National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for arabia sudan syria

  1. Governance for Sustainable Development in the Arab Region | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Type Guidemanual Website http:www.escwa.un.orginform Country Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  2. Best Practices and Tools for Large-scale Deployment of Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.escwa.un.orginformationpublicationsedituploadsdpd-09-TP3.pdf Country: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  3. United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Background Membership "ESCWA comprises 14 Arab countries in Western Asia: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  4. Damascus, Syria: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is the capital of Syria. Registered Energy Companies in Damascus, Syria Al Furat Petroleum Company References "NGA Geonames Search" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  5. Syria: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Syria Population 17,951,639 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.84 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SY 3-letter ISO code SYR Numeric ISO...

  6. DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment ...

  7. Sudan-IAEA Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agency Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http:www-tc.iaea.orgtcwebt Program Start 2007 Country Sudan Northern Africa References IAEA project database1...

  8. Sudan-National Adaptation Programme of Action | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Background analysis Website http:unfccc.intresourcedoc Country Sudan Northern Africa References Sudan-NAPA1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  9. Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Riyadh is a city in Saudi Arabia. Registered Energy Companies in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology Saudi Electricity Company References "NGA...

  10. Yanbu, Saudi Arabia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Saudi Arabia. Registered Energy Companies in Yanbu, Saudi Arabia Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) References "NGA Geonames Search" Retrieved from "http:...

  11. Dhahran, Saudi Arabia | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Visit the Careers page to search and apply for Global Research jobs in Saudi Arabia. We also welcome robust participation in our work from a range of science and technology students. Find out more about Edison Internships and the

  12. Secretary Bodman Travels to Saudi Arabia to Discuss Global Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Europe with a two-day stop in Saudi Arabia where he met with Saudi Arabia's Minister of Petroleum and Mineral Resources Ali Ibrahim Al-Naimi to discuss joint energy cooperation. ...

  13. DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington, DC - The Office of General Counsel was recently asked whether the Sudan Accountability and Divestment Act of 2007 barred the Department from considering a loan guarantee application...

  14. U.S. Energy Secretary Visits Saudi Arabia | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arabia today, meeting with Saudi Arabia's Minister of Petroleum and Mineral Resources Ali bin Ibrahim Al-Naimi, touring the Aramco headquarters and visiting Aramco's Shaybah oil ...

  15. GE Opens Research Center in Saudi Arabia | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GE's US1 billion investment in Saudi Arabia creates a path for new initiatives in localization, technology innovation and manufacturing to drive country's digital transformation...

  16. NASA Remote Sensing Validation Data: Saudi Arabia

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Myers, Daryl R. [NREL; Al-Abbadi, Naif [King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, Energy Research Institite; Wilcox, Steve [NREL

    Since 1995, the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have co-operated to establish a 12 station network of high quality solar radiation monitoring installations across the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. NREL and KACST realized the value of accurate surface solar radiation flux measurements for validation of satellite derived surface and atmospheric solar radiation flux measurements, and is making this data available to support validation of satellite data products related to the NASA Mission to Planet Earth component of the Earth Science Enterprise Earth Observing System (EOS) project to evaluate long term climate trends based on measuements from EOS Terra Platforms. A CIMEL 8 channel sunphotometer for measuring aerosol optical depth at 6 wavelengths and total column water has been deployed at the Solar Village station since February 24, 1999. [Taken from http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/new_data/Saudi_Arabia/

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - Saudi Arabia 2-22-10 final for distribution.pptx |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Saudi Arabia 2-22-10 final for distribution.pptx Microsoft PowerPoint - Saudi Arabia 2-22-10 final for distribution.pptx PDF icon Microsoft PowerPoint - Saudi Arabia 2-22-10 final for distribution.pptx More Documents & Publications Microsoft PowerPoint - UAE Masdar 2-24

  18. GE Opens Research Center in Saudi Arabia | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GE's US$1 billion investment in Saudi Arabia creates a path for new initiatives in localization, technology innovation and manufacturing to drive country's digital transformation by 2020 Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) GE's US$1 billion investment in Saudi Arabia creates a path for new initiatives in

  19. Statement by U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman at the conclusion of the Jeddah Energy Meeting in Saudi Arabia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    JEDDAH, SAUDI ARABIA - At the conclusion of the Jeddah Energy Meeting in Saudi Arabia, U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman issued the following statement:

  20. Meeting Our Partners in Saudi Arabia and U.S. Military Forces in Bahrain |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Our Partners in Saudi Arabia and U.S. Military Forces in Bahrain Meeting Our Partners in Saudi Arabia and U.S. Military Forces in Bahrain January 26, 2015 - 1:15am Addthis Deputy Secretary of Energy Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall looks out at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, from a helicopter en route to view the Manifa Oil Field. | Photo by Kathryn Grant, Energy Department. Deputy Secretary of Energy Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall looks out at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, from a helicopter en

  1. Geothermal Technologies Office: Download GETEM, August 2012 Beta

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovak Republic Slovenia South Africa South Korea Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand...

  2. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania...

  3. How to Request & Access Beam Time | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    who were born in, are citizens of, or have affiliations with organizations from Cuba, Iran, Sudan or Syria, we must collect additional information and obtain ADVANCE...

  4. Shipping and Receiving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shipping should be used at all other times. Shipping materials to Cuba, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Sudan, and Syria is prohibited; contact Berkeley Lab Procurement for more...

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - Saudi Arabia 2-22-10 final for distribution.pptx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Solving the Energy and Climate Challenge Together Secretary Steven Chu International Energy Forum Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 22 February 2010 King Faisal Prize Winners, 1993 The United States of America and Saudi Arabia have a long and deep relationship We are adding a new dimension to our Saudi King Abdul Aziz Al Saud and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt on the USS Quincy 65 years ago dimension to our relationship - as we move to meet shared energy and climate challenges (1) The global economy

  6. Automated management of radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Jamil, M. F.; Basar, M. R.; Tuwaili, W. R.

    2014-09-30

    For usage of radioactive substances, any facility has to register and take license from relevant authority of the country in which such facility is operating. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the authority for managing radioactive sources and providing licenses to organizations for its usage is the National Center of Radiation Protection (NCRP). This paper describes the system that automates registration and licensing process of the National Center of Radiation Protection. To provide 247 accesses to all the customers of NCRP, system is developed as web-based application that provide facility to online register, request license, renew license, check request status, view historical data and reports etc. and other features are provided as Electronic Services that would be accessible to users via internet. The system also was designed to streamline and optimize internal operations of NCRP besides providing ease of access to its customers by implementing a defined workflow through which every registration and license request will be routed. In addition to manual payment option, the system would also be integrated with SADAD (online payment system) that will avoid lengthy and cumbersome procedures associated with manual payment mechanism. Using SADAD payment option license fee could be paid through internet/ATM machine or branch of any designated bank, Payment will be instantly notified to NCRP hence delay in funds transfer and verification of invoice could be avoided, SADAD integration is discussed later in the document.

  7. Evolution of gas processing industry in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showail, A.

    1983-01-01

    The beginning of the natural gas processing industry in Saudi Arabia is traced back to 1959 when Aramco embarked on a program to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) for export from low pressure gases such as stabilizer overhead, spheroid, tank farm, and refinery off-gases. The processing scheme involves compression and refrigeration to extract C3+ raw NGL, a raw NGL gathering system, and a fractionation plant to separate propane, butane, and natural gasoline. NGL extracted in Abqaiq and Ras Tanura is moved to Ras Tanura for fractionation, storage, and export. The system, built in several increments, has total design capacity of 500 MMscfd of feed gases to produce 320,000 bpd of NGL composed of 40% propane, 30% butane, and 30% natural gasoline. Phase II of the Saudi gas program envisages collection and processing of associated gas produced with Arabian medium and heavy crude oils largely in the northern onshore and offshore fields. Further domestic development may focus on more diversification in gas product utilization and on upgrading to higher value products.

  8. Sale of US military aircraft to Saudi Arabia. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bents, E.R.

    1995-05-01

    The end of the Cold War in the late 1980s resulted in a gigantic downsizing and consolidation of America`s defense industries, as domestic demand plummeted and the volume of international arms trading fell. However, in total world arms exports the United States exports more arms than any other nation. The country of Saudi Arabia has been the destination of a disproportionate amount of these weapons. The following account is an examination of the US military aerospace industry, the world military aerospace market, US government policy concerning arms exports, and the Saudi aerospace market. Each of these entities profoundly impacts US-Saudi military aerospace commerce. By individually analyzing the above factors, it will be demonstrated that the supply relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia is dependent on the convergence of several long standing and deep seated aspirations on the part of the three major players: the US Aerospace Industry, the US Government, and the Saudi Government. The US military aerospace industry`s exports are critical to ensure its independent survival, help fund crucial RD programs, and maintain a viable defense high tech industrial base in the U.S. In addition, it wishes to exert a military presence in the Gulf area and nurture relations with Saudi Arabia in particular, as the world`s leading oil producer. The Saudi government requires a military defense anchored in high tech aerospace systems, as well as a dependable and capable military ally such as the US.

  9. Documents for Foreign Nationals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beamtime, etc. NOTE: Researchers who are citizens of, or were born in, T4 countries (Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria) need DOE permission, which can take 4-6 months to obtain, and...

  10. Selection of a suitable reactor type for water desalination and power generation in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, F.M.

    1988-03-01

    Selection of a reactor type suitable for water desalination and power generation is a complex process that involves the evaluation of many criteria and requires the professional judgment of many experts in different fields. A reactor type that is suitable for one country might not be suitable for another. This is especially true in the case of Saudi Arabia because of its strategic location, the nature of its land and people, and its moderate technological situation. A detailed study using a computer code based on Saaty's mathematical pairwise comparison technique and developed in a previous study was carried out to find the most suitable reactor for water desalination and power generation in Saudi Arabia from among five potential types: boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors, CANDU heavy water reactors (HWRs), steam-generating heavy water reactors (SGHWRs), and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. It was concluded that the CANDU HWR is the most suitable type for this purpose followed first by the BWR, then the SGHWR.

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2014 HydroPower - Stockton Turbine Replacement June 2014 [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer Transportation Fuels O tl k Outlook April 10, 2012 www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Key factors driving the short-term outlook * Recovery in Libyan production but lower crude oil exports from South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen and uncertainty over from South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen and uncertainty over the level and security of supply from Iran and other countries in the Middle East and North Africa region. * Decline in consumption in

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2012_summer_fuels.pptx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Summer Transportation Fuels O tl k Outlook April 10, 2012 www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Key factors driving the short-term outlook * Recovery in Libyan production but lower crude oil exports from South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen and uncertainty over from South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen and uncertainty over the level and security of supply from Iran and other countries in the Middle East and North Africa region. * Decline in consumption in

  13. The status and prospective of environmental radiation monitoring stations in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Holzheimer, Clous

    2014-09-30

    The use of nuclear technology requires an environmental monitoring program to ensure the safety of the environment, and to protect people from the hazards of radioactive materials, and nuclear accidents. Nuclear accidents are unique, for they incur effects that surpass international frontiers, and can even have a long lasting impact on Earth. Such was the case of the Chernobyl accident in the Ukraine on April 6, 1986. For that purpose, international and national efforts come together to observe for any nuclear or radioactive accident. Many states, including Saudi Arabia which oversees the operation of the National Radiation, Environmental and Early Monitoring Stations, The Radiation Monitoring Stations(RMS’s) are currently scattered across 35 cities in the country,. These locations are evaluated based on various technological criteria such as border cities, cities of high population density, wind direction, etc. For new nuclear power plants hovering around, it is strongly recommended to increase the number of radiation monitoring stations to warn against any threat that may arise from a nuclear leak or accident and to improve the performance of the existing RMS’s. SARA (Spectroscopic Monitoring Station for air) should be implemented due to the high sensitivity to artificial radiation, automatic isotope identification, free of maintenance, and fully independent due to solar power supply (incl. battery backup) and wireless communication (GPRS)

  14. Limit on Saudi Arabia's oil pricing policy: a short-run econometric-simulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagour, O.S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Absence of a unified OPEC policy is largely attributed to frequent Saudi Arabian pricing/production decisions to influence oil price changes. Such demonstrated ability in the past prompted many to attribute oil price current downward rigidity to Saudi Arabian unwillingness to increase production. Empirically, this study presents a simultaneous equations oil market model in a simulation setting to test this hypothesis and to predict future oil prices under specific assumptions. Major conclusions are: (1) contrary to popular belief the international oil industry rarely, if ever, operated competitively; (2) the sole association of oil price increases to the embargo of 1973 is an outright distortion of facts; (3) the roots of the so-called energy crisis lie in: (a) post-World War II West European reconstruction, (b) US industrial adjustments from a war to a consumer-oriented economy, (c) the continuously dwindling oil reserves in major industrial countries, and (d) the comparative advantage of location and cost-per-unit of the Middle Eastern oil; (4) barring further market institutionalizations, a per barrel price below $15 by the end of 1990 (in constant 1984 prices) is not unlikely; and (5) future Saudi Arabian pricing/production policies to exert downward pressures on prices could lead to price increases, if perceived to be permanent by the OPEC group excluding Saudi Arabia.

  15. Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1981-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1980 totaled 6,747,719,000 bbl or an average rate of 18,436,390,000 bbl/d, down 13.9% from 1979. Increases were in Saudi Arabia and Syria. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, and Turkey. New discoveries were made in Abu Dhabi, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sharjah, and Oman. New areas were explored in Bahrain, Oman, Syria, and Yemen. 9 figures, 16 tables.

  16. The effect of component efficiency and operating conditions on the 50-kW dish Stirling system in Riyadh, Saudia Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, G.W. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper deals with the development of a weather data base and the performance prediction of a 50-kW dish Stirling system. An analysis of direct solar insolation data for 1985 from the site in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia was made to determine the available solar energy. A parameter study was done of the effects of component efficiencies and operating conditions on instantaneous and yearly average system efficiency using the prepared weather data. The system performance was found to be most affected by wind, mirror reflectivity, and exact placement of the receiver in the focal point of the mirror.

  17. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1985 totaled 3,837,580,000 bbl (an average rate of 10,513,917 BOPD), down 2.2% from the revised 1984 total of 3,924,034,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Dubai, Oman, and Syria had significant increases; Kuwait, Kuwait-Saudi Arabia Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar had significant decreases. New fields went on production in Iraq, Abu Dhabi, Oman, and Syria. In North Yemen, the first ever oil production in that country was nearing the start-up stage at year end. 9 figures, 9 tables.

  18. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Hatch, G.C.

    1983-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1982 totaled 4,499,464,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,162,915 BOPD), down 21.5% from 1981. Increases were in Iraq, Iran, and Oman. Significant decreases occurred in Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were reported in Oman, Syria, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Iran, and Saudi Arabia.

  19. Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0008418 Section J, Appendix D

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D SECTION J APPENDIX D SENSITIVE FOREIGN NATIONS CONTROL 1. Pursuant to the Contract Section I Clause 952.204-71 entitled "Sensitive Foreign Nations Controls," "sensitive foreign nations" is one of the countries listed below: Algeria Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus China (People's Republic of China) Cuba Georgia Hong Kong India Iran Iraq Israel Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Libya Moldova North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of) Pakistan Russia Sudan Syria Taiwan Tajikistan

  20. Microsoft Word - SEC J_Appendix D - Sensitive Foreign Nations Control

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX D SENSITIVE FOREIGN NATIONS CONTROL 1. Pursuant to the Contract Section I Clause entitled "Sensitive Foreign Nations Controls," "sensitive foreign nations" is one of the countries listed below: Algeria Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus China (People's Republic of China) Cuba Georgia Hong Kong India Iran Iraq Israel Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Libya Moldova North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of) Pakistan Russia Sudan Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Turkmenistan

  1. Sudan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    600 MW of coal-fired capacity is awaiting contract signatures, for construction near the Red Sea. Finally, work is underway to raise the 280 MW Roseires Dam, with completion of the...

  2. Middle East: Output expansions boost drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    Iraqi exports may return to the market in limited fashion, but none of the region`s producers seems particularly concerned. They believe that global oil demand is rising fast enough to justify their additions to productive capacity. The paper discusses exploration, drilling and development, and production in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Oman, Iran, Iraq, Yemen, Qatar, Syria, Turkey, and Sharjah. The paper also briefly mentions activities in Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, and Ras al Khaimah.

  3. Somebody better find some rigs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the gas and oil industries of the Middle East. Field development projects abound, as the larger exporting nations pursue ambitious policies of production expansion. However, their plans may be hampered by the growing worldwide shortage of rigs. Separate evaluations are given for Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Iran, Iraq, Qatar, Yemen, Syria, Dubai, Turkey, Sharjah, and briefly for Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, UAE-Ajman, and UAE-Ras al-Khaimah.

  4. Get Access to Work Onsite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Get Access to Work Onsite Print The following process MUST be completed online by new and returning users at least TWO WEEKS prior to arrival at the ALS. Not a U.S. citizen? Please look at Documents for Foreign Nationals well ahead of your visit. Bring all relevant documents to the ALS in order to complete your registration. NOTE: Users who are citizens of, or were born in, T4 countries (Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria) need DOE permission to work at the ALS, a process which can take 4-6 months to

  5. Saudi Arabia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves 7,461,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 5 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 264,600,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 1 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  6. Sudan-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  7. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1987-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1986 totaled 4,493,973,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,312,254 BOPD), up 22.3% from the revised 1985 total of 3,673,729,000 bbl. Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, and Oman had significant increased; Iran was the only Middle East country with a significant decrease. New fields went on production in Oman and Yemen Arab Republic, and significant discoveries were reported in Iraq, Yemen Arab Republic, Oman, and Syria. However, exploration was generally down in most countries. Exploration and production operations continued to be affected by war in Iraq and Iran. 8 figures, 7 tables.

  8. Oil and gas development in Middle East in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.; Phillips, C.B.

    1988-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1987 totaled an estimated 4,500,500,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,330,137 b/d), up slightly from the revised 1986 total of 4,478,972,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic had significant increases; Kuwait and Saudi Arabia had significant decreases. Production was established for the first time in People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. New fields went on production in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, and Syria, and significant oil discoveries were reported in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic. The level of exploration increased in 1987 with new concessions awarded in some countries, drilling and seismic activities on the increase, new regions in mature areas explored for the first time, and significant reserve additions reported in new and old permits. The Iraq-Iran war still had a negative impact in some regions of the Middle East, particularly in and around the Gulf. 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    leaders and government ministers. The Supreme Council is responsible for petroleum and natural gas policy-making, including contract review. It also sets broad policies for the...

  10. Secretary Bodman Travels to Saudi Arabia to Discuss Global Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    business leaders in Jordan. He will also travel to the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and Egypt, to continue dialogues with global leaders, enhance the United States' relationship...

  11. Readout of Energy Secretary Chu's Meetings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretary Chu was in Riyadh today on his first stop of a four-day Middle East trip. He met with King Abdullah, Minister of Petroleum & Mineral Resources Ali Al Naimi and other ...

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - Saudi Arabia 2-22-10 final for distribution...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Natural gas plant liquids Net petroleum imports Source: Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Global economic health is affected by the price of oil 120 150 180 Red lines are oil price spikes ...

  13. Meeting Our Partners in Saudi Arabia and U.S. Military Forces...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    about their work around vehicle emissions, engine efficiency, energy use modeling, unconventional gas development and enhanced imaging tools for resource mapping, much of...

  14. International Oil and Gas Board International Oil and Gas Board...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Petroleum Company Syrian Petroleum Company Damascus Syria Syria http www spc sy com en production activities1 en php Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Yemen Ministry of Oil and...

  15. Why the Gulf War still matters: Foreign perspectives on the war and the future of international security. Report No. 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrity, P.J.

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the main findings of a Center for National Security Studies (CNSS) project that examined how a number of nations other than the United States have reacted to the course and outcome of the Persian Gulf War of 1991. The project was built around studies of key countries on which the Gulf War might reasonably be expected to have had a significant impact: Argentina, the ASEAN states, Brazil, China, Cuba, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Libya, North Korea, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Spain, Syria, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, Vietnam, and the states of the former Yugoslavia. These country studies were written by well-recognized independent experts following a common set of guidelines provided by CNSS. When the country studies were completed, they were reviewed and supplemented through a series of peer assessments and workshops. The report represents a synthesis of material generated through this process, and is intended to stimulate thought and further analysis on the critical topics discussed herein.

  16. Property:Country | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + HOMER + Armenia + HOMER + Bhutan + HOMER + Yugoslavia + HOMER + Mexico + HOMER + Egypt + HOMER + Saint Helena + HOMER + Syria + HOMER + Israel + HOMER + Uganda + HOMER +...

  17. An information system for the utility of the ephemeral tributaries west of the Nile Valley in Sudan. Based on remote sensing and geological techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al Biely, A.I.; Mohamed, A.H.A.; Khidir, S.O.

    1996-08-01

    Interpretation of landsat MSS and TM satellite and NOAA-AVHRR images, climatological data and conventional geological methods were integrated in this study to arrive at a rigorous scientific geoinformation system that could assist the on-going endeavours to rehabilitate areas west of the Nile Valley. The study area, which repetitively suffered severe spells of drought, extends between latitudes 12{degrees}N-18{degrees}N and longitudes 27{degrees}E-32{degrees}E. The area considered abodes four major ephemeral tributaries of the River Nile, they are Wadi Howar, Wadi El Milk, Wadi El Mugaddam and Khor Abu Habil. Visual interpretation of remotely sensed data coupled with geological investigations revealed that these ephemeral tributaries are structurally controlled and their lower courses are buried under extensive sand sheets, that block their channels from reaching the Nile Valley. Sites where those tributaries disappear could constitute huge reservoirs of groundwater that could be utilized to harness desert encroachment and to plan rehabilitation projects. It is envisaged that, surface and subsurface hydrological engineering constructions in favourable sites, across those tributaries may lead to permanent surface water ponding. The performed study demonstrated the possibility of combating the environmental degradation on the area under consideration through carefully designed rehabilitation and development projects based on the integration of available data in a geoinformation system.

  18. Al Furat Petroleum Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Furat Petroleum Company Name: Al Furat Petroleum Company Place: Damascus, Syria Product: oil and hydrocarbon gas Year Founded: 1985 Phone Number: 00963-11- (6183333) Website:...

  19. Part VII: Section J - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Syria - Terrorist Taiwan (Republic of China) Tajikistan Turkmenistan Ukraine Uzbekistan Sensitive VisitAssignment - A visitassignment will be considered sensitive if: ...

  20. 6th Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum Ministers' Meeting Underway in

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Saudi Arabia | Department of Energy 6th Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum Ministers' Meeting Underway in Saudi Arabia 6th Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum Ministers' Meeting Underway in Saudi Arabia November 2, 2015 - 8:12am Addthis The 6th Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) Ministerial Meeting opened yesterday in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The event, which is being co-chaired by the United States and Saudi Arabia, kicked off with various policy and technical meetings with

  1. LBNL-Cookstoves Projects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (LBNL) Sector Energy Focus Area Biomass, - Biomass Combustion Topics Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Website http:cookstoves.lbl.gov Country Sudan, Ethiopia,...

  2. National Solar Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Solar Systems Place: Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia Zip: 31952 Product: Leading system intergrator in Saudi Arabia. Coordinates: 26.28665, 50.21434 Show Map Loading map......

  3. Word Pro - S11

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Production from the Neutral Zone between Kuwait and Saudi Arabia is included in "Per- sian Gulf Nations." Web Page:

  4. JPRS report, nuclear developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-03-28

    This report contains articles concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) China; (2) Japan, North Korea, South Korea; (3) Bulgaria; (4) Argentina, Brazil, Honduras; (5) India, Iran, Pakistan, Syria; (6) Soviet Union; and (7) France, Germany, Turkey.

  5. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than 90% of Syria's oil exports went to countries in the European Union (E.U.), with Germany, Italy, France and the Netherlands as the largest buyers. But while crude exports to...

  6. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Guard Corps, as contained in Titles II and III of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012. The effective date was December 10, 2012. This Flash will be...

  7. Federal Acquisition Regulation Federal Acquisition Circular 2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012. This final rule will not ... because the rule does not impose any additional requirements on small business. ...

  8. Syrian Petroleum Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    was established by decree number 9 in the 1974 legislation. SPC is responsible for all oil and gas related activity (e.g. exploration, production, etc.) in Syria. References ...

  9. Project Management Development Company PMD | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Company PMD Jump to: navigation, search Name: Project Management & Development Company (PMD) Place: Jubail Industrial City, Saudi Arabia Zip: 31961 Product: Saudi-based...

  10. GE Global Research Careers | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Location Location Bangalore, India Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Munich, Germany Niskayuna, USA Oklahoma City, USA Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Shanghai, China Tirat Carmel, Israel Keyword ...

  11. King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology Place: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Zip: 11442 Sector: Solar...

  12. Secretary Bodman Praises Western States' "Frontier Line" | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Qatari Officials to Promote Energy Expansion Efforts Secretary Bodman Travels to Saudi Arabia to Discuss Global Energy Investments Secretary Bodman Travels to the Middle East

  13. Secretary Bodman Highlights Alternative Energy Cooperation in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Secretary Bodman previously traveled to Jordan and Saudi Arabia. From the UAE, Secretary Bodman will travel to Qatar and Egypt where he will continue dialogues with global leaders ...

  14. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  15. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  16. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  17. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  18. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    table below indicates, Persian Gulf producers (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Iran) appear to have accounted for 80 percent of the overall cutback over...

  19. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Total OPEC Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar,...

  20. SREL Reprint #3320

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Policy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA 3Red Sea Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia 4Southwest...

  1. Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company (SAMREF) Name: Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) Address: P.O. Box 30078 Place: Yanbu, Saudi Arabia Sector: Oil and Gas Product: Crude Oil Refining Phone...

  2. SABICs Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Material used to Produce the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tony Cerruti, Marketing Director, Americas, for SABIC's Innovative Plastics business ... in Saudi Arabia, the USA, the Netherlands, Spain, Japan, India, China and South Korea. ...

  3. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    North America and Saudi Arabia, seasonally lower demand in October due to refinery maintenance, outages, and slower global economic growth. In its November Short-Term Energy...

  4. Saudi Electricity Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Saudi Electricity Company Place: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Zip: 11416 Sector: Solar Product: Riyahd-based utility, 80% state-owned...

  5. Energy Department Offers Conditional Commitment to Support Nevada...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Saudi Arabia of geothermal energy and I thank Secretary Chu for recognizing the Silver State's enormous job-creating potential to produce plenty of clean and affordable energy." ...

  6. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of individual company data. a Free on Board. See Glossary. b Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes...

  7. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of individual company data. a Free on Board. See Glossary. b Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes...

  8. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. a Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes...

  9. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. a Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes...

  10. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    No data reported. W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates....

  11. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. 2 Includes...

  12. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. a Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes Algeria,...

  13. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 3 Free on Board. See Glossary. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates....

  14. Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela UN Region: Northern America,...

  15. U.S. Crude Oil Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Peru 14 11 8 11 9 6 1995-2015 Puerto Rico 1973-1997 Russia 269 223 101 42 18 28 1973-2015 Singapore 1993-2006 South Africa 2006-2009 Spain 1995-1996 Sweden 2000-2000 Syria 3 ...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - Seitz HIDRA final

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Saudi Arabia 2-22-10 final for distribution.pptx Microsoft PowerPoint - Saudi Arabia 2-22-10 final for distribution.pptx PDF icon Microsoft PowerPoint - Saudi Arabia 2-22-10 final for distribution.pptx More Documents & Publications Microsoft PowerPoint - UAE Masdar 2-24

    Considerations Related to Human Intrusion in the Context of Disposal of Radioactive Waste - Results of the IAEA HIDRA Project Roger Seitz Senior Advisory Scientist P&RA Community of Practice -

  17. Word Pro - S3

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nigeria f Saudi Arabia d Vene- zuela Other g Total OPEC 1960 Average ... included in "Total Non-OPEC" on Table 3.3d. g Includes these countries in the years ...

  18. International - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    in. If the country has a full write-up (a full brief, more than just bullets), we do offer a PDF. See Saudi Arabia (http:www.eia.govbetainternationalanalysis.cfm?isoSAU)...

  19. Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    in North Africa and Arabia: regional distribution and depositional model." Earth-Science Reviews, vol. 49, no. 1-4, p. 121-200. 3 Boote, David R. D., Daniel D. Clark-Lowes,...

  20. Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    exporters operating as OPEC." Prof. M. Adelman, MIT, 2004. Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia UAE Venezuela 0 20 40 60 80 100 120...

  1. Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports Fact 734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports Even though Saudi Arabia is the ...

  2. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OPEC Algeria Canada Indonesia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela Other Countries Arab OPEC a Total OPEC b 1978 ... 14.93 14.41 14.65...

  3. Fact #733: June 25, 2012 World's Top Petroleum-Producing Countries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2011, total world petroleum production was 84.7 million barrels per day. Saudi Arabia, Russia and the United States were by far the top petroleum producing countries with 11.1, 10.2, and 9.0...

  4. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    from September 2008 production levels. Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Qatar accounted for about three-fourths of the 2.6 million bbld of actual...

  5. TABLE37.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Zaire. e Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. (s) Less than 500 barrels per day. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components...

  6. TABLE42.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Zaire. e Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. (s) Less than 500 barrels per day. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components...

  7. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Beginning in 1971, includes imports from the Neutral Zone that are reported to U.S. Customs as originating in Saudi Arabia. 4 On this table, "Total OPEC" for all years includes ...

  8. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    led by production in Iraq and Saudi Arabia (Table 2, Table 3). Global surplus crude oil production capacity averaged 1.7 million bd in May and June, 0.4 million bd lower...

  9. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    oil imports from Saudi Arabia increased sharply, along with crude oil imports from Nigeria. Venezuelan crude oil imports, for the second week in a row, continue on a path...

  10. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OPEC Algeria Indonesia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela Other Countries Arab OPEC b Total OPEC c 1978 ... 14.12 13.61 13.24 14.05...

  11. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Saudi Arabia, are continuing the policy of defending market share in a low oil price environment. EIA expects global consumption of petroleum and other liquids to grow by 1.4...

  12. Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Even though Saudi Arabia is the world's largest producer of petroleum, and OPEC countries produce much of the oil in the global market, the U.S. imports most of its oil from Canada, Mexico and...

  13. Middle East oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The following subjects are covered in this publication: (1) position of preeminence of the Middle East; (2) history of area's oil operations for Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, neutral zone, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman and Egypt; (3) gas operations of Saudi Arabia, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Iraq and United Arab Emirates; (4) changing relationships with producing countries; (5) a new oil pricing environment; (6) refining and other industrial activities; and (7) change and progress. 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Three Blind Men and the Elephant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J S

    2007-02-13

    Just like the blind men in the popular story of perceiving the elephant, the three major constituencies participating in the energy debate have greatly different perceptions of the problem. The constituency that is worried about climate change believes the energy problem is caused by profligate use of fossil fuel that has dramatically changed our atmosphere. The energy security group sees dangerous reliance on foreign sources of oil increasingly held by countries hostile to the US. The economic vitality group sees high energy prices and their effect on the economy and our life-style. Just like the blind men, each of the three constituencies perceives a different problem. And just as with the blind men, while each perspective is right as a piece of the elephant, it takes all the perspectives together to actually solve the problem. Environmentalists focus on solutions responding to the scientific consensus that greenhouse gases are creating rapid climate change. The tipping point has come: it is now a consensus position among scientists the global warming is being affected by anthropogenic activity to 90% certainty according to the last IPCC report. Although they still struggle with the prediction of how much global temperatures will rise if we do nothing--is it 5 deg or 10 under BAU? This group believes that we cannot afford to take a chance because we get only one chance. We can not afford to do this kind of experiment with the Earth. Any choice which decreases our CO{sub 2} footprint is favored, even if it means a decrease in standard of living. The energy security constituency sees the geo-politics of oil becoming increasingly dire. They look at oil money being used to fund anti-American activities of groups such as the Wahabis in Saudi Arabia, Hezbollah in Lebanon and the infamous Al Qaeda. They quip that the Iraq war is the first war where we are paying for both sides. They note Iran and the Shia throughout the Middle East seeing the possibility of controlling 2/3 of the world's oil. They see oil and gas being used by Russia to exert political power using the gas tap and Hugo Chavez in Venezuela clearly anti-American and now a virtual dictator who controls 15% of our oil imports. Conflicts in Nigeria over oil wealth and corruption affected our oil supply. Countries such as China are at best unwilling to join political action against countries such as Sudan that supply them oil, and at worst, selling them arms in order to cement their relationships with respect to importing oil. This security constituency favors ending our vulnerability by ending our ''addiction to foreign oil''. This group thinks that there is no domestic source of energy that is bad. They will be happy to see our corn turned into ethanol; our coal turned into liquid fuel for transportation. No matter that the price of tortillas doubles in Mexico, we expand corn farming at the expense of the environment, our tanks and pipes in gas stations corrode and leak, or we make liquid fuel from coal, thus increasing the carbon footprint by 30% per unit of energy. The economic vitality group sees increasing international demand for oil occurring simultaneously with a peaking supply of light sweet crude. They see an oil market where higher prices drive more production of oil which is heavier and more sour (supply follows demand). However, fast growth in world-wide demand increases even faster and prices will go up. For example, China adds 10,000 cars per month, and there is an uncanny correlation between the price of oil and the amount of oil imported by China. The security contingent also worries about reliability of supply as affected by pipeline leaks in Alaska or hurricanes or potential terrorism. This constituency thinks the problem is one of capacity and favors solutions that will increase oil production, reservoirs, pipelines and refineries. They believe that the energy system will be determined by the market and want solutions that favor investment in capacity. What the environmentalists don't seem to get is climate change by itself will fail to gather b

  15. Recommendation 174: Quarterly Project Reviews Be Shared with the EM SSABs |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Energy Secretary Chu's Meetings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Readout of Energy Secretary Chu's Meetings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia February 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Secretary Chu was in Riyadh today on his first stop of a four-day Middle East trip. He met with King Abdullah, Minister of Petroleum & Mineral Resources Ali Al Naimi and other senior officials. Secretary Chu reaffirmed the United States' commitment to a strong bilateral relationship with the Kingdom of Saudi

  16. Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    June 2003 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Average crude oil prices rose in May as continued reports of low oil inventories trumped expectations that Iraqi oil production would quickly return to pre-war levels. Those hopes faded on the news that post-war looting would postpone for some months the return of the Iraqi oil sector to normal operations. In addition, a terrorist attack in Saudi Arabia and estimates of lower production in Saudi Arabia by some analysts

  17. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.Ch.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,906,065 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1984, an increase of 4.6% from the 1,821,966 km/sup 2/ in force at the end of 1983. This increase is due to large awards in the Sudan despite significant relinquishments elsewhere. Seismic surveys conducted during 1984 decreased to about 510.5 crew-months onshore and 29.5 crew-months offshore. However, exploration in and off Egypt was higher compared to 1983. Exploratory drilling was lower, with only 125 wells drilled compared to 179 tests completed in 1983. The main decrease was in Egypt and Sudan, but drilling in Libya resulted in 20 more completions. A significant oil discovery was made in the offshore part of the Sirte basin, off southwest Cyrenaica. The success rate in North Africa ranged from 19% to 50% (Libya). Development drilling increased during 1984, as higher activity appears to have taken place in 3 countries. Oil production, with an estimated daily rate of 2,952,570 bbl, was up 2.8% from 1983 (2,871,460 BOPD). In Egypt, 7 fields located in the Gulf of Suez area went on stream during the year. Political unrest, which prevailed in southern Sudan during most of 1984, will likely delay the start-up of production in several fields. No statistics are available on gas production in North African countries.

  18. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.C.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,906,065 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1984. An increase of 4.6% from the 1,821,966 km/sup 2/ in force at the end of 1983. This increase is due to large awards in the Sudan despite significant relinquishments elsewhere. Seismic surveys conducted during 1984 decreased to about 510.5 crew-months onshore and 29.5 crew-months offshore. However, exploration in and off Egypt was higher compared to 1983. Exploratory drilling was lower, with only 125 wells drilled compared to 179 tests completed in 1983. The main decrease was in Egypt and Sudan, but drilling in Libya resulted in 20 more completions. A significant oil discovery was made in the offshore part of the Sirte basin, off southwest Cyrenaica. The success rate in North America ranged from 19% to 50% (Libya). Development drilling increased during 1984, as higher activity appears to have taken place in 3 countries. Oil production, with an estimated daily rate of 2,952,570 bbl, was 2.8% from 1983 (2,871,460 BOPD). In Egypt, 7 fields located in the Gulf of Suez area went on stream during the year. Political unrest, which prevailed in southern Sudan during most of 1984, will likely delay the start-up of production in several fields. No statistics are available on gas production in North African countries. 9 figures, 27 tables.

  19. Global warming and the regions in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvi, S.H.; Elagib, N.

    1996-12-31

    The announcement of NASA scientist James Hansen made at a United States Senate`s hearing in June 1988 about the onset of global warming ignited a whirlwind of public concern in United States and elsewhere in the world. Although the temperature had shown only a slight shift, its warming has the potential of causing environmental catastrophe. According to atmosphere scientists, the effect of higher temperatures will change rainfall patterns--some areas getting drier, some much wetter. The phenomenon of warming in the Arabian Gulf region was first reported by Alvi for Bahrain and then for Oman. In the recent investigations, the authors have found a similar warming in other regions of the Arabian Gulf and in several regions of Sudan in Africa. The paper will investigate the observed data on temperature and rainfall of Seeb in Oman, Bahrain, International Airport in Kuwait as index stations for the Arabian Gulf and Port Sudan, Khartoum and Malakal in the African Continent of Sudan. Based on various statistical methods, the study will highlight a drying of the regions from the striking increase in temperature and decline of rainfall amount. Places of such environmental behavior are regarded as desertifying regions. Following Hulme and Kelly, desertification is taken to mean land degradation in dryland regions, or the permanent decline in the potential of the land to support biological activity, and hence human welfare. The paper will also, therefore, include the aspect of desertification for the regions under consideration.

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - UAE Masdar 2-24-10 final for distribution.pptx |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy UAE Masdar 2-24-10 final for distribution.pptx Microsoft PowerPoint - UAE Masdar 2-24-10 final for distribution.pptx PDF icon Microsoft PowerPoint - UAE Masdar 2-24-10 final for distribution.pptx More Documents & Publications Microsoft PowerPoint - Saudi Arabia 2-22

  1. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [June 1, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-06-01

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) China, (2) Japan, (3) East Europe; Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, German Democratic Republic, Poland, Hungary, (5) Brazil, (6) Near East and South Asia; India, Israel, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia (7) Soviet Union, and (8) Federal Republic of Germany.

  2. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1982-11-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1981 totaled 5,741,096,000 bbl, or an average rate of 15,729,030 BOPD, down 14.9% from 1980. Increases were in Oman, Dubai, and Turkey. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were made in Oman, Saudi Arabia, and Abu Dhabi.

  3. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 4. Saudi Engineering Solar Energy Applications System Design Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Literature summarizing a study on the Saudi Arabian solar controlled environment agriculture system is presented. Specifications and performance requirements for the system components are revealed. Detailed performance and cost analyses are used to determine the optimum design. A preliminary design of an engineering field test is included. Some weather data are provided for Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

  4. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed.

  5. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed. 4 figures, 9 tables.

  6. Understanding Resource Nationalism in the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Llewelyn; Kreyling, Sean J.

    2010-07-26

    Resource nationalism in oil-importing states appears on the rise. Oil price volatility underpinned by demand growth has led China, India and others to increase state support for national-flag firms in order to increase the states energy self-sufficiency. Both Chinese and Indian National Oil Companies (NOCs) have made energy investments worldwide, including in Sudan and Iran. Long-standing oil importers such as the United States and Japan have reenergized policies designed to increase domestic production of crude and crude substitutes, or have subsidized national-flag firms, in the name of energy independence.

  7. Turmoil doesn`t dampen enthusiasm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the African gas and oil industries. Though Africa remains politically and economically volatile, its vast energy potential is becoming increasingly attractive to foreign oil and gas companies. Separate evaluations are given for Algeria, Egypt, Nigeria, Angola, Libya, Congo, Gabon, Tunisia, Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, and briefly for South Africa, Sudan, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Zaire, Benin, Mozambique, Chad, Namibia, Tanzania, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia, Niger, Madagascar, Rwanda, Mauritania, Seychelles, Uganda, and Liberia.

  8. International energy indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, E.K.

    1980-09-01

    Data are compiled and graphs are presented for Iran: Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; Saudi Arabia: Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; Non-OPEC Free World and US Production of Crude Oil, 1973-1980; Oil Stocks: Free World, US, Japan and Europe (landed), 1973-1980; Petroleum Consumption by Industrial Countries, 1973-1980; USSR Crude Oil Production, 1974-1980; Free World and US Nuclear Generation Capacity, 1973-1980; US Imports of Crude Oil and Products, 1973-1980; Landed Cost of Saudi Crude in Current and 1974 Dollars; US Trade in Bituminous Coal, 1973-1980; Summary of US Merchandise Trade, 1976-1980; and Energy/GNP Ratio.

  9. NREL: International Activities - Bilateral Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Printable Version Bilateral Partnerships NREL partners with more than 50 countries around the world to advance development and use of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies: Angola Argentina Australia Bangladesh Brazil Canada Chile China Colombia Costa Rica Gabon Haiti India Indonesia Japan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea Mexico North America Philippines Saudi Arabia U.S. Pacific Territories United Arab Emirates Vietnam Asia Bangladesh Under sponsorship from the U.S. Agency for International

  10. Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Current Issues & Trends See more › More U.S. vessels powered by liquefied natural gas launched LNG Industrial and electric power sectors drive projected growth in U.S. natural gas use consumptionforecastresidentialindustrialcommercial United States remains largest producer of petroleum and natural gas hydrocarbons productioncrude oilUnited StatesRussiaSaudi Arabia Hydropower conditions improve as West Coast drought eases statesCaliforniahydroelectricOregonWashington Sabine Pass

  11. Petroleum & Other Liquids - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Current Issues & Trends See more › Oil companies focus on production over exploration as low oil prices reduce value of new reserves productioncrude oilinternationalcrude reserves & productionoil pricesfinancial marketsresources United States remains largest producer of petroleum and natural gas hydrocarbons natural gasproductioncrude oilUnited StatesRussiaSaudi Arabia China's diesel exports put downward pressure on Asia-Pacific crack spreads

  12. East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Indonesia Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Bosnia

  13. IRS (Internal Revenue Service) claim against oil firms heads for a court showdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-24

    During the gasoline crisis of the late Seventies, Saudi Arabia pumped oil to four U.S. oil companies at a price mutually agreed on. But the Internal Revenue Service says the companies sold the oil at a higher rate, raking in profits that they must pay taxes on. Exxon and Texaco dispute the ruling, while the other companies are being audited. The Tax Court is scheduled to try the case April of 1991.

  14. Contact Us - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Company Level Imports With Data for February 2016 | Release Date: April 29, 2016 | Next Release Date: May 31, 2016 | XLS Previous Issues Month: February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 prior issues Go February 2016 Import Highlights Monthly data on the origins of crude oil imports in February 2016 show that two countries, Canada and Saudi Arabia, exported more than one million

  15. Comparing Photosynthetic and Photovoltaic Efficiencies and Recognizing the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Company Level Imports With Data for February 2016 | Release Date: April 29, 2016 | Next Release Date: May 31, 2016 | XLS Previous Issues Month: February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 prior issues Go February 2016 Import Highlights Monthly data on the origins of crude oil imports in February 2016 show that two countries, Canada and Saudi Arabia, exported more than one million

  16. International energy indicators. [International and US statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, E.K.

    1980-03-01

    For the international sector, a table of data is first presented followed by corresponding graph of the data for the following: (1) Iran: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974 to February 1980; (2) Saudi Arabia (same as Iran); (3) OPEC (ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia); capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974 to January 1980; (4) non-OPEC Free World and US production of crude oil, 1973 to January 1980; (5) oil stocks: Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (landed), 1973 to 1979; (6) petroleum consumption by industrial countries, 1973 to October 1979; (7) USSR crude oil production, 1974 to February 1980; (8) Free World and US nuclear generation capacity, 1973 to January 1980. For the United States, the same data format is used for the following: (a) US imports of crude oil and products 1973 to January 1980; (b) landed cost of Saudi Arabia crude oil in current and 1974 dollars, 1974 to October 1979; (c) US trade in coal, 1973 to 1979; (d) summary of US merchandise trade, 1976 to January 1980; and (e) US energy/GNP ratio (in 1972 dollars), 1947 to 1979.

  17. World`s LPG supply picture will change by 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1995-11-06

    Middle East LPG producers will continue to dominate world export markets in 1996. Led by Saudi Arabia, the Middle East will produce nearly 26 million metric tons of LPG in million metric tons of LPG in 1996, more than 54% of the world`s almost 48 million metric tons of export LPG. In 2000, however, with world exports of LPG expanding to 58.9 million metric tons, Middle East suppliers; share will have remained flat, making up 31.7 million metric tons, or 53.9%. Saudi Arabia`s contribution will exceed 15 million metric tons, reflecting essentially no growth since 1995. These and other patterns, from data compiled by Purvin and Gertz, Dallas, and published earlier this year, show other suppliers of LPG, especially African (Algeria/Nigeria), North Sea, and Latin American (Venezuela/Argentina), picking up larger shares in the last 5 years of this decade. This scenario assumes completion of several major supply projects that are either panned, under construction, or nearing start up in most of these areas. The paper discusses the global picture, the supply situation in the Middle East, Africa, the North Sea, and South America.

  18. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  19. Natural Gas Exports from Iran

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Irans natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

  20. Natural Gas Exports from Iran

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

  1. Table 5.7 Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011 Year Persian Gulf 2 Selected OPEC 1 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 1 Countries Total Net Imports Total Net Imports as Share of Consumption 5 Net Imports From OPEC 1 Algeria Nigeria Saudi Arabia 3 Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Mexico United Kingdom Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Total Non-OPEC 4 Share of Total Net Imports 6 Share of Consumption 7 Thousand Barrels Percent 1960 NA [8] [9] 30,786 333,046 450,799 31,454 -620 -4,267 12,553 139,406

  2. TABLE21.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 53,500 1,139 2,258 115 625 0 0 1,267 0 0 Algeria ...................................... 0 1,139 1,174 115 0 0 0 824 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 7,822 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 44,568 0 1,084 0 625 0 0 443 0 0 Other

  3. TABLE22.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. PAD District I-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 6,171 845 0 115 625 0 0 824 0 0 Algeria ....................................... 0 845 0 115 0 0 0 824 0 0 Saudi Arabia .............................. 6,171 0 0 0 625 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 13,975 0 280 588 1,644 776 715 2,024 3 0 Nigeria ....................................... 8,825 0 0 0 0 0 0 166 0 0 Venezuela

  4. TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. PAD District II-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 6,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,253 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 4,966 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 4,136 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria ...................................... 540 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela ................................. 3,596 0 0

  5. TABLE24.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. PAD District III-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 38,701 294 2,258 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Algeria ....................................... 0 294 1,174 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ........................................ 5,270 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia .............................. 33,431 0 1,084 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 41,555 0 1,652 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria

  6. TABLE25A.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    PAD District V PAD District IV January 1998 Non OPEC .................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Canada ..................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Total .............................................. 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Arab OPEC .................................. 2,409 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,299 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia

  7. U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Completes Middle East Trip | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Bodman Completes Middle East Trip U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Completes Middle East Trip November 20, 2005 - 2:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman concluded his four-nation swing through the Middle East this weekend, by attending the inauguration of the New Permanent Headquarter Office Building of the International Energy Forum (IEF) Secretariat and participating in a number of bilateral meetings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. "This trip allowed me

  8. 4 oil firms turn secret on reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaffer, P.

    1980-04-14

    US oil companies are complying with Saudi Arabia's and Indonesia's request by not revealing the companies' shares of oil reserves, adding to supply uncertainties and increasing the power of the producing countries. The information blackout reduces the reserve estimates filed by Exxon, Mobil, Standard Oil of California, and Texaco with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which plans to deal with the reporting problem on a case-by-case basis. Unless the companies decide the information can be disclosed to DOE's Financial Reporting System, a legal battle will ensue. A summary of reserve reports indicates a trend in declining production relative to new discoveries as well. (DCK)

  9. highllights

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    00 Summary Based on the results of OPEC's June meeting and the July 3 announcement by Saudi Arabia of its intention to push for an additional 500,000 barrels per day of new output, we conclude that the probability of significant declines in world oil prices by yearend is larger than it was a month ago. We now expect a decline of between $4 and $5 per barrel in average crude oil prices between June and December 2000. Moreover, expected increases in petroleum inventories resulting from the

  10. Earth shelter performance and evaluation proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Papers from 16 states, plus New South Wales, Australia, Alberta, Canada, and the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia were presented in the conference. About one-third of the papers are authored by architects, nearly one-half by engineers, and the remainder are mainly by building contractors. Slightly over half of the authors are associated with universities, of which 13 are represented. The scale of the projects discussed varies from domestic, to commercial, to institutional; with an increased emphasis on passive solar inputs and earth cooling. Of the 32 papers presented, 19 were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (JMT)

  11. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Non-OECD Oil consumption in developing countries that are not part of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has risen sharply in recent years. While oil consumption in the OECD countries declined between 2000 and 2010, non-OECD oil consumption increased more than 40 percent. China, India, and Saudi Arabia had the largest growth in oil consumption among the countries in the non-OECD during this period. Economic growth has

  12. Microsoft Word - Highlights Bullets Final.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2004 Oil Market Developments (Figures 1 to 5) U.S. spot prices for crude oil (West Texas Intermediate (WTI)), while currently down from the highs above $40 per barrel seen in early June, continue to fluctuate in the upper $30's despite general improvement in crude oil inventories and increases in output by key OPEC producers, including Saudi Arabia. OPEC (excluding Iraq) crude oil production in June was 27.1 million barrels per day, 800,000 barrels per day

  13. Adventures in Infectious Diseases

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan [University of Texas School of Public Health

    2014-06-25

    Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch, Virologist and Epidemiologist, will discuss her research and travels associated with viral hemorrhagic fevers. From the Ebola outbreak in Reston, Virginia to outbreaks of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in South Africa, Senegal, and Saudi Arabia, Dr. Fisher-Hoch has studied and tracked the pathophysiology of these viral diseases. These studies have led her from the Center for Disease Control in the United States, to Lyon, France where she was instrumental in designing, constructing, and rendering operational a laboratory capable of containing some of the world's most dangerous diseases.

  14. H. R. 5916: A Bill to require the President of the United States to use the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in the event of a domestic energy supply shortage, to amend the Energy Policy and Conservation Act and the Export Administration Act of 1979 to prohibit the exportation of refined petroleum products except under certain circumstances, and for other purposes, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, October 24, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The bill amends the Energy Policy and Conservation Act by making mandatory the use of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in the event of a domestic energy supply shortage. The restriction on the export of refined petroleum products refers to gasoline, kerosene, heating oils, jet fuel, diesel fuel, residual fuel oil, propane, butane, and any natural liquid or natural gas liquid product refined within the US or entered for consumption within the US. The bill also describes the appointment of special investigator to investigate possible gouging and market manipulation by oil companies and the sense of Congress concerning the cost of deployment and maintenance of United States troops in Saudi Arabia.

  15. Word Pro - S9

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    34 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review May 2016 Table 9.2 F.O.B. Costs of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries (Dollars a per Barrel) Selected Countries Persian Gulf Nations b Total OPEC c Total Non-OPEC c Angola Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1973 Average d ................. W W - 7.81 3.25 - 5.39 3.68 5.43 4.80 1975 Average .................. 10.97 - 11.44 11.82 10.87 - 11.04 10.88 11.34 10.62 1980 Average .................. 33.45

  16. Tareq Malas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tareq Malas Tareq Malas photo 2013 Tareq Majed Malas Ph.D. tmalas@lbl.gov Web: https://sites.google.com/site/tareqmmalas/ 1 Cyclotron Rd MS 59R4023D Berkeley, CA 94720 US Summary I work in NERSC with Greg Newman and Petr Petrov from Berkeley Lab's Earth & Environmental Sciences to port Geophysical Inverse Modeling applications for Cori supercomputer. I obtained my MS and Ph.D. degrees from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), in Saudi Arabia, advised by Prof. David

  17. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.C.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,839,817 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1985, a decrease of 3% from the 1,896,446 km/sup 2/ held at the end of 1984. This decrease mainly is due to significant relinquishments made in Algeria, Egypt, and Tunisia. Morocco, however, had an increase of 18,087 km/sup 2/. Oil discoveries were reported in Algeria (possibly 5), Libya (at least 2), and Egypt (16). Only 1 gas find was made (in Morocco). According to sparse information, development drilling may have decreased markedly during 1985. Oil and condensate production increased by 3.1% to approximately 3,054,000 b/d compared to about 2,963,400 b/d in 1984. No statistics are currently available on gas production in North Africa. 8 figures, 27 tables.

  18. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    Licensed oil acreage in the 6 North Africa countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan and Tunisia) totaled 1,500,000 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1986, down 290,000 km/sup 2/ from 1985. About 50% of the relinquishments were in Libya. Most oil and gas discoveries were made in Egypt (16 oil and 2 gas). Several oil finds were reported in onshore Libya, and 1 was reported in Algeria in the southeastern Sahara. According to available statistics, development drilling decreased from 1985 levels, except in Tunisia. A 6.3% decline in oil production took place in 1986, falling below the 3 million bbl level (2,912,000 b/d). Only sparse data are released on the gas output in North Africa. 6 figures, 27 tables.

  19. Africa: the emphasis is exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    Individual country reports on drilling, oil and gas production, and petroleum exploration and reserves are given for Africa. Nigeria was the continent's largest oil producer in 1979, averaging 2.3 million bpd, followed closely by Libya with 2.07 million bpd. Algeria cut production of crude oil in 1979 to a level of 1,194,350 bpd, and increased gas production to 2031 mmcfd. In Egypt, the return of Israeli-occupied oil fields and a surge in productive capacity enabled production averaging 524,000 bpd. Brief country reports are included for Gabon, Angola, Republic of the Congo, Cameroun, Tunisia, Morocco, Zaire, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Niger, Chad, Republic of South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Equatorial Guinea, Seychelles Islands, Mauritania, Republic of Mali, Benin, Kenya, Madagascar, Botswana, Gambia, Mozambique, and Senegal.

  20. 3-D seismology in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Husseini, M.; Chimblo, R.

    1995-08-01

    Since 1977 when Aramco and GSI (Geophysical Services International) pioneered the first 3-D seismic survey in the Arabian Gulf, under the guidance of Aramco`s Chief Geophysicist John Hoke, 3-D seismology has been effectively used to map many complex subsurface geological phenomena. By the mid-1990s extensive 3-D surveys were acquired in Abu Dhabi, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Also in the mid-1990`s Bahrain, Kuwait and Dubai were preparing to record surveys over their fields. On the structural side 3-D has refined seismic maps, focused faults and fractures systems, as well as outlined the distribution of facies, porosity and fluid saturation. In field development, 3D has not only reduced drilling costs significantly, but has also improved the understanding of fluid behavior in the reservoir. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) has now acquired the first Gulf 4-D seismic survey (time-lapse 3D survey) over the Yibal Field. The 4-D survey will allow PDO to directly monitor water encroachment in the highly-faulted Cretaceous Shu`aiba reservoir. In exploration, 3-D seismology has resolved complex prospects with structural and stratigraphic complications and reduced the risk in the selection of drilling locations. The many case studies from Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, which are reviewed in this paper, attest to the effectiveness of 3D seismology in exploration and producing, in clastics and carbonates reservoirs, and in the Mesozoic and Paleozoic.

  1. International energy indicators. [Statistical tables and graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, E.K.

    1980-05-01

    International statistical tables and graphs are given for the following: (1) Iran - Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, June 1974-April 1980; (2) Saudi Arabia - Crude Oil Capacity, Production, and Shut-in, March 1974-Apr 1980; (3) OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia) - Capacity, Production and Shut-in, June 1974-March 1980; (4) Non-OPEC Free World and US Production of Crude Oil, January 1973-February 1980; (5) Oil Stocks - Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (Landed, 1973-1st Quarter, 1980); (6) Petroleum Consumption by Industrial Countries, January 1973-December 1979; (7) USSR Crude Oil Production and Exports, January 1974-April 1980; and (8) Free World and US Nuclear Generation Capacity, January 1973-March 1980. Similar statistical tables and graphs included for the United States include: (1) Imports of Crude Oil and Products, January 1973-April 1980; (2) Landed Cost of Saudi Oil in Current and 1974 Dollars, April 1974-January 1980; (3) US Trade in Coal, January 1973-March 1980; (4) Summary of US Merchandise Trade, 1976-March 1980; and (5) US Energy/GNP Ratio, 1947 to 1979.

  2. International energy indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, E.K.

    1981-02-01

    Extensive data are compiled for energy on the international scene and for the US. Data are indicated from the date given and into 1980 as far as available. Data are given for the international scene on: world crude oil production, 1975-to date; Iran: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; Saudi Arabia: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; oil stocks: Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (landed), 1973-to date; petroleum consumption by industrial countries, 1973-to date; USSR crude oil production, 1974-to date; Free World and US nuclear generation capacity, 1973-to date. Data are supplied specifically for the US on US gross imports of crude oil and products, 1973-to date; landed cost of Saudi crude in current and 1974 dollars; US trade in bituminous coal, 1973-to date; summary of US merchandise trade, 1976-to date; and energy/GNP ratio.

  3. Technosocial Modeling for Determining the Status and Nature of a State’s Nuclear Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Harvey, Julia B.

    2009-09-25

    The International Atomic Energy Agency State Evaluation Process: The Role of Information Analysis in Reaching Safeguards Conclusions (Mathews et al. 2008), several examples of nonproliferation models using analytical software were developed that may assist the IAEA with collecting, visualizing, analyzing, and reporting information in support of the State Evaluation Process. This paper focuses on one of the examples a set of models developed in the Proactive Scenario Production, Evidence Collection, and Testing (ProSPECT) software that evaluates the status and nature of a state’s nuclear activities. The models use three distinct subject areas to perform this assessment: the presence of nuclear activities, the consistency of those nuclear activities with national nuclear energy goals, and the geopolitical context in which those nuclear activities are taking place. As a proof-of-concept for the models, a crude case study was performed. The study, which attempted to evaluate the nuclear activities taking place in Syria prior to September 2007, yielded illustrative, yet inconclusive, results. Due to the inconclusive nature of the case study results, changes that may improve the model’s efficiency and accuracy are proposed.

  4. Iraqi crude exports may rise further

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-08

    Iraq will soon start exporting crude oil through a 550 mi, 500,000 bbl/day capacity pipeline from Iraq to Banias, Syria, on the Mediterranean. Iraq has already been transporting a reported 400,000 bbl/day in a 700,000 bbl/day capacity pipeline that goes to Dortyol, Turk., on the Mediterranean. Iraq's theoretical export capacity will soon reach 1.2 million bbl/day (compared with 3.2 million bbl/day before the war), assuming that the facilities are undamaged. Iran has been exporting some crude from its Kharg Island terminal, presumably by Iranian boat to the Lavan Island terminal at the southern end of the gulf, where it would be transported along with crude from offshore fields in the area. The exports apparently had been large enough to keep spot-market prices from rising much above the $40/bbl level, and in Dec. 1980, the spot-market prices eased to just under the $40 mark. Indonesia has raised the premium on its Sumatran light crude by $1/bbl, bringing the total to $35.20. Other producers have not yet raised their prices correspondingly. The agenda of the Dec. 1980 price-fixing meeting in Indonesia (assuming it takes place as planned) is discussed.

  5. Table 5.20 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries, 1973-2011 (Thousand Dollars )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries, 1973-2011 (Thousand Dollars 1) Year Persian Gulf 3 Selected OPEC 2 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 2 Countries Total 5 Kuwait Nigeria Saudi Arabia Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Colombia Mexico Norway United Kingdom Total Non-OPEC 4 1973 1,729,733 W 1,486,278 904,979 753,195 5,237,483 1,947,422 W – 0 0 2,351,931 7,589,414 1974 4,419,410 W 3,347,351 1,858,788 1,309,916 11,581,515 3,314,999 0 W – 0 4,054,475 15,635,990 1975 5,169,811 W 3,457,766

  6. New constraints in absorptive capacity and the optimum rate of petroleum output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Mallakh, R

    1980-01-01

    Economic policy in four oil-producing countries is analyzed within a framework that combines a qualitative assessment of the policy-making process with an empirical formulation based on historical and current trends in these countries. The concept of absorptive capacity is used to analyze the optimum rates of petroleum production in Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. A control solution with an econometric model is developed which is then modified for alternative development strategies based on analysis of factors influencing production decisions. The study shows the consistencies and inconsistencies between the goals of economic growth, oil production, and exports, and the constraints on economic development. Simulation experiments incorporated a number of the constraints on absorptive capacity. Impact of other constraints such as income distribution and political stability is considered qualitatively. (DLC)

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Renewable Energy Annual 2009 75

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Table 2.10 Export shipments of solar thermal collectors by country, 2008 and 2009 (square feet) Africa Egypt - 1,771 0.11 Morocco 4,755 3,916 0.25 Nigeria 333 - - Total 5,088 5,687 0.36 Asia Indonesia - 4,041 0.26 Israel 5,756 - - Japan - 240 0.02 Jordan - 13,200 0.84 Korea, South - 336 0.02 Saudi Arabia 51,951 - - Taiwan - 48 * United Arab Emirates 4,412 - - Vietnam 2,640 1,980 0.13 Total 64,759 19,845 1.26 Australia and Oceania Australia 81,980 106,459 6.75 New Zealand 11,915 14,106 0.89

  8. OPEC production: Untapped reserves, world demand spur production expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, I.A.H. )

    1994-05-02

    To meet projected world oil demand, almost all members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) have embarked on ambitious capacity expansion programs aimed at increasing oil production capabilities. These expansion programs are in both new and existing oil fields. In the latter case, the aim is either to maintain production or reduce the production decline rate. However, the recent price deterioration has led some major OPEC producers, such as Saudi Arabia and Iran, to revise downward their capacity plans. Capital required for capacity expansion is considerable. Therefore, because the primary source of funds will come from within each OPEC country, a reasonably stable and relatively high oil price is required to obtain enough revenue for investing in upstream projects. This first in a series of two articles discusses the present OPEC capacity and planned expansion in the Middle East. The concluding part will cover the expansion plans in the remaining OPEC countries, capital requirements, and environmental concerns.

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. World natural gas reserves by country as of January 1, 2016 Country Reserves (trillion cubic feet) Percent of world total World 6,950 100 Top 20 countries 6,359 91.5 Russia 1,688 24.3 Iran 1,201 17.3 Qatar 866 12.5 United States 369 5.3 Saudi Arabia 300 4.3 Turkmenistan 265 3.8 United Arab Emirates 215 3.1 Venezuela 198 2.9 Nigeria 180 2.6 China 175 2.5 Algeria 159 2.3 Iraq 112 1.6 Indonesia 102 1.5 Mozambique 100 1.4 Kazakhstan 85 1.2 Egypt 77 1.1 Canada 70 1 Norway 68 1 Uzbekistan 65 0.9

  10. National Geothermal Academy. Geo-Heat Center Quarterly Bulletin, Vol. 31 No. 2 (Complete Bulletin). A Quarterly Progress and Development Report on the Direct Utilization of Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya; Maddi, Phillip

    2012-08-01

    The National Geothermal Academy (NGA) is an intensive 8-week overview of the different aspects involved in developing a geothermal project, hosted at University of Nevada, Reno. The class of 2012 was the second graduating class from the academy and included 21 students from nine states, as well as Saudi Arabia, Dominica, India, Trinidad, Mexico. The class consisted of people from a wide range of scholastic abilities from students pursuing a Bachelor’s or Master’s degrees, to entrepreneurs and professionals looking to improve their knowledge in the geothermal field. Students earned 6 credits, either undergraduate or graduate, in engineering or geology. Overall, the students of the NGA, although having diverse backgrounds in engineering, geology, finance, and other sciences, came together with a common passion to learn more about geothermal.

  11. Word Pro - S9

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Table 9.3 Landed Costs of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries (Dollars a per Barrel) Selected Countries Persian Gulf Nations b Total OPEC c Total Non-OPEC c Angola Canada Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1973 Average d ............... W 5.33 W - 9.08 5.37 - 5.99 5.91 6.85 5.64 1975 Average ................ 11.81 12.84 - 12.61 12.70 12.50 - 12.36 12.64 12.70 12.70 1980 Average ................ 34.76 30.11 W 31.77 37.15 29.80 35.68 25.92 30.59 33.56 33.99 1985

  12. The Gulf War and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Baz, F. (ed.) (Boston Univ., MA (United States). Center for Remote Sensing); Makharita, R.M. (ed.) (World Bank, Washington, DC (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The Gulf War inflicted dramatic environmental damage upon the fragile desert and shore environments of Kuwait and northeastern Saudi Arabia. Coastal and marine environments experienced oil spills of more than 8 million barrels, which killed wildlife and damaged the fishing industry. In inland Kuwait, hundreds of oil lakes are scattered across the desert surface: these lakes emit noxious gases, drown insects and birds, and may seep to pollute groundwater. Exploding and burning oil wells released soot particles, oil droplets, and noxious chemicals into the atmosphere, spreading air pollution, acid rain, and respiratory problems. Military diggings, constructions, and vehicles have destroyed much of the desert pavement, resulting in increased dust storms and large, moving dunes.

  13. Political dynamics of economic sanctions: a case study of Arab oil embargoes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daoudi, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The general question is considered of the effectiveness of economic sanctions in international politics, in terms of the Arabs' use of oil as a political weapon in 1956, 1967, and 1973. Chapter 3 focuses on the impact of the interruption of oil supplies to Western Europe throughout the 1956 Suez crisis. By 1967, pressure on the conservative governing elites of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Libya, and the Gulf Sheikdoms obliged these states to join Iraq and Algeria in imposing production cutbacks and an embargo. Yet the conservative regimes' ties to the West, and the control exerted by multinational oil corporations over all phases of their oil industry, insured that the embargo was not enforced. Chapter 4 explains historically how, by the late 1960s, relinquishment of old concessions, nationalization acts, and participation agreements had caused a decline in the multinationals' domination of the oil industry. The rise of OPEC and OAPEC, which by 1970 had united and organized the producing governments, channeled their demands, and created an international forum for their political grievances, is discussed. Chapter 5 considers how by 1973 international and Arab political developments had forced states like Saudi Arabia, which had sought to dissociate oil and politics, to unsheathe the oil weapon and wave it in the faces of their Western allies. The author concludes from analysis of these complex cases that scholarship has exaggerated the inefficacy of sanctions. The effectiveness of sanctions is seen to depend upon how the demands are formulated and presented and to what extent they can be negotiated, as well as upon the sociopolitical, cultural, and psychological characteristics of the target population.

  14. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  15. Landau damping effects on dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty negative-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barman, Arnab; Misra, A. P. E-mail: apmisra@gmail.com

    2014-07-15

    The nonlinear theory of dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) with Landau damping is studied in an unmagnetized dusty negative-ion plasma in the extreme conditions when the free electrons are absent. The cold massive charged dusts are described by fluid equations, whereas the two-species of ions (positive and negative) are described by the kinetic Vlasov equations. A Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with Landau damping, governing the dynamics of weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive DAWs, is derived following Ott and Sudan [Phys. Fluids 12, 2388 (1969)]. It is shown that for some typical laboratory and space plasmas, the Landau damping (and the nonlinear) effects are more pronounced than the finite Debye length (dispersive) effects for which the KdV soliton theory is not applicable to DAWs in dusty pair-ion plasmas. The properties of the linear phase velocity, solitary wave amplitudes (in presence and absence of the Landau damping) as well as the Landau damping rate are studied with the effects of the positive ion to dust density ratio (?{sub pd}) as well as the ratios of positive to negative ion temperatures (?) and masses (m)

  16. Nonlinear stability of field-reversed configurations with self-generated toroidal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omelchenko, Y. A.; Schaffer, M. J.; Parks, P. B.

    2001-10-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a high-beta compact toroidal plasma confinement scheme in which the external poloidal field is reversed on the geometric axis by azimuthal (toroidal) plasma current. A quasineutral, hybrid, particle-in-cell (PIC) approach [Y. A. Omelchenko and R. N. Sudan, Phys. Plasmas 2, 2773 (1995)] is applied to study long-term nonlinear stability of computational FRC equilibria to a number of toroidal modes, including the most disruptive tilt mode. In particular, a self-generated toroidal magnetic field is found to be an important factor in mitigating the instability and preventing the confinement disruption. This is shown to be a unique FRC property resulting from the Hall effect in the regions of vanishing poloidal magnetic field. The instability-driven toroidal field stabilizes kink formation by increasing the magnetic field energy without destabilizing curvature-driven plasma motion. Finally, the tilt instability saturates due to nonlinear, finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and plasma relaxation to a quasisteady kinetic state. During this transition the FRC is shown to dissipate a substantial amount of initially trapped flux and plasma energy. These effects are demonstrated for kinetic and fluid-like, spherical and prolate FRCs.

  17. Kinetic simulations of the formation and stability of the field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omelchenko, Yu. A.

    2000-05-01

    The Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) is a high-beta compact toroidal plasma confined primarily by poloidal fields. In the FRC the external field is reversed on axis by the diamagnetic current carried by thermal plasma particles. A three-dimensional, hybrid, particle-in-cell (zero-inertia fluid electrons, and kinetic ions), code FLAME, previously used to study ion rings [Yu. A. Omelchenko and R. N. Sudan, J. Comp. Phys. 133, 146 (1997)], is applied to investigate FRC formation and tilt instability. Axisymmetric FRC equilibria are obtained by simulating the standard experimental reversed theta-pinch technique. These are used to study the nonlinear tilt mode in the ''kinetic'' and ''fluid-like'' cases characterized by ''small'' ({approx}3) and ''large'' ({approx}12) ratios of the characteristic radial plasma size to the mean ion gyro-radius, respectively. The formation simulations have revealed the presence of a substantial toroidal (azimuthal) magnetic field inside the separatrix, generated due to the stretching of the poloidal field by a sheared toroidal electron flow. This is shown to be an important tilt-stabilizing effect in both cases. On the other hand, the tilt mode stabilization by finite Larmor radius effects has been found relatively insignificant for the chosen equilibria. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  18. The Case for the Application of Worldwide Marine Radioactivity Studies In the Search for Undeclared Facilities and Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Schanfein

    2013-06-01

    Undeclared nuclear facilities unequivocally remain the most difficult safeguards challenge facing the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Recent cases of undeclared facilities revealed in Iran and Syria, which are NPT signatory States, show both the difficulty and the seriousness of this threat to nonproliferation. In the case of undeclared nuclear facilities, the most effective deterrent against proliferation is the application of Wide-Area Environmental Sampling (WAES); however, WAES is currently cost-prohibitive. As with any threat, the most effective countering strategy is a multifaceted approach. Some of the approaches applied by the IAEA include: open source analysis, satellite imagery, on-site environmental sampling, complementary access under the Additional Protocol (where in force), traditional safeguards inspections, and information provided by member States. These approaches, naturally, are focused on specific States. Are there other opportunities not currently within the IAEA purview to assess States that may provide another opportunity to detect clandestine facilities? In this paper, the author will make the case that the IAEA Department of Safeguards should explore the area of worldwide marine radioactivity studies as one possible opportunity. One such study was released by the IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory in January 2005. This technical document focused on 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239/240Pu. It is clearly a challenging area because of the many sources of anthropogenic radionuclides in the world’s oceans and seas including: nuclear weapons testing, reprocessing, accidents, waste dumping, and industrial and medical radioisotopes, whose distributions change based on oceanographic, geochemical, and biological processes, and their sources. It is additionally challenging where multiple States share oceans, seas, and rivers. But with the application of modern science, historical sampling to establish baselines, and a focus on the most relevant radionuclides, the potential is there to support this challenging IAEA safeguards mission.

  19. Crustal structure of mountain belts and basins: Industry and academic collaboration at Cornell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allmendinger, R.; Barazangi, M.; Brown, L.

    1995-08-01

    Interdisciplinary investigations of the large-scale structure and evolution of key basins and orogenic belts around the world are the focal point of academic-industry interaction at Cornell. Ongoing and new initiatives with significant industry involvement include: Project INDEPTH (Interdisciplinary Deep Profiling of Tibet and the Himalayas), a multinational effort to delineate deep structure across the type example of active continent-continent collision. 300 km of deep reflection profiling was collected across the Himalaya: and southern Tibet Plateau in 1992 and 1994. CAP (Cornell Andes Project), a long-standing interdisciplinary effort to understand the structure and evolution of the Andes, with a focus on Argentina, Chile and Bolivia. A deep reflection profile is tentatively planned for 1997. Intra-plate Orogeny in the Middle East and North Africa is the focus of multidisciplinary regional syntheses of existing seismic reflection and other databases in Syria (Palmyrides)and Morocco (Atlas), with an emphasis on reactivation and inversion tectonics. Project URSEIS (Urals Reflection Seismic Experiment and Integrated Studies) is a collaboration with EUROPROBE to collect 500 km of vibroseis and dynamite deep reflection profiling across the southern Urals in 1995. Project CRATON, an element in COCORP`s systematic exploration of the continental US, is a nascent multi-disciplinary effort to understand the buried craton of the central US and the basins built upon it. Global Basins Research Network (GBRN) is a diversified observational and computational effort to image and model the movement of pore fluids in detail and on a regional scale for a producing oil structure in the Gulf of Mexico.

  20. Deterring Nuclear Proliferation: The Importance of IAEA Safeguards: A TEXTBOOK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Fishbone, L.G.; Gallini, L.; Krass, A.; Kratzer, M.; Sanborn, J.; Ward, B.; Wulf, N. A.

    2012-03-13

    Nuclear terrorism and nuclear proliferation are among the most pressing challenges to international peace and security that we face today. Iran and Syria remain in non-compliance with the safeguards requirements of the NPT, and the nuclear ambitions of North Korea remain unchecked. Despite these challenges, the NPT remains a cornerstone of the nuclear non-proliferation regime, and the safeguards implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under the NPT play a critical role in deterring nuclear proliferation.How do they work? Where did they come from? And what is their future? This book answers these questions. Anyone studying the field of nuclear non-proliferation will benefit from reading this book, and for anyone entering the field, the book will enable them to get a running start. Part I describes the foundations of the international safeguards system: its origins in the 1930s - when new discoveries in physics made it clear immediately that nuclear energy held both peril and promise - through the entry into force in 1970 of the NPT, which codified the role of IAEA safeguards as a means to verify states NPT commitments not to acquire nuclear weapons. Part II describes the NPT safeguards system, which is based on a model safeguards agreement developed specifically for the NPT, The Structure and Content of Agreements between the Agency and States required in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, which has been published by the IAEA as INFCIRC/153. Part III describes events, especially in South Africa, the DPRK, and Iraq in the early 1990s, that triggered a transformation in the way in which safeguards were conceptualized and implemented.

  1. Use of supercritical fluid solution expansion processes for drug delivery, particle synthesis, and thin film deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hybertson, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    Properties of the gases and aerosols resulting from the expansion of supercritical fluid solutions were studied. Film deposition, particle formation, and drug delivery processes using supercritical fluids were developed. Thin films of palladium, copper, aluminum, silver, and silicon dioxide were deposited by a method called supercritical fluid transport-chemical deposition (SFT-CD). In each case, a precursor compound was dissolved in a supercritical fluid and the solution was allowed to expand through a restrictor nozzle into a reaction chamber at subcritical pressure, resulting in the formation of aerosol particles of the precursor. A chemical reaction was induced to occur at the surface of a substrate, resulting in deposition of a thin film. Micron-sized particles of aluminum fluoride and copper oxide were synthesized by a method called supercritical fluid transport-chemical formation of particles (SFT-CFP). The process was similar to that in SFT-CD, but the chemical reactions were induced to occur in the gas phase instead of at a substrate surface, resulting in the formation of fine particles. A new method of pulmonary drug delivery called supercritical fluid drug delivery (SFDD) was conceived and demonstrated. In SFDD a drug compound is dissolved in a supercritical fluid, and the solution is allowed to expand through a restrictor nozzle. The resultant aerosol is directly inhaled by a human or animal subject and the fine drug particles are deposited in the lungs. Menthol, vanillin, camphor, cholesterol, Sudan III, and Oil Blue N were used as model drug compounds for SFDD. Delivery of [alpha]-tocopherol to rat lung tissue was demonstrated, with observed increases of 80-290% above background levels.

  2. A giant dune-dammed lake on the North Platte River, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinehart, J.B. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Conservation and Survey Div.); Loope, D.B. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The recent work in the Nebraska Sand Hills, just north of the North Platte Valley, has revealed the presence of numerous dune dams--sites where eolian sand has filled Pleistocene paleovalleys and caused the formation of lake basins containing abundant small, interdunal lakes. Although the Platte River is considered the southern margin of the Sand Hills, there is a 1,200 sq km triangular area of large dunes in Lincoln County just south of the South Platte. The authors hypothesize that large dunes migrated southward to fill the North Platte Valley during glacial maximum when both the North and South Platte were dry. As Rocky Mountain snowmelt and Great Plains precipitation increased during deglaciation, a single 65 km-long, 15 km-wide, 50 m-deep lake formed behind the massive dune dam. The tentative chronology suggests that the lake was in existence for at least several thousand years. They have not yet found compelling evidence of catastrophic flooding downstream of the former lake. Evidence of two large Quaternary lakes on the White Nile between Khartoum and Malakal (Sudan) was discovered in the 1960's. Shoreline deposits indicate the lakes were 400--600 km long and up to 50 km wide. Although the lakes have been attributed to repeated blockage of the White Nile by clay-rich Blue Nile deposits, the distribution and age of dune sand near the confluence of these rivers suggest that, as in the Nebraska example, the course of the White Nile was blocked by dunes when the region was desiccated in the Late Pleistocene. Lakes behind permeable dams rise to a level where input equals output. Earthen dams are vulnerable to overtopping and piping. The relatively high permeability of dune sand prevents or delays overtopping, and piping is prevented by the extremely high low hydraulic gradients that typify extant sand dams.

  3. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  4. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  5. U.S. energy flow -- 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1995-12-01

    Energy consumption in 1994 increased for the fourth year in a row, reaching an all-time high. It was associated with a robust economy, low inflation, and low unemployment rates. Of the populous states, California lagged substantially behind the national recovery. Consumption in all major end-use sectors reached historic highs. Transmission of electrical power by the utilities increased almost 3%. However, this understates the increase of the total amount of electricity used in the nation because the amount of electricity used ``in-house`` by a growing number of self-generators is unrecorded. Imports of both fossil fuels and electricity increased. About half of the total oil consumed was imported, with Saudi Arabia being the principal supplier. Domestic oil production continued to decline; however, the sharp decline in Alaskan production was slowed. The increase in the demand for natural gas was met by both a modest increase in domestic production and imports from Canada, which comprised 10% of supply. The residential/commercial sector is the largest single consumer of natural gas; however, use by electric generators has increased annually for the past decade. The regulated utilities increased their consumption 11% in 1994. The year was noteworthy for the US nuclear power industry. Work was halted on the last nuclear power plant under construction in the country. Because of the retirement of aged and poorly performing nuclear plants and because of improved efficiencies, the capacity factor for the remaining 109 operable plants reached a record 74%.

  6. Assessing world energy in the wake of the Iran/Iraq war: an oil shortage proves elusive. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randol, W.L.; Verleger, P.K. Jr.; Clayman, M.

    1981-01-01

    A reassessment of world energy supplies was made in the wake of curtailed exports during the Iran/Iraq war and the corresponding increase in world oil prices, the drop in oil consumption, the widening economic recession, and US decontrol of oil. The report concludes that present worldwide levels of oil production are adequate to satisfy projected levels of consumption through 1981. This leaves the world energy system in balance even if oil exports from Iran and Iraq remain at minimal levels for the year. Past overestimation of demand makes it more likely that this year's consumption will fall short of the projection. The way in which Saudi Arabia's output is cut will be the key to oil pricing in 1981, the authors feel, but the likely approach will be a gradual reduction in production that will allow the Saudis to regain control of OPEC. The effects of a receding demand for oil have been intensified by high US interest rates and the spreading recession. The effect of immediate decontrol of petroleum is likely to compound the trend for reduced consumption and a corresponding increase in efficiency. 2 figures, 2 tables.

  7. World crude output overcomes Persian Gulf disruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Several OPEC producers made good on their promises to replace 2.7 MMbpd of oil exports that vanished from the world market after Iraq took over Kuwait. Even more incredibly, they accomplished this while a breathtaking 1.2- MMbopd reduction in Soviet output took place during the course of 1991. After Abu Dhabi, Indonesia, Iran, Libya, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela turned the taps wide open, their combined output rose 2.95 MMbopd. Put together with a 282,000-bopd increase by Norway and contributions from smaller producers, this enabled world oil production to remain within 400,000 bopd of its 1990 level. The 60.5-MMbopd average was off by just 0.7%. This paper reports that improvement took place in five of eight regions. Largest increases were in Western Europe and Africa. Greatest reductions occurred in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Fifteen nations produced 1 MMbopd or more last year, compared with 17 during 1990.

  8. Mexico: swapping crude for atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro, B.

    1982-06-24

    Mexico, considered the Saudi Arabia of the Western Hemisphere because of its proven and potential petroleum reserves, has surprised the world: it has embarked on the biggest nuclear-electric program in the Third World, only to postpone it days before scheduled approval of an international bidding (on which the atomic energy industry had pinned its hopes). A graph shows Mexican supplies of electricity by source with official projections to 1990. The point of entrance of the first nuclear reactor, originally scheduled for 1982, won't come onstream until 1983; and how nuclear-generated electricity grows close to 5% of the total in 1990. The big question is, will the future President of Mexico give the green light to the atomic megaproject. And if he does, how will Mexico deal with the serious logistics problems and grave ecological implications confronting the industry worldwide. In this issue, the author and Energy Detente touch on these questions and review the nuclear power status of Mexico, as well as addressing some of its global problems. Also presented in this issue is an update of the fuel price/tax series for the Western Hemisphere countries.

  9. HYDROPHOBIC CHARACTERISTICS OF COMPOSITE INSULATORS IN SIMULATED INLAND ARID DESERT ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Yasin; Al-Arainy, Abdulrehman Ali; Malik, Nazar Hussain; Qureshi, Muhammad Iqbal

    2010-06-15

    Presently along with traditional insulators i.e. glass and porcelain, etc., the polymeric insulators are also used world widely. These polymeric insulators are very sensitive to various environmental parameters e.g. UV radiations, heat, etc. The UV radiation level in the central region of Saudi Arabia is high as compared to the recommended IEC-61109 standard for the accelerated aging of the composite insulators. In this study, thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) and Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) insulators were subjected to accelerated aging stress as per IEC standard as well as modified IEC standard simulating the inland arid desert's atmospheric conditions. The hydrophobic characteristics were studied by measuring the contact angle along the insulator surface before and after the accelerated aging of the samples. It was found that TPE loses its hydrophobic properties more as compared to EPDM insulator. This loss was proportional to the intensity of UV irradiation. The rate of recovery is also low for both the tested materials as compared to Silicone Rubber insulators.

  10. The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

  11. Gas projects surge in the Middle East as governments seek new revenue sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.D.

    1997-02-24

    The rapid development of natural gas and condensate reserves in the Middle East results from a simple motivation: the desire of governments to earn revenues. For the past decade, Middle East governments have run budget deficits, which they funded by drawing down foreign assets and issuing debt. Now in the process of structural economic reform, they have begun to use an under-utilized resource--natural gas, of which Middle East governments own about one third of the world`s reserves. Governments receive revenues from several sources in natural gas developments, which makes the projects very attractive. Revenue comes from the sale of the natural gas in the domestic market and, if exported, the international market; the sale of associated condensates; the additional exports of crude oil or refined products if natural gas is substituted for refined products in domestic markets; the increased sale of crude oil if natural gas is injected into reservoirs to maintain pressure; and the sale of petrochemicals where natural gas is used as feedstock. Large projects under way in the Middle East highlight the consequences of multiple revenue sources and interlinked costs of natural gas and condensate development. Other countries in the region are undertaking similar projects, so examples cited represent only a portion of what is occurring. The paper describes Abu Dhabi, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and Iran.

  12. Update: US oil-import market. 1982 top 7 suppliers to US import market: how their shares changed since 1973

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-09

    This issue updates the Energy Detente 7/09/82, which tracked US oil imports since the Arab Oil Embargo. Since then, the phrase oil glut became common even among cautious market analysts as many exporters, hard-pressed for petrodollars, produced much more than the market was prepared to absorb. To examine how the US import market has adjusted to this continued buyers market, the top seven suppliers of 1982 are tracked backwards through time. A graph shows the 1982 reversal of Mexico's and Saudi Arabia's positions in this market. The three main reasons for Mexico's strong present position in the US market are: crude costs and corresponding refined value; proximity to US refining centers; and strategic importance of Mexico's economic stability through oil sales. Interviews with various US refiners and other market observers confirm that these elements will persist during 1983, regardless of significant price cuts among OPEC and other producers. It is believed that the profitability of running heavy Maya crude in sophisticated plants will continue to look optimistic, and that Mexican crude sales to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve implies US government interest in Mexico's economic recovery, and in its stability in the light of civil wars being waged in Central America. This issue presents the Energy Detente (1) fuel price/tax series and (2) industrial fuel prices for March 1983 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere. 6 figures, 8 tables.

  13. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Boris B.; Sverdlik, Leonid G.; Imashev, Sanjar A.; Solomon, Paul A.; Lantz, Jeffrey; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Artamonova, Maria S.; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2013-01-01

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM 2.5 and PM 10 mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. Regionalmore » sources are characterized by pollution transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the Ångström exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the Ångström exponent (about 0.51) and the fine particle mass fraction (64%). Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.« less

  14. The Russian Federation's Ministry of Atomic Energy: Programs and Developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CM Johnson

    2000-07-24

    This paper reviews select programs driving the Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation's (Minatom) efforts to raise funds, comments on their potential viability, and highlights areas likely to be of particular concern for the US over the next three to five years. The paper's findings are: (1) Despite numerous cabinet displacements throughout the Yeltsin administration, Yevgeny Adamov was reappointed Minister on four occasions. With Boris Yeltsin's January 1, 2000 resignation, Adamov's long-term position as the head of the Ministry is more tenuous, but he will likely retain his position until at least the March 2000 elections. Acting President Vladimir Putin is unlikely to reorganize his cabinet prior to that date and there are no signs that Putin is dissatisfied with Adamov's leadership of Minatom. (2) Adamov's chief priorities are downsizing Minatom's defense sector, increasing the oversight of subsidiary bodies by the central bureaucracy and consolidating commercial elements of the Ministry within an umbrella organization called Atomprom. (3) Viktor Mikhaylov, Adamov's predecessor and critic of his reform efforts, has been relieved of his duties as First Deputy Minister. While he retains his positions as Chief of the Science Councils and Chief Scientist at Arzamas-16, his influence on Minatom's direction is greatly diminished. Adamov will likely continue his efforts to further marginalize Mikhaylov in the coming year. (4) Securing extra-budgetary sources of income continues to be the major factor guiding Minatom's international business dealings. The Ministry will continue to aggressively promote the sale of nuclear technology abroad, often to countries with questionable nonproliferation commitments. (5) Given the financial difficulties in Russia and Minatom's client states, however, few nuclear development programs will come to fruition for a number of years, if ever. Nevertheless, certain peaceful nuclear cooperation agreements should be carefully monitored--particularly those negotiated with Cuba, Iran, Libya and Syria. (6) Waste management has also risen in importance for Minatom. Opportunities for raising funds by reprocessing, storing and permanently disposing of spent fuel from foreign states are being explored. Although currently prohibited by federal law, the Russian Parliament will likely pass legislation in support of this program.

  15. Performance prediction using geostatistics and window reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontanilla, J.P.; Al-Khalawi, A.A.; Johnson, S.G.

    1995-11-01

    This paper is the first window model study in the northern area of a large carbonate reservoir in Saudi Arabia. It describes window reservoir simulation with geostatistics to model uneven water encroachment in the southwest producing area of the northern portion of the reservoir. In addition, this paper describes performance predictions that investigate the sweep efficiency of the current peripheral waterflood. A 50 x 50 x 549 (240 m. x 260 m. x 0.15 m. average grid block size) geological model was constructed with geostatistics software. Conditional simulation was used to obtain spatial distributions of porosity and volume of dolomite. Core data transforms were used to obtain horizontal and vertical permeability distributions. Simple averaging techniques were used to convert the 549-layer geological model to a 50 x 50 x 10 (240 m. x 260 m. x 8 m. average grid block size) window reservoir simulation model. Flux injectors and flux producers were assigned to the outermost grid blocks. Historical boundary flux rates were obtained from a coarsely-ridded full-field model. Pressure distribution, water cuts, GORs, and recent flowmeter data were history matched. Permeability correction factors and numerous parameter adjustments were required to obtain the final history match. The permeability correction factors were based on pressure transient permeability-thickness analyses. The prediction phase of the study evaluated the effects of infill drilling, the use of artificial lifts, workovers, horizontal wells, producing rate constraints, and tight zone development to formulate depletion strategies for the development of this area. The window model will also be used to investigate day-to-day reservoir management problems in this area.

  16. Geochemistry, palynology, and regional geology of worldclass Upper Devonian source rocks in the Madre de Dios basin, Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, K.E.; Conrad, K.T.; Carpenter, D.G.; Wagner, J.B.

    1996-08-01

    Recent exploration drilling indicates the existence of world-class source rock in the Madre de Dios basin, Bolivia. In the Pando-1 X and -2X wells, over 200 m of poorly bioturbated, organic-rich (TOC = 3-16 wt.%) prodelta to shelf mudstones in the Frasnian-Famennian Tomachi Formation contain oil-prone organic matter (hydrogen index = 400-600 mg HC/g TOC). Our calculated source prolificity indices for this interval in these wells (SPI = 15-18 tons of hydrocarbons per square meter of source rock) exceed that for the Upper Jurassic in Central Saudi Arabia. The Tomachi interval is lithologically equivalent to the Colpacucho Formation in the northern Altiplano, the Iquiri Formation in the Cordillera Oriental, and is coeval with other excellent source rocks in North America, Africa, and Eurasia. All of these rocks were deposited under conditions favorable for accumulation of organic matter, including a global highstand and high productivity. However, the Madre de Dios basin was situated at high latitude during the Late Devonian and some of the deposits are interpreted to be of glacial origin, indicating conditions not generally associated with organic-rich deposition. A biomarker and palynological study of Upper Devonian rocks in the Pando-1X well suggests deposition under conditions similar to certain modern fjords. High productivity resulted in preservation of abundant organic matter in the bottom sediments despite a cold, toxic water column. Low-sulfur crude oil produced from the Pando-1X well is geochemically similar to, but more mature than, extracts from associated organic-rich Tomachi samples, and was generated from deeper equivalents of these rocks.

  17. OPEC and lower oil prices: Impacts on production capacity, export refining, domestic demand and trade balances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesharaki, F.; Fridley, D.; Isaak, D.; Totto, L.; Wilson, T.

    1988-12-01

    The East-West Center has received a research grant from the US Department of Energy's Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis to study the impact of lower oil prices on OPEC production capacity, on export refineries, and petroleum trade. The project was later extended to include balance-of-payments scenarios and impacts on OPEC domestic demand. As the study progressed, a number of preliminary presentations were made at the US Department of Energy in order to receive feedback from DOE officials and to refine the focus of our analysis. During one of the presentations on June 4, 1987, the then Director of Division of Oil and Gas, John Stanley-Miller, advised us to focus our work on the Persian Gulf countries, since these countries were of special interest to the United States Government. Since then, our team has visited Iran, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia and obtained detailed information from other countries. The political turmoil in the Gulf, the Iran/Iraq war, and the active US military presence have all worked to delay the final submission of our report. Even in countries where the United States has close ties, access to information has been difficult. In most countries, even mundane information on petroleum issues are treated as national secrets. As a result of these difficulties, we requested a one-year no cost extension to the grant and submitted an Interim Report in May 1988. As part of our grant extension request, we proposed to undertake additional tasks which appear in this report. 20 figs., 21 tabs.

  18. Continuous sea-floor spreading in Red Sea: an alternative interpretation of magnetic anomaly pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Brecque, J.L.; Zitellini

    1985-04-01

    The magnetic anomaly pattern over the Red Sea can be modeled as a continuous system of sea-floor spreading from the early Miocene to the present by using a timevarying process filter. The half spreading rate is approximately 1 cm/yr (0.4 in./yr) since initial rifting. The parameters that determine the process filter and development of the transition zone are the intrusion parameter (a measure of the dispersion of feeder dikes or horizontal strain about the rift axis), a flow parameter (a measure of the average flow width), and the effusion parameter (a measure of the volcanic effusion and thickness of layer 2). The authors estimate the flow parameter to be 2.7km(1.7 mi) and the intrusion parameter to be 7.5km(4.7 mi) at early rifting. These values suggest that a wide distribution of axial dikes or horizontal strain is the dominant factor in forming the magnetic anomaly pattern. Reduction in the width of the intrusion parameter and the effusion rate as rifting proceeded resulted in focusing of the strain, thinning of layer 2, and formation of the Red Sea deeps. Their modeling suggests that phase 2, or the stratoid phase, began about the time of anomaly 5C or chron C5C approximately 16 Ma. This age is compatible with geologic estimates of the initial rifting at the late Oligocene to early Miocene (Coleman, 1974; Gass, 1977). The opening rate for Africa-Arabia plate motion has remained relatively constant since early rifting although the African margin appears to be accreting faster than the Arabian plate.

  19. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  20. Interest-free loans used by the Saudi government as a transfer mechanism of oil revenue to the private sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fozan, M.N.

    1986-01-01

    Prior to 1970 the Saudi Government faced severe socioeconomic problems two of which were: (1) the contribution of the private sector to the gross domestic product was low, and (2) the oil revenues were the main source of the national income. As the oil revenues rapidly increased between 1972 and 1981, the government used every means at its disposal to encourage the private sector. The goal was to diversify the sources of national income in order to decrease the dependency on oil revenues as the main source of national income. To achieve this the government has provided interest-free loans to the private sector which, along with the demand, increased the gross domestic fixed-capital formation of the private sector. This study theoretically explains the phenomenal expansion of the private sector. Three models were developed from the least to the most difficult. The main principle of the models is that the expansion of the private sector is stimulated because of the low cost of capital in Saudi Arabia. Since oil revenues (the main source of government expenditures) have decreased in recent years, questions have been raised concerning the ability of the private sector to support the economy. It is argued that the demand of national and international markets will increase in the future, thus allowing the private sector to expand further. Even though the cost of capital will increase, Saudi companies will be able to compete either nationally or internationally. In addition, the competitiveness of the Saudi capital market may increase which will, in turn, benefit the Saudi economy.

  1. Late Quaternary paleodune deposits in Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAF: Paleoclimatic implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouwers, E.M.; Bown, T.M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Hadley, D.G. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Remnants of late Quaternary paleodunes are exposed near the coast of the Arabian Gulf and in large inland playas and interdunal areas in central and western Abu Dhabi Emirate over a distance of >45 km normal to the coast. Paleodunes occur south of Madinat Zayed (lat. 23[degree]35 N), which marks the northern limit of a modern dune field that grades into the mega-dune sand sea of the ar Rub al Khali, Saudi Arabia. Coastal paleodunes are composed of weakly cemented millolid foraminifers, ooids, and rounded biogenic grains, whereas inland and southward the paleodunes show a progressive increase in the proportion of eolian quartz sand. The paleodunes exhibit large-scale trough foresets in remnant exposures 0.5 to 10 m thick, indicating paleowind directions from 65[degree] to 184[degree] (dominantly southeast transport). Scattered paleoplaya remnants provide paleodune scale. Paleoplaya deposits form buttes 30--50 m high. If coeval with the Paleodunes, large-scale paleodune fields are implied (100+ m high), comparable to star dunes and sand mountains at the northwestern edge of the ar Rub al Khali. Based on U-Th isotopic analyses, the carbonate paleodune sands are >160ka and probably >250ka. The carbonate source was a shallow, nearly dry Arabian Gulf at a time when large areas were exposed during a low sea-level stand. Paleowind direction indicates that Pleistocene prevailing winds were northwesterly, the direction of the dominant (winter shamal) wind today. The geographic extend and implied magnitude of the paleodunes suggest large-scale eolian transport of carbonate sand during the Pleistocene disiccation, and admixed quartz sand identifies a youthful stage of contemporaneous evolution of the ar Rub al Khali. Wave-eroded paleodunes probably floor much of the present-day Gulf and extend beneath the modern dunes and sand mountains.

  2. Fiscalini Farms Biomass Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Stringfellow; Mary Kay Camarillo; Jeremy Hanlon; Michael Jue; Chelsea Spier

    2011-09-30

    In this final report describes and documents research that was conducted by the Ecological Engineering Research Program (EERP) at the University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA) under subcontract to Fiscalini Farms LP for work under the Assistance Agreement DE-EE0001895 'Measurement and Evaluation of a Dairy Anaerobic Digestion/Power Generation System' from the United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. Fiscalini Farms is operating a 710 kW biomass-energy power plant that uses bio-methane, generated from plant biomass, cheese whey, and cattle manure via mesophilic anaerobic digestion, to produce electricity using an internal combustion engine. The primary objectives of the project were to document baseline conditions for the anaerobic digester and the combined heat and power (CHP) system used for the dairy-based biomass-energy production. The baseline condition of the plant was evaluated in the context of regulatory and economic constraints. In this final report, the operation of the plant between start-up in 2009 and operation in 2010 are documented and an interpretation of the technical data is provided. An economic analysis of the biomass energy system was previously completed (Appendix A) and the results from that study are discussed briefly in this report. Results from the start-up and first year of operation indicate that mesophilic anaerobic digestion of agricultural biomass, combined with an internal combustion engine, is a reliable source of alternative electrical production. A major advantage of biomass energy facilities located on dairy farms appears to be their inherent stability and ability to produce a consistent, 24 hour supply of electricity. However, technical analysis indicated that the Fiscalini Farms system was operating below capacity and that economic sustainability would be improved by increasing loading of feedstocks to the digester. Additional operational modifications, such as increased utilization of waste heat and better documentation of potential of carbon credits, would also improve the economic outlook. Analysis of baseline operational conditions indicated that a reduction in methane emissions and other greenhouse gas savings resulted from implementation of the project. The project results indicate that using anaerobic digestion to produce bio-methane from agricultural biomass is a promising source of electricity, but that significant challenges need to be addressed before dairy-based biomass energy production can be fully integrated into an alternative energy economy. The biomass energy facility was found to be operating undercapacity. Economic analysis indicated a positive economic sustainability, even at the reduced power production levels demonstrated during the baseline period. However, increasing methane generation capacity (via the importation of biomass codigestate) will be critical for increasing electricity output and improving the long-term economic sustainability of the operation. Dairy-based biomass energy plants are operating under strict environmental regulations applicable to both power-production and confined animal facilities and novel approached are being applied to maintain minimal environmental impacts. The use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for nitrous oxide control and a biological hydrogen sulfide control system were tested at this facility. Results from this study suggest that biomass energy systems can be compliant with reasonable scientifically based air and water pollution control regulations. The most significant challenge for the development of biomass energy as a viable component of power production on a regional scale is likely to be the availability of energy-rich organic feedstocks. Additionally, there needs to be further development of regional expertise in digester and power plant operations. At the Fiscalini facility, power production was limited by the availability of biomass for methane generation, not the designed system capacity. During the baseline study period, feedstocks included manure, sudan grass silage, and refused-feed. The ability of the dairy to produce silage in excess of on-site feed requirements limited power production. The availability of biomass energy crops and alternative feedstocks, such as agricultural and food wastes, will be a major determinant to the economic and environmental sustainability of biomass based electricity production.