreakers, Arctic seafloor conditions, ice-structures, frost heave and structure icing.

  2. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Arctic and Subarctic Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-11-01

    Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools book detailing DOE's EnergySmart Schools Program for Arctic Climates.

  3. A Three-Year Study of Ichyoplankton in Coastal Plains Reaches of the Savannah River Site and its Tributaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, D.

    2007-03-05

    Altering flow regimes of rivers has large effects on native floras and faunas because native species are adapted to the natural flow regime, many species require lateral connectivity with floodplain habitat for feeding or spawning, and the change in regime often makes it possible for invasive species to replace natives (Bunn & Arthington 2002). Floodplain backwaters, both permanent and temporary, are nursery areas for age 0+ fish and stable isotope studies indicate that much of the productivity that supports fish larvae is autochthonous to these habitats (Herwig et al. 2004). Limiting access by fish to floodplain habitat for feeding, spawning and nursery habitat is one of the problems noted with dams that regulate flow in rivers and is considered to be important as an argument to remove dams and other flow regulating structures from rivers (Shuman 1995; Bednarek 2001). While there have been a number of studies in the literature about the use of floodplain habitat for fish reproduction (Copp 1989; Killgore & Baker 1996; Humphries, et al. 1999; Humphries and Lake 2000; Crain et al. 2004; King 2004) there have been only a few studies that examined this aspect of stream ecology in more than a cursory way. The study reported here was originally designed to determine whether the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site was having a negative effect on fish reproduction in the Savannah River but its experimental design allowed examination of the interactions between the river, the floodplain and the tributaries entering the Savannah River across this floodplain. This study is larger in length of river covered than most in the literature and because of its landscape scale may be in important indicator of areas where further study is required.

  4. Potassium in Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils: II. Crop Responses and Changes in Soil Potassium Under Intensive Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    on the two sandier soils. In the zero K plots, dilute double acid-extractable K concentrations ranged from 56 soil texture and the quantity of water that percolates through the soil profile (Bertsch and Thomas the land in the grain when modern picker-shellers are used for harvest (Welch and Flannery, 1985

  5. The impact of Arctic warming on the midlatitude jet-stream: Can it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    Opinion The impact of Arctic warming on the midlatitude jet-stream: Can it? Has it? Will it. An open question, however, is whether these Arctic changes have an effect on the jet-stream and thereby inquiries around three distinct questions: Can Arctic warming influence the midlatitude jet-stream? Has

  6. Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery Article Published.G. and Ravishankara, A.R. (2009) Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery's research outputs online #12;Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery J. F

  7. Observational determination of albedo decrease caused by vanishing Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenman, Ian

    ) The decline of Arctic sea ice has been documented in over 30 y of satellite passive microwave observations- ments along with satellite microwave sea ice data to document the Arctic-wide decrease in planetary to an additional 6.4 ± 0.9 W/m2 of solar energy input into the Arctic Ocean region since 1979. Averaged over

  8. 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 7 -Woodgate Schematic Surface and Atlantic Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    LHW ­ Lower Halocline Water AW ­ Atlantic Water DW ­ Deep Water WESTERN ARCTIC (PACIFIC) HALOCLINE Halocline Water LHW ­ Lower Halocline Water AW ­ Atlantic Water DW ­ Deep Water European Speak: e.g. Manley Circulation Jones, 2001 Typical Arctic profiles Bottom Water "the rest" Western Arctic warmer ATLANTIC WATER T

  9. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

  10. Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-24

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  11. QER- Comment of Plains All American Pipeline, L.P.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To: Members of the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Secretariat and Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Staff, U.S. Department of Energy Enclosed please find comments submitted on behalf of Plains All American Pipeline, L.P. for the record of the QER’s August 21, 2014 Infrastructure Siting and Permitting Meeting in Cheyenne, WY. Feel free to contact me if you need anything further regarding this communication.

  12. Pleasant Plains, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | OpenBethlehemPlainsboroPlasticCalifornia:Plains, Illinois:

  13. Alluvial plains and earthquake recurrence at the Coalinga anticline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, A.B. (San Jose State Univ., CA (USA)); Donahue, D.J.; Jull, A.J.T (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA)); Payen, L.A. (Univ. of California, Riverside (USA)); Atwater, B.F.; Trumm, D.A.; Tinsley, J.C. III; Stein, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Having approached 0.5 m during the May 2 earthquake, the uplift of Quaternary deposits on the Coalinga anticline may provide evidence of the average repeat time of similar earthquakes during the recent geologic past. Stein and King (1984) estimated the average late Quaternary repeat time to be 500 to 1,500 yr from the degree of folding in the upper Pliocene and Pleistocene Tulare Formation; in addition, they estimated the average Holocene repeat time to be at least 200 to 600 yr on the basis of an alluvial-plain profile near Los Gatos Creek, whose arroyo extends across the Coalinga anticline from the synclinal Pleasant Valley into the synclinal San Joaquin Valley. In this chapter, the authors estimate an average repeat time from the stratigraphy of Holocene alluvium exposed in the walls of that arroyo. Largely deposited overbank, this alluvium reveals the approximate configuration of former alluvial plains whose present configuration over the anticline should reflect the rate of anticlinal growth. Resulting constraints on the Holocene uplift rate, though made uncertain by possible differences in the initial configuration of the alluvial plains, suggest an average repeat time of at least 200 to 1,000 yr for major (M = 6-7) Coalinga-area earthquakes during the late Holocene.

  14. An active atmospheric methane sink in high Arctic mineral cryosols

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lau, Maggie C.Y.; Stackhouse, B.; Layton, Alice C.; Chauhan, Archana; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chourey, Karuna; Mykytczuk, N. C.S.; Bennett, Phil C.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Burton, N.; et al

    2015-04-14

    The transition of Arctic carbon-rich cryosols into methane (CH?)-emitting wetlands due to global warming is a rising concern. However, the spatially predominant mineral cryosols and their CH? emission potential are poorly understood. Fluxes measured in situ and estimated under laboratory conditions coupled with -omics analysis indicate (1) mineral cryosols in the Canadian high Arctic contain atmospheric CH?-oxidizing bacteria; (2) the atmospheric CH? uptake flux increases with ground temperature; and, as a result, (3) the atmospheric CH? sink strength will increase by a factor of 5-30 as the Arctic warms by 5-15 °C over a century. We demonstrated that acidic mineralmore »cryosols have previously unrecognized potential of negative CH? feedback.« less

  15. The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verlinde, J

    2010-10-18

    The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

  16. Using GIS Tainted Glasses to Help Subdivide the Ogallala/High Plains Aquifer in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Brownie

    2013-11-20

    Using GIS Tainted Glasses to Help Subdivide the Ogallala/High Plains Aquifer Brownie Wilson Geohydrology Section Kansas Geological Survey University of Kansas 12th Annual GIS Day @ KU November 20, 2013 The High Plains Aquifer Kansas Geological... Survey The High Plains Aquifer in Kansas Great Bend Prairie Equus Beds Ogallala Kansas Geological Survey Accumulated Water Level Change, 1996 to 2012 Kansas Geological Survey Water Management Activities, circa 2000 Kansas Geological Survey • Active...

  17. Sampling Strategy for Enumerating the Western Arctic Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the bowhead whale and discusses methods 20· 40· 80· N 60· 70· 30· 120· NORTH AMERICA ARCTIC OCEAN 150· W which scientific means of assessing the number of whales which can be safely removed from the bowhead stock stress relating to ac- tivities of offshore oil development, subsistence harvest, or natural fluctua

  18. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  19. Mass wasting on the submarine Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    ) made from nuclear submarine Hawkbill (SCICEX). Bathymetry is derived from multi-beam measurements madeMass wasting on the submarine Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean Yngve Kristoffersen a,, Bernard particulate matter in the water column accumulate as a uniform drape on submarine plateaus and ridges

  20. Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow (Preliminary analysis of 2008 Biomass/poll. Factor: all data Pollution factor: depth data #12;2009 Data set for receptor modeling with limited analytes Factor 1: biomass Factor 2: pollution Factor 3: marine Factor 4: biomass #12;Factor

  1. Network Modeling of Arctic Melt Ponds Meenakshi Barjatiaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Network Modeling of Arctic Melt Ponds Meenakshi Barjatiaa , Tolga Tasdizena,b, , Boya Songc. In late spring and summer, the albedo of the ice pack is determined primarily by melt ponds that form on the sea ice surface. The transition of pond configurations from isolated structures to interconnected

  2. Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated threedimensional model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wuhu

    Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated three­dimensional model study Chipperfield winter­spring chemical ozone loss from 1991 2003, its observed correlation with low temperatures. CTM throughout studied. The model reproduces large column winters also captures shape of ozone loss profile

  3. Monday, March 23, 2009 PHOENIX: EXPLORATION OF THE MARTIAN ARCTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Monday, March 23, 2009 PHOENIX: EXPLORATION OF THE MARTIAN ARCTIC 8:30 a.m. Waterway Ballroom 1 Chairs: Raymond Arvidson Peter Smith 8:30 a.m. Smith P. H. * Water at the Phoenix Landing Site [#1329] The Phoenix mission found a water ice layer 5 cm beneath a dry soil overburden. The presence of Ca

  4. Tenure and Mechanization of the Cotton Harvest, Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metzler, William H.; Adkins, William G.

    1955-01-01

    below those of 1951. The heavy frost of October 7 permitted ma- chine-harvesting to begin by the middle of Oc- tober. A frost that early in the season meant that High Plains farmers would be able to harvest their entire crop by hand or by machine... depends on the timely appearance of an adequate supply of migratory workers who will stay through the season. Machine-stripping depends on a frost early enough to per- mit harvesting over a period of 4 or 5 weeks. The advantage of one method over...

  5. Garden Plain, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: Energy Resources Jump to:Garden Acres,Grove,Plain, Kansas:

  6. Plain City, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | OpenBethlehem BiomassMassachusetts:Piute County,PlacerPlain

  7. North Plains, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNew Hampshire:source History ViewLittlePerry, Ohio:North Plains,

  8. City of West Plains, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation,Vineland, NewCity of Weimar, TexasPlains,

  9. West Plains Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho)VosslohWest Plains Electric Coop Inc Place: North

  10. Plain Language Compliance Report (2012) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnership forHydrogen Storage »of EnergyPlain

  11. Plain Language Compliance Report (2015) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnership forHydrogen Storage »of5) Plain Language

  12. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  13. Mechanisms of metal release from contaminated coastal sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalnejais, Linda H

    2005-01-01

    The fate of trace metals in contaminated coastal sediments is poorly understood, yet critical for effective coastal management. The aim of this thesis is to investigate and quantify the mechanisms leading to the release ...

  14. Calculation of Extreme Wave Loads on Coastal Highway Bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Bo

    2010-01-14

    Coastal bridges are exposed to severe wave, current and wind forces during a hurricane. Most coastal bridges are not designed to resist wave loads in such extreme situations, and there are no existing analytical methods to calculate wave loads...

  15. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    humidity above stratiform clouds on indirect aerosol climateOverview of Arctic cloud and radiation characteristics. J.of Arctic low-level clouds observed during the FIRE Arctic

  16. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  17. Great Plains ASPEN model development: Phosam section. Final topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, S.S.; Kirman, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    An ASPEN model has been developed of the PHOSAM Section, Section 4600, of the Great Plains Gasification Plant. The bases for this model are the process description given in Section 6.18 of the Great Plains Project Management Plan and the Lummus Phosam Schematic Process Flow Diagram, Dwg. No. SKD-7102-IM-O. The ASPEN model that has been developed contains the complete set of components that are assumed to be in the gasifier effluent. The model is primarily a flowsheet simulation that will give the material and energy balance and equipment duties for a given set of process conditions. The model is unable to predict fully changes in process conditions that would result from load changes on equipment of fixed sizes, such as a rating model would predict. The model can be used to simulate the steady-state operation of the plant at or near design conditions or to design other PHOSAM units. Because of the limited amount of process information that was available, several major process assumptions had to be made in the development of the flowsheet model. Patent literature was consulted to establish the ammonia concentration in the circulating fluid. Case studies were made with the ammonia content of the feed 25% higher and 25% lower than the base feed. Results of these runs show slightly lower recoveries of ammonia with less ammonia in the feed. As expected, the duties of the Stripper and Fractionator reboilers were higher with more ammonia in the feed. 63 references.

  18. Climate and coastal dune vegetation: disturbance, recovery, and succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Thomas E.

    Climate and coastal dune vegetation: disturbance, recovery, and succession Thomas E. Miller Æ Elise. Foredune, interdune, and backdune habitats common to most coastal dunes have very different vegetation deterministic trajectories. Keywords Dune habitats Á Succession Á Disturbance Á Coastal vegetation Á Hurricane Á

  19. Atmospheric Momentum Roughness Applied to Stage-Discharge Relationships in Flood Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Momentum Roughness Applied to Stage-Discharge Relationships in Flood Plains Jennifer M and discharge relationship for turbulent flows over vegetated flood plains. The model is based on the turbulent sites. The model estimates of the flood flow discharges from a natural site are compared to observed

  20. Iodine in groundwater of the North China Plain: Spatial patterns and hydrogeochemical processes of enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Iodine in groundwater of the North China Plain: Spatial patterns and hydrogeochemical processes online xxxx Keywords: Iodine Groundwater Spatial patterns Hydrogeochemistry North China Plain The North/L) and low-iodine (b10 g/L) groundwater regions that frequently result in iodine excess or deficien- cy

  1. Population Dynamics of Plain Chachalacas in the Lower Rio Grande Valley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandaria, Adan G.

    2011-02-22

    National Wildlife Refuge, Alamo, Texas, 2004?????????????.. 4 2 Seasonal survival for radio-tagged plain chachalacas by sex and season (breeding, December?March; nesting, April?July), Santa Ana... National Wildlife Refuge, Alamo, Texas, 2004....................................... 8 3 Seasonal ranges (95% probability area) and core areas (50% probability area) for radio-tagged plain chachalacas by sex...

  2. A REANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STRONG WESTERLIES AND PRECIPITATION IN THE GREAT PLAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    precipitation patterns has been used to explain past drought events in the Great Plains and Midwest of North widespread drought in the Great Plains and Midwest, consistent with the hypothesis of stronger westerlies droughts of the Colorado front range (Muhs, 1985), and early to mid-Holocene aridity of the Upper Midwest

  3. Groundwater depletion and sustainability of irrigation in the US High Plains and Central Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Groundwater depletion and sustainability of irrigation in the US High Plains and Central Valley impact crop produc- tion in the United States because 60% of irrigation relies on groundwater. Groundwater depletion in the irrigated High Plains and California Central Valley accounts for 50

  4. U.S./EUROPEAN PARTNERSHIPS IN COASTAL ATLASES AND COASTAL/OCEAN INFORMATICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    of coastal and ocean data and information), little has been done to take stock of the implications of these efforts or to identify best practices in terms of taking lessons learned into consideration (including

  5. Management of the coastal zone in Small Island Developing States; coastal defences and sustainable tourism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jennifer

    2014-11-27

    Barbados, as with many Small Island Developing States has a tourism-dependent economy. Climate change and its effects pose a great threat to the coastal tourism facilities the island has to offer, particularly vulnerable are beaches. The government...

  6. Workshop report: planning for Coastal Climatologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamble, Douglas W.

    , and assessments on the Atlantic coast of the southeastern United States was convened in October 2003 to facilitate: agriculture, coastal transportation, energy conservation and planning, environmental quality, fishery, and the obstacles to incorporating new technology in decision- making processes. This report provides

  7. Coastal Waters Imaging on GOES-R

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Satellites (GOES) have played a key part in the nation's weather prediction capabilities and have been used to include an imaging capability for coastal waters on the next generation of GOES satellites, scheduled changed weather prediction over the last 30 years. In its report to Congress, the U.S. Commission on Ocean

  8. The Economic Value of Resilient Coastal Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 The Economic Value of Resilient Coastal Communities LAST REVISED 3/18/2013 NOAA activities support science, service, and stewardship that protect life, health, and property and create economic value, income, and jobs. Across the agency, we have begun collecting data on the economic importance

  9. Marine Studies Building Fund Coastal Community Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Studies Building Fund Coastal Community Challenge Our Future Is Bright! Marine science synergy in marine science and education among diverse partners ·A long-standing, collaborative, can-do spirit that grows with each success Oregon State University - with Hatfield Marine Science Center as its

  10. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  11. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-01-13

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  12. Genome Sequence of the Arctic Methanotroph Methylobacter tundripaludum SV96

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svenning, Mette M [University of Tromso, Norway; Hestnes, Anne Grethe [University of Tromso, Norway; Wartiainen, Ingvild [University of Tromso, Norway; Stein, Lisa Y. [University of Alberta, Edmondton, Canada; Klotz, Martin G [University of Louisville, Louisville; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G. [University of Washington, Seattle; Spang, Anja [University of Vienna, Austria; Bringel, Francoise O. [University of Strasbourg; Vuilleumier, Stephane [University of Strasbourg; Lajus, Aurelie [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Medigue, Claudine [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Methylobacter tundripaludum SV96(T) (ATCC BAA-1195) is a psychrotolerant aerobic methane-oxidizing gammaproteobacterium (Methylococcales, Methylococcaceae) living in High Arctic wetland soil. The strain was isolated from soil harvested in July 1996 close to the settlement Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway (78 degrees 56'N, 11 degrees 53'E), and described as a novel species in 2006. The genome includes pmo and pxm operons encoding copper membrane monooxygenases (Cu-MMOs), genes required for nitrogen fixation, and the nirS gene implicated in dissimilatory nitrite reduction to NO but no identifiable inventory for further processing of nitrogen oxides. These genome data provide the basis to investigate M. tundripaludum SV96, identified as a major player in the biogeochemistry of Arctic environments.

  13. Analysis of gas chilling alternatives for Arctic pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvoiris, A.; McMillan, D.K.; Taksa, B.

    1994-12-31

    The operation of buried natural gas pipelines in Arctic regions requires installation of gas chilling facilities at compressor stations. These facilities are required in order to cool compressed pipeline gases to temperatures below that of permanently frozen surrounding soil. If these pipeline gas temperatures are too high, the frozen ground around the pipelines will eventually thaw. This is undesirable for many reasons amongst which are ground settlement and possible catastrophic failure of the pipeline. This paper presents the results of a study which compared several alternative methods of gas chilling for possible application at one of the compressor stations on the proposed new Yamal-Center gas pipeline system in the Russian Arctic. This technical and economic study was performed by Gulf Interstate Engineering (GIE) for GAZPROM, the gas company in Russia that will own and operate this new pipeline system. Geotechnical, climatical and other information provided by GAZPROM, coupled with information developed by GIE, formed the basis for this study.

  14. Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Peter J.

    2013-06-13

    Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

  15. Estimating Migration Resistance: a Case Study of Greenlandic Arctic Terns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensz, Christopher

    2013-01-15

    Chris Hensz University of Kansas Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Biodiversity Institute Estimating Migration Resistance: a Case Study of Greenlandic Arctic Terns The Problem 1: How do migratory animals choose... d ay °C m /s Models ? Implemented in R ? Models: ? Linear exploration Southern Migration, 9 birds, n=929 Northern Migration, 9 birds, n=629 Future Directions 1: Finish non-linear model 2: Generalize procedure and include...

  16. Playa basin development, southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Holliday, V.T. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    More than 20,000 playa basins have formed on fine-grained eolian sediments of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw and Tertiary Ogallala Formations on the High Plains of TX and NM. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the development of playa basins: (1) subsidence due to dissolution of underlying Permian bedded salt, (2) dissolution of soil carbonate and piping of clastic sediment into the subsurface, (3) animal activity, and (4) deflation. Evidence of eolian processes includes lee dunes and straightened shorelines on the eastern and southern margins of many playas. Lee dunes, which occur on the eastern side of ca 15% of playa basins and contain sediment deflated from adjacent playas, are cresentic to oval in plain view and typically account for 15--40% of the volume of the playa basin. Quaternary fossil biotas and buried calcic soils indicate that grasslands and semi-arid to aid climatic conditions prevailed as these basins formed. Evidence of fluviolacustrine processes in playa basins includes centripetal drainage leading to fan deltas at playa margins and preserved deltaic and lacustrine sediments. Playa basins expanded as fluvial processes eroded basin slopes and carried sediment to the basin floor where, during periods of minimal vegetation cover, loose sediment was removed by deflation. Other processes that played secondary roles in the development of certain playa basins include subsidence induced by dissolution of deeply buried Permian salt, dissolution of soil carbonate and piping, and animal activity. Two small lake basins in Gray County, TX, occur above strata affected by dissolution-induced subsidence. Dissolution of soil carbonate was observed in exposures and cores of strata underlying playa basins. Cattle, and in the past vast numbers of migrating buffalo, destroy soil crusts in dry playas, making these sediments more susceptible to deflation, and carry sediment out of flooded playas on their hooves.

  17. Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01

    Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

  18. Polar Gas to pick route for Arctic Y Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-26

    Polar Gas Project is considering four possible Y line routes to move gas reserves from the Arctic Islands and the MacKenzie Delta/Beaufort Sea areas to southern Canada. All four routes are west of the single line route proposed by Polar Gas Ltd. in 1977 to run from the Arctic Islands to Longlac, Ontario, and would connect with existing pipelines at either Longlac, Winnipeg, Calgary, or Edmonton. Marketable reserves in the High Arctic Islands are estimated at 12.7 trillion cubic feet, not counting 3-6 trillion cubic feet probably contained in recent discoveries; the MacKenzie Delta reserves are estimated at 5.8 trillion cubic feet. The gas will be chilled to 0C for passage through permafrost regions, to prevent thawing of the soil, but the gas will be at higher temperatures in other areas, with various construction techniques used to protect the area of discontinuous permafrost from thawing. More than $70 million has been spent on project studies. An application will be filed in 1981, and the pipeline could be completed in 7-10 years.

  19. Structural monitoring helps assess deformations in Arctic pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyman, K.J.; Lara, P.F.

    1986-11-10

    Advanced structural monitoring systems can play an important role in the evaluation of arctic pipeline distortions along the alignment. These systems can influence pipeline design requirements, reduce capital costs, and improve operating reliability. Differential soil movements resulting from terrain instabilities are the main features which threaten a pipeline's structural integrity and affect the design of buried pipeline systems in the Arctic. Economic, aesthetic, and safety concerns make conventional buried construction an optimum design choice for an arctic crude-oil or gas-pipeline transportation system. However, variable frozen and thawed soil conditions underlying the pipeline along a discontinuous permafrost corridor pose a challenge to the design and operation of such systems. Crude-oil pipelines which must operate at elevated temperatures can be installed in unfrozen soils or in permafrost soils where initially frozen segments will exhibit limited settlement under the thawed conditions imposed by pipeline construction and operation. Ice-rich portions of the frozen alignment may have an unacceptable settlement potential for a warm buried pipeline. In contrast, natural-gas pipelines can be operated cold to increase throughput capability and to prevent the problems associated with thawing permafrost.

  20. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iversen, Colleen M; Sloan, Victoria L; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; McGuire, A. David; Norby, Richard J; Walker, Anthony P; Warren, Jeffrey; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2015-01-01

    Arctic tundra is characterized by short-statured plant communities underlain by carbon (C)-rich soils and permafrost. Ecosystem C and nutrient cycles in tundra are driven by complex interactions between plants and their environment. However, root dynamics are one of the least understood aspects of plant growth in the Arctic. We synthesized available literature on tundra roots and discussed their representation in terrestrial biosphere models. Belowground biomass in tundra ecosystems can be an order of magnitude larger than aboveground biomass. Data on root production and turnover in tundra is sparse, limiting our understanding of the controls over root dynamics in these systems. Roots are shallowly distributed in the thin layer of soil that thaws each year, and are often found in the organic horizon at the soil surface. Species-specific differences in root distribution, mycorrhizal colonization, and resource partitioning may affect plant species competition under changing climatic conditions. Model representation of belowground processes has increased in complexity over recent years, but data are desperately needed to fill the gaps in model treatment of tundra roots. Future research should focus on estimates of root production and lifespan, and interactions between roots and the surrounding soil across the diversity of tundra ecosystems in the Arctic.

  1. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case, and approved February 13, 2015 (received for review September 8, 2014) Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes

  2. Directional change in upland tundra plant communities 20-30 years after seismic exploration in the Canadian low-arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    in the Canadian low-arctic Kemper, J. Todd1,2 & Macdonald, S. Ellen1Ã 1 Department of Renewable Resources Energy Board of Canada. Introduction Arctic tundra plant communities are subject to both natural of low-arctic plant communities two to three decades after seismic ex- ploration. Location: Mackenzie

  3. Multiple Effects of Changes in Arctic Snow Cover Terry V. Callaghan, Margareta Johansson, Ross D. Brown, Pavel Ya. Groisman,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Raymond S.

    , there are likely to be some benefits from a changing Arctic snow regime such as more even run-off from melting snow that favours hydropower operations. Keywords Snow Á Arctic Á Climate Á Albedo Á Hydrology Á Ecology Á and river ice surfaces for 8­10 months each year. Arctic climate has entered a unique period relative

  4. Private Takings of Endangered Species as Public Nuisance: Lucas v. South Carolina Coastal Council and the Endangered Species Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Paula C.

    1993-01-01

    82. Id. 83. Lucas v. South Carolina Coastal Council, 404Public Nuisance: Lucas v. South Carolina Coastal Council andlanguage. ). 23. Lucas v. South Carolina Coastal Council,

  5. The impact of precession changes on the Arctic climate during the last interglacialglacial transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Born, Andreas

    The impact of precession changes on the Arctic climate during the last interglacial­glacial temperature to the summer Arctic melt process are evaluated. Timing of the perihelion is varied in each melting of snow is found primarily as a result of feedbacks from the delayed seasonal cycle of hydrologic

  6. Ascorbate dynamics and oxygen consumption during arousal from hibernation in Arctic ground squirrels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drew, Kelly L.

    at the time of peak O2 consumption and peak plasma urate production. The ascor- bate decrease didAscorbate dynamics and oxygen consumption during arousal from hibernation in Arctic ground and oxygen consumption during arousal from hibernation in Arctic ground squirrels. Am J Physiol Regulatory

  7. SIMULATION OF BLOWING SNOW IN THE CANADIAN ARCTIC USING A DOUBLE-MOMENT MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    SIMULATION OF BLOWING SNOW IN THE CANADIAN ARCTIC USING A DOUBLE-MOMENT MODEL STEPHEN J. DÉRY and M the development of a double-moment model of blowing snow and its application to the Canadian Arctic. We first snow mixing ratio and total particle num- bers, both moments of particles that are gamma

  8. Vegetation characteristics and primary productivity along an arctic transect: implications for scaling-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and changes in the region's energy balance. Arctic terrestrial ecosystems are important com- ponents of the global C cycle. They cover an area of more than 7 Â 106 km2 and contain over 11% of the world's organic matter pool (Callaghan & Maxwell 1995). Studies of the C balance of speci®c arctic tun- dra ecosystems

  9. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation and Stakeholder Outreach Session: Kotzebue

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  10. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Dutch Harbor/Unalaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  11. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Dutch Harbor/Unalaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  12. The Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    Carbon sequestration Biological pump a b s t r a c t We present observation based estimatesThe Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n , A.C. Naveira Garabato a , T. Tsubouchi b , S January 2014 Keywords: Arctic Ocean Dissolved inorganic carbon Carbon budget Air­sea carbon dioxide flux

  13. A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface covered in melt ponds is essential for a realistic estimate of the albedo for global climate models. We

  14. JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS). This data allows for observationally-based calculations ofradiative heating rate profiles within the Arctic atmosphere. In this paper we define cloud radiative heating rate forcing (CRHF) as the difference between

  15. Arctic ice export events and their potential impact on global climate during the late Pleistocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, Dennis

    Arctic ice export events and their potential impact on global climate during the late Pleistocene export events are identified from the Laurentide and the Innuitian ice sheets, between 14 and 34 ka, the Arctic export events appear to occur prior to Heinrich events. INDEX TERMS: 4207 Oceanography: General

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic ice-covered lake Jessica-cover extent and dynamics on this perennially ice-covered, High Arctic lake. These pellets are interpreted growth. The pellets remain frozen in the ice until a summer or series of summers with reduced ice cover

  17. Sources and Fate of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter in the Arctic Ocean and Surrounding Watersheds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Sally Annette

    2012-10-19

    of the Canadian Archipelago, 17 % of the DOM pool is of terrestrial origin, even though waters are diluted with sea ice melt, suggesting the likelihood of a subsurface plume of tDOM entrained within river runoff from Arctic Rivers. In the interior Arctic...

  18. Impacts of ocean albedo alteration on Arctic sea ice restoration and Northern Hemisphere climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cvijanovic, Ivana; Caldeira, Ken; MacMartin, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is expected to transition into a seasonally ice-free state by mid-century, enhancing Arctic warming and leading to substantial ecological and socio-economic challenges across the Arctic region. It has been proposed that artificially increasing high latitude ocean albedo could restore sea ice, but the climate impacts of such a strategy have not been previously explored. Motivated by this, we investigate the impacts of idealized high latitude ocean albedo changes on Arctic sea ice restoration and climate. In our simulated 4xCO? climate, imposing surface albedo alterations over the Arctic Ocean leads to partial sea ice recovery and a modestmore »reduction in Arctic warming. With the most extreme ocean albedo changes, imposed over the area 70°–90°N, September sea ice cover stabilizes at ~40% of its preindustrial value (compared to ~3% without imposed albedo modifications). This is accompanied by an annual mean Arctic surface temperature decrease of ~2 °C but no substantial global mean temperature decrease. Imposed albedo changes and sea ice recovery alter climate outside the Arctic region too, affecting precipitation distribution over parts of the continental United States and Northeastern Pacific. For example, following sea ice recovery, wetter and milder winter conditions are present in the Southwest United States while the East Coast experiences cooling. We conclude that although ocean albedo alteration could lead to some sea ice recovery, it does not appear to be an effective way of offsetting the overall effects of CO? induced global warming.« less

  19. Growing season methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at a sub-arctic wetland in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Blei, Emanuel; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01

    Methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes were measured at several sites in a sub-arctic wetland near Abisko, Sweden (68°28?N 18°49?E) throughout the 2008 growing season. Averaged over 92 flux measurements the sub-arctic ...

  20. Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    -scale control on energy flux and primary and secondary production, ultimately reaching the top of the food chainLatitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony size Naturama, Dronningemaen 30, 5700 Svendborg, Denmark 4 Department of Arctic Environment, National

  1. Be production-rate calibration for the Arctic NICOLA S E. YOUNG,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    A 10 Be production-rate calibration for the Arctic NICOLA´ S E. YOUNG,1,2 * JOERG M. SCHAEFER,1 2013; Accepted 18 April 2013 ABSTRACT: We present a Baffin Bay 10 Be production-rate calibration published 10 Be calibration datasets to develop an Arctic 10 Be production rate. Our calibration comprises

  2. The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 1: Strategic summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-15

    The proposed COPS (Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems) program is concerned with combining numerical models with observations (through data assimilation) to improve our predictive knowledge of the coastal ocean. It is oriented toward applied research and development and depends upon the continued pursuit of basic research in programs like COOP (Coastal Ocean Processes); i.e., to a significant degree it is involved with ``technology transfer`` from basic knowledge to operational and management applications. This predictive knowledge is intended to address a variety of societal problems: (1) ship routing, (2) trajectories for search and rescue operations, (3) oil spill trajectory simulations, (4) pollution assessments, (5) fisheries management guidance, (6) simulation of the coastal ocean`s response to climate variability, (7) calculation of sediment transport, (8) calculation of forces on structures, and so forth. The initial concern is with physical models and observations in order to provide a capability for the estimation of physical forces and transports in the coastal ocean. For all these applications, there are common needs for physical field estimates: waves, tides, currents, temperature, and salinity, including mixed layers, thermoclines, fronts, jets, etc. However, the intent is to work with biologists, chemists, and geologists in developing integrated multidisciplinary prediction systems as it becomes feasible to do so. From another perspective, by combining observations with models through data assimilation, a modern approach to monitoring is provided through whole-field estimation.

  3. Cultural Control of the Boll Weevil: A Four Season Approach - Texas Rolling Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slosser, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    weevil control program of the Texas High Plains. Tex. Agric. Exp. Sta. Prog. Rep. 2766. Bottrell, D. G., J. R. White, D. S. Moody, and D. D. Hardee. 1972. Overwintering habitats of the boll weevil in the Rolling Plains of Texas. Environ. Entomol. 1... of the Boll Weevil A Four Season Approach - Texas Rolling Plains J. E. Slosser1 1Professor, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station LIBRARY TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY JUN 21 1995 TEXAS STATE DOCUMENTS Key Words: boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman...

  4. Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

  5. Texas GLO Coastal Forms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) | Opensource HistoryTerraWattTestingMissouri: EnergyCoastal

  6. Protecting Elm Trees from Elm Bark Beetle on the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Patrick; Baugh, Brant A.; Siders, Kerry; Riley, Cherinell; Young, Stanley

    2001-06-27

    This publication can help you recognize and understand the development of the lesser European elm bark beetle, which threatens elm trees on the Texas High Plains. Management and prevention measures are discussed. Deciduous shade and flowering trees...

  7. The cost of agriculturally based greenhouse gas offsets in the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandrasena, Rajapakshage Inoka Ilmi

    2004-09-30

    based emission reducing practices. The practices investigated in the Texas High Plains involve reduced tillage use, reduced fallow use, reduced crop fertilization, cropland conversion to grassland, feedlot enteric fermentation management and digester...

  8. Vegetation, soils, and surface hydrology of playa landforms in the Rio Grande Plains, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farley, Andrea Lee

    2000-01-01

    Playas in the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas were compared with respect to their: 1) size, shape, soil properties, and microtopography, 2) vegetation composition and structure, 3) surface water accumulation potential, and 4) disturbance history...

  9. ESMN Solar Magnetism ESMN Pages --Plain Text Copy August 13, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    1 European Network ESMN Solar Magnetism ESMN Pages -- Plain Text Copy ­ August 13, 2011 http . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.2 Structure and dynamics of solar surface fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.3 Topology and evolution of solar active regions

  10. Finite Element Analysis of Ballistic Penetration of Plain Weave Twaron CT709® Fabrics: A Parametric Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogineni, Sireesha

    2011-10-21

    The ballistic impact of Twaron CT709® plain weave fabrics is studied using an explicit finite element method. Many existing approximations pertaining to woven fabrics cannot adequately represent strain rate-dependent behavior exhibited by the Twaron...

  11. Environmental and Pedogenic Change in the Central Great Plains from the Middle Wisconsinan to the Present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willey, Karen Lynn

    2009-07-30

    During the middle Wisconsinan, the Gilman Canyon Formation (GCF), consisting of three loess units and three soils, formed on the loess plateaus of the central Great Plains about 40-25 ka. Stable carbon isotope analysis of ...

  12. Recursive Programming Model for Crop Production on the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Ellis, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A flexible, recursive programming model of crop production on the Texas High Plains was developed. Besides the linear programming (LP) Optimization routine and recursive feedback section, the model also includes a matrix generator and report writer...

  13. EPA Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA) Section...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6217 Webpage Abstract This webpage provides an overview of the Coastal Nonpoint Pollution Control Program (16 U.S.C. Chapter 33) which addresses nonpoint pollution problems...

  14. Otolith elemental signatures reflect residency in coastal water masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishimoto, Mary M.; Washburn, Libe; Warner, Robert R.; Love, Milton S.; Paradis, Georges L.

    2010-01-01

    residency in coastal water masses Mary M. Nishimoto & LibeSebastes jordani) resid- ing in water masses with distinctthat resided in different water masses that were associated

  15. Modeling Water and Sediment Quality in the Coastal Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stolzenbach, Keith D.; McWilliams, James C.

    2008-01-01

    ecosystem, oceanography, pollution, sediment, stratification193 Modeling Water and Sediment Quality in the Coastal Oceana model of water and sediment quality capable of forecasting

  16. Regional setting of Niobrara Formation in Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurr, G.W.

    1984-05-01

    Natural gas is currently produced from the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation in northeastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, and several small fields in Nebraska. As a part of studies of low-permeability gas reservoirs in the northern Great Plains, the regional geologic setting of the Niobrara has been investigated in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. Structural contours of the Ardmore Bentonite Bed suggest that the area of thin Niobrara strata presently approximates the south flank of the Williston basin and north flank of the Denver and Kennedy basins. Chalk tongues are interpreted as low-angle shelf surfaces, known as carbonate ramps, which sloped gently to the northwest and southeast off a paleotectonic high. The paleotectonic high cut obliquely across the seaway and was close to the position of the Transcontinental arch that influenced Paleozoic sedimentation. As a result, the present-day stratigraphy and structural setting of the Niobrara are different north and south of the arch crest. 58 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  17. Economic Implications of Applying Effluent for Irrigation in the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victurine, Raymond F.; Goodwin, H.L.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1985-01-01

    and groundwater irrigated farms, the respective increases in returns are 170% and 65%. Keywords: Wastewater/rural communities/sewage treatment/waste disposal ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF APPLYING EFFLUENT FOR IRRIGATION IN THE TEXAS HIGH PLAINS Raymond F... .......... . . . .................... . .................. 14 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ....................................... 17 ii ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF APPLYING EFFLUENT FOR IRRIGATION IN THE TEXAS HIGH PLAINS INTRODUCTION Wastewater treatment through land application has been practiced for decades...

  18. An investigation of dust storm generation in the Southern Great Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Marshall Conrad

    1977-01-01

    of daily mean precipitation amounts and Antecedent Precipitation Index (API) profiles with number of stations reporting dust for February- May 1974 in four regions of the Southern Great Plains 43 Contoured frequency graph depicting the comparison... of monthly dust observations with time of day of occurrence, Contours are labeled in number of. observations and the data base includes 5056 dust reports from 34 Southern Great Plains stations during February-May 1966-1975 . . . . . . . . . . . 46 20...

  19. Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Model Biases Using data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant Nigam

    2013-02-05

    These five publications are summarized: Key role of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation in 20th century drought and wet periods over the Great Plains; A Sub-Seasonal Teleconnection Analysis: PNA Development and Its Relationship to the NAO; AMO's Structure and Climate Footprint in Observations and IPCC AR5 Climate Simulations; The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation in 20th Century Climate Simulations: Uneven Progress from CMIP3 to CMIP5; and Tropical Atlantic Biases in CCSM4.

  20. Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudakov, Ivan; Golden, Kenneth M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds that develop on the surface of sea ice floes during the late spring and summer largely determine their albedo $-$ a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a simple sea ice climate model passing through a bifurcation point $-$ an irreversible critical threshold as the system warms, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a nonlinear phase transition model for melt ponds, and bifurcation analysis of a simple climate model with ice - albedo feedback as the key mechanism driving the system to a potential bifurcation point.

  1. Method for preventing thaw settlement along offshore arctic pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duthweiler, F.C.

    1987-06-30

    A method is described for installing a warm fluid-bearing pipeline across an arctic seafloor, the method comprising: (1) drilling a series of boreholes along the seafloor through a thawed zone of subsea soil to penetrate a distance into a zone of permafrost; (2) circulating a warm circulation fluid through the boreholes to create a slump trough on the surface of the seafloor by creating a prethawing zone in the permafrost zone; and (3) installing a pipeline bearing a warm fluid along the bottom of the slump trough without causing further substantial slumping along the seafloor.

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlantic (ACE-ENA)StudygovCampaignsArctic

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - FIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01)govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA ARM Data

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design togovCampaignsMASRAD: Pt. Reyes Stratus(MC3E):govCampaignsMixed-Phase Arctic

  5. Patterns and Controls of Temporal Variation in CO2 Sequestration and Loss in Arctic Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walter C.

    2002-03-21

    Determine seasonal and interannual patterns of net ecosystem CO2 flux from wet coastal and moist tussock tundra.

  6. Human dimensions perspectives on the impacts of coastal zone marine renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Conway, Flaxen; Hall-Arber, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    coastal zone marine renewable energy generation. REFERENCESOuter Continental Shelf Renewable Energy Space-Use ConflictsOF COASTAL ZONE MARINE RENEWABLE ENERGY Caroline Pomeroy,

  7. ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOES D.O.E. HAVE A ROLE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    sting Regional Energy Supply Issues • Zone . • . • . ision-coastal zone, planned energy supply developments also areforecasts regional energy supply dependence on the coastal

  8. Human dimensions perspectives on the impacts of coastal zone marine renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Conway, Flaxen; Hall-Arber, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    coastal zone marine renewable energy generation. REFERENCESOF COASTAL ZONE MARINE RENEWABLE ENERGY Caroline Pomeroy,and implementing marine renewable energy (MRE) development

  9. Microclimate Corrosion Effects in Coastal Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.

    1996-03-24

    The Albany Research Center is conducting atmospheric corrosion research in coastal environments to improve the performance of materials in the Nation's infrastructure. The corrosion of bare metals, and of painted, thermal-sprayed, and galvanized steels are presented for one-year exposures at sites located on bridges and utility poles along the Oregon coast. The effects of microclimates (for example distance from the ocean, high wind zones, and salt-fog prone regions) are examined in conjunction with sample orientation and sheltered/unsheltered comparisons. An atmospheric corrosion model examines the growth and dissolution of corrosion product layers to arrive at a steady-state thickness and corrosion rate.

  10. Coastal Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,Coal TechnologiesClio Power Ltd JumpCoastal Electric Coop, Inc

  11. Coastal Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,Coal TechnologiesClio Power Ltd JumpCoastal Electric Coop,

  12. CoastalXethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,Coal TechnologiesClio Power Ltd JumpCoastal Electric

  13. Coastal Zone Management Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) JumpIowa: Energy ResourcesCreek,Coastal Zone Management Act

  14. Coastal Barrier Resources Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, searchClover Hill HighPowerCoastal Barrier

  15. Coastal Energy (CCAP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, searchClover Hill HighPowerCoastal

  16. Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, searchClover Hill HighPowerCoastalHarbors

  17. Status of Wind-Diesel Applications in Arctic Climates: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Corbus, D.

    2007-12-01

    The rising cost of diesel fuel and the environmental regulation for its transportation, use, and storage, combined with the clear impacts of increased arctic temperatures, is driving remote communities to examine alternative methods of providing power. Over the past few years, wind energy has been increasingly used to reduce diesel fuel consumption, providing economic, environmental, and security benefits to the energy supply of communities from Alaska to Antarctica. This summary paper describes the current state of wind-diesel systems, reviews the operation of wind-diesel plants in cold climates, discusses current research activities pertaining to these systems, and addresses their technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems in Alaska will be reviewed. Specific focus will also be given to the control of power systems with large amounts of wind generation and the complexities of replacing diesel engine waste heat with excess wind energy, a key factor in assessing power plants for retrofit. A brief overview of steps for assessing the viability of retrofitting diesel power systems with wind technologies will also be provided. Because of the large number of isolated diesel minigrids, the market for adding wind to these systems is substantial, specifically in arctic climates and on islands that rely on diesel-only power generation.

  18. INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    4010 INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for several decades because of increased human activity. Modern agriculture is a major contributor to coastal pollution levels of pollution and potentially harming marine organisms (Banerjee et al., 1996). Some organisms

  19. TOOLS AND METHODS FOR STUDIES IN COASTAL ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

    TOOLS AND METHODS FOR STUDIES IN COASTAL ECOLOGY OF THE BAHAMAS Version 1.2. April 2006 #12;TOOLS Sealey, K, K. Semon, N. Cushion, E.Wright, C. Kaplan, and B. Carpenter. 2006. Tools and Methods for Coastal Ecological Studies of The Bahamas. University of Miami, Coral Gables, Fl. 33124. 111 pp. #12;TOOLS

  20. Toward an uncertainty budget for a coastal ocean model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    budget for a coastal ocean model in a wind-forced regime are made, based on numerical simulations with knowledge only of the wind forcing, and no ocean data, for wind fields with these estimated errors it are of increasing interest. For the wind-forced Oregon coastal ocean regime, Kim et al. (2009) recently examined

  1. WIND SPEED VARIABILITY AND ADAPTATION STRATEGIES IN COASTAL AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohfeld, Karen

    WIND SPEED VARIABILITY AND ADAPTATION STRATEGIES IN COASTAL AREAS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST of Thesis: Wind Speed Variability and Adaptation Strategies in Coastal Areas of the Pacific Northwest/Approved: ___________________________________________ #12;iii ABSTRACT Overall, previous wind speed studies in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) present

  2. South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study Myrtle Beach Nearshore Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voulgaris, George

    South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study Myrtle Beach Nearshore Experiment Dec. 10 to Dec. 15, 2003 Savannah Campus Savannah, Ga. Technical Report University of South Carolina CPSD Technical Report: CPSD/04 with the collection of offshore wave and current data as part of the U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Coastal

  3. Protection of Coastal Infrastructure under Rising Flood Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protection of Coastal Infrastructure under Rising Flood Risk Megan J. Lickley, Ning Lin and Henry D://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;Protection of Coastal Infrastructure under Rising Flood Risk Megan J to an increasing risk of flooding. We study the combined impacts of anticipated sea level rise, hurricane activity

  4. Research Note Effects of Coastal Lighting on Foraging Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branch, Lyn C.

    , particularly in coastal systems. Light pollution alters the behavior of sea turtles during nesting; therefore light affects the behavior of terrestrial species in coastal areas and that light pollution deserves, light pollution, Peromyscus polionotus leucocephalus, Santa Rosa beach mice Efectos del Alumbrado

  5. Viability, Development, and Reliability Assessment of Coupled Coastal Forecasting Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singhal, Gaurav

    2012-10-19

    Real-time wave forecasts are critical to a variety of coastal and offshore opera- tions. NOAA’s global wave forecasts, at present, do not extend into many coastal regions of interest. Even after more than two decades of the historical Exxon Valdez...

  6. Walton County Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project Walton County, FL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    to reduce coastal storm damages by constructing berms and dunes along 18.8 miles of Walton County shoreline;vegetation and replacement of dune walkover structures as required. Material for the berm and duneWalton County Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project Walton County, FL 13 December 2012 ABSTRACT

  7. MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER IN SALT WATER INGRESS COASTAL AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER IN SALT WATER INGRESS COASTAL AQUIFERS C. P. Kumar Scientist `E1 dealing with exploitation, restoration and management of fresh groundwater in coastal aquifers, the key is disturbed by groundwater withdrawals and other human activities that lower groundwater levels, reduce fresh

  8. Policy: HREO-107 Equal Employment Opportunity Coastal Carolina University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchens, John

    Policy: HREO- 107 Equal Employment Opportunity Coastal Carolina University Reviewed/Revised: March 2010, August 2011, October 2013 Page 1 of 6 NOTE: THIS POLICY, LIKE ALL OTHER COASTAL CAROLINA UNIVERSITY POLICIES, IS NOT A CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT AND SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS SUCH. THIS POLICY MAY

  9. Oil, Development, and the Environment: Coastal Brazil at a Crossroads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    ://www.petrobras.com/pt/energia-e-tecnologia/ #12;(E&P 2011) (BP 2013) *Brazil is 8th largest energy consumer and 10th largest producer (EIA 2012Oil, Development, and the Environment: Coastal Brazil at a Crossroads Dr. Tom Safford ­ UNH - Dept #12;Overview Background on coastal development and the environment in Brazil Global and local

  10. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant Nigam

    2013-02-01

    Work reported included analysis of pentad (5 day) averaged data, proposal of a hypothesis concerning the key role of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in 20th century drought and wet periods over the Great Plains, analysis of recurrent super-synoptic evolution of the Great Plains low-level jet, and study of pentad evolution of the 1988 drought and 1993 flood over the Great Plains from a NARR perspective on the atmospheric and terrestrial water balance.

  11. Accomplishments and future perspective of coastal ocean observing systems Coastal oceans are the most densely urbanized regions on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are the most densely urbanized regions on the planet with populations growing at rapid rate. In the near future as communities increasingly rely on the coastal ocean to provide additional sources of energy (wind, waves, oil, our ability to map and forecast the coastal ocean remains low. While certain areas are difficult

  12. The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 2: Overview and invited papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-15

    This document is a compilation of summaries of papers presented at the Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems workshop. Topics include; marine forecasting, regulatory agencies and regulations, research and application models, research and operational observing, oceanic and atmospheric data assimilation, and coastal physical processes.

  13. The Impact of Global Warming on the Carbon Cycle of Arctic Permafrost...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: The Impact of Global Warming on the Carbon Cycle of Arctic Permafrost: An Experimental and Field Based Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Impact...

  14. Source attributions of pollution to the Western Arctic during the NASA ARCTAS field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-8 aircraft during theand Woollen, J. : MERRA: NASA’s Modern-Era RetrospectiveWestern Arctic during the NASA ARCTAS field campaign H. P.

  15. The NGEE Arctic Data Archive -- Portal for Archiving and Distributing Data and Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boden, Thomas A; Palanisamy, Giri; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Killeffer, Terri S; Krassovski, Misha B; Hook, Leslie A

    2014-01-01

    The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project is committed to implementing a rigorous and high-quality data management program. The goal is to implement innovative and cost-effective guidelines and tools for collecting, archiving, and sharing data within the project, the larger scientific community, and the public. The NGEE Arctic web site is the framework for implementing these data management and data sharing tools. The open sharing of NGEE Arctic data among project researchers, the broader scientific community, and the public is critical to meeting the scientific goals and objectives of the NGEE Arctic project and critical to advancing the mission of the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Biological and Environmental (BER) Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) program.

  16. Satellite Retrievals of Arctic and Equatorial Rain and Snowfall Rates Using Millimeter Wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surussavadee, Chinnawat

    A new global precipitation retrieval algorithm for the millimeter-wave Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit is presented that also retrieves Arctic precipitation rates over surface snow and ice. This algorithm improves upon ...

  17. Building skills : a construction trades training facility for the eastern Canadian Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roszler, Sarah Katherine, 1977-

    2005-01-01

    On April 1, 1999, the Inuit of the Eastern Canadian Arctic achieved sovereignty over a new territory, Nunavut, envisioning economic self-reliance, political self-determination, and renewal of confidence in Inuit community. ...

  18. Impacts of Climate Change on Human Access and Resource Development in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephenson, Scott Ryan

    2014-01-01

    C. (2014). Russian Arctic LNG project to name shippers,tax breaks to benefit Yamal LNG project (21 October). Globalthe first- ever transit by an LNG carrier in November 2012 (

  19. bowhead whales. The Naval Arctic Re-search Laboratory at Barrow, Alaska,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Greenland whale, or bowhead. Unpubl. manuscr. [Vol. 15, Encyclopedia Arctica], 71 p. Avail. Dartmouth. Biology of the bowhead whale (Sa/aena mysticetus) in the western Arctic. Unpubl. manuscr., 93 p. Dep. Bio

  20. Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Laura Marie

    2014-04-25

    Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

  1. Simulated Response of the Arctic Freshwater Budget to Extreme NAO Wind Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condron, Alan

    The authors investigate the response of the Arctic Ocean freshwater budget to changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) using a regional-ocean configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology GCM (MITgcm) ...

  2. Patterns of shrub expansion in Alaskan arctic river corridors suggest phase transition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naito, Adam T; Cairns, David M

    2015-01-01

    of tall shrubs. Given current understanding of the local-scale implications for hydrol- ogy, surface energy balances, and carbon and nutrient cycling as a result of enhanced shrub cover, the comple- tion of this phase transition will alter tundra ecosystem... in Alaskan arctic river corridors suggest phase transition Adam T. Naito & David M. Cairns Department of Geography, Texas A&M University, 810 Eller O&M Building, Mailstop 3147 TAMU, College Station, Texas 77843-3147 Keywords Alaska, Arctic, landscape analysis...

  3. Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

    2014-01-01

    The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

  4. Active layer dynamics and arctic hydrology and meteorology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Man`s impact on the environment is increasing with time. To be able to evaluate anthropogenic impacts on an ecosystems, it is necessary first to understand all facets of how the ecosystems works: what the main processes (physical, biological, chemical) are, at what rates they proceed, and how they can be manipulated. Arctic ecosystems are dominated by physical processes of energy exchange. This project has concentrated on a strong program of hydrologic and meteorologic data collection, to better understand dominant physical processes. Field research focused on determining the natural annual and diurnal variability of meteorologic and hydrologic variables, especially those which may indicate trends in climatic change. Comprehensive compute models are being developed to simulate physical processes occurring under the present conditions and to simulate processes under the influence of climatic change.

  5. Process-Based Coastal Erosion Modeling for Drew Point, North Slope, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Process-Based Coastal Erosion Modeling for Drew Point, North Slope, Alaska Thomas M. Ravens1, Beaufort Sea, Alaska. This coastal setting has experienced a dramatic increase in erosion since the early, coastal erosion/shoreline change model has been developed for a small coastal segment near Drew Point

  6. Southern/Northern California Coastal Processes Annotated Bibliography: Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, Planning Division, Coastal Resources Branch

    1987-01-01

    vegetation has proved to be the most effective and efficient means of stabilizing coastal sand dunes.

  7. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  8. Sensitivity of CAM5-Simulated Arctic Clouds and Radiation to Ice Nucleation Parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Shaocheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Yuying

    2013-08-01

    Sensitivity of Arctic clouds and radiation in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 to the ice nucleation process is examined by testing a new physically based ice nucleation scheme that links the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentration to aerosol properties. The default scheme parameterizes the IN concentration simply as a function of ice supersaturation. The new scheme leads to a significant reduction in simulated IN number concentrations at all latitudes while changes in cloud amount and cloud properties are mainly seen in high latitudes and middle latitude storm tracks. In the Arctic, there is a considerable increase in mid-level clouds and a decrease in low clouds, which result from the complex interaction among the cloud macrophysics, microphysics, and the large-scale environment. The smaller IN concentrations result in an increase in liquid water path and a decrease in ice water path due to the slow-down of the Bergeron-Findeisen process in mixed-phase clouds. Overall, there is an increase in the optical depth of Arctic clouds, which leads to a stronger cloud radiative forcing (net cooling) at the top of the atmosphere. The comparison with satellite data shows that the new scheme slightly improves low cloud simulations over most of the Arctic, but produces too many mid-level clouds. Considerable improvements are seen in the simulated low clouds and their properties when compared to Arctic ground-based measurements. Issues with the observations and the model-observation comparison in the Arctic region are discussed.

  9. Coastal-zone biogeochemical dynamics under global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackenzie, F.T.; Ver, L.M.; Lerman, A.

    2000-03-01

    The coastal zone, consisting of the continental shelves to a depth of 200 meters, including bays, lagoons, estuaries, and near-shore banks, is an environment that is strongly affected by its biogeochemical and physical interactions with reservoirs in the adjacent domains of land, atmosphere, open ocean, and marine sediments. Because the coastal zone is smaller in volume and area coverage relative to the open ocean, it traditionally has been studied as an integral part of the global oceans. In this paper, the authors show by numerical modeling that it is important to consider the coastal zone as an entity separate from the open ocean in any assessment of future Earth-system response under human perturbation. Model analyses for the early part of the 21st century suggest that the coastal zone plays a significant modifying role in the biogeochemical dynamics of the carbon cycle and the nutrient cycles coupled to it. This role is manifested in changes in primary production, storage, and/or export of organic matter, its remineralization, and calcium carbonate precipitation--all of which determine the state of the coastal zone with respect to exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Under a scenario of future reduced or complete cessation of the thermohaline circulation (THC) of the global oceans, coastal waters become an important sink for atmospheric CO{sub 2}, as opposed to the conditions in the past and present, when coastal waters are believed to be a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Profound changes in coastal-zone primary productivity underscore the important role of phosphorus as a limiting nutrient. In addition, calculations indicate that the saturation state of coastal waters with respect to carbonate minerals will decline by {approximately}15% by the year 2030. Any future slowdown in the THC of the oceans will increase slightly the rate of decline in saturation state.

  10. An AeroCom Assessment of Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and Sea Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, Mian; De Luca, N.; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Liu, Xiaohong; Mann, G. W.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Yun, Yuxing; Zhang, Kai

    2014-03-07

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea-ice. Here, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea-ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004-2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng g?1 for an earlier Phase of AeroCom models (Phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng g?1 for a more recent Phase of AeroCom models (Phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng g?1. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model–measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60-90?N) atmospheric residence time for BC in Phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with the fact that most Arctic BC deposition originates from extra-Arctic emissions, these results suggest that aerosol removal processes are a leading source of variation in model performance. The multi-model mean (full range) of Arctic radiative effect from BC in snow is 0.15 (0.07-0.25) W m?2 and 0.18 (0.06-0.28) W m?2 in Phase I and Phase II models, respectively. After correcting for model biases relative to observed BC concentrations in different regions of the Arctic, we obtain a multi-model mean Arctic radiative effect of 0.17 W m?2 for the combined AeroCom ensembles. Finally, there is a high correlation between modeled BC concentrations sampled over the observational sites and the Arctic as a whole, indicating that the field campaign provided a reasonable sample of the Arctic.

  11. An economic analysis of alternative sprinkler irrigation distribution systems on the Southern High Plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, John Christopher

    1973-01-01

    Situation; Texas High Plains. . . 146 Pumping Cost Per Acre Foot of Irri- gation Water~ Texas High Plains. . . . . . . 107 xiii LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Delineation of Study Area. ~ ~ ~ ~ . ~ ~ . ~ . ~ , 8 Hypothetical Iso-Product and Iso-Cost...-product curve is shown in Figure 2, with variable inputs capital and labor, used to produce Z units of' output. As capital is 20 Labor Iso-Product Curve I I I Capital Z3 Iso-Cost Curve Zl FIGURE 2. Hypothetical Iso-Product and Iso-Cost Curves...

  12. Cyclogenesis and the low-level jet over the southern Great Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladwig, David Scott

    1980-01-01

    cyclone mov. 'ng through the The citations on the following pages follow +he style of the Journal cif ~A o'. i ed Meteorology . Great Plains. This model included a moist tongue coincident with a LLJ. A number of authors have discussed the advection... is that of the fully developed cyclone moving through the Great Plains and described in Newton's (1967) model. This model in- corporates those characteristics found in nearly every case of cyclo- genesis during the per', od of this study. Initially, a pola, air...

  13. Reactive nitrogen, ozone and ozone production in the Arctic troposphere and the impact of stratosphere-troposphere exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    and Logan, J. A. : Atmospheric chemistry in the Arctic andIntroduction to Atmospheric Chemistry, Princeton University3.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Reactive

  14. Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric T. DeWeaver

    2010-02-17

    The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. The examination of present-day climate also includes diagnostic intercomparison of model simulations and observed mean climate and climate variability using reanalysis and satellite datasets. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A further objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system.

  15. Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric T. DeWeaver

    2010-01-19

    This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

  16. Onset of deep drainage and salt mobilization following forest clearing and cultivation in the Chaco plains (Argentina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    plains (Argentina) M. L. Amdan,1 R. Aragon,2,3 E. G. Jobbagy,3 J. N. Volante,4 and J. M. Paruelo1-fed agriculture and pasture, with different age of clearance (>30 years, 20 and 3 years) in Salta, Argentina, we drainage and salt mobilization following forest clearing and cultivation in the Chaco plains (Argentina

  17. Failure Criterion for Two-Ply Plain-Weave CFRP Laminates H.M.Y.C. Mallikarachchi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    -ply plain-weave lami- nates of carbon-fiber reinforced plastic. The criterion is formulated in terms of six-strain-energy composite deployable booms with tape-spring hinges made from a two-ply laminate of plain weave carbon fiber in the distribution and arrangement of the fibers that are responsible for stress concen- trations. These effects

  18. Plain Language Disclosure for Direct Subsidized Loans and Direct Unsubsidized Loans William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    Plain Language Disclosure for Direct Subsidized Loans and Direct Unsubsidized Loans William D. Ford Subsidized Loan and/or Direct Unsubsidized Loan to help cover the costs of your education. This Plain to separate loans made under the MPN depending on whether the loan is subsidized or unsubsidized, when

  19. Evaluation of ECMWF cloud type simulations at the ARM Southern Great Plains site using a new cloud type climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of ECMWF cloud type simulations at the ARM Southern Great Plains site using a new cloud; accepted 13 December 2006; published 3 February 2007. [1] A new method to derive a cloud type climatology is applied to cloud observations over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM

  20. Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric modes of continental stratus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric.5 years) cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) climate research facility in Oklahoma are used to develop detailed cloud climatology. Clouds

  1. COASTAL OCEANOGRAPHY USING A SMALL AUV , Manhar R Dhanak*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhanak, Manhar R.

    1 COASTAL OCEANOGRAPHY USING A SMALL AUV Edgar An (1) , Manhar R Dhanak*(1) , Lynn K Shay (2, Boca Raton, Florida, 33431 (2) Division of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography RSMAS, University

  2. Seawater circulation in coastal aquifers : processes and impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karam, Hanan Nadim

    2012-01-01

    This thesis explores the subterranean domain of chemical cycling in coastal oceans abutting permeable aquifers, where transport through sediments is dominated by advection, rather than diffusion. We investigate the mechanisms ...

  3. MULTIVARIATE VISUALIZATION OF DATA QUALITY ELEMENTS FOR COASTAL ZONE MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MULTIVARIATE VISUALIZATION OF DATA QUALITY ELEMENTS FOR COASTAL ZONE MONITORING D. E. van de Vlag for illustrating quantitative values of quality elements using multivariate visualization techniques. Quality, temporal accuracy and completeness. By combining multivariate visualization with the technique of multiple

  4. Communicating Coastal Risk Analysis in an Age of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the ocean and in relatively low-lying, flat coastal regions [1], and the land, people, and supporting by allowing further inland penetration of surge and waves. Additionally, the actual inundation caused

  5. Septic Systems in the Coastal Environment: Multiple Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    ....................................................... 82 4.2 Septic System Pollutants and Treatment Processes4 Septic Systems in the Coastal Environment: Multiple Water Quality Problems in Many Areas Michael .................................................................. 82 4.3 Septic Systems and Fecal Microbial Pollution

  6. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  7. Life history and habitat associations of the broad wood cockroach, Parcoblatta lata (Blattaria: Blattellidae) and other native cockroaches in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.

    2002-06-18

    Wood cockroaches are an important prey of the red-cockaded woodpecker, Picoides borealis, an endangered species inhabiting pine forests in the southern United States. These woodpeckers forage on the boles of live pine trees, but their prey consists of a high proportion of wood cockroaches, Parcoblatta spp., that are more commonly associated with dead plant material. Cockroach population density samples were conducted on live pine trees, dead snags and coarse woody debris on the ground. The studies showed that snags and logs are also important habitats of wood cockroaches in pine forests.

  8. Capacity-building: an inquiry into the local coastal program component of coastal zone management in Louisiana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris-Raynbird, Carla

    2007-09-17

    Social research specifically aimed at evaluating the efficacy of coastal zone management programs at the parish (county) level in building local capacities has been meager in academic literatures and absent from Louisiana Department of Natural...

  9. Social relationships and reproductive state influence leadership roles in movements of plains zebra, Equus burchellii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Daniel I.

    Social relationships and reproductive state influence leadership roles in movements of plains zebra 2007; MS. number: A10511) In animal groups, collective movements emerge from individual interactions that movement initiation in unstable groups depends on individual state at the time of the decision. We

  10. RuralNet (Digital Gangetic Plains): WiFi-Based Low-Cost Rural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Bhaskaran

    RuralNet (Digital Gangetic Plains): WiFi-Based Low-Cost Rural Networking Bhaskaran Raman Department in the west This business model can thrive when average per capita income is high ($20K) Wireless systems being deployed in India are successful in Metro pockets, but providing cost effective voice and data

  11. Referenceable Numbering for Plain TEX A Macro Package by Russell Lyons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Russell

    Referenceable Numbering for Plain TEX A Macro Package with contributions from Oded Schramm Referencing Objects This package is called Ref.macros. Everything you number can be given a lab* *el, which can consist of numbers, letters, and symbols. The label must

  12. Comparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to test the strengths and limitations of cloud boundary retrievals from radiosonde profiles, 4 yearsComparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains radiosonde-based methods applied to 200 m resolution profiles obtained at the same site. The lidar

  13. A shallow seismic reflection survey in basalts of the Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

    1990-06-01

    recorded along a 500 m long line over a basalt, rhyolite, and sedimentary sequence in the Snake River Plain. Some shallow reflections at 40 to 50 ms on the field files are of exceptional quality with frequency exceeding 150 Hz. Reflections and refractions...

  14. The role of herbivores in Great Plains conservation: comparative ecology of bison and cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allred, Brady

    The role of herbivores in Great Plains conservation: comparative ecology of bison and cattle BRADY with significant influence from bison (Bison bison), but is presently dominated by cattle (Bos taurus). While to study and compare the grazing behavior and effects of bison and cattle within grassland ecosystems

  15. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  16. College of Human Sciences FY2014 Research Abstracts Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alliance Oklahoma State University is a member institution in the Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance, a partnership of 20 public university members providing access to educational and maintenance of the alliance. Alliance membership is a selective process that engages institutional leadership

  17. The Effects of Energy Prices on Agricultural Groundwater Extraction from the High Plains Aquifer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    1 The Effects of Energy Prices on Agricultural Groundwater Extraction from the High Plains-752-0824 Abstract In this article we examine the effects of energy prices on groundwater extraction using and extensive margins. Our results show that energy prices have an effect on both the intensive and extensive

  18. Weather pattern climatology of the Great Plains and the related wind regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barchet, W.R.

    1982-11-01

    The meteorology of the Great Plains can be described as a constant progression of air masses, fronts and cyclonic storm systems. Each of these meteorological conditions can be characterized by identifiable isobaric and related weather parameter patterns. Nine such patterns have been defined to type the weather patterns in the Great Plains. Time series of weather pattern types were produced for 62 stations on the Great Plains. Statistical analyses of these time series produced annual and seasonal frequencies of occurrence of the weather pattern types. Maps of the annual and seasonal frequency of occurrence of weather pattern type are presented for the Great Plains. Persistence and alternation frequencies match what is expected for traveling temperate latitude cyclones, anticyclones and fronts. The wind regime for stations at which the anemometer height and location was constant (and known) for a minimum of three consecutive years was stratified by weather pattern type. Statistical analyses were made to show the response of the wind to the large-scale distribution of air pressure associated with a weather pattern type. The response of the wind to the weather pattern is a site-specific result of the interaction of the large-scale meteorology with local terrain, surface roughness and atmospheric stability. Mean wind speed discriminates between pairs of weather pattern types with better than 75% confidence for more than two-thirds of the possible pairs of weather pattern types.

  19. Great Plains ASPEN model development: executive summary. Final topical report for Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinard, I.H.; Stern, S.S.; Millman, M.C.; Schwint, K.J.; Benjamin, B.W.; Kirman, J.J.; Dweck, J.S.; Mendelson, M.A.

    1986-07-25

    The Scientific Design Company contracted with the United States Department of Energy through its Morgantown Energy Technology Center to develop a steady-state simulation model of the Great Plains Coal Gasification plant. This plant produces substitute natural gas from North Dakota lignite. The model was to be developed using the ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineering) simulation program. The project was divided into the following tasks: (1) Development of a simplified overall model of the process to be used for a sensitivity analysis to guide the development of more rigorous section models. (2) Review and evaluation of existing rigorous moving-bed gasifier models leading to a recommendation of one to be used to model the Great Plains gasifiers. Adaption and incorporation of this model into ASPEN. (3) Review of the accuracy and completeness of the physical properties data and models provided by ASPEN that are required to characterize the Great Plains plant. Rectification of inaccurate or incomplete data. (4) Development of rigorous ASPEN models for critical unit operations and sections of the plant. (5) Evaluation of the accuracy of the ASPEN Cost Estimation and Evaluation System and upgrading where feasible. Development of a preliminary cost estimate for the Great Plains plant. (6) Validation of the simulation models developed in the course of this project. Determination of model sensitivity to variations of technical and economic parameters. (7) Documentation of all work performed in the course of this project. Essentially all of these tasks were completed successfully. 34 figs.

  20. SINGLE-PHASE LIQUID HEAT TRANSFER IN PLAIN AND ENHANCED MICROCHANNELS Mark E. Steinke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    SINGLE-PHASE LIQUID HEAT TRANSFER IN PLAIN AND ENHANCED MICROCHANNELS Mark E. Steinke Systems upon the understanding of the fundamental heat transfer processes that occur in these systems. There have been great advancements in our understanding of the heat transfer and fluid flow mechanisms

  1. Evidence of enhanced precipitation due to irrigation over the Great Plains of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Evidence of enhanced precipitation due to irrigation over the Great Plains of the United States of the local hydrological cycle has enhanced the regional precipitation. We examined station and gridded precipitation observations for the warm season months over and downwind of the Ogallala over the 20th century

  2. Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

    2008-12-31

    The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD participants believe that the platform concept could have far-reaching applications in the Arctic as a drilling and production platform, as originally intended, and as a possible staging area. The overall objective of this project was to document various potential applications, locations, and conceptual designs for the inland platform serving oil and gas operations on the Alaska North Slope. The University of Alaska Fairbanks assisted the HARC/TerraPlatforms team with the characterization of potential resource areas, geotechnical conditions associated with continuous permafrost terrain, and the potential end-user evaluation process. The team discussed the various potential applications with industry, governmental agencies, and environmental organizations. The benefits and concerns associated with industry's use of the technology were identified. In this discussion process, meetings were held with five operating companies (22 people), including asset team leaders, drilling managers, HSE managers, and production and completion managers. Three other operating companies and two service companies were contacted by phone to discuss the project. A questionnaire was distributed and responses were provided, which will be included in the report. Meetings were also held with State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources officials and U.S. Bureau of Land Management regulators. The companies met with included ConcoPhillips, Chevron, Pioneer Natural Resources, Fairweather E&P, BP America, and the Alaska Oil and Gas Association.

  3. Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s Jinlun.203°C. The warming of the world ocean is associated with an increase in global surface air temperature heat flux. Citation: Zhang, J. (2005), Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global

  4. Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system I. Sudakova,, S. A. Vakulenkob,c, K. M. Goldena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system I. Sudakova,, S. A. Vakulenkob,c, K. M Abstract Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a bifurcation analysis

  5. "Just to orient us," Dr. Eric Steig be-gan, "Arctic means bear. It is the place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    packed the auditorium to capacity to hear Steig discuss his re- search on climate change and Steig, raising waves across the scien- tific community. He is the director of the Quaternary Research Center is ocean and the other is land. The Arctic is covered in sea ice." Data measuring levels of Arctic sea ice

  6. Stochastic dynamics of Arctic sea ice Part II: Multiplicative noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Woosok

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the numerical solutions of a stochastic Arctic sea ice model with multiplicative noise over a wide range of external heat-fluxes, $\\Delta F_0$, which correspond to greenhouse gas forcing. When the noise is multiplicative, the noise-magnitude depends on the state-variable, and this will influence the statistical moments in a manner that differs from the additive case, which we analyzed in Part I of this study. The state variable describing the deterministic backbone of our model is the energy, $E(t)$, contained in the ice or the ocean and for a thorough comparison and contrast we choose the simplest form of multiplicative noise $\\sigma E(t) \\xi(t)$, where $\\sigma$ is the noise amplitude and $\\xi(t)$ is the noise process. The case of constant additive noise (CA) we write as $\\sigma\\overline{E_S}\\xi(t)$, in which $\\overline{E_S}$ is the seasonally averaged value of the periodic deterministic steady-state solution $E_S(t)$, or the deterministic seasonal cycle. We then treat the case of seasonally-varyi...

  7. Weakening of the Stratospheric Polar Vortex by Arctic Sea-Ice Loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Baek-Min; Son, Seok-Woo; Min, Seung-Ki; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Joong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Shim, Taehyoun; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-09-02

    Successive cold winters of severely low temperatures in recent years have had critical social and economic impacts on the mid-latitude continents in the Northern Hemisphere. Although these cold winters are thought to be partly driven by dramatic losses of Arctic sea ice, the mechanism that links sea ice loss to cold winters remains a subject of debate. Here, by conducting observational analyses and model experiments, we show how Arctic sea ice loss and cold winters in extra-polar regions are dynamically connected through the polar stratosphere. We find that decreased sea ice cover during early winter months (November-December), especially over the Barents-Kara seas, enhance the upward propagation of planetary-scale waves with wavenumbers of 1 and 2, subsequently weakening the stratospheric polar vortex in mid-winter (January- February). The weakened polar vortex preferentially induces a negative phase of Arctic Oscillation at the surface, resulting in low temperatures in mid-latitudes.

  8. A multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shindell, D T; Chin, M; Dentener, F; Doherty, R M; Faluvegi, G; Fiore, A M; Hess, P; Koch, D M; MacKenzie, I A; Sanderson, M G; Schultz, M G; Schulz, M; Stevenson, D S; Teich, H; Textor, C; Wild, O; Bergmann, D J; Bey, I; Bian, H; Cuvelier, C; Duncan, B N; Folberth, G; Horowitz, L W; Jonson, J; Kaminski, J W; Marmer, E; Park, R; Pringle, K J; Schroeder, S; Szopa, S; Takemura, T; Zeng, G; Keating, T J; Zuber, A

    2008-03-13

    We examine the response of Arctic gas and aerosol concentrations to perturbations in pollutant emissions from Europe, East and South Asia, and North America using results from a coordinated model intercomparison. These sensitivities to regional emissions (mixing ratio change per unit emission) vary widely across models and species. Intermodel differences are systematic, however, so that the relative importance of different regions is robust. North America contributes the most to Arctic ozone pollution. For aerosols and CO, European emissions dominate at the Arctic surface but East Asian emissions become progressively more important with altitude, and are dominant in the upper troposphere. Sensitivities show strong seasonality: surface sensitivities typically maximize during boreal winter for European and during spring for East Asian and North American emissions. Mid-tropospheric sensitivities, however, nearly always maximize during spring or summer for all regions. Deposition of black carbon (BC) onto Greenland is most sensitive to North American emissions. North America and Europe each contribute {approx}40% of total BC deposition to Greenland, with {approx}20% from East Asia. Elsewhere in the Arctic, both sensitivity and total BC deposition are dominated by European emissions. Model diversity for aerosols is especially large, resulting primarily from differences in aerosol physical and chemical processing (including removal). Comparison of modeled aerosol concentrations with observations indicates problems in the models, and perhaps, interpretation of the measurements. For gas phase pollutants such as CO and O{sub 3}, which are relatively well-simulated, the processes contributing most to uncertainties depend on the source region and altitude examined. Uncertainties in the Arctic surface CO response to emissions perturbations are dominated by emissions for East Asian sources, while uncertainties in transport, emissions, and oxidation are comparable for European and North American sources. At higher levels, model-to-model variations in transport and oxidation are most important. Differences in photochemistry appear to play the largest role in the intermodel variations in Arctic ozone sensitivity, though transport also contributes substantially in the mid-troposphere.

  9. The southern Lake Michigan coastal erosion study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, D.W. (Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    As a result of damage inflicted on the Chicago shoreline by exceptionally high waters in 1985-87, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a cooperative 5-year (1988--1992) study to evaluate the geologic framework of the area, the frequency of lake level fluctuations, and the processes responsible for the intense coastal erosion. The study involved 19 scientists from the USGS, Illinois State Geological Survey, Indiana Geological Survey, Indiana University, Purdue University, Northeastern Illinois University, Oregon State University, and the University of Washington. Some important results of the study follow: (1) the failure of revetments protecting the Chicago lakeshore is mainly structural and not erosional. (2) Prehistoric lake level fluctuations exceeded historic fluctuations by as much as a factor of two. For example, in the 17th century, lake level changed over a range of [approximately]3 m, whereas between the 1964 low and the 1986 high it changed only [approximately]1.6 m. (3) Bluff retreat between Wilmette and Waukegan varies from 10--75 cm/yr and averages 20--25 cm/yr; erosion rates north of Waukegan have been as high as 3 m/yr. (4) Eroding bluffs provide most of the sand to the nearshore zone; however, possibly due to construction of shore protection, the nearshore sand wedge has shown a dramatic decrease in volume during the last two decades. (5) Ice ridges as high as 7 m form along the lakeshore but do not effectively protect the beach from winter erosion as previously thought. (6) The Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore apparently was a major sink for sand moving southward along both sides of the lake; sediment input now appears to come mostly from the eastern shore.

  10. Impacts of sea level rise and climate change on coastal plant species in the central California coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Parameter Inundation Flooding Dune erosion Cliff erosion (brackish marshes, coastal dunes, scrub, coastal bluffs, andflooding, and cliff and dune erosion). SLR threat analysis

  11. From the land to the sea: Impacts of submarine groundwater discharge on the coastal ocean of California and Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lecher, Alanna Louise

    2015-01-01

    California  coastal  waters.  Environ.  Sci.   Technol.  with stable isotopes of water. Hydrol. Process. 17: 1073–to central California coastal waters. Environ. Sci. Technol.

  12. A radiocarbon method and multi-tracer approach to quantifying groundwater discharge to coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gramling, Carolyn M

    2003-01-01

    Groundwater discharge into estuaries and the coastal ocean is an important mechanism for the transport of dissolved chemical species to coastal waters. Because many dissolved species are present in groundwater in concentrations ...

  13. Analysis and interpretation of tidal currents in the coastal boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Paul Wesley, 1950-

    1979-01-01

    Concern with the impact of human activities on the coastal region of the world's oceans has elicited interest in the so-called "coastal boundary layer"-that band of water adjacent to the coast where ocean currents adjust ...

  14. ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOES D.O.E. HAVE A ROLE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    LBL-11154 UC- 11 ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOESD.O.E. HAVE A ROLE? Ronald L. Ritschard, Kendall F. Haven,Washington. • Conclusions • DOE S Role in Coastal Zone

  15. The coastal environment and human health: microbial indicators, pathogens, sentinels and reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin F.

    Innovative research relating oceans and human health is advancing our understanding of disease-causing organisms in coastal ecosystems. Novel techniques are elucidating the loading, transport and fate of pathogens in coastal ...

  16. Dynamics of invasion and native species recovery following fire in coastal sage scrub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gressard, Scott Charles

    2012-01-01

    Biology. 16: 909-23. O'Leary, J. F. 1995. Coastal sageSpringer-Verlag, New York O'Leary, J. F. 1990. Post-fireof Vegetation Science 1:173-180 O'Leary, J. F. 1995. Coastal

  17. Cessation of the 22–25 June 2006 Coastally Trapped Wind Reversal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahn, David A.; Parish, Thomas R.

    2010-07-01

    Coastally trapped wind reversals (CTWRs) occur periodically in the marine boundary layer off the western coast of the United States and dramatically change the low-level wind regime and coastal weather. Southerly flow becomes established...

  18. Extreme Hurricane Surge Estimation for Texas Coastal Bridges Using Dimensionless Surge Response Functions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Youn Kyung

    2010-10-12

    Since the devastating hurricane seasons of 2004, 2005, and 2008, the stability and serviceability of coastal bridges during and following hurricane events have become a main public concern. Twenty coastal bridges, critical for hurricane evacuation...

  19. Establishment of the Northeast Coastal Watershed Geospatial Data Network (NECWGDN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannigan, Robyn

    2014-02-17

    The goals of NECWGDN were to establish integrated geospatial databases that interfaced with existing open-source (water.html) environmental data server technologies (e.g., HydroDesktop) and included ecological and human data to enable evaluation, prediction, and adaptation in coastal environments to climate- and human-induced threats to the coastal marine resources within the Gulf of Maine. We have completed the development and testing of a "test bed" architecture that is compatible with HydroDesktop and have identified key metadata structures that will enable seamless integration and delivery of environmental, ecological, and human data as well as models to predict threats to end-users. Uniquely this database integrates point as well as model data and so offers capacities to end-users that are unique among databases. Future efforts will focus on the development of integrated environmental-human dimension models that can serve, in near real time, visualizations of threats to coastal resources and habitats.

  20. Enhanced Geothermal System Potential for Sites on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert K Podgorney; Thomas R. Wood; Travis L McLing; Gregory Mines; Mitchell A Plummer; Michael McCurry; Ahmad Ghassemi; John Welhan; Joseph Moore; Jerry Fairley; Rachel Wood

    2013-09-01

    The Snake River volcanic province overlies a thermal anomaly that extends deep into the mantle and represents one of the highest heat flow provinces in North America (Blackwell and Richards, 2004). This makes the Snake River Plain (SRP) one of the most under-developed and potentially highest producing geothermal districts in the United States. Elevated heat flow is typically highest along the margins of the topographic SRP and lowest along the axis of the plain, where thermal gradients are suppressed by the Snake River aquifer. Beneath this aquifer, however, thermal gradients rise again and may tap even higher heat flows associated with the intrusion of mafic magmas into the mid-crustal sill complex (e.g., Blackwell, 1989).

  1. The Impact of Energy Shortage and Cost on Irrigation for the High Plains and Trans Pecos Regions of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, R. D.; Condra, G. D.; Hardin, D. C.; Zavaleta, L.; Petty, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    ). The Ogalalla aquifer underlying the High Plains and many of the alluvium aquifers underlying the Trans Pecos are exhaustible; i.e., there is a negligible recharge from percolation and other sources. Therefore, even with unchanged natural gas prices...

  2. The Impact of Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williford, G. H.; Beattie, B. R.; Lacewell, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    of the Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services G.H. Williford B.R. Beattie R.D. Lacewell Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  3. Examining the Relationship between Antecedent Soil Moisture and Summer Precipitation in the U.S. Great Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Lei

    2010-01-14

    This dissertation focuses on examining the relationship between antecedent soil moisture and summer precipitation in the U.S. Great Plains (GP). The influence of Nino sea surface temperatures (SSTs) on summer precipitation ...

  4. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume II. Plant specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R. E.

    1983-12-31

    The specifications and design criteria for all plant systems and subsystems used in developing the preliminary design of Carrisa Plains 30-MWe Solar Plant are contained in this volume. The specifications have been organized according to plant systems and levels. The levels are arranged in tiers. Starting at the top tier and proceeding down, the specification levels are the plant, system, subsystem, components, and fabrication. A tab number, listed in the index, has been assigned each document to facilitate document location.

  5. Watermelon marketing in Texas with emphasis on the Rio Grande Plain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Charles William

    1958-01-01

    ?outs cf Water?alone by Truch and. Rail Frc? BobbrcnvQIop Texaco' 1957 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 33 7. Carlct Receipts cf Texas Waters?lens at, Major Barhots, 1953 561 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ * ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ II ~ ~ 38 8, Prices of Water... xxaternelon producing areas in the h. ie Grande PlaiR4 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ I ~ ~ ~ 3, Distribution sf xxaterxalene free the Bio Grande Plain by w e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6. Distribution ef xxatermlone by rail...

  6. Water and Associated Costs in the Production of Cotton and Grain Sorghum, Texas High Plains, 1955. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, A. C.; Hughes, William F.

    1957-01-01

    vary widely; consequently, there is a wide range in the cost of machinery on High Plains farms. Most wholly irrigated farms are equipped with the amount and kinds of machinery required be- fore acreage-control programs reduced the cotton acreage.... Before acreage control, some 70 to 80 j~ercent of the irrigated lands in the area covered by this study commonly were planted to cotton. Irrigated farms with 100 percent of the cropland in cotton were' not unusual. Present machinery inventories...

  7. The Shelterbelt Project: a study of tree planting on the Great Plains, 1934-1942 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilkemann, Virginia Violet

    1978-01-01

    for the Shelterbelt Project. From the beginning it was apparent that the Shelter- belt Project rested on "shaky" ground. During its lifetime the Project suffered from financial difficulties and public misunderstanding of its aims and purpose. Although it never...-108 A PRESS RELEASE 100 B A TEN-ROW SHELTERBELT DESIGN 103 D THE LENRD DISTRICT THE GREAT PLAINS REGION NEBRASKA 104 105 106 EFFECTS OF SHELTER BELTS ON WIND VELOCITY 107 LOCATION OF THE ORIGINAL SHELTERBELT ZONE 108 VITA 109 CHAPTER I...

  8. Economic effect on agricultural production of alternative energy input prices: Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Benjamin Michael

    1975-01-01

    ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIYE ENERGy INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAlNS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAINS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Approved as to style and content...

  9. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.

    2013-02-07

    The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

  10. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John

    2013-06-30

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  11. Joint Defra/EA Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management R&D Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Joint Defra/EA Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management R&D Programme Understanding and Predicting FD1926/TR #12;#12;Joint Defra/EA Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management R&D Programme the science and suggests guidance to help flood and coastal erosion risk management policy makers

  12. Invasive grasses, climate change, and exposure to storm-wave overtopping in coastal dune ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Invasive grasses, climate change, and exposure to storm-wave overtopping in coastal dune ecosystems result in increased risk of flooding in coastal areas. In the Pacific Northwest (USA), coastal dunes and reducing dune height. Here we quantify the relative exposure to storm-wave induced dune overtopping posed

  13. Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Ecosystem Restoration, LA Six Conditionally Authorized Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Ecosystem Restoration, LA Six Conditionally Authorized Projects 27 August 2010 Abstract: In 2004, USACE completed the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Near-Term Report measures are needed to sustain coastal ecosystems, the LCA Near-Term Report was developed to identify cost

  14. Using Long-Term Census Data to Inform Restoration Methods for Coastal Dune Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Using Long-Term Census Data to Inform Restoration Methods for Coastal Dune Vegetation Elise S Barrier Island . Coastal ecology . Dune zone . Disturbance . Dune vegetation . Storm response Introduction), with varied results. Restoration strategies can be difficult to implement successfully in coastal dune systems

  15. Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to support new protection for coastal sand dunes and non-vegetated wetlands. The regulatory program was alsoVirginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 30, Issue. This process continues to be as important now and for the future of the Commonwealth's coastal resources

  16. Phytoliths of common grasses in the coastal environments of southeastern USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kam-biu

    communities and their predominant phytolith contents. The dominant grasses of coastal sand dunes). The coastal zones of the southeastern USA consist of a variety of ecological habitats and vegetation typesPhytoliths of common grasses in the coastal environments of southeastern USA Houyuan Lua,b , Kam

  17. Decline of Birds in a Human Modified Coastal Dune Forest Landscape in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pretoria, University of

    @zoology.up.ac.za Introduction Coastal dune forest is one of South Africa's rarest vegetation types; restricted to the easternDecline of Birds in a Human Modified Coastal Dune Forest Landscape in South Africa Morgan J modified coastal dune forest landscape in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. However, occurrence does

  18. Remote sensing of the coastal zone: an overview and priorities for future research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote sensing of the coastal zone: an overview and priorities for future research TIM J. MALTHUS of the International Journal of Remote Sensing on Remote Sensing of the Coastal Marine Environment to highlight recent advances in knowledge of remote sensing of the coastal zone and to define a series of priorities where

  19. CARIBBEAN DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS Coastal Models Supporting our Nation's Needs through Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    natural resources. Data identified as coming from the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center are provided, coastal managers, and policy makers in effectively managing marine ecosystems and coastal resources;DIGITAL ELEVATION MODEL PuertoRicoIsland #12;http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/coastal/ dem.info

  20. Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements Yonghoon Choi1. Wang (2004), Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements carbon cycle. However, the dynamics of carbon (C) cycling in coastal wetlands and its response to sea

  1. DOE/SC-ARM-14-021 Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOE ProjectREMOTE-HANDLED TRU764 The Arctic6324525671

  2. Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories. Part I: Occurrence and Macrophysical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    distributions, temperature, mi- crophysical properties, thickness, and phase composition. Arctic cloud to derive estimates of cloud occurrence fraction, vertical distribution, persistence in time, diurnal cycle seasons for which the sun is above the horizon for at least part of the day. 1. Introduction Clouds play

  3. 2006 Nature Publishing Group Arctic hydrology during global warming at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © 2006 Nature Publishing Group Arctic hydrology during global warming at the Palaeocene The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum represents a period of rapid, extreme global warming ,55 million years ago global warming6 . The terrestrial-plant carbon isotope excursion (about 24.5 to 26 per mil

  4. Towards a more saline North Atlantic and a fresher Arctic under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Helge

    Towards a more saline North Atlantic and a fresher Arctic under global warming I. Bethke,1,2,3 T global warming, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L21712, doi:10.1029/ 2006GL027264. 1. Introduction [2.g., Cubasch et al., 2001; Ra¨isa¨nen, 2002]. At the high northern latitudes, a combination of warming

  5. Does Growth Rate Determine the Rate of Metabolism in Shorebird Chicks Living in the Arctic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    primarily of greater metabolic inten- sities of heat-generating tissues. The maximum temperature gradient500 Does Growth Rate Determine the Rate of Metabolism in Shorebird Chicks Living in the Arctic/22/2007; Electronically Published 7/13/2007 ABSTRACT We measured resting and peak metabolic rates (RMR and PMR

  6. Short-lived pollutants in the Arctic: their climate impact and possible mitigation strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Quinn, P.K.; Bates, T.S.; Baum, E.; Doubleday, N.; Fiore, A.M.; Flanner, M.; Fridlind, A.; Garrett, T.J.; Koch, D.; Menon, S.; Shindell, D.; Stohl, A.; Warren, S.G.

    2007-09-24

    Several short-lived pollutants known to impact Arctic climate may be contributing to the accelerated rates of warming observed in this region relative to the global annually averaged temperature increase. Here, we present a summary of the short-lived pollutants that impact Arctic climate including methane, tropospheric ozone, and tropospheric aerosols. For each pollutant, we provide a description of the major sources and the mechanism of forcing. We also provide the first seasonally averaged forcing and corresponding temperature response estimates focused specifically on the Arctic. The calculations indicate that the forcings due to black carbon, methane, and tropospheric ozone lead to a positive surface temperature response indicating the need to reduce emissions of these species within and outside the Arctic. Additional aerosol species may also lead to surface warming if the aerosol is coincident with thin, low lying clouds. We suggest strategies for reducing the warming based on current knowledge and discuss directions for future research to address the large remaining uncertainties.

  7. Megatides in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions Stephen D. Griffiths,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    Megatides in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions Stephen D. Griffiths,1 and W. R. Peltier1's climate and ocean circulation. Citation: Griffiths, S. D., and W. R. Peltier (2008), Megatides occurred approx- imately 26,000 years ago, since the bathymetric changes are now well constrained [Peltier

  8. Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean W. R. Peltier,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean freshening W. R. Peltier,1 G to the response to North Atlantic freshening. Citation: Peltier, W. R., G. Vettoretti, and M. Stastna (2006 of the Atlantic by Heinrich Event 1 [Peltier, 2005]. Simi- larly, the onset of the Younger Dryas (Y-D) cold

  9. Response of the Greenland-Scotland overflow to changing deep water supply from the Arctic Mediterranean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response of the Greenland-Scotland overflow to changing deep water supply from the Arctic to changes in the available volume of deep and intermediate waters in the Nordic Seas. Hydraulic control sensitive to changes in the deep water supply than that of the Faeroe-Bank Channel, but no sudden breakdown

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF MIXED-PHASE CLOUDS ON SURFACE SHORTWAVE IRRADIANCE DURING THE ARCTIC SPRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE INFLUENCE OF MIXED-PHASE CLOUDS ON SURFACE SHORTWAVE IRRADIANCE DURING THE ARCTIC SPRING Dan-phase stratiform clouds on the surface shortwave irradiance is examined using spectral irradiance measurements from.) spectroradiometer measured downwelling spectral irradiance in the interval 350­2200 nm, in one-minute averages

  11. The influence of mixedphase clouds on surface shortwave irradiance during the Arctic spring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The influence of mixedphase clouds on surface shortwave irradiance during the Arctic spring Dan irradiance is examined using unique spectral shortwave irradiance measurements made during the Indirect spectral irradiance from 350 to 2200 nm in oneminute averages throughout April­May 2008 from the ARM

  12. Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Instrumentation, Bergen, Norway An autonomous buoy which collects seismic reflection data and transmits to shore of the seismic buoy (thick red, green and black lines). - we have successfully developed an autonomous buoy

  13. 2006 Nature Publishing Group Episodic fresh surface waters in the Eocene Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakobsson, Martin

    with a local sea surface temperature rise from ,10 8C to 13 8C, pointing to simultaneous increases in salt. The recent Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 302 (or Arctic Coring Expedition, ACEX tolerant species have experimentally been pre-conditioned by gradual increase of salt concentrations

  14. Export of nutrients from the Arctic Ocean Sinhu Torres-Valds,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    Export of nutrients from the Arctic Ocean Sinhué Torres-Valdés,1 Takamasa Tsubouchi,2 Sheldon Bacon Strait, the Barents Sea Opening (BSO), and Bering Strait. We found that the major exports of all three budgets show that statistically robust net silicate and phosphate exports exist, while the net nitrate

  15. Proceedings of the ASME 28th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    Proceedings of the ASME 28th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering-mail: frederic.alauzet@inria.fr ABSTRACT Engineering offshore problems require a continuous progress of numerical schemes. How- ever, this strategy requires advanced meshing techniques. As engineering offshore

  16. Proceedings of OMAE2008: The 27th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics & Arctic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of OMAE2008: The 27th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics & Arctic Taggart BP America Production Mike Campbell 2H Offshore Inc. ABSTRACT In an effort to more effectively instrumented several of them on a number of mobile offshore drilling units (MODUs) and offshore production

  17. A continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    A continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1 and Daniel L. Feltham1 to generate meltwater that accumulates in ponds. The melt ponds reduce the albedo of the sea ice cover during), which simulates the formation and evolution of the melt pond cover. In order to be compatible

  18. Simulated heat storage in a perennially ice-covered high Arctic lake: Sensitivity to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    . In contrast, the perennially ice-covered lakes found at high latitudes can store heat in excess of the annualSimulated heat storage in a perennially ice-covered high Arctic lake: Sensitivity to climate change conductivity and temperature profiles. They are salinity stratified and have deep thermal maxima that persist

  19. Report of the workshop on Arctic oil and gas recovery. [Offshore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-09-01

    Mission of the workshop was to identify research priorities for the technology related to Arctic offshore oil and gas production. Two working groups were formed on ice-related subjects and soil-related subjects. Instrumentation needed to accomplish some of the research objectives was also discussed. Results of a research priority allocation survey are summarized. (DLC)

  20. For publication in the Journal of O#shore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    For publication in the Journal of O#shore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering May 2000 STOCHASTIC'' (NTF) method. The basic goal of this method is to require the use of a generally expensive, nonlinear trend toward increasingly detailed, numerically complex analysis methods (e.g.,[10--12, 15

  1. For publication in the Journal of Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    For publication in the Journal of Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering May 2000 STOCHASTIC transfer function" (NTF) method. The basic goal of this method is to require the use of a generally trend toward increasingly detailed, numerically complex analysis methods (e.g.,[10­12, 15

  2. Proceedings of OMAE98 17th Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    Proceedings of OMAE98 17th Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering July 5­7, Lisbon transfer function'' (NTF) method. The basic goal of this method is to require the use of a gener­ ally, there is an on­ going trend toward increasingly detailed, numerically com­ plex analysis methods (e.g., Nakos

  3. Proceedings of OMAE98 17th Conference on O shore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    Proceedings of OMAE98 17th Conference on O shore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering July 5-7, Lisbon transfer function" NTF method. The basic goal of this method is to require the use of a gener- ally, there is an on- going trend toward increasingly detailed, numerically com- plex analysis methods e.g., Nakos

  4. Vegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    by insulating vegetation from winter wind and temperature extremes, modifying winter soil temperaturesVegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow ) open-topped fiberglass chambers (OTCs) to study the effects of changes in winter snow cover and summer

  5. Ocean advection, Arctic-Atlantic Connections, Climate P.B.Rhines, University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean advection, Arctic-Atlantic Connections, Climate P.B.Rhines, University of Washington Sirpa Hakkinen, NASA Goddard SPC with David Bailey, Wei Cheng, Jerome Cuny, Trisha Sawatzky WUN Climate Track,Wintertime Storm Track,Wintertime Storm Track, Eurasian climate and weatherEurasian climate

  6. Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo Stephen Warren, University wavelengths: ice is nearly transparent. Absorptive impurities: Black carbon (soot) Brown carbon (organics broadband albedo: 83% 71% (2) by addition of black carbon (BC) (20 ppb): 0.5% for r = 100 µm 1.6% for r

  7. Arctic methane sources: Isotopic evidence for atmospheric inputs R. E. Fisher,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Arctic methane sources: Isotopic evidence for atmospheric inputs R. E. Fisher,1 S. Sriskantharajah,1 D. Lowry,1 M. Lanoisellé,1 C. M. R. Fowler,1 R. H. James,2 O. Hermansen,3 C. Lund Myhre,3 A. Stohl,3 J. Greinert,4 P. B. R. NisbetJones,5 J. Mienert,6 and E. G. Nisbet1 Received 16 August 2011

  8. Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS) Pamela Spier, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK Abstract This paper presents an evaluation of the Hydro. Introduction and Motivation The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS, Kramm et al. 1996, Mölders

  9. An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David Institute, Bremerhaven, Germany g Institute of Numerical Mathematics Russian Academy of Science, Moscow, potential and available potential energies, energy conversion and forcing rates are studied. The energy

  10. Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment Matthew D a 35-GHz cloud radar and the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program operated a suite Clouds Experiment took place during April­July 1998, with the primary goal of investigating cloud

  11. how new hampshire's coastal watershed communities are addressing growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    how new hampshire's coastal watershed communities are addressing growth Setting Goals, Redefining Boundaries #12;Amanda Stone, NROC Coordinator University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension 36 County University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension/ New Hampshire Sea Grant Kingman Farm University of New

  12. Eutrophication risk assessment in coastal embayments using simple statistical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    Eutrophication risk assessment in coastal embayments using simple statistical models G. Arhonditsis was the development of regression models relating the levels of chlorophyll a (Chl) with the concentration of the limiting nutrient­­usually nitrogen­­and the renewal rate of the systems. The method was applied

  13. GIS and the Coastal Zone: An Annotated Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tools and concepts to the coastal zone is one of the great challenges paradoxically, geographical information systems (GIS) have not yet enjoyed the success at the coast for Geographic Information and Analysis Report 93-9 #12;Preface and Acknowledgments To all who sent me references

  14. Inland and coastal flooding: developments in prediction and prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    of meteorological causes of floods, hydraulics of flood water movement and coastal wind­wave-surge. Probabilistic statistical and computational modelling methodologies for long range forecasts and extreme events effects of climatic trends on flooding, appropriate planning of rapidly growing urban areas could mitigate

  15. Reproduction of the blacknose shark (Carcharhinus acronotus) in coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brazil Fabio H. V. Hazin Paulo G. Oliveira Matt K. Broadhurst Departamento de Pesca, Laboratório de off the southeastern United States and cor roborate much of Schwartz's (1984) work, including patterns of the blacknose shark in coastal waters off northeastern Brazil, using available fishery-dependent data. Material

  16. NOAAINMFS Developments NOAA Raises Coastal Zone Management Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    attention on the coastal zone for deepwater ports, floating nuclear power plants, and offshore oil and gas to eight vessels supplying three processing plants, with a total output of around 1.2 million pounds of the deep-sea red crab, and declining consumer buying power, make the fu- ture for the red crab market

  17. Coastal Engineering Technical Note IV-20 September 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Coastal Engineering Technical Note IV-20 September 1999 1 Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS platforms. This CETN is a companion to CETN-IV-15 (Revised September 1999) (Rosati and Kraus 1999), which IV-20 September 1999 2 · Produces report-quality graphics and has all typical Windows operating

  18. Managing a Coastal Bluegum (Eucalyptus globulus) Forest1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Managing a Coastal Bluegum (Eucalyptus globulus) Forest1 Ralph S. Osterling2 HISTORY In 1853 eucalyptus was introduced from Australia into California by Mr. Abbot McKinley3. At first, plantings were scattered over several areas on an expanded trial basis. Some fifty years later eucalyptus plantings

  19. NOAA COASTAL OCEAN PROGRAM Decision Analysis Series No. 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that grew out of them. The handbook contains the written substance of the material being taught A Handbook for Coastal Resource Policymakers U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric have been selected through an extensive peer review process. To learn more about the COP

  20. Stormwater Programs offered to Communities in New Hampshire's Coastal Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Stormwater Programs offered to Communities in New Hampshire's Coastal Watershed Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater: A Bird's Eye View Provides information about on-the-ground actions for communities to improve stormwater management from landscape to site level scales. Facilitated discussion helps

  1. Technical Note/ Impact of Coastal Land Reclamation on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    of fresh ground water resource because the reclaimed land can be an additional aquifer and rain rechargeTechnical Note/ Impact of Coastal Land Reclamation on Ground Water Level and the Sea Water a significant effect on local ground water systems. Steady-state analytic solutions based on Dupuit and Ghyben

  2. VARIATIONAL BOUSSINESQ MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF COASTAL WAVES AND TSUNAMIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    1 VARIATIONAL BOUSSINESQ MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF COASTAL WAVES AND TSUNAMIS DIDIT ADYTIA E. VAN different applications in this paper. One application deals with tsunami simulations, for which we show the phenomenon of tsunami waveguiding before the coast of Lampung in Indonesia. Another application deals

  3. The Asian Tsunami: A Protective Role for Coastal Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    The Asian Tsunami: A Protective Role for Coastal Vegetation Finn Danielsen,1 * Mikael K. Sørensen,2 The scale of the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was almost unprecedented. In areas with the maximum tsunami intensity, little could have prevented catastrophic coast- al destruction. Further away, however

  4. Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicklighter, David W.; Hayes, Daniel J; Mcclelland, James W; Peterson, Bruce; Mcguire, David; Melillo, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

  5. ShoreZone in the Arctic 8,000 km of Coastal Habitat Mapping Cathy Coon, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, catherine.coon@boem.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @coastalandoceans.com Cindy Hartmann Moore, NOAA/NMFS, cindy.hartmann@noaa.gov Tahzay Jones, National Park Service, Tahzay Resources Inc., john@coastalandoceans.com Cindy Hartmann Moore | NOAA/NMFS, cindy.hartmann@noaa.gov Tahzay

  6. ALLUVIAL SCRUB VEGETATION IN COASTAL SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA1 Ted L. Hanes, Richard D. Friesen, and Kathy Keane2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALLUVIAL SCRUB VEGETATION IN COASTAL SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA1 Ted L. Hanes, Richard D. Friesen deposits along the coastal side of major mountains of southern California. This vegetation type is adapted coastal and desert dunes, coastal val- leys and foothills, interior mountains and desert flats. Holland

  7. Paleoreconstruction of Particulate Organic Carbon Inputs to the High-Arctic Colville River Delta, Beaufort Sea, Alaska 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiner, Kathryn 1983-

    2013-01-09

    High Arctic permafrosted soils represent a massive sink in the global carbon cycle, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger...

  8. Climatic responses in spring migration of boreal and arctic birds in relation to wintering area and taxonomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    and taxonomy Kalle Rainio, Toni Laaksonen, Markus Ahola, Anssi V. Va¨ha¨talo and Esa Lehikoinen Rainio, K of boreal and arctic birds in relation to wintering area and taxonomy. Á J. Avian Biol. 37: 507Á515. Large

  9. The ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and ozone forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John C.

    In recent decades, the Arctic has been warming and sea ice disappearing. By contrast, the Southern Ocean around Antarctica has been (mainly) cooling and sea-ice extent growing. We argue here that interhemispheric asymmetries ...

  10. Abundance and distribution trends of the West Indian manatee in the coastal zone of Belize: implications for conservation. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auil, Nicole Erica

    2004-09-30

    Coastal zone management (CZM) became a focus for Belize in 1989. An integrated approach has since been taken for coral reef, coastal habitat, and coastal species sustainable use. The first objective of the National Integrated Coastal Zone Management... is intended to provide additional information to apply to endangered species protection and integrated coastal systems management. It is also intended to aid in protected area design and special management area creation for Belize. 3 Study Area...

  11. On the fast track: Collaboration expedites adoption of efficient irrigation technologies in the High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    the most of their available resources, Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service professionals are ge?ing new irrigation technologies into growers? hands in record time. Irrigation is incredibly valuable in the High... said. ?Part of that is due to the fact that we?ve got very harsh environmental ON THE FAST TRACK Collaboration expedites adoption of e?cient irrigation technologies in the High Plains 1 Texas Water Resources Institute EM-115, 2012. Summer 2013 tx...

  12. Don Quijote on the Plains: Harnessing Enthusiasm for the "Quijote" at the Undergraduate Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Patricia W.

    2005-03-01

    , when the light bounces off the wind turbines near Montezuma, Kansas at just the right angle, they almost resemble the traditional windmills one sees in Spain. But apart from this climatological predisposition toward wind-power, other parallels between... the plains of twenty-first-century Kansas and the seventeenth-century Spain of the Quijote are few and far between. Despite the large temporal and spatial gap between these two worlds, I am pleased to note the number of students in the upper...

  13. GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to allocate Kansas High Plains Irrigated Agriculture Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Peiwen

    2014-04-08

    GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to Allocate Irrigated Agriculture Land Use Peiwen Chiu Kansas State University GIS Day 2013 November 20, 2013 University of Kansas High Plains/Ogallala Aquifer 8 States 186,000 mi2 480,000 km2 http...://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/05/16/us/an-underground-pool-drying-up.html?ref=us Aquifer Decline When amount of water diverted in the zone of influence is greater than recharge, this will result decline in the water level in the Aquifer. Most concentrated irrigated...

  14. Two dimensional finite element analysis of homogenization and failure in plain weave textile composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondagunta, Veeraraghava Gopal

    1993-01-01

    and continuity[7]. The model is still two-dimensional and the actual three-dimension- al cross-sectional shape of the fiber bundles was not considered. The fiber undulation model could analyze the knee behavior in plain-weave composites. Ishikawa and Chou [7... is discussed. 23 III. 2 Micromechanics model for calculating fiber tow properties One of the most basic problems in the analysis of the behavior of composite materials is the prediction of effective or average macroscopic properties in terms...

  15. EPA Plain English Guide to the Clean Air Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsAreaforInformation ECrNEPAStateEPANationalPlain English

  16. Oregon Coastal Management Program Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt.InformationImprovementsTransmissionCoastal Management

  17. Fine-grained sedimentation on the Chenier Plain Coast and inner continental shelf, northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draut, Amy Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    This thesis examines the evolution of a mud-dominated coastal sedimentary system on multiple time scales. Fine-grained systems exhibit different properties and behavior from sandy coasts, and have received relatively little ...

  18. Tectonic control of coastal onlap cycles, southwest Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armentrout, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    Local coastal onlap and paleobiobathymetric curves for 14 sections define three Cenozoic depositional onlap-offlap cycles separated by regionally significant unconformities. A paleoclimatic curve for western Oregon and Washington, based on paleoecologic data sets, demonstrates that the local transgressions are coincident with cool climates and the regressions with warm climates, and are therefore not driven by glacioeustatic cycles. Comparison of the local coastal onlap and paleobiobathymetric curves with the global Cenozoic Cycle Chart (modified Exxon Sea Level Chart - May, 1986) further demonstrates the uniqueness of the western Washington curves. The global Cenozoic cycle Chart curve represents coastal onlap and sea level curves based on integration of both climate and tectonic variations. The non-parallel cycle pattern for southwest Washington suggests a unique tectonically forced system. Evidence derived from stratigraphic sequences, igneous rock geochemistry, radiometric dating, remnant magnetic patterns, sandstone provenance studies, and paleogeographic reconstructions is used to identify the tectonic events controlling the local depositional cycles. The principal events are (1) middle Eocene accretion of a seamount chain; (2) early-late Eocene westward relocation of subduction; (3) late Eocene onset of Cascade arc volcanism; (4) late-early Miocene plate readjustment due to back-arc extension in the Columbia River Plateau and Great Basin; and (5) late Pliocene to early Pleistocene northeast compression forced by continued subduction of remnants of the Kula Plate beneath North America.

  19. Critical review of studies on atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shearer, D.L.; Kaleel, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study effort was required as a preliminary step prior to initiation of field measurements of atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is in the process of planning an extensive field measurement program to generate data which will serve as improved data bases for licensing decisions, confirmation of regulations, standards, and guides, and for site characterizations. The study being reported here is an effort directed to obtaining as much information as is possible from existing studies that is relevant toward NRC's objectives. For this study, reports covering research and meteorological measurements conducted for industrial purposes, utility needs, military objectives, and academic studies were obtained and critically reviewed in light of NRC's current data needs. This report provides an interpretation of the extent of existing usable information, an indication of the potential for tailoring existing research toward current NRC information needs, and recommendations for several follow-on studies which could provide valuable additional information through reanalysis of the data. Recommendations are also offered regarding new measurement programs. Emphasis is placed on the identification and acquisition of data from atmospheric tracer studies conducted in coastal regions. A total of 225 references were identified which deal with the coastal atmosphere, including meteorological and tracer measurement programs, theoretical descriptions of the relevant processes, and dispersion models.

  20. Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact on future oil imports and expenditures of opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to petroleum development. High, low, and mean ANWR oil resource case projections were compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case. The study also examined whether potential synergies exist in opening ANWR to petroleum development and the construction of an Alaska gas pipeline from the North Slope to the lower 48 states.

  1. Corrosion inhibitor selection for arctic and subsea high-velocity flowlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, J.A.

    2000-03-01

    Qualifying corrosion inhibitors for use in high-velocity multiphase flowlines in arctic or subsea environments is discussed. The criteria include high-velocity flow loop corrosion tests, pumpability through 0.125-in. (0.318-cm) capillary at low temperatures, compatibility with nylon 11, emulsion tendency testing, and partitioning characteristics. Laboratory and field data show the importance of using these criteria for inhibitor selection.

  2. Criteria for the selection of corrosion inhibitors for Arctic and subsea high velocity flowlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, J.A.; Ahn, Y.S.

    1999-11-01

    Qualifying corrosion inhibitors for use in high velocity multiphase flowlines in arctic or subsea environments is discussed. The tests include high velocity flow loop corrosion tests, pumpability through 0.125 (0.318 cm) inch capillary at low temperatures, compatibility with Nylon 11, emulsion tendency testing, and partitioning characteristics. Laboratory and field data show the importance for using the above criteria for inhibitor selection.

  3. Global Coastal Carbon Program Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Coastal Carbon Data Project. The coastal regions data are very important for the understanding of carbon cycle on the continental margins. The Coastal Project data include the bottle (discrete) and surface (underway) carbon-related measurements from coastal research cruises, the data from time series cruises, and coastal moorings. The data from US East Coast, US West Coast, and European Coastal areas are available. CDIAC provides a map interface with vessel or platform names. Clicking on the name brings up information about the vessel or the scientific platform, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, when available, and the links to the data files themselves.

  4. In the Po Plain (Northern Italy), the natural compo-nent of subsidence can be split into: (1) a long-term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUMMARY In the Po Plain (Northern Italy), the natural compo- nent of subsidence can be split into subsidence rates of about 1.0 mm yr-1. Long term subsidence in the Venice area and in the Po Plain on total natu- ral subsidence rates in the area of Venice, with aver- age values of around 1.3 mm yr-1

  5. ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOES D.O.E. HAVE A ROLE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Coastal Zone annual oil production, 10 E + 06 bbl per year.58 percent of all regional oil production is in the coastalgenerating capacity, crude oil production~ total petroleum

  6. UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE CENTER OF COASTAL AND OCEAN MAPPING Camera Cage Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE ­ CENTER OF COASTAL AND OCEAN MAPPING Camera Cage Construction Manual.......................................................................................................................................29 Camera (Electrical Components)............................................................. Error................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Assemble Electrical Components

  7. Southern/Northern California Coastal Processes Annotated Bibliography: Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, Planning Division, Coastal Resources Branch

    1987-01-01

    tsunami generation, propagation, terminal effects, instrumentation, warning systems,early warning system. KEYWORDS: Coastal Processes tsunamisWarning System and a report of its operation during the tsunami

  8. Economic Incentives and Policies to Improve Quality in a Binational Coastal Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Linda M

    2007-01-01

    and Risk Analysis’, Water Pollution Control FederationRecreational Coastal Water Pollution- A Case Study in Orangethe two countries in water pollution stock, flow, cost,

  9. Human dimensions perspectives on the impacts of coastal zone marine renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Conway, Flaxen; Hall-Arber, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    floating wind devices, and over 100 wave energy conversionenergy. In coastal areas, the po- tential to harness the clean power of offshore wind,

  10. GIS and the Coastal Zone: An Annotated Bibliography (93-9)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartlett, Darius J.

    1993-01-01

    1988) A demonstration GIS project to assist the ChesapeakeNewsletter. KEYWORDS: GIS, Coastal management, Chesapeake18-26, KEYWORDS: Coasts, GIS, Remote sensing, China. NOTES:

  11. Ecology of Pacific Northwest coastal sand dunes: a community profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedemann, A.M.

    1984-03-01

    Sand dunes occur in 33 localities along the 950 km of North American Pacific coast between the Straits of Juan de Fuca (49/sup 0/N) and Cape Mendocino (40/sup 0/). The dune landscape is a mosaic of dune forms: transverse ridge, oblique dune, retention ridge, foredune, parabola dune, sand hummock, blowout, sand plain, deflation plain, dune ridge, swale, remnant forest, and ponds and lakes. These forms are the basic morphological units making up the four dune systems: parallel ridge, parabola dune, transverse ridge, and bay dune. Vegetation is well-developed on stabilized dunes. Of the 21 plant communities identified, nine are herbaceous, five are shrub, and seven are forest. A wide variety of vertebrate animals occur in seven distinct habitats: open dunes, grassland and meadow, shrub thicket, forest, marsh, riparian, and lakes and ponds. Urban development, increased rate of stabilization due to the introduction of European beachgrass (Ammophila arenaria (L.) Link), and massive disturbance resulting from heavy off-road vehicle traffic are the greatest threats to the long-term survival and stability of a number of sand dune habitats. Two animals and three plants dependent on dune habitats are listed as rare, threatened, or endangered. 93 references, 52 figures, 13 tables.

  12. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-04-10

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic. Total PM2.5 agrees well with the measurements, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that during the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had undergone significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne lidar measurements. Model results show that the pollution event transported aerosols into the Arctic (> 66.6° N) for a 4-day period. During this 4-day period, biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~ 1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~ 4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface in anthropogenic plumes. The European plumes sampled during the POLARCAT-France campaign were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport event, the average modeled top-of-atmosphere (TOA) shortwave direct and semi-direct radiative effect (DSRE) north of 60° N over snow and ice-covered surfaces reaches +0.58 W m?2, peaking at +3.3 W m?2 at noon over Scandinavia and Finland.

  13. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-01-01

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic. Total PM2.5 agrees well with the measurements, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that during the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had undergone significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne lidar measurements. Model results show that the pollution event transported aerosols into the Arctic (> 66.6° N) for a 4-day period. During this 4-day period, biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~ 1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~ 4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface in anthropogenic plumes. The European plumes sampled during the POLARCAT-France campaign were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport event, the average modeled top-of-atmosphere (TOA) shortwave direct and semi-direct radiative effect (DSRE) north of 60° N over snow and ice-covered surfaces reaches +0.58 W m?2, peaking at +3.3 W m?2 at noon over Scandinavia and Finland.

  14. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-04-10

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic. Total PM2.5 agrees well with the measurements, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that duringmore »the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had undergone significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne lidar measurements. Model results show that the pollution event transported aerosols into the Arctic (> 66.6° N) for a 4-day period. During this 4-day period, biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~ 1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~ 4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface in anthropogenic plumes. The European plumes sampled during the POLARCAT-France campaign were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport event, the average modeled top-of-atmosphere (TOA) shortwave direct and semi-direct radiative effect (DSRE) north of 60° N over snow and ice-covered surfaces reaches +0.58 W m?2, peaking at +3.3 W m?2 at noon over Scandinavia and Finland.« less

  15. A Sensitivity Study on Modeling Black Carbon in Snow and its Radiative Forcing over the Arctic and Northern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Rudong; Flanner, M. G.; Rasch, Philip J.

    2014-06-02

    Black carbon in snow (BCS) simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) is evaluated against measurements over Northern China and the Arctic, and its sensitivity to atmospheric deposition and two parameters that affect post-depositional enrichment is explored. The BCS concentration is overestimated (underestimated) by a factor of two in Northern China (Arctic) in the default model, but agreement with observations is good over both regions in the simulation with improvements in BC transport and deposition. Sensitivity studies indicate that uncertainty in the melt-water scavenging efficiency (MSE) parameter substantially affects BCS and its radiative forcing (by a factor of 2-7) in the Arctic through post-depositional enrichment. The MSE parameter has a relatively small effect on the magnitude of BCS seasonal cycle but can alter its phase in Northern China. The impact of the snow aging scaling factor (SAF) on BCS, partly through the post-depositional enrichment effect, shows more complex latitudinal and seasonal dependence. Similar to MSE, SAF affects more significantly the magnitude (phase) of BCS season cycle over the Arctic (Northern China). While uncertainty associated with the representation of BC transport and deposition processes in CAM5 is more important than that associated with the two snow model parameters in Northern China, the two uncertainties have comparable effect in the Arctic.

  16. Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering 26 (2006) 694707 Plain strain soilstructure interaction model for a building supported by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    2006-01-01

    Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering 26 (2006) 694­707 Plain strain soil­structure interaction, CA 90089-2531, USA Accepted 3 January 2006 Abstract A simple theoretical model for soil­structure interaction in water saturated poroelastic soils is presented, developed to explore if the apparent building­foundation­soil

  17. OE Issues Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 21, 2012, DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) issued a Notice of Intent (NOI) to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project on behalf of the Department and Southwestern Power Administration

  18. Useful General Links for Information on Web 2.0 Common Craft's "Social Media in Plain English" Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .html?scp=8&sq=facebook&st=nyt Useful General Links for Technology in the Classroom The ProfHacker Blog (one://academhack.outsidethetext.com/home/ Liberal Education Tomorrow blog (useful for trends in technology) http://blogs.nitle.org/ Classroom://www.intodit.com Web 2.0 Technologies: Blogs in the Classroom Common Craft "Blogs in Plain English" video (highly

  19. SMALL MAMMALS ASSOCIATED WITH COLONIES OF BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOGS (CYNOMYS LUDOVICIANUS) IN THE SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    common species among the types of sites. Prairie dogs are touted as a keystone species) often are touted as a keystone species within the Great Plains ecosys- tem. If adhering to the definition of a keystone species as one whose impact on its c

  20. Arctic Sea Ice Hits Record Low--Extreme Weather to Come? Global warming to blame for highest observed decline, scientists say.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bohemia, University of

    at the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center said the rate of Arctic sea ice decline is now the highest." Climate models used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) also predict that Arctic at a historic rate, scientists say. In fact, a recent analysis of satellite data "utterly obliterates

  1. Extension of the Yellowstone plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Owyhee plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, D.W.; Hackett, W.R.; Ore, H.T. (Idaho State Univ., Pocatello (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Formation of the late Cenozoic volcanic province comprising the Owyhee plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Yellowstone plateau has been accompanied by east-northeast-directed crustal extension. A new vector of 45 mm/yr, N56{degree}E for the migration of silicic volcanism across the volcanic province is calculated. If migration of volcanism reflects west-southwest continental drift over a mantle plume, a zone of crustal extension must separate the volcanic province from the more slowly moving North American craton. Space-time relations of basin fill in the adjacent Basin and Range province provide evidence for a zone of extension, about 125 km wide, coincident with and east of coeval silicic volcanism. Since 16 Ma, the zone of extension has migrated along with silicic volcanism, maintaining its position between the province and the unextended craton.

  2. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-31

    The design of the 30 MWe central receiver solar power plant to be located at Carrisa Plains, San Luis Obispo County, California, is summarized. The plant uses a vertical flat-panel (billboard) solar receiver located at the top of a tower to collect solar energy redirected by approximately 1900 heliostats located to the north of the tower. The solar energy is used to heat liquid sodium pumped from ground level from 610 to 1050/sup 0/F. The power conversion system is a non-reheat system, cost-effective at this size level, and designed for high-efficiency performance in an application requiring daily startup. Successful completion of this project will lead to power generation starting in 1986. This report also discusses plant performance, operations and maintenance, development, and facility cost estimate and economic analysis.

  3. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 96, NO. C8, PAGES 14,885-14,907, AUGUST 15, 1991 Structure and Dynamics of a Coastal Filament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    and Dynamics of a Coastal Filament RICHARD K. DEWEY, 1JAMESN. MOUM, CLAYTON A. PAULSON, DOUGLASR. CALDWELL transects across filaments in the coastal transition zone (CTZ) have

  4. Domoic acid production near California coastal upwelling zones, June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainer, V L. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Adams, Nicolaus G. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Bill, Brian D. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Stehr, Carla M. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Wekell, John C. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Moeller, Peter (National Ocean Service, Marine Biotoxins Program); Busman, Mark (National Ocean Service, Marine Biotoxins Program); Woodruff, Dana L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2000-01-01

    Sea lion mortalities in central California during May and June 1998 were traced to their ingestion of sardines and anchovies that had accumulated the neurotoxin domoic acid. The detection of toxin in urine, feces, and stomach contents of several sea lions represents the first proven occurrence of domoic acid transfer through the food chain to a marine mammal. The pennate diatoms, Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and P. australis, were the dominant, toxin-producing phytoplankton constituting algal blooms near Monterey Bay, Half Moon Bay, and Oceano Dunes, areas where sea lions with neurological symptoms stranded. Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia were also found near Morrow Bay, Point Conception, Point Arguello, and Santa Barbara, demonstrating that these species were widespread along the central California coast in June 1998. Measurements of domoic acid during three cruises in early June showed the highest cellular toxin levels in P. multiseries near Point A?o Nuevo and in P. australis from Morro w Bay. Maximum cellular domoic acid levels were observed within 20 km of the coast between 0 and 5 m depth, although toxin was also measured to depths of 40 m. Hydrographic data indicated that the highest toxin levels and greatest numbers of toxic cells were positioned in water masses associated with upwelling zones near coastal headlands. Nutrient levels at these sites were less than those typically measured during periods of active upwelling, due to the 1998 El Ni?o event. The flow of cells and/or nutrients from coastal headlands into embayments where cells can multiply in a stratified environment is a possible mechanism of bloom development along the central California coast. This coupling of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia growth near upwelling zones with physical processes involved in cell transport will be understood only when long-term measurements are made at several key coastal locations, aiding in our capability to predict domoic-acid producing algal blooms.

  5. Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens Bosarge Family Education Center

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Boothbay, ME The Bosarge Family Education Center offers the Gardens a unique opportunity to educate, influence and inspire the public regarding environmental sustainable living practices. The building is a new ~8000 SF Education Center adjacent to the existing Visitors Center in Boothbay ME, owned by Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens (CMBG). This project provides an important addition to CMBG's environmental programming and expands the Gardens' public image. It houses administrative office space as well as flexible and adaptable classroom space that can also be used for various events and gatherings.

  6. Marine and coastal ecosystems include estuaries and coastal waters and lands. Within these systems are sensitive habitats, marine sanctuaries, national parks, aquaculture, fisheries, and tourism activities. Informed and responsible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information on how weather and climate trends affect ecosystems, local communities, regulatory requirements of weather and climate on marine and coastal ecosystems. This type of information can help decision makersOverview Marine and coastal ecosystems include estuaries and coastal waters and lands. Within

  7. Impact of Benthic Algae on Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in a Temperate, Coastal Lagoon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    Impact of Benthic Algae on Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in a Temperate, Coastal Lagoon Anna Christina-released to the water column on short time scales (minutes-hours). Benthic algae thus clearly influence benthic Introduction: Impact of benthic algae on dissolved organic nitrogen dynamics in temperate, coastal lagoons

  8. Analysis of Subtidal Coastal Sea Level Fluctuations Using Wavelets Donald B. Percival* and Harold O. Mofjeld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    ocean currents, the seasonal heating and cooling of the adjacent ocean, and interannual phenomena 98195 Research Oceanographer, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric that the ocean has on both human activities and coastal ecosystems within the coastal zone. For example

  9. Modeling Realistic Events of the Maine Coastal Current Monica J. Holboke 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Realistic Events of the Maine Coastal Current Monica J. Holboke 1 Abstract The Maine Coastal Current (MCC) is an along­shore current off the coast of New England in the Gulf of Maine. The computational domain encompasses the Gulf of Maine with a cross­shelf upstream boundary at Halifax and an along

  10. Evaluation of Offshore Wind Simulations with MM5 in the Japanese and Danish Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Evaluation of Offshore Wind Simulations with MM5 in the Japanese and Danish Coastal Waters Teruo to evaluate the accuracy of offshore wind simulation with the mesoscale model MM5, long-term simulations to simulate offshore wind conditions in the Japanese coastal waters even using a mesoscale model, compared

  11. Blue Ribbon Panel on Development of Wind Turbine Facilities in Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    #12;ii #12;iii Blue Ribbon Panel on Development of Wind Turbine Facilities in Coastal Waters on Development of Wind Turbine Facilities in Coastal Waters. Last December, Governor Codey signed his twelfth of developing offshore wind turbine facilities." This interim report represents our progress to date toward

  12. Wind stress forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during the 1999 upwelling season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    Wind stress forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during the 1999 upwelling season R. Samelson, P November 2001; published 1 May 2002. [1] The wind stress forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during June hypothesis that systematic variations in local wind stress may contribute to the observed offshore

  13. Delayed upwelling alters nearshore coastal ocean ecosystems in the northern California current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    ecology Equatorward winds along the eastern boundaries of the world's oceans drive offshore surface Ekman, January 22, 2007 (sent for review December 9, 2006) Wind-driven coastal ocean upwelling supplies nutrientsDelayed upwelling alters nearshore coastal ocean ecosystems in the northern California current John

  14. Coastal ocean response to summer upwelling favorable winds in a region of alongshore bottom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    Coastal ocean response to summer upwelling favorable winds in a region of alongshore bottom structure of the velocity and hydrographic fields. The ocean response to wind forcing is compared between., and J. A. Barth (2005), Coastal ocean response to summer upwelling favorable winds in a region

  15. Oceanography December 2008 53 THE WINDDRIVEN COASTAL OCEAN: NOW IN HIGHDEF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    of wind-driven coastal ocean ecosystems. ese tools allowed us to probe the entire water column, the air (vertical sections), winds and ocean currents (arrows), and surface chlo- rophyll (green shades at seaOceanography December 2008 53 THE WINDDRIVEN COASTAL OCEAN: NOW IN HIGHDEF By John A. Barth, John M

  16. Forearc uplift rates deduced from sediment cores of two coastal lakes in south-central Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Forearc uplift rates deduced from sediment cores of two coastal lakes in south-central Chile Keywords: Forearc tectonics Uplift rate Lago Lanalhue Lago Lleu Lleu Arauco Peninsula Sea-level change uplift rates based on the study of lake sediments. We investigated two coastal lakes at the south

  17. ATL ANTIC AND GULF OF MEXICO COASTAL PEL AGIC FISHERIES atlantic and gulf of mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    149 ATL ANTIC AND GULF OF MEXICO COASTAL PEL AGIC FISHERIES UNIT 7 atlantic and gulf of mexico Center Miami Florida INTRODUCTION Coastal pelagic species of the U.S. Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico north of the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico. Cobia and dolphinfish are broadly distributed in tropical

  18. AUTONOMOUS MOBILE BUOY (A-M-B) COASTAL & LAGOON: autonomous monitoring and sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    AUTONOMOUS MOBILE BUOY (A-M-B) COASTAL & LAGOON: autonomous monitoring and sampling PI: Stephen, goals and objectives The project objective of this proposal is to develop an Autonomous Mobile Buoy of a prototype autonomous (computer controlled) mobile buoy (A-M-B) to monitor coastal and lagoon areas

  19. Coastal pollution hazards in southern California observed by SAR imagery: stormwater plumes, wastewater plumes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washburn, Libe

    Coastal pollution hazards in southern California observed by SAR imagery: stormwater plumes pollution hazards for the heavily populated Southern California Bight (SCB). Due to their small size observational tool for assessment and monitoring of coastal marine pollution hazards in the SCB and other

  20. Optimal Pollution Mitigation in Monterey Bay Based on Coastal Radar Data and Nonlinear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsden, Jerrold

    Optimal Pollution Mitigation in Monterey Bay Based on Coastal Radar Data and Nonlinear Dynamics run-off which is a typical source of pollution in the bay. We show that a HF radar-based pollution release scheme using this flow structure reduces the impact of pollution on the coastal envi- ronment