Sample records for aquifer system south-central

  1. Climate Change Impacts on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Precipitation Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Cesalea

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation Variations on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Climate Change Impacts Cesalea N. Osborne Environmental Science Haskell Indian Nations University This project was sponsored by Kiksapa Consulting... through NASA CAN NNX10AU65A The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer spans five counties in south-central Oklahoma: Carter, Coal, Johnston, Murray, and Pontotoc Base Data • Aquifer study area, roads, rural/non-rural communities, state/county boundaries Methodology...

  2. Value of Irrigation Water with Alternative Input Prices, Product Prices and Yield Levels: Texas Coastal Bend, Cross Timbers, Deep East, Edwards Aquifer, El Paso, Gulf Coast, Lower South Central, Rolling Plains, Trans Pecos and Winter Garden Regions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, J. M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Beattie, B. R.

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    East Texas, Edwards Aquifer, E1 Paso, Lower and Upper Gulf Coast, Lower South Central, Rolling Plains I and II, Trans-Pecos and Winter Garden regions. The original contract (TWB 14-40034) did not specify several of the regions included in this report...

  3. aquifer system idaho: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scatterer InSAR reveals seasonal and long-term aquifer-system response to groundwater pumping and artificial Geosciences Websites Summary: characterize the storage properties of...

  4. aquifer system brazil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of southern England a simple methodology Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 485495 (2002) EGS Physics Websites Summary: Estimating daily recharge to the Chalk aquifer of...

  5. Economic and Hydrologic Implications of Proposed Edwards Aquifer Management Plans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Carl R.; Jones, Lonnie L.; Williams, R. Lynn; Jordan, Wayne R.; McCarl, Bruce A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Edwards Aquifer underlies a large region in south central Texas extending from west of Uvalde to Austin. The karstic aquifer supports irrigated agriculture in the western part of the region, provides the sole source of water supply for San...

  6. Hydrogeology and structure of the Bluewater Springs area south central Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padilla, C.E. [AGES, Billings, MT (United States); Osborne, T.J. [Braun Intertec, Billings, MT (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bluewater springs area in south central Montana was the site of oil and gas exploration in the first half of this century. Though no significant oil was found, artesian water wells produced over 3,000 gallons per minute. Artesian springs in the area produce tufa deposits over faulted, northwest dipping Mesozoic and upper Paleozoic sediments. Two new faults were mapped in the vicinity, one of these a high angle vertical fault dissects an anticline. The Tensleep and Madison aquifers (700-1,000 feet deep) leak water to the surface through faults and fractures, producing variable water quality depending on the minerals dissolved from overlying rock formations. Evaluation of limited aquifer data reveals the following: (1) hydraulic conductivity of 40,000 to 300,000 gpd/ft, (2) hydrostatic head greater than 400 feet above land surface. (3) Total dissolved solids concentrations were 2,370 ppm in Big Bluewater Springs, but only 1,200 ppm in a Tensleep well in the vicinity. Flowing wells 45 to 70 years old have failed leading to major yield reductions, and cessation of flow. Potentially corrosive groundwater coupled with excessive flow velocities and inadequate well construction has likely led to well failures. In response, major uncontrolled alterations of groundwater flow systems have occurred with outbreaks of new springs and sinkholes near failed wells. New wells must be carefully planned, constructed and tested to avoid excessive interference, depressurization and failure.

  7. DOE South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl DOE South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl March 13, 2015 8:00AM to 8:00PM EDT Shawnee State University, 940 Second Street, Portsmouth,...

  8. Chillicothe High School wins 2015 South Central Ohio Regional...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Chillicothe High School wins 2015 South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl Chillicothe High School wins 2015 South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl March 13, 2015 - 6:43pm...

  9. Development of a three-dimensional ground-water model of the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1995 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurstner, S.K.; Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.; Freshley, M.D.; Williams, M.D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional numerical model of ground-water flow was developed for the uppermost unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. Development of the model is supported by the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is responsible for monitoring the sitewide movement of contaminants in ground water beneath the Hanford Site. Two objectives of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project are to (1) identify and quantify existing, emerging, or potential ground-water quality problems, and (2) assess the potential for contaminants to migrate from the Hanford Site through the ground-water pathway. Numerical models of the ground-water flow system are important tools for estimating future aquifer conditions and predicting the movement of contaminants through ground water. The Ground-Water Surveillance Project has supported development and maintenance of a two-dimensional model of the unconfined aquifer. This report describes upgrade of the two-dimensional model to a three-dimensional model. The numerical model is based on a three-dimensional conceptual model that will be continually refined and updated as additional information becomes available. This report presents a description of the three-dimensional conceptual model of ground-water flow in the unconfined aquifer system and then discusses the cur-rent state of the three-dimensional numerical model.

  10. On the solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bian, Aiguo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is composed of five chapters and three major contributions are presented in Chapter II, III and IV. Chapter I provided a review of studies on solute transport in aquifer-aquitard system. If the aquitard is considered, two...

  11. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  12. South Central Indiana REMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Central Indiana REMC, a Touchstone Energy Partner, offers incentives for residential customers to save energy in participating homes. Rebates are available for central air conditioning...

  13. A critical evaluation of the upper ocean heat budget in the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis data for the south central equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu H.; Lin W.; Liu, X.; Zhang, M.

    2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled ocean-atmospheric models suffer from the common bias of a spurious rain belt south of the central equatorial Pacific throughout the year. Observational constraints on key processes responsible for this bias are scarce. The recently available reanalysis from a coupled model system for the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) data is a potential benchmark for climate models in this region. Its suitability for model evaluation and validation, however, needs to be established. This paper examines the mixed layer heat budget and the ocean surface currents - key factors for the sea surface temperature control in the double Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone in the central Pacific - from 5{sup o}S to 10{sup o}S and 170{sup o}E to 150{sup o}W. Two independent approaches are used. The first approach is through comparison of CFSR data with collocated station observations from field experiments; the second is through the residual analysis of the heat budget of the mixed layer. We show that the CFSR overestimates the net surface flux in this region by 23 W m{sup -2}. The overestimated net surface flux is mainly due to an even larger overestimation of shortwave radiation by 44 W m{sup -2}, which is compensated by a surface latent heat flux overestimated by 14 W m{sup -2}. However, the quality of surface currents and the associated oceanic heat transport in CFSR are not compromised by the surface flux biases, and they agree with the best available estimates. The uncertainties of the observational data from field experiments are also briefly discussed in the present study.

  14. South Central Indiana REMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Central Indiana REMC offers a 6.0% interest loan for residential customers interested in making energy efficiency improvements to participating homes. The loan can be used for a variety of...

  15. Diurnal Precipitation Variations in South-Central New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orographic forcing of diurnal precipitation variations in south-central New Mexico is examined. Harmonic analysis reveals a strong diurnal cycle in precipitation frequency at all stations studied. In addition, relatively ...

  16. Hydraulics of horizontal wells in fractured shallow aquifer systems Eungyu Parka,*, Hongbin Zhanb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Hydraulics of horizontal wells in fractured shallow aquifer systems Eungyu Parka,*, Hongbin Zhanb Accepted 1 May 2003 Abstract An analysis of groundwater hydraulic head in the vicinity of a horizontal well in fractured or porous aquifers considering confined, leaky confined, and water-table aquifer boundary

  17. Hydrogeophysical methods for analyzing aquifer storage and recovery systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minsley, B.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Morgan, F.D.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogeophysical methods are presented that support the siting and monitoring of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems. These methods are presented as numerical simulations in the context of a proposed ASR experiment in Kuwait, although the techniques are applicable to numerous ASR projects. Bulk geophysical properties are calculated directly from ASR flow and solute transport simulations using standard petrophysical relationships and are used to simulate the dynamic geophysical response to ASR. This strategy provides a quantitative framework for determining site-specific geophysical methods and data acquisition geometries that can provide the most useful information about the ASR implementation. An axisymmetric, coupled fluid flow and solute transport model simulates injection, storage, and withdrawal of fresh water (salinity {approx}500 ppm) into the Dammam aquifer, a tertiary carbonate formation with native salinity approximately 6000 ppm. Sensitivity of the flow simulations to the correlation length of aquifer heterogeneity, aquifer dispersivity, and hydraulic permeability of the confining layer are investigated. The geophysical response using electrical resistivity, time-domain electromagnetic (TEM), and seismic methods is computed at regular intervals during the ASR simulation to investigate the sensitivity of these different techniques to changes in subsurface properties. For the electrical and electromagnetic methods, fluid electric conductivity is derived from the modeled salinity and is combined with an assumed porosity model to compute a bulk electrical resistivity structure. The seismic response is computed from the porosity model and changes in effective stress due to fluid pressure variations during injection/recovery, while changes in fluid properties are introduced through Gassmann fluid substitution.

  18. Column Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semprini, Lewis

    Column Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material bioremediation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) at the Hanford site in south- central Washington state. Benzoate in south- central Washington state has been a defense materials pro- duction complex since 1943. Carbon

  19. Permanent scatterer InSAR reveals seasonal and long-term aquifer-system response to groundwater pumping and artificial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    with an artificial recharge program, long-term, residual, inelastic aquifer-system compaction (subsidenceSAR reveals seasonal and long-term aquifer-system response to groundwater pumping and artificial rechargePermanent scatterer InSAR reveals seasonal and long-term aquifer-system response to groundwater

  20. Preliminary hydrogeologic framework of the Silurian and Devonian carbonate aquifer system in the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region of Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, G.D. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aquifer and confining units have been identified; data on the thickness, extent, and structural configuration of these units have been collected; and thickness and structure-contour maps have been generated. Hydrologic information for the confining units and the aquifer also has been compiled. Where present, the confining unit that caps the carbonate aquifer consists of shales of Middle and Upper Devonian age and Lower Mississippian age, however, these units have been eroded from a large part of the study area. The regional carbonate aquifer consists of Silurian and Devonian limestones and dolomites. The rocks that comprise the aquifer in Indiana and northwestern Illinois are grouped into four major stratigraphic units: Brassfield and Sexton Creek Limestones or the Cataract Formation, the Salamonie Dolomite, the Salina Group, and the Detroit River and Traverse Formations or the Muscatatuck Group. In Ohio and southern Michigan the aquifer is grouped into ten stratigraphic units: Brassfield Limestone and Cataract Formation, the Dayton Limestone, the Rochester Shale equivalent, the Lockport Dolomite, the Salina Formation, the Hillsboro Sandstone, the Detroit River Group, the Columbus Limestone, the Delaware Limestone, and the Traverse Formation. The thickness of the carbonate aquifer increases from the contact with the outcropping Ordovician shales in the south-central part of the study area from the contact into the Appalachian Foreland Structural Basin from 0 ft at the contact to more than 700 ft at the eastern boundary of the study area, to more than 1,000 ft beneath Lake Erie and greater than 1,200 ft in southeastern Michigan. At the edge of the Michigan Intercontinental Structural Basin in western Ohio and eastern Indiana, the thickness ranges from 700 to 900 ft. and from 200 ft to 300 ft in south-central Indiana along the northeastern edge of the Illinois Intercontinental Structural Basin.

  1. Hydrochemistry and hydrogeologic conditions within the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Webber, W.D.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, Flow System Characterization Task. Pacific Northwest Laboratory examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system for the US Department of Energy (DOE). As part of this activity, groundwater samples were collected over the past 2 years from selected wells completed in the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt. The hydrochemical and isotopic information obtained from these groundwater samples provides hydrologic information concerning the aquifer-flow system. Ideally, when combined with other hydrologic property information, hydrochemical and isotopic data can be used to evaluate the origin and source of groundwater, areal groundwater-flow patterns, residence and groundwater travel time, rock/groundwater reactions, and aquifer intercommunication for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydrochemical properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report provides the hydrogeologic characteristics (Section 2.0) and hydrochemical properties (Section 3.0) for groundwater within this system. A detailed description of the range of the identified hydrochemical parameter subgroups for groundwater in the upper basalt confined aquifer system is also presented in Section 3.0. Evidence that is indicative of aquifer contamination/aquifer intercommunication and an assessment of the potential for offsite migration of contaminants in groundwater within the upper basalt aquifer is provided in Section 4.0. The references cited throughout the report are given in Section 5.0. Tables that summarize groundwater sample analysis results for individual test interval/well sites are included in the Appendix.

  2. A parametric and economic investigation of an energy system utilizing aquifer storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tostengard, Stephen Gilbert

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Chairman of Committee) (Co-Chairman of Committee) (He d. of Department (Member) e ber) December 1980 ABSTRACT A Parametric and Economic Investigation of an Energy System Utilizing Aquifer Storage. (Dec. 1980) Stephen Gilbert Tostengard B. S. , Texas Lutheran... College Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Or. Richard R. Davison Dr. William B. Harris Aquifers may be used as long-term storage facilities i'or heated or chilled water. Computer models were used to simulate the thermal response of an aquafer...

  3. Three-dimensional conceptual model for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1994 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.; Vermeul, V.R.; Macdonald, Q.C.; Schubert, S.E.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work conducted during the fiscal year 1994 to development an improved three-dimensional conceptual model of ground-water flow in the unconfined aquifer system across the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, which is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The main objective of the ongoing effort to develop an improved conceptual model of ground-water flow is to provide the basis for improved numerical report models that will be capable of accurately predicting the movement of radioactive and chemical contaminant plumes in the aquifer beneath Hanford. More accurate ground-water flow models will also be useful in assessing the impacts of changes in facilities and operations. For example, decreasing volumes of operational waste-water discharge are resulting in a declining water table in parts of the unconfined aquifer. In addition to supporting numerical modeling, the conceptual model also provides a qualitative understanding of the movement of ground water and contaminants in the aquifer.

  4. Descriptive analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, R.W.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and economic feasibility of large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) was examined. A key to ATESs attractiveness is its simplicity of design and construction. The storage device consists of two ordinary water wells drilled into an aquifer, connected at the surface by piping and a heat exchanger. During the storage cycle water is pumped out of the aquifer, through the heat exchanger to absorb thermal energy, and then back down into the aquifer through the second well. The thermal storage remains in the aquifer storage bubble until required for use, when it is recovered by reversing the storage operation. For many applications the installation can probably be designed and constructed using existing site-specific information and modern well-drilling techniques. The potential for cost-effective implementation of ATES was investigated in the Twin Cities District Heating-Cogeneration Study in Minnesota. In the study, ATES demonstrated a net energy saving of 32% over the nonstorage scenario, with an annual energy cost saving of $31 million. Discounting these savings over the life of the project, the authors found that the break-even capital cost for ATES construction was $76/kW thermal, far above the estimated ATES development cost of $23 to 50/kW thermal. It appears tht ATES can be highly cost effective as well as achieve substantial fuel savings. ATES would be environmentally beneficial and could be used in many parts of the USA. The existing body of information on ATES indicates that it is a cost-effective, fuel-conserving technique for providing thermal energy for residential, commercial, and industrial users. The negative aspects are minor and highly site-specific, and do not seem to pose a threat to widespread commercialization. With a suitable institutional framework, ATES promises to supply a substantial portion of the nation's future energy needs. (LCL)

  5. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 7. The south central region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, R.L.; Graves, L.F.; Sprankle, A.C.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas of the south central region combines seven collections of wind resource data: one for the region, and one for each of the six states (Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas). At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than that provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  6. Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan Joseph K. Goode,1 the controls on this intramontane basin deformation, we study the Naryn Basin of south central Kyrgyzstan central Kyrgyzstan, Tectonics, 30, TC6009, doi:10.1029/2011TC002910. 1. Introduction [2] Deformation

  7. Two well storage systems for combined heating and airconditioning by groundwater heatpumps in shallow aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelka, W.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of soil and ground water as an energy source and heat storage systems for heat pumps in order to conserve energy in heating and air conditioning buildings is discussed. Information is included on heat pump operation and performance, aquifer characteristics, soil and ground water temperatures, and cooling and heating demands. Mathematical models are used to calculate flow and temperature fields in the aquifer. It is concluded that two well storage systems with ground water heat pumps are desirable, particularly in northern climates. (LCL)

  8. Mineralogical and Microbial Controls on Iron Reduction in a Contaminated Aquifer-Wetland System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howson, Andrea Melissa

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    minerals are important controls on iron reduction in natural systems. For the first phase of this research a series of sequential chemical extractions was performed on a core taken from a landfill-leachate-contaminated wetland-aquifer system at the Norman...

  9. Late Cenozoic structure and stratigraphy of south-central Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)]|[Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Geology; Campbell, N.P. [Yakima Valley Coll., WA (United States); Fecht, K.R.; Lindsey, K.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural framework of the Columbia Basin began developing before Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) volcanism. Prior to 17.5 Ma, the eastern part of the basin was a relatively stable area, with a basement of Paleozoic and older crystalline rock. The western part was an area of subsidence in which large volumes of sediment and volcanic rocks accumulated. Concurrent with eruption of the CRBG, anticlinal ridges of the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) were growing under north-south compression. Topographic expression of these features was later masked by the large volume of CRBG basalt flowing west from fissures in the eastern Columbia Basin. The folds continued to develop after cessation of volcanism, leading to as much as 1,000 m of structural relief in the past 10 million years. Post-CRBG evolution of the Columbia Basin is recorded principally in folding and faulting in the YFB and sediments deposited in the basins. The accompanying tectonism resulted in lateral migration of major depositional systems into subsiding structural lows. Although known late Cenozoic faults are on anticlinal ridges, earthquake focal mechanisms and contemporary strain measurements indicate most stress release is occurring in the synclinal areas under north-south compression. There is no obvious correlation between focal mechanisms for earthquakes whose foci are in the CRBG and the location of known faults. High in situ stress values help to explain the occurrence of microseismicity in the Columbia Basin but not the pattern. Microseismicity appears to occur in unaltered fresh basalt. Faulted basalt associated with the YFB is highly brecciated and commonly altered to clay. The high stress, abundance of ground water in confined aquifers of the CRBG, and altered basalt in fault zones suggest that the frontal faults on the anticlinal ridges probably have some aseismic deformation. 85 refs.

  10. Air and water flows in a large sand box with a two-layer aquifer system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Air and water flows in a large sand box with a two-layer aquifer system Xingxing Kuang & Jiu Jimmy negative air pressure can be generated in the vadose zone during pumping. The negative air pressure. The initial water-table depth has a significant effect on the generated negative air pressure. The shallower

  11. Tide-induced groundwater fluctuation in a coastal leaky confined aquifer system extending under the sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Tide-induced groundwater fluctuation in a coastal leaky confined aquifer system extending under, China Abstract. This paper presents the analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal fluctuation length, dimensionless leakage, and tidal efficiency on the groundwater level fluctuations in the inland

  12. South Central Ohio’s brightest to square off Friday at DOE Regional Science Bowl

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PIKETON, Ohio — A record number of teams (32) from 18 southern Ohio high schools will compete in the third annual South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl on Friday, March 13, 2015 at Shawnee State...

  13. Energy, Industry, and Transport in South-Central Africa’s History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavhunga, Clapperton Chakanets

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy must be seen in interaction with transportation and industry in order for its role in South-Central Africa to be fully understood. All three—energy, industry, and transportation—are themselves always socialized and ...

  14. Geostatistical Simulation of Hydrofacies Heterogeneity of the West Thessaly Aquifer Systems in Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modis, K., E-mail: kmodis@mail.ntua.gr; Sideri, D. [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering (Greece)] [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering (Greece)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating geological properties, such as relative positions and proportions of different hydrofacies, is of highest importance in order to render realistic geological patterns. Sequential indicator simulation (SIS) and Plurigaussian simulation (PS) are alternative methods for conceptual and deterministic modeling for the characterization of hydrofacies distribution. In this work, we studied the spatial differentiation of hydrofacies in the alluvial aquifer system of West Thessaly basin in Greece. For this, we applied both SIS and PS techniques to an extensive set of borehole data from that basin. Histograms of model versus experimental hydrofacies proportions and indicative cross sections were plotted in order to validate the results. The PS technique was shown to be more effective in reproducing the spatial characteristics of the different hydrofacies and their distribution across the study area. In addition, the permeability differentiations reflected in the PS model are in accordance to known heterogeneities of the aquifer capacity.

  15. aquifer system california: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    City Environmental Health Services Delivery System The purpose service delivery in California with the aim of providing a foundation for informed decision making about...

  16. Problems of trace element ratios and geothermometry in a gravel geothermal-aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonderegger, J.L.; Donovan, J.J.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Tertiary-age, block-faulted basin in which a Pleistocene gravel bed acts as a confined aquifer and permits the lateral dispersion of the geothermal fluids is studied. Basic data on geology and trace element holes presented previously are reproduced along with fluoride data. Evaluation of the phenomena in this system was attempted using a dissolved silica-enthalpy graph. A chalcedomy curve is also plotted. An enthalpy versus chloride plot suggests that either conductive cooling occurs before mixing or that higher chloride content background waters are available for mixing. (MHR)

  17. Biology and distribution of the histerid beetles associated with bovine feces in South Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summerlin, James William

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    :ed with bark beetles in western yellow pine, was conducted by Struble (1930). Recent studies concerning the potential value of histerids as biological control agents have done much to add to the knowledge of their behavior and bring recognition...BIOLOGY AND OISTRIBUTIilN GF THE HISTERID BEETLES ASSOCIATEO WITH BOVINE FECES IN SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS A Thesis JAMES WILLIAM SUMMERLIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABm University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  18. Sedimentology of mid Permian strata of the Sublett Range, South-Central Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duree, Dana Kay

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    eastward to the Cordilleran hingeline area during Roadian time, but returned to the Sublett Range by Wordian time. The basin opened north and northwestward of the Sublett Range, shoaled, ramp-like into central Utah, and more sharply toward... REGIONAL STRATIGRAPHY. 20 Park City Group. West-Central Utah, Northeastern Nevada, and South- Central Idaho. Kaibab Limestone Formation. Grandeur Formation vs. Grandeur Member. . . . . . . , . . . . . Grandeur Formation Plympton Formation Murdock...

  19. Applications of geographic information systems (GIS) in decision analysis for monitoring aquifer systems during oilfield development projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blundell, S.; Baldwin, D.O.; Anderson, N.J. [Integrated Geoscience, Inc., Helena, MT (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) coupled with numerical ground water models provide a powerful Decision Support System (DSS) and visualization tool for monitoring aquifer systems during oilfield development projects. A GIS is a coupled software/hardware system that stores, processes, and displays a variety of data structures (raster, vector, TIN, CAD) that have been geographically referenced to some common map projection and coordinate system. Georeferencing allows the analyst to integrate diverse types of data layers into thematic maps for analysis of spatial trends and analyses. The integration of quasi 3-D numerical ground water models with GIS provides project managers with a Decision Support System (DSS) to assess potential impacts to aquifer systems during oilfield development projects. The rapid advancement in desktop PC computing power and data storage has allowed software developers to produce 32-bit GIS and data integration software applications. A variety of image processing, GIS, and numerical ground water modeling software will be used to demonstrate techniques for monitoring and visualizing the migration of an oilfield brine plume leaking during an oilfield development project. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of data structures and on database design to create a DSS within a desktop GIS to serve Project Managers during oilfield development.

  20. Preliminary delineation of natural geochemical reactions, Snake River Plain aquifer system, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and vicinity, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knobel, L.L.; Bartholomay, R.C.; Orr, B.R.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting a study to determine the natural geochemistry of the Snake River Plain aquifer system at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. As part of this study, a group of geochemical reactions that partially control the natural chemistry of ground water at the INEL were identified. Mineralogy of the aquifer matrix was determined using X-ray diffraction and thin-section analysis and theoretical stabilities of the minerals were used to identify potential solid-phase reactants and products of the reactions. The reactants and products that have an important contribution to the natural geochemistry include labradorite, olivine, pyroxene, smectite, calcite, ferric oxyhydroxide, and several silica phases. To further identify the reactions, analyses of 22 representative water samples from sites tapping the Snake River Plain aquifer system were used to determine the thermodynamic condition of the ground water relative to the minerals in the framework of the aquifer system. Principal reactions modifying the natural geochemical system include congruent dissolution of olivine, diopside, amorphous silica, and anhydrite; incongruent dissolution of labradorite with calcium montmorillonite as a residual product; precipitation of calcite and ferric oxyhydroxide; and oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron. Cation exchange reactions retard the downward movement of heavy, multivalent waste constituents where infiltration ponds are used for waste disposal.

  1. Sequence Stratigraphy and Detrital Zircon Provenance of the Eureka Quartzite in South-Central Nevada and Eastern California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workman, Benjamin David

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Middle-Late Ordovician Eureka Quartzite in south-central Nevada and eastern California is a supermature quartz arenite that was deposited along the Lower Paleozoic western passive margin of Laurentia. Measured section ...

  2. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  4. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

  5. Analysis of No-Flow Boundaries in Mixed Unconfined-Confined Aquifer Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerlan, Kent A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As human population increases, demand for water supplies will cause an increase in pumping rates from confined aquifers which may become unconfined after long-term pumping. Such an unconfined-confined conversion problem has not been fully...

  6. The tectonic development of south-central Asia and the paleogeographic setting of its hydrocarbon resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scotese, C.R. (Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (USA)); Tyrell, W.W. Jr. (Amoco Production Co., Houston, TX (USA)); Maher, K.A. (Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The countries of south-central Asia (Afghanistan to Thailand) are made up of fragments of Gondwana that collided with the southern margin of Eurasia during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. The Cimmerian terranes (Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, Qiang Tang, and Burma-Malaya) rifted away from Gondwana beginning in the Late Carboniferous and were accreted to Asia during the Late Triassic-Jurassic. The Lhasa terrane, presumably also derived from Gondwana, was accreted during the Late Jurassic. By the Early Cretaceous, India-Madagascar had separated from Africa and from Australia-Antarctica. In the middle Cretaceous, India rapidly rifted away from Madagascar, and during the early Eocene collided with Asia giving rise to the Tibetam Plateau and the mountain belts from Afghanistan through Burma. The sedimentary basins and petroleum provinces adjacent to and south of these collision zones are best understood when viewed in the context of their tectonic history and paleogeographic setting. About 7 billion bbl of oil and 50 tcf of gas have been discovered in south-central Asia, mostly in Cenozoic deltaic sandstones or marine carbonate reservoirs in rift (Cambay), passive margin (Bombay shelf), and foreland basins (Assam, Indux, Potwar, Bengal) in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, and in a fore-arc setting in Burma. Source rocks are mostly Paleogene shale, but some Paleozoic and Mesozoic sources be present in Pakistan. New exploration is underway or will begin soon in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Burma.

  7. A parametric and economic investigation of an energy system utilizing aquifer storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tostengard, Stephen Gilbert

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CLIMATE. . 5. RESULTS PROM SOLAR& COLD CLIMATE. . 6. RESULTS PROM SPRAY POR SEVERAL LOCATIONS. . 7. RESULTS PROM SPRAY POR AMARILLO. . 8. EXAMPLE OP SOLAR AVERAGING PROCESS. . 9. WET-BULB DATA POR SPRAY. 39 . . 50 . . 70 . . 76 . . 78 . . 159... aquifer at a mild climate. 52 8. Recovery efficiency for a 30. 48 m aquii'er in a mild climate. 9. Recovery efficiency for a 15. 24 m aquifer in a cold climate. 10 ' Recovery efficiency versus injection volume 53 for cold water injection...

  8. Geologic map of the Gulkana B-1 quadrangle, south-central Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, D.H.; Ratte, J.C.; Schmoll, H.R.; Leeman, W.P.; Smith, J.G.; Yehle, L.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quadrangle includes the Capital Mountain Volcano and the northern part of Mount Sanford Volcano in the Wrangell Mountains of south-central Alaska. The Capital Mountain volcano is a relatively small, andesitic shield volcano of Pleistocene age, which contains a 4-km-diameter summit caldera and a spectacular post-caldera radial dike swam. Lava flows from the younger Pleistocene Mount Sanford Volcano overlap the south side of the Capital Mountain Volcano. Copper-stained fractures in basaltic andesite related to a dike-filled rift of the North Sanford eruptive center are the only sign of mineralization in the quadrangle. Rock glaciers, deposits of Holocene and Pleistocene valley glaciers and Pleistocene Copper River basin glaciers mantle much of the volcanic bedrock below elevations of 5,500 ft.

  9. Analysis of No-Flow Boundaries in Mixed Unconfined-Confined Aquifer Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerlan, Kent A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    investigated before and is the focus of this thesis. The objective of this thesis is to use both analytical and numerical modeling to investigate groundwater flow in an unconfined-confined aquifer including the no-flow lateral boundary effect and the regional...

  10. The south central Texas heavy rain event of October 1998: an MM5 simulation and diagnosis of convective initiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Richard Kevin

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the weekend of 17-18 October 1998, extremely heavy rainfall over south central Texas resulted in widespread flash flooding and numerous river floods. Southern Hays County received 760 mm of rainfall, and an area of 18,000 kmČ recorded over...

  11. Wisconsinan and Sangamonian climate interpreted from fossil ostracodes and vegetation in south-central Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, B.B. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Forester, R.M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Zhu, Hong; Baker, R.G. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interpretation of paleoclimate during the late Illinoian, Sangamonian, and Wisconsinan Ages in the region of present south-central Illinois has been based on plant macrofossil, pollen, and vertebrate records. The ostracode records identify periods of flow across the basins and perhaps characteristics of groundwater discharge or recharge. Basins with the largest lake-to-catchment-area ratio were most sensitive to changes in effective moisture and hydrochemistry. The Sangamonian included three intervals during which the winters were warmer than those of historical record. These intervals are represented by sediment containing relatively abundant arboreal pollen, notably bald cypress and sweet gum, and the ostracode Heterocypris punctata, which lives in subtropical to tropical lakes and estuaries. H. punctata occurs with other ostracodes that require low salinity; their association indicates that precipitation typically exceeded evaporation and that the basin was affected by throughflow. The Sangamonian ended with two warm, wet episodes that sandwich an interval implying prairie lake conditions. Warmth-loving species are abundantly represented in upper Sangamonian sediments. Such warm, wet episodes are not known to have occurred in the Midcontinent during the Holocene. The top of the Sangamonian in all except the Pittsburgh Basin is capped by a layer of reworked sediment containing fluvial ostracodes and exotic mixtures of pollen, including both spruce and sweet gum but dominated by chenopods. The reworked layer is overlain by Wisconsinan sediment containing abundant pollen of boreal taxa and ostracodes that indicate basin throughflow.

  12. Geochemistry of the Yegua Aquifer system and its relation to microbial processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlichenmeyer, Jeannette Leone

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in southwestern North Dakota and northwestern South Dakota They noted a decrease in sulfate and an increase in HS- along the hydrologic flow path. In a study of the Black Creek aquifer in South Carolina, Chapelle and McMahon (1991) found evidence that sulfate... in South Carolina, Fredrickson et aL (1991) found higher viable counts in the coarse sands of the Middendorf formation than in the fine sands of the Cape Fear formation, or in lignites and lignite-sands. Also, at the Savannah River Site higher numbers...

  13. Sedimentology, sediment dispersal patterns, and stratigraphic architecture of progradational carbonate sand bodies, lower Lake Valley Formation (Mississippian), Sacramento Mountains, south-central New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Michael Francis

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alamogordo, Nunn, and Tierra Blanca Members of the Lake Valley Formation comprise one of at least four transgressive-regressive sequences found within Mississippian strata of the Sacramento Mountains, south-central New Mexico. Excellent...

  14. Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifer near the ground surface to the storage formation.below the ground surface. The storage formation is boundedstorage formation, and Aquifer 8 the uppermost aquifer nearest to the ground

  15. Influence of browse availability on goat diets in an Acacia senagal savannah of South-Central Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamau, Peter Njenga

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -November) at Kiboko, Kenya, 1982 53 9 Monthly selection order across all canopy treatments of species found in diets of goats grazing an Acacia eenega7. savannah at Kiboko, Kenya, 1982 . 56 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 Location of the National Range Research... to 1980 the population of Kenya rose from 8 million to 15, 8 million. Rangelands will become more important as alternative areas to supply surplus food needed to feed the nation. The savannahs of south-central Kenya exhibi t a wide ar ray of bush...

  16. The effect of egg grading on quality and returns to the producer in selected areas of south central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deck, Alvin Nick

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ ~ ~ ~ t ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 14 THE EFFECT OF EGG GRADING ON QUALITY AND RETURNS TO THE PRODUCER ZN SELECTED AREAS OF SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS A Thesis By Alvin Nick Deok Approved as to style and oontent by& C of Committee Head of Department... January 1955 LlBRARy A A M COLLEGE OF TEXAS THE EFFECT OF EGG GRADING ON QUALITY AND RETURNS TO THE PRODUGER IN SELECTED AREAS OF SOUTH GENTRAI TEXAS A Thesis Alvin Nick Deok IJ Submitted to ths Graduate Sohool of the Agrioultural and Mechanical...

  17. Status report on the development of a three-dimensional conceptual model for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the status of development of a three-dimensional conceptual model for the unconfined aquifer system at Hanford. A conceptual model is needed to support development of a realistic three-dimensional numerical model for predicting ground-water flow and the transport of contaminants. The report focuses on developing a hydrogeologic framework, assessing available hydraulic property data, describing flow-system boundaries, and evaluating areal recharge and leakage. Geologic descriptions of samples obtained during well drilling were used to prepare cross sections that correlate relatively continuous layers. The layers were defined based on textural differences that are expected to reflect differences in hydraulic properties. Assigning hydraulic properties to the layers is a critical part of the conceptual model. Available hydraulic property data for the study area were compiled and were correlated with the geologic layers where possible. Flow-system boundaries are present within the study area at basalt outcrops and at the Columbia River. Boundary conditions have been evaluated for these areas. Available estimates of areal recharge from precipitation were compiled.

  18. AQUIFER CHARACTERIZATION JOHN S. BRIDGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioremediation Site in southwestern Michigan, where detailed estimates of aquifer properties were needed to accurately simulate multi-component reactive transport and to design an effective bioremediation strategy-long continuous cores was collected in the vicinity of the bioremediation-system delivery wells. These cores were

  19. Three-dimensional analysis of future groundwater flow conditions and contaminant plume transport in the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1996 and 1997 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, C.R.; Wurstner, S.K.; Williams, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.; Bergeron, M.P.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow and transport, based on the Coupled Fluid Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) code, was developed for the Hanford Site to support the Hanford Groundwater Project (HGWP), managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The model was developed to increase the understanding and better forecast the migration of several contaminant plumes being monitored by the HGWP, and to support the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200-Area Plateau. Recent modeling efforts have focused on continued refinement of an initial version of the three-dimensional model developed in 1995 and its application to simulate future transport of selected contaminant plumes in the aquifer system. This version of the model was updated using a more current version of the CFEST code called CFEST96. Prior to conducting simulations of contaminant transport with the three-dimensional model, a previous steady-state, two-dimensional model of the unconfined aquifer system was recalibrated to 1979 water-table conditions with a statistical inverse method implemented in the CFEST-INV computer code. The results of the recalibration were used to refine the three-dimensional conceptual model and to calibrate it with a conceptualization that preserves the two-dimensional hydraulic properties and knowledge of the aquifer`s three-dimensional properties for the same 1979 water-table conditions. The transient behavior of the three-dimensional flow model was also calibrated by adjusting model storage properties (specific yield) until transient water-table predictions approximated observed water-table elevations between 1979 and 1996.

  20. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solid-fluid heat storage systems in the ground; extractions0 Thermal storage of cold water in ground water aquifers forA. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-gravel ground:

  1. The Edwards Aquifer: An Economic Perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merrifield, John D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Griffin, Ronald C.; Emerson, Peter M.; Collinge, Robert A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    now served by the Edwards Aquifer. A system of transferable groundwater rights is commendable for several reasons. It is flexible because it accomodates unforeseeable future shifts in demand. Transferable rights allow voluntary action on behalf...

  2. aquifers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31 Gulf Service Station... Neathery, Jeffrey Stephen 2012-06-07 331 Evaluation of kinetic controls on sulfate reduction in a contaminated wetland-aquifer system Texas A&M...

  3. High-resolution stratigraphic and structural characterization of the fault-partitioned Hickory Sandstone aquifer system, Mason County, central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Jason Steven

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hickory Sandstone is an important aquifer in central Texas and is partitioned by faults that impede cross-fault fluid flow. This study provides a detailed stratigraphic and structural model in the vicinity of a normal, oblique-slip fault...

  4. Chemical and Isotopic Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the Geothermal System at Long Valley, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Chemical...

  5. THE TEPHRA STRATIGRAPHY OF TWO LAKES IN SOUTH-CENTRAL BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MID-LATE HOLOCENE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT GLACIER PEAK AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavin, Daniel G.

    FOR THE MID-LATE HOLOCENE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT GLACIER PEAK AND MOUNT ST. HELENS, WASHINGTON, USA Objective · New evidence of the ages and plume trajectories for four tephras. First evidence of Glacier Peak A, D, and Dusty Creek, and Mt. St. Helens P, as airfall tephra in south-central British Columbia. · The Glacier

  6. Reduction of Risk in Exploration and Prospect Generation through a Multidisciplinary Basin-Analysis Program in the South-Central Mid-Continent Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, S.; Barker, C.; Fite, J.; George, S.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.; Jordan, J., Szpakiewicz, M.; Person, M.; Reeves, T.K.; Safley, E.; Swenson, J.B.; Volk, L.; and Erickson, R.

    1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report will discuss a series of regional studies that were undertaken within the South-Central Mid-Continent region of the U.S. Coverage is also provided about a series of innovative techniques that were used for this assessment.

  7. Structural geometry, strain distribution, and mechanical evolution of eastern Umtanum Ridge and a comparison with other selected localities within Yakima fold structures, south-central Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, E.H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima fold system of south-central Washington and north-central Oregon is a series of megascopic anticlinal ridge of multilayered basalt. Cross-sectional strain analyses were performed at five localities within three anticlines. The analyses show that the strain is consistent both laterally along a fold and within different folds. Folding strain is localized layer-internal faulting, extensive shattering, and limited layer-parallel faulting. Most strain is cataclastic, but glassy flow tops appear to have been more ductile. The strain distributions and structural geometries accord well with a flexural flow buckle model; however, the internal cataclastic flow is not inherently penetrative and limited flexural slip has occurred. This fold model suggests that most strain in the fold is by simple shear and it took place above the topographic surface of adjacent synclinal valleys. Large reverse faults associated with the anticlines are interpreted to be folding strain required by the concentric folding and their displacement is interpreted to have reached the surface late in the folding process. Therefore, the observed strain and its distribution are interpreted to be not directly the result of regional plateau shortening, but of local stresses and resultant strains related to fold geometry. A mechanical analysis of the Umtanum structure termination geometry, combined with slickenside striae movement directions from the study areas suggests that the Palouse slope has behaved as a rigid buttress around which the basalt has rotated clockwise into the folds from the southeast. Compression-box clay modeling of the Yakima fold system within the Pasco Basin shows that the buttress edge orientations control the localization and orientations of buckle folds. Fold orientations and three-dimensional shapes remarkably resembling the Yakima fold system in the Pasco Basin were produced under north-south compression.

  8. Evaluation of kinetic controls on sulfate reduction in a contaminated wetland-aquifer system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneeshaw, Tara Ann

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    oxidation of organic material to CO2 (Ball and Reinhard, 1996; Cozzarelli et al., 1999; Wilson et al., 2000; Wilson et al., 2004). The resulting reactions and reaction rates in groundwater systems thus partially depend on the availability of electron...., 1999), push-pull tests (Istok et al., 1997; Kleikemper et al., 2002; Kneeshaw et al., 2007; McGuire et al., 2002; Schroth et al., 1998; Schroth et al., 2001b), and tracer tests (Rugge et al., 1999; Sandrin et al., 2004; Smith et al., 1996...

  9. Method and system for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for extraction of chemicals from an groundwater remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating groundwater contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

  10. Geology, thermal maturation, and source rock geochemistry in a volcanic covered basin: San Juan sag, south-central Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gries, R.R. [Priority Oil & Gas, Denver, CO (United States); Clayton, J.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Leonard, C. [Platte River Associates, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Juan sag, concealed by the vast San Juan volcanic field of south-central Colorado, has only recently benefited from oil and gas wildcat drilling and evaluations. Sound geochemical analyses and maturation modeling are essential elements for successful exploration and development. Oil has been produced in minor quantities from an Oligocene sill in the Mancos Shale within the sag, and major oil and gas production occurs from stratigraphically equivalent rocks in the San Juan basin to the southwest and in the Denver basin to the northeast. The objectives of this study were to identify potential source rocks, assess thermal maturity, and determine hydrocarbon-source bed relationships. Source rocks are present in the San Juan sag in the upper and lower Mancos Shale (including the Niobrara Member), which consists of about 666 m (2184 ft) of marine shale with from 0.5 to 3.1 wt. % organic carbon. Pyrolysis yields (S{sub 1} + S{sub 2} = 2000-6000 ppm) and solvent extraction yields (1000-4000 ppm) indicate that some intervals within the Mancos Shale are good potential source rocks for oil, containing type II organic matter, according to Rock-Eval pyrolysis assay.

  11. Aquifer behavior with reinjection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonet, Euclides Jose

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rates, so only the latter is considered here. Six cases have been treated here. They are: f) A linear aquifer of finite width and extent. Water is injected into the aquifer at point x, y at constant rate. The pres- 0 0 sure along the line x = o... is maintained at zero pressure. See Figure f. Equations showing the potential distribution, rates, velocity and cumulative influx have been developed. Certain numerical results are shown. 2) A linear aquifer of finite width and extent. Water is injected...

  12. A simulation model for generation of aquifer characteristics and contaminant concentrations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deena, Jayaram

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remediation of natural systems such as aquifers requires a thorough characterization of its physical and hydraulic properties. Variability in physical and hydraulic properties of aquifers makes design and operation of suitable remediation process...

  13. State and Local Code Implementation: South-central Region - 2014 BTO Peer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideosSpring O&MAnnouncement2-002SystemReview |

  14. A paleoenvironmental study of the Lower Mississippian Caballero Formation and Andrecito member of the Lake Valley Formation in the south-central Sacramento Mountains, Otero County, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Peter Gillham

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formations. . . . . . . 3 Southern exposure of Muleshoe Mound and flank beds. . . Isopach of Mississippian strata in southwestern and south-central New Mexico (from Kottlowski . 1963). . . . . . . . . 14 Mountains and counties of southwestern and south... of section 12 in Deadman Canyon. 36 Photographs of bed types from the Andrecito member and large nodules from the Caballero Formation in San Andres Canyon. 39 12 Photographs of erosion of the lowermost Andrecito member in San Andres Canyon. 41 13 Photog...

  15. Provenance study and environments of deposition of the Pennslyvanian-Permian Wood River Formation, south-central Idaho, and the paleotectonic character of the Wood River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Christopher William

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and provenance of the conglomerates in the Big Wood River and Fish Creek Reservoir regions of south-central Idaho is needed. Distinguishing between marine and non-marine strata and determining source terranes will aid in reconstructing Wood River basin... paleogeography and paleo- tectonics. Three source areas have been postulated in recent years: 1, The Antler highland to the west, containing volcanics and low grade metamorphic rocks (Bissell, 1960; Churkin, 1962; Roberts and Thomasson, 1964). 2. The stable...

  16. Aquifer behavior with reinjection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonet, Euclides Jose

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AQUIFER BEHAVIOR WITH REINJECTION A Thesis By EUCLIDES JOSE BONET Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARUM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, f967 Major Subject... Petroleum Engineering AQUIFER BEHAVIOR WITH REINJECTION A Thesis By E UC LI DES JOSE BONE T Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) May, 1967 ACKNOWLEDGMENT Thanks are due to Petroleo Brasilerio S...

  17. Aquifer sensitivity assessment modeling at a large scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, R.C.; Abert, C.C. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 480 square-mile region within Will County, northeastern Illinois was used as a test region for an evaluation of the sensitivity of aquifers to contamination. An aquifer sensitivity model was developed using a Geographic Information System (GIS) with ARC/INFO software to overlay and combine several data layers. Many of the input data layers were developed using 2-dimensional surface modeling (Interactive Surface Modeling (ISM)) and 3-dimensional volume modeling (Geologic Modeling Program (GMP)) computer software. Most of the input data layers (drift thickness, thickness of sand and gravel, depth to first aquifer) were derived from interpolation of descriptive logs for water wells and engineering borings from their study area. A total of 2,984 logs were used to produce these maps. The components used for the authors' model are (1) depth to sand and gravel or bedrock, (2) thickness of the uppermost sand and gravel aquifer, (3) drift thickness, and (4) absence or presence of uppermost bedrock aquifer. The model is an improvement over many aquifer sensitivity models because it combines specific information on depth to the uppermost sand and gravel aquifer with information on the thickness of the uppermost sand and gravel aquifer. The manipulation of the source maps according to rules-based assumptions results in a colored aquifer sensitivity map for the Will County study area. This colored map differentiates 42 aquifer sensitivity map areas by using line patterns within colors. The county-scale model results in an aquifer sensitivity map that can be a useful tool for making land-use planning decisions regarding aquifer protection and management of groundwater resources.

  18. Analyzing aquifers associated with gas reservoirs using aquifer influence functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Targac, Gary Wayne

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - teristics of the associated aquifer are vital to proper management of the reservoir. Typically, the reservoir and associated aquifer are located in a geologic setting which is highly faulted. Limited geologic and seismic knowledge exists about...ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  19. Analyzing aquifers associated with gas reservoirs using aquifer influence functions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Targac, Gary Wayne

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE V z May 1988 z V z z I- Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Approved as to style and content by: (Chair of Committ R...

  20. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  1. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  2. Stream aquifer interactions: analytical solution to estimate stream depletions caused by stream stage fluctuations and pumping wells near streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intaraprasong, Trin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is composed of three parts of contributions. Systems of a fully penetrating pumping well in a confined aquifer near a fully penetrating stream with and without streambeds are discussed in Chapter II. In Chapter III, stream-aquifer...

  3. Stream aquifer interactions: analytical solution to estimate stream depletions caused by stream stage fluctuations and pumping wells near streams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intaraprasong, Trin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is composed of three parts of contributions. Systems of a fully penetrating pumping well in a confined aquifer near a fully penetrating stream with and without streambeds are discussed in Chapter II. In Chapter III, stream-aquifer...

  4. System-Scale Model of Aquifer, Vadose Zone, and River Interactions for the Hanford 300 Area - Application to Uranium Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Bacon, Diana H.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Parker, Kyle R.; Waichler, Scott R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents a synthesis and integration of basic and applied research into a system-scale model of the Hanford 300 Area groundwater uranium plume, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Richland Operations (DOE-RL) office. The report integrates research findings and data from DOE Office of Science (DOE-SC), Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and DOE-RL projects, and from the site remediation and closure contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH). The three-dimensional, system-scale model addresses water flow and reactive transport of uranium for the coupled vadose zone, unconfined aquifer, and Columbia River shoreline of the Hanford 300 Area. The system-scale model of the 300 Area was developed to be a decision-support tool to evaluate processes of the total system affecting the groundwater uranium plume. The model can also be used to address “what if” questions regarding different remediation endpoints, and to assist in design and evaluation of field remediation efforts. For example, the proposed cleanup plan for the Hanford 300 Area includes removal, treatment, and disposal of contaminated sediments from known waste sites, enhanced attenuation of uranium hot spots in the vadose and periodically rewetted zone, and continued monitoring of groundwater with institutional controls. Illustrative simulations of polyphosphate infiltration were performed to demonstrate the ability of the system-scale model to address these types of questions. The use of this model in conjunction with continued field monitoring is expected to provide a rigorous basis for developing operational strategies for field remediation and for defining defensible remediation endpoints.

  5. Aquifer thermal energy storage: a survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, C.F.; Hopkins, D.; Hellstroem, G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disparity between energy production and demand in many power plants has led to increased research on the long-term, large-scale storage of thermal energy in aquifers. Field experiments have been conducted in Switzerland, France, the United States, Japan, and the People's Republic of China to study various technical aspects of aquifer storage of both hot and cold water. Furthermore, feasibility studies now in progress include technical, economic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable storage sites, and evaluation and design of pilot plants. Several theoretical and modeling studies are also under way. Among the topics being studied using numerical models are fluid and heat flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the efficiency of different injection/withdrawal schemes, buoyancy tilting, numerical dispersion, the use of compensation wells to counter regional flow, steam injection, and storage in narrow glacial deposits of high permeability. Experiments to date illustrate the need for further research and development to ensure successful implementation of an aquifer storage system. Some of the areas identified for further research include shape and location of the hydrodynamic and thermal fronts, choice of appropriate aquifers, thermal dispersion, possibility of land subsidence or uplift, thermal pollution, water chemistry, wellbore plugging and heat exchange efficiency, and control of corrosion.

  6. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridge

  7. Fluid Flow, Thermal History, and Diagenesis of the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group and Overlying Units in South-Central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Bradley Donald

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    controlled during calcite precipitation. Ouachita tectonism caused tectonically valved and gravity-driven fluid flow sourced from the Anadarko basin and possibly involved sandstone aquifers or basement. Mechanisms of ancient fluid flow appear to contrast...

  8. Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response storage potential of all the geological CO2 storage options and are widely distributed throughout the globe in all sedimentary basins.ForCO2 storage tohaveasignificantimpact on atmospheric levels

  9. Transboundary aquifers: Southwestern states assess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Mexico borders. The federally funded project, known as United States-Mexico Transboundary Aquifer Assessment, will provide a scientific foundation for state and local officials to address pressing water resources challenges in the United States... heavily on groundwater in aquifers. Municipal and other water users are increasing their use of groundwater, raising concerns about the long-term quality and availability of this supply, Michelsen said. ?Groundwater is the major and, in many areas...

  10. Transboundary aquifers: Southwestern states assess 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 14 Southwestern states assess Researchers from three universities in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona and from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are partnering on a new project to evaluate aquifers that span the United States... and Mexico borders. The federally funded project, known as United States-Mexico Transboundary Aquifer Assessment, will provide a scientific foundation for state and local officials to address pressing water resources challenges in the United States...

  11. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak RidgeAquifers for Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of

  12. Potential for future development of salt cavern storage in the upper Silurian Syracuse Formation of south-central New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, J.P.; Sarwar, G.; Guo, B. [Brooklyn College of the City Univ. of New York, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although depleted reservoirs remain the dominant structures used for storage fulfilling the demand for base load gas supply during the heating season, the current general surge in storage projects, nationwide, takes advantage of opportunities in Order 636, and makes greater use of salt caverns for gas storage. This reflects the increasing need by gas users, local distribution companies in particular, to quickly cycle a storage facility`s gas supply for services such as peak shaving, emergency supply, and system balancing to meet hourly swings. Occurrence of thick deposits of bedded salt deposits provides New York the capability to develop high deliverability salt cavern storage facilities. Furthermore, New York is uniquely positioned at the gateway to major northeastern markets to provide peak load storage services of natural gas supply. The thickest units of bedded salt in New York occur in the {open_quotes}F{close_quotes} horizon of the Upper Silurian Syracuse Formation. Three bedded salt cavern storage facilities have been recently proposed in New York. Two of these projects is much larger (with 5 Bcfg ultimate capacity), is under construction, and will provide valuable storage service to the Ellisburg-Leidy market center hub in Pennsylvania. Identification of possible sites for future salt cavern storage projects has been achieved chiefly by defining areas of thick beds of salt at sufficient depths close to gas transmission lines, with access to a freshwater supply for leaching, and possessing an acceptable method of brine disposal.

  13. Precision Dual-Aquifer Dewatering at a Low Level Radiological Cleanup in New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosnell, A. S.; Langman, J. W. Jr.; Zahl, H. A.; Miller, D. M.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleanup of low-level radioactive wastes at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), Wayne, New Jersey during the period October, 2000 through November, 2001 required the design, installation and operation of a dual-aquifer dewatering system to support excavation of contaminated soils. Waste disposal pits from a former rare-earth processing facility at the WISS had been in contact with the water table aquifer, resulting in moderate levels of radionuclides being present in the upper aquifer groundwater. An uncontaminated artesian aquifer underlies the water table aquifer, and is a localized drinking water supply source. The lower aquifer, confined by a silty clay unit, is flowing artesian and exhibits potentiometric heads of up to 4.5 meters above grade. This high potentiometric head presented a strong possibility that unloading due to excavation would result in a ''blowout'', particularly in areas where the confining unit was < 1 meter thick. Excavation of contaminated materials w as required down to the surface of the confining unit, potentially resulting in an artesian aquifer head of greater than 8 meters above the excavation surface. Consequently, it was determined that a dual-aquifer dewatering system would be required to permit excavation of contaminated material, with the water table aquifer dewatered to facilitate excavation, and the deep aquifer depressurized to prevent a ''blowout''. An additional concern was the potential for vertical migration of contamination present in the water table aquifer that could result from a vertical gradient reversal caused by excessive pumping in the confined system. With these considerations in mind, a conceptual dewatering plan was developed with three major goals: (1) dewater the water table aquifer to control radionuclide migration and allow excavation to proceed; (2) depressurize the lower, artesian aquifer to reduce the potential for a ''blowout''; and (3) develop a precise dewatering level control mechanism to insure a vertical gradient reversal did not result in cross-contamination. The plan was executed through a hydrogeologic investigation culminating with the design and implementation of a complex, multi-phased dual-aquifer dewatering system equipped with a state of the art monitoring network.

  14. Value of Irrigation Water with Alternative Input Prices, Product Prices and Yield Levels: Texas Coastal Bend, Cross Timbers, Deep East, Edwards Aquifer, El Paso, Gulf Coast, Lower South Central, Rolling Plains, Trans Pecos and Winter Garden Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, J. M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Beattie, B. R.

    of irrigation water in agricultural production stems in part from rapid change in prices paid for farm inputs and prices received for farm products. The past two years have been a period of abrupt and large increases in prices. Prices of some farm products have...

  15. Saving for dry days: Aquifer storage and recovery may help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    underground storage (MUS) of recoverable water. The Committee on Sustainable Underground Storage of Recoverable Water uses MUS ?to denote purposeful recharge of water into an aquifer system for intended recovery and use as an element of long-term water...tx H2O | pg. 2 Saving for dry days Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 3 Aquifer storage and recovery may help With reoccurring droughts and growing population, Texas will always be looking for better ways to save or use water. Some water...

  16. Saving for dry days: Aquifer storage and recovery may help 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 2 Saving for dry days Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 3 Aquifer storage and recovery may help With reoccurring droughts and growing population, Texas will always be looking for better ways to save or use water. Some water... suppliers in Texas are turning to aquifer storage and recovery. During the dry summer of 2008, the San Antonio Water System (SAWS) had enough assets in its ?bank? (of water) to make with- drawals to meet the needs of its customers. The water bank...

  17. AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO; VANMIDDLESWORTH PE

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining and losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.

  18. Radon Concern in the Hickory Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Amanda

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Randolph conducts her research at a small field site in the Katemcy Creek watershed in northern Mason and southern McCulloch counties. She hopes to gather enough data to achieve the first step in a long-term assessment of radionuclides in the Hickory... in the world's aquifers that are geologically and hydrologically similar to the Hickory aquifer,? she said, anticipating her research leading to further investigations of relationships between radon gas and its parent nuclides, aquifer mineralogy...

  19. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy storage in Aquifers.In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

  20. Seymour Aquifer Water Quality Improvement Project Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sij, J.; Morgan, C.; Belew, M.; Jones, D.; Wagner, K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer underlying over 300,000 acres in 20 counties in northwest central Texas. High nitrate concentrations are widespread in the Seymour Aquifer. Median nitrate levels in Knox, Haskell, Baylor, Hall, Wichita...

  1. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

  2. Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The Virginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  3. Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

  4. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withAnnual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors' InformationLarge-Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and

  5. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

  6. THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the complex to be found in the aquifer are volatile organic contaminants - particularly carbon tetrachloride ("carbon tet"). The carbon tet found in the aquifer is attributed to...

  7. ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~al modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-Mathematical modeling; thermal energy storage; aquifers;

  8. aquifer beneath yucca: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AQUIFER BIBI. IOGRAPHY... Wauters, John F 2012-06-07 38 Modelling Bioremediation of Uranium Contaminated Aquifers Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary:...

  9. aquifer recharge areas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processes across4 Fisher, Andrew 4 Investigation of Possible Extra Recharge During Pumping in Nottinghant .Aquifer Geosciences Websites Summary: completely from aquifer...

  10. aquifer recharge investigations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Investigation of Possible Extra Recharge During Pumping in Nottinghant .Aquifer Geosciences Websites Summary: completely from aquifer...

  11. aquifer testing recommendations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sand-And-Gravel Aquifer Santa; Christopher J. Richards 3 Airflow induced by pumping tests in unconfined aquifer with a low-permeability cap Geosciences Websites Summary:...

  12. alto piura aquifer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An impermeable layer isolates these two aquifers. This layer is deleted in some area and causes connection between two aquifers. This relationship affects the unconfined...

  13. AQUIFER STORAGE SITE EVALUATION AND MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Mike

    CO2 AQUIFER STORAGE SITE EVALUATION AND MONITORING Edited and compiled by Martin Smith, David Campbell, Eric Mackay and Debbie Polson Understanding the challenges of CO2 storage: results of the CASSEM Project Im agecopyrightofNERC #12;#12;CO2 Aquifer storage site evaluation and monitoring EDITED

  14. Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

  15. Reply to comments by Veling on"A Semi-Analytical Solution for Large-Scale Injection-Induced Pressure Perturbation and Leakage in a Laterally Bounded Aquifer-Aquitard System"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Veling (2010) pointed to 'a serious mistake' and 'mathematical inconsistency' in Zhou et al. (2009) because the dimensionless flow equations in Equation 4 (in terms of dimensionless hydraulic head rise in the aquifer and the aquitard) would give rise to additional terms when back converting to the groundwater flow equations, in the case that initial conditions for hydraulic head were spatially variable. He added, however, that the conclusions of the paper remain valid when uniform initial conditions are assumed. We accept this comment because we have indeed assumed uniform initial conditions in the system but failed to state this explicitly in the publication, partially because this assumption is very common in groundwater hydrology when deriving analytical and semi-analytical solutions. The same assumption was employed, for example, by Veling in Veling and Maas (2009), as stated 'For the ease of presentation we assume from here on that {phi}{sub i0} (r, z) ... are all equal to zero. An arbitrary initial function ... will complicate the solution, but not essentially'. We shall emphasize that with this assumption, our semi-analytical solutions and their derivations are correct.

  16. CX-002610: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central KansasCX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Sumner County, KansasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-002613: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central KansasCX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9Date: 12/11/2009Location(s): Sumner County, KansasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. Streamline simulation of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tunison, Douglas Irvin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLS) are a recognized source of groundwater contamination. Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) shows promise in increasing the efficiency and effectiveness over traditional "pump and treat" NAPL remediation...

  19. Modelling Bioremediation of Uranium Contaminated Aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotter, Ben E G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide extraction, processing and storage have resulted in a legacy of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater aquifers worldwide. An emerging remediation technology for such sites is the in situ immobilisation of ...

  20. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HAUSZ, W. , 1977. "Seasonal Storage in District Heating,"District Heating, July-August-September, 1977, pp. 5-11.aquifer storage for district heating and cooling. C. W.

  1. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersB. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

  2. A new pseudo time for geopressured aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villegas, Mauricio Eduardo

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time variable linearizes the pressure behavior of a single fluid flowing through a porous medium. Four cases were simulated: (1) three different aquifers at different states of flow and at a constant rate of water influx and, (2) a variable rate... to the diffusivity equati. on when nonlinear behavior exist and when rate changes are not very important. Traditional methods to calculate water influx in geopressured aquifers are improved by using the new Pseudo Time. DEDICATION To my family for what I am...

  3. A new pseudo time for geopressured aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villegas, Mauricio Eduardo

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A NEW PSEUDO TIME FOR GEOPRESSURED AQUIFERS A Thesis by MAURICIO EDUARDO VILLEGAS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A NEW PSEUDO TIME METHOD FOR GEOPRESSURED AQUIFERS A Thesis by MAURICIO EDUARDO VILLEGAS Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Robert A. Watte ger (Chair of Comm ee) Dr. James E. Russell (Member) Dr...

  4. Aquitard control of stream-aquifer interaction and flow to a horizontal well in coastal aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dongmin

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    from aquitard as a source term inside the aquifer which is called Hantushù��s assumption (1964), we linked flows in aquitard and aquifer by the idea of continuity of flux and drawdown. The result in this chapter is compared with that of Zhan and Park...

  5. ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~rmal1980), 'I'hermal energy storage? in a confined aquifer·--al modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-

  6. A Lumped Parameter Model for the Edwards Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anaya, Roberto; Wanakule, Nisai

    A lumped parameter model has been developed to simulate monthly water levels and spring flows in the Edwards Aquifer. It is less complex and easier to use than the existing complex finite difference models for the Edwards Aquifer. The lumped...

  7. Analyzing aquifer driven reservoirs using a computer-oriented approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flumerfelt, Raymond William

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on knowledge of the aquifer properties, nor does it depend specifically on a large amount of accurate pressure and production data. Instead, an initial reservoir model, based on the flow properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the aquifer, is refined...

  8. A Lumped Parameter Model for the Edwards Aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anaya, Roberto; Wanakule, Nisai

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lumped parameter model has been developed to simulate monthly water levels and spring flows in the Edwards Aquifer. It is less complex and easier to use than the existing complex finite difference models for the Edwards Aquifer. The lumped...

  9. Hydrogeologic characterization of the Hickory Sandstone Aquifer near Camp Air in northern Mason and southern McCulloch counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaney, Cynthia Daphine

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hickory Sandstone is the primary source of ground water for the Western Uano Region of Central Texas. Irrigation from the Hickory Aquifer has been intensive for the past 15 years. Available hydrogeologic data for development of a management model... are very limited. Localized detailed studies of the spatial and temporal variations within the aquifer were conducted to provide data for characterization of the ground-water flow system. Field investigations of the Hickory Sandstone included geologic...

  10. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Julio Enrique

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas ?a, storage in aquifers in the midwestern U.S states of Illinois and Indiana and salt caverns

  11. Seymour Aquifer Water Quality Improvement Project Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sij, J.; Morgan, C.; Belew, M.; Jones, D.; Wagner, K.

    on over 2,500 acres. NRCS also began funding irrigation improvements in Haskell, Knox, Baylor, Wilbarger, Hardeman and Foard counties through the Seymour Aquifer Special Emphasis Area. Since this Special Emphasis Area was established in 2004, over $16.../Need Statement Figure 1. Seymour Aquifer Region (TWDB 2004). The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow, unconfined aquifer formed by isolated pockets of alluvial deposits (Figure 1). It underlies over 300,000 acres in 20 counties in north central Texas...

  12. Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

  13. Radon Concern in the Hickory Aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Amanda

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Hickory Aquifer's groundwater poses health risks for residents in the area. Radon is a natural, radioactive gas that may be found indoors in air or drinking water. Radon is the decay product of radium, so radon indi- rectly reflects the presence... of radium. Radon in groundwater occurs from the decay of radium both within the aquifer host rock and in the groundwater itself. It does not react chemically with either, however, because it is a noble or inert gas. About 1 percent to 2 percent...

  14. Predevelopment Water-Level Contours for Aquifers in the Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain area of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph M. Fenelon; Randell J. Laczniak; and Keith J. Halford

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. Although contaminants were introduced into low-permeability rocks above the regional flow system, the potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by ground-water transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the water-level distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. The contoured water-level distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped, presented, and discussed in general terms as being one of three aquifer types—volcanic aquifer, upper carbonate aquifer, or lower carbonate aquifer. Each of these aquifer types was subdivided and mapped as independent continuous and isolated aquifers, based on the continuity of its component rock. Ground-water flow directions, as related to the transport of test-generated contaminants, were developed from water-level contours and are presented and discussed for each of the continuous aquifers. Contoured water-level altitudes vary across the study area and range from more than 5,000 feet in the volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,450 feet in the lower carbonate aquifer in the southern part of the study area. Variations in water-level altitudes within any single continuous aquifer range from a few hundred feet in a lower carbonate aquifer to just more than 1,100 feet in a volcanic aquifer. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly southward with minor eastward or westward deviations. Primary exceptions are westward flow in the northern part of the volcanic aquifer and eastward flow in the eastern part of the lower carbonate aquifer. Northward flow in the upper and lower carbonate aquifers in the northern part of the study area is possible but cannot be substantiated because data are lacking. Interflow between continuous aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form the regional ground-water flow system. The implications of these tributary flow paths in controlling transport away from the underground test areas at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain are discussed. The obvious data gaps contributing to uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers and development of water-level contours are identified and evaluated.

  15. Potential Risks of Freshwater Aquifer Contamination with Geosequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Robert

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Substantial leakage of CO{sub 2} from deep geological strata to shallow potable aquifers is likely to be rare, but chemical detection of potential leakage nonetheless remains an integral component of any safe carbon capture and storage system. CO{sub 2} that infiltrates an unconfined freshwater aquifer will have an immediate impact on water chemistry by lowering pH in most cases and by altering the concentration of total dissolved solids. Chemical signatures in affected waters provide an important opportunity for early detection of leaks. In the presence of CO{sub 2}, trace elements such as Mn, Fe, and Ca can increase by an order of magnitude or more above control concentrations within 100 days. Therefore, these and other elements should be monitored along with pH as geochemical markers of potential CO{sub 2} leaks. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity can also be rapidly responsive to CO{sub 2} and are stable indicators of a leak. Importantly, such changes may be detectable long before direct changes in CO{sub 2} are observed. The experimental results also suggest that the relative severity of the impact of leaks on overlying drinking-water aquifers should be considered in the selection of CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. One primary selection criteria should be metal and metalloid availability, such as uranium and arsenic abundance, to carefully monitor chemical species that could trigger changes above maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Overall, the risks of leakage from underground CO{sub 2} storage are real but appear to be manageable if systems are closely monitored.

  16. Isotope characterization of shallow aquifers in the Horombe region, South of Madagascar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fareze, L P; Ramaroson, V; Andriambololona, Raoelina; Andriamiarintsoa, G; Razafitsalama, P R; Rahobisoa, J J; Randrianarison, H; Ranaivoarisoa, A; Marah, H

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study deals with the problem of evaluation of the recharge mechanism and the characterization of the groundwater flow system in the basement shallow aquifer, which is one of the groundwater resource in the semi-arid South region of Madagascar. Stable isotopes (deuterium and oxygen-18) and tritium are used to achieve with accuracy the hydrogeological and geochemical dynamics study. Chemical analysis is used to provide complementary information to the investigation. A space distribution of tritium concentration and isotopic composition in groundwater shows evidence of two opposite categories of aquifers, which is confirmed by the chemical analysis results and by the geological features of the study site. Some groundwater flow path directions have been identified in the study area thanks to the tritium concentration space distribution and the geological formation. Besides, the groundwater recharge of the shallow aquifers in the South of Madagascar has been characterized by the exponential mixing mode...

  17. Aquifer Management for CO2 Sequestration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anchliya, Abhishek

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of carbon dioxide is being actively considered for the reduction of green house gases. To make an impact on the environment CO2 should be put away on the scale of gigatonnes per annum. The storage capacity of deep saline aquifers...

  18. Two different investigations of shallow sandy aquifers inform our thinking about the role of reactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in contaminated aquifers and the role of Fe(III)- bearing minerals and grain coatings as sorption substrates of reactive iron minerals in hydrogeological systems. Ground water in a number of settings has been described as having elevated concentrations of dissolved iron in anoxic portions of contaminant plumes (e.g. Baedecker

  19. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Uebel, M.H.; Delin, G.N.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Sterling, R.L.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system has been operated as a field test facility (FTF) since 1982. The objectives were to design, construct, and operate the facility to study the feasibility of high-temperature ATES in a confined aquifer. Four short-term and two long-term cycles were previously conducted, which provided a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. The third long-term cycle (LT3) was conducted to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact that heated water storage had on the aquifer. For LT3, the source and storage wells were modified so that only the most permeable portion, the Ironton-Galesville part, of the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer was used for storage. This was expected to improve storage efficiency by reducing the surface area of the heated volume and simplify analysis of water chemistry results by reducing the number of aquifer-related variables which need to be considered. During LT3, a total volume of 63.2 {times} 10{sup 3} m {sup 3} of water was injected at a rate of 54.95 m{sup 3}/hr into the storage well at a mean temperature of 104.7{degrees}C. Tie-in to the reheat system of the nearby Animal Sciences Veterinary Medicine (ASVM) building was completed after injection was completed. Approximately 66 percent (4.13 GWh) of the energy added to the aquifer was recovered. Approximately 15 percent (0.64 GWh) of the usable (10 building. Operations during heat recovery with the ASVM building`s reheat system were trouble-free. Integration into more of the ASVM (or other) building`s mechanical systems would have resulted in significantly increasing the proportion of energy used during heat recovery.

  20. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Julio Enrique

    2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO{sub 2} and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO{sub 2}. The basic problem of CO{sub 2} injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO{sub 2} injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO{sub 2} injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factor of 15. Because of the lower viscosity, the CO{sub 2} displacement front will have a tendency towards instability. Preliminary simulation results show good agreement between classical instability solutions and numerical predictions of finger growth and spacing obtained using different gas/liquid viscosity ratios, relative permeability and capillary pressure models. Further studies are recommended to validate these results over a broader range of conditions.

  1. Effects of aquifer interconnection resulting from underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, R.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory evaluated the effects of aquifer interconnection caused by the collapse of cavities formed in coal seams by two small underground coal gasification experiments in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Flow models and field measurements were used to show that the water from one or both of the upper aquifers enters the collapse, rubble and flows down to the lowest aquifer (the gasified coal seam) where it flows away from the collapse zones. The investigations showed that the hydraulic conductivity of the collapse rubble is less than that of the aquifers and provides only a moderately permeable interconnection between them, a marked reduction in hydraulic conductivity of the gasified coal seam near the collapse zones restricts the flow in the seam, away from them; changes in the hydraulic head and flow patterns caused by aquifer interconnection extend generally only 60-90 m away from the experiment sites, whereas flow in the uppermost aquifer at one of the sites may be influenced as far away as 122 m. At both sites, the aquifer interconnection allows water from the uppermost (sand) aquifer, which contains the poorest quality water of the 3 aquifers, to enter one or both of the underlying aquifers.

  2. Aquifer characterization and groundwater modeling in support of remedial actions at the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carman, J.D. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., St. Charles, MO (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifer characterization studies were performed to develop a hydrogeologic understanding of an unconfined shallow aquifer at the Weldon Spring site west of St. Louis, Missouri. The 88-ha site became contaminated because of uranium and thorium processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1960s. Slug and pumping tests provided valuable information on the lateral distribution of hydraulic conductivities, and packer tests and lithologic information were used to determine zones of contrasting hydrologic properties within the aquifer. A three-dimensional, finite- element groundwater flow model was developed and used to simulate the shallow groundwater flow system at the site. The results of this study show that groundwater flow through the system is predominantly controlled by a zone of fracturing and weathering in the upper portion of the limestone aquifer. The groundwater flow model, developed and calibrated from field investigations, improved the understanding of the hydrogeology and supported decisions regarding remedial actions at the site. The results of this study illustrate the value, in support of remedial actions, of combining field investigations with numerical modeling to develop an improved understanding of the hydrogeology at the site.

  3. Flash flooding events in south central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utley, Tom Wilson

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is covered by radars at Hondo and Stephenville, Texas. This technique was developed exclusively for use in the designated study area. Extensive operational testing should be conducted prior to attempting to apply this forecasting technique to any other...

  4. Vegetable Gardening in South Central Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L GE organic matter improves drain age and aeration and allows for better root development. Ifthe soil is a sandy type, adding li beral amounts oforganic matter helps it hold water and nut rients'. Organic matter also serves as a food source... Globe', White Icicle; (Winter) Black Spanish, White Chinese Rutabaga - American Purple Top Spinach - Early Hybrid 7, Dixie Savoy, Bloomsdale; (summer production) New Zealand, Malabar (Basella alba) Squash - Early Prolific Straightneck, Goldneck, Dixie...

  5. South Central Power Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonix Japan IncInformation South Carolina'sSouth

  6. South Central Electric Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteelSolarSolkarTopics BackgroundBend,South

  7. South Central Indiana REMC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteelSolarSolkarTopics BackgroundBend,SouthSouth

  8. Estimation of Recharge to the Middle Trinity Aquifer of Central Texas Using Water-Level Fluctuations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennings, Marshall; Chad, Thomas; Burch, John; Creutzburg, Brian; Lambert, Lance

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 23-site monitoring well network located in the Trinity Aquifer region of Central Texas, with all wells penetrating the Middle Trinity Aquifer, was used with available values of aquifer storativity and specific yield to estimate recharge...

  9. Analysis of the semianalytical method for matching aquifer influence functions using an analytical model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vega, Leonardo

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a heterogeneous aquifer of unknown size and shape, ics. Aquifer Influence Functions (AIF) can be used to model the aquifer pressure behavior from field production and pressure data. Two methods have been used in the past to accomplish this...

  10. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy, Energy Storage Division through thegeneration and energy storage, Presented at Frontiers ofIn Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

  11. Methane-eating microbes found in Illinois aquifer | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Mahomet aquifer is protected by its glacial ancestry; growing and receding glaciers laid alternating blankets of fine glacial "till" and coarser gravel. When humans...

  12. Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    gas pressurized aquifers confined underneath impermeable layers, within both the volcanic rock pile and the underlying Pleistocene loose sediments. Degassing mostly occurs in...

  13. aquifers geochemical results: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    industrial sectors in the area. However, increasing water demand and sustained heavy pumping from the aquifer ... Zhu, Ni, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology...

  14. alluvial aquifer nicaragua: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 kyears B.P. and prevailed in the early Holocene (10 Klinger, Yann 427 Hydrogeologic Controls on Bioactive Zone Development in Biostimulated Aquifers University of Kansas - KU...

  15. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground Natural Gas Storage...

  16. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencethe Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed by

  17. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence BerkeleyP, Andersen, "'rhermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer~University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment." Lawrence

  18. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194.Mathematical modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers,of Current Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Programs (in

  19. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence Berkeleythe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  20. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencewithin the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

  1. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aspects of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrencethe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  2. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.Proceedings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

  3. Aquifer Sampling Tube Results for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Peterson, Robert E.

    2003-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents and discusses results of the fiscal year 2003 sampling event associated with aquifer tubes along the Columbia River in the northern Hanford Site. Aquifer tube data help define the extent of groundwater contamination near the river, determine vertical variations in contamination, monitor the performance of interim remedial actions near the river, and support impact studies.

  4. Investigation of Possible Extra ~Recharge During Pumping in Nottinghant .Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Investigation of Possible Extra ~Recharge During Pumping in Nottinghant .Aquifer by Jiu J. Jiaoa Abstract Approaches to investigate possible recharge during a pumping test period are demonstrated by analyzing the pumping test data from the Nottingham aquifer, UK. The pumping lasted more than 200 days

  5. Characterizing aquifer heterogeneity using hydraulic tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wachter, Brian James

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    such as sands and gravels because these materials drain the water so quickly. The K value is highly localized and only represents the portion of the aquifer in which the core was taken. When working with unconsolidated sediments, care must be taken to pack...?????. .?????.1 17 vi LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1: Map of field site and layout of wells used in study (figure modified from Engard, 2006). Figure 2: MOG setup for tomography study. Figure 3: Packed versus unpacked response in an observation well...

  6. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, E.A. (ed.)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  7. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burklund, P.W.

    1984-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole is disclosed. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  8. Review of simulation techniques for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.; Miller, W.J.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storage of thermal energy in aquifers has recently received considerable attention as a means to conserve and more efficiently use energy supplies. The analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems will rely on the results from mathematical and geochemical models. Therefore, the state-of-the-art models relevant to ATES was reviewed and evaluated. These models describe important processes active in ATES including ground-water flow, heat transport (heat flow), solute transport (movement of contaminants), and geochemical reactions. In general, available models of the saturated ground-water environment are adequate to address most concerns associated with ATES; that is, design, operation, and environmental assessment. In those cases where models are not adequate, development should be preceded by efforts to identify significant physical phenomena and relate model parameters to measurable quantities. Model development can then proceed with the expectation of an adequate data base existing for the model's eventual use. Review of model applications to ATES shows that the major emphasis has been on generic sensitivity analysis and site characterization. Assuming that models are applied appropriately, the primary limitation on model calculations is the data base used to construct the model. Numerical transport models are limited by the uncertainty of subsurface data and the lack of long-term historical data for calibration. Geochemical models are limited by the lack of thermodynamic data for the temperature ranges applicable to ATES. Model applications undertaken with data collection activities on ATES sites should provide the most important contributions to the understanding and utilization of ATES. Therefore, the primary conclusion of this review is that model application to field sites in conjunction with data collection activities is essential to the development of this technology.

  9. A comparison of recharge rates in aquifers of the United States based on groundwater-age data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . McMahon & L. N. Plummer & J. K. Böhlke & S. D. Shapiro & S. R. Hinkle Abstract An overview of recharge in selected unconfined aquifer systems of the United States. Apparent age distributions, numerical hydraulic modeling, water-table fluctuations, stream base-flow separation, and various other types

  10. Changes in sources and storage in a karst aquifer during a transition from drought to wet conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    , and used inverse geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) to con- strain controls on groundwater compositions during more storage. Ă? 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Karst groundwater systems Keywords: Karst Drought Telogenetic Edwards aquifer Groundwater Texas s u m m a r y Understanding

  11. Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arreola-Triana, Alejandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    24 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Alejandra Arreola-Triana In the Rolling Plains of Texas, the Seymour Aquifer is the major source of water for Haskell, Jones and Knox counties. #31;e water from the Seymour Aquifer, however, contains nitrate levels... are working on ways to manage the nitrate levels in this aquifer. Tracking the source Nitrates in groundwater can come from runo#27;, fertilizer use, leaks from septic tanks, sewage and erosion of natural deposits, according to the U.S. Environmental...

  12. AQUIFER TESTING AND REBOUND STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE 100-H DEEP CHROMIUM INVESTIGATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMOOT JL

    2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) second Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) 5-year review (DOEIRL-2006-20, The Second CERCLA Five-Year Review Report for the Hanford Site) set a milestone to conduct an investigation of deep hexavalent chromium contamination in the sediments of the Ringold upper mud (RUM) unit, which underlies the unconfined aquifer in the 100-H Area. The 5-year review noted that groundwater samples from one deep well extending below the aquitard (i.e., RUM) exceeded both the groundwater standard of 48 parts per billion (ppb) (Ecology Publication 94-06, Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Statute and Regulation) and the federal drinking water standard of 100 {mu}g/L for hexavalent chromium. The extent of hexavalent chromium contamination in this zone is not well understood. Action 12-1 from the 5-year review is to perform additional characterization of the aquifer below the initial aquitard. Field characterization and aquifer testing were performed in the Hanford Site's 100-H Area to address this milestone. The aquifer tests were conducted to gather data to answer several fundamental questions regarding the presence of the hexavalent chromium in the deep sediments of the RUM and to determine the extent and magnitude of deeper contamination. The pumping tests were performed in accordance with the Description of Work for Aquifer Testing in Support of the 100-H Deep Chromium Investigation (SGW-41302). The specific objectives for the series of tests were as follows: (1) Evaluate the sustainable production of the subject wells using step-drawdown and constant-rate pumping tests. (2) Collect water-level data to evaluate the degree of hydraulic connection between the RUM and the unconfined (upper) aquifer (natural or induced along the well casing). (3) Evaluate the hydraulic properties of a confined permeable layer within the RUM.; (4) Collect time-series groundwater samples during testing to evaluate the extent and persistence of hexavalent chromium in the deeper zones. Use data collected to refine the current conceptual model for the 100-H Area unconfined aquifer and the RUM in this area. (5) Evaluate the concentration 'rebound' in the unconfined aquifer of hexavalent chromium and the contaminants of concern during shutdown of the extraction wells. Measure co-contaminants at the beginning, middle, and end of each pumping test. The RUM is generally considered an aquitard in the 100-HR-3 OU; however, several water-bearing sand layers are present that are confined within the RUM. The current hydrogeologic model for the 100-H Area aquifer system portrays the RUM as an aquitard layer that underlies the unconfined aquifer, which may contain permeable zones, stringers, or layers. These permeable zones may provide pathways for chromium to migrate deeper into the RUM under certain hydrogeologic conditions. One condition may be the discharge of large volumes of cooling water that occurred near the former H Reactor, which caused a mound of groundwater to form 4.9 to 10.1 m (16 to 33 ft) above the natural water table. The cooling water reportedly contained 1 to 2 mglL of hexavalent chromium for corrosion prevention. Three alternate hypotheses for the introduction of hexavalent chromium into the RUM are as follows: (1) Local groundwater with higher concentrations of hexavalent chromium originating from reactor operations at H Reactor was driven by high heads from groundwater mounding in the unconfined aquifer into the RUM via permeable pathways in the upper surface of the RUM. (2) Local groundwater with hexavalent chromium was introduced from the unconfined aquifer via well boreholes, either during drilling or as a result of poor well construction, allowing hydraulic communication between the unconfined aquifer and the RUM. (3) Hexavalent chromium migrated across the Hom area within the more permeable zones of the RUM. The three wells used for the aquifer pumping tests (199-H3-2C, 199-H4-12C, and 199-H4-15CS) exhibit hexavalent chromium contamination in confined aqu

  13. IMPROVED NUMERICAL METHODS FOR MODELING RIVER-AQUIFER INTERACTION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent C.; Sue Tillery; Phillip King

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new option for Local Time-Stepping (LTS) was developed to use in conjunction with the multiple-refined-area grid capability of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) groundwater modeling program, MODFLOW-LGR (MF-LGR). The LTS option allows each local, refined-area grid to simulate multiple stress periods within each stress period of a coarser, regional grid. This option is an alternative to the current method of MF-LGR whereby the refined grids are required to have the same stress period and time-step structure as the coarse grid. The MF-LGR method for simulating multiple-refined grids essentially defines each grid as a complete model, then for each coarse grid time-step, iteratively runs each model until the head and flux changes at the interfacing boundaries of the models are less than some specified tolerances. Use of the LTS option is illustrated in two hypothetical test cases consisting of a dual well pumping system and a hydraulically connected stream-aquifer system, and one field application. Each of the hypothetical test cases was simulated with multiple scenarios including an LTS scenario, which combined a monthly stress period for a coarse grid model with a daily stress period for a refined grid model. The other scenarios simulated various combinations of grid spacing and temporal refinement using standard MODFLOW model constructs. The field application simulated an irrigated corridor along the Lower Rio Grande River in New Mexico, with refinement of a small agricultural area in the irrigated corridor.The results from the LTS scenarios for the hypothetical test cases closely replicated the results from the true scenarios in the refined areas of interest. The head errors of the LTS scenarios were much smaller than from the other scenarios in relation to the true solution, and the run times for the LTS models were three to six times faster than the true models for the dual well and stream-aquifer test cases, respectively. The results of the field application show that better estimates of daily stream leakage can be made with the LTS simulation, thereby improving the efficiency of daily operations for an agricultural irrigation system. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSThe authors appreciatively acknowledge support for Sue Tillery provided by Sandia National Laboratories' through a Campus Executive Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) research project.Funding for this study was provided by Directed Research and Development (LDRD) research project.

  14. Migration and trapping of CO? in saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMinn, Christopher William

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mitigation of climate change requires a reduction in atmospheric carbon dioxide (C0 2) emissions. One promising tool for achieving this is the large-scale injection of CO2 into deep saline aquifers. After injection, upward ...

  15. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1971, storage of Solar Energy in a Bandy- Gravel Ground. 2.Aquifer Storage of Heated Water: A Field Experuuent. GroundStorage of Heated Water: Part II - Numerical Simulation of Field Results. Ground

  16. Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Abstract This study...

  17. Underground helium travels to the Earth's surface via aquifers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of South America; it supplies water to more than 15 million people. Scientists found helium pools in this aquifer and is released to the atmosphere when the water reaches the...

  18. Seawater circulation in coastal aquifers : processes and impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karam, Hanan Nadim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the subterranean domain of chemical cycling in coastal oceans abutting permeable aquifers, where transport through sediments is dominated by advection, rather than diffusion. We investigate the mechanisms ...

  19. aquifer colombia estudio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    availability of ground water and the impact of withdrawals on existing users and the environment Sand-And-Gravel Aquifer Santa; Christopher J. Richards 33 Water temperature as a...

  20. aquifer column studies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Simulation Study of Heat Transportation in an Aquifer about Well-water-source Heat Pump Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: The study of groundwater reinjection, pumping...

  1. Analyzing aquifer driven reservoirs using a computer-oriented approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flumerfelt, Raymond William

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new computer-oriented approach for analyzing aquifer driven reservoirs incorporates both geological and historical pressure data to determine original hydrocarbons-in-place and to forecast production. This new approach does not rely entirely...

  2. The Initiative Fund of Southeastern and South Central Minnesota SOUTHEASTERN AND SOUTH CENTRAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    calls the "Diamond of Advantage." These four determinants, (1) factor conditions, (2) home demand, (3 class of lightweight but durable plastic products), 2) printing, publishing and software, 3) industrial density of the region a limitation Home Demand · most customers extend domestically and in many cases

  3. FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  4. Reduction of trichloroethylene in a model aquifer with methanotrophic bacteria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Duane Dee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REDUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A MODEL AQUIFER WITH METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA A Thesis by Duane Dee Hicks Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fullfillment of the requirements for thc degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Civil Engineering REDUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A MODEL AQUIFER WITH METHANOTROPHIC BACTEPslA A Thesis by Duane Dec Hicks Approved as to style and content by Bill Batchclor (Chair of Committee...

  5. Methanogens in Central Texas aquifers: a microbiological and molecular study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacRae, Martha Jean Davies

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METHANOGENS IN CENTRAL TEXAS AQUIFERS: A MICROBIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR STUDY A Thesis by MARTHA JEAN DAVIES MACRAE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillmen of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Oceanography METHANOGENS IN CENTRAL TEXAS AQUIFERS: A MICROBIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR STUDY A Thesis by MARTHA JEAN DAVIES MACRAE Approved as to style and content by: James W. Ammerman (Chair...

  6. Hydrogeology and groundwater modeling of a Calvert Bluff aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, James

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYDROGEOLOGY AND GROUNDWATER MODELING OF A CALVERT BLUFF AQUIFER A Thesis by JAMES LAWRENCE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1989 Major Subject: Geology HYDROGEOLOGY AND GROUNDWATER MODELING OF A CALVERT BLUFF AQUIFER A Thesis by James Lawrence Approved as to style and content by: Patrick A. Domenico (Chair of Committee) Donald L. Reddell (Member) Robert R...

  7. Application of the decline curve method to aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potnis, Girish Vijay

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPLICATION OF THE DECLINE CURVE METHOD TO AQUIFERS A Thesis by GIRISH VIJAY POTNIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ADAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1992 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering APPLICATION OF THE DECLINE CURVE METHOD TO AQUIFERS A Thesis by GIRISH VIJAY POTNIS Approved as to style and content by: Steven W. Poston (Chair of Committee) Thomas . Blasingame (member) James E...

  8. OPTIMAL GEOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE DISPOSAL IN SALINE AQUIFERS IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan D. Hovorka

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research and applications have demonstrated technologically feasible methods, defined costs, and modeled processes needed to sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline-water-bearing formations (aquifers). One of the simplifying assumptions used in previous modeling efforts is the effect of real stratigraphic complexity on transport and trapping in saline aquifers. In this study we have developed and applied criteria for characterizing saline aquifers for very long-term sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate a methodology for optimizing matches between CO{sub 2} sources and nearby saline formations that can be used for sequestration. This project identified 14 geologic properties used to prospect for optimal locations for CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline-water-bearing formations. For this demonstration, we digitized maps showing properties of saline formations and used analytical tools in a geographic information system (GIS) to extract areas that meet variably specified prototype criteria for CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Through geologic models, realistic aquifer properties such as discontinuous sand-body geometry are determined and can be used to add realistic hydrologic properties to future simulations. This approach facilitates refining the search for a best-fit saline host formation as our understanding of the most effective ways to implement sequestration proceeds. Formations where there has been significant drilling for oil and gas resources as well as extensive characterization of formations for deep-well injection and waste disposal sites can be described in detail. Information to describe formation properties can be inferred from poorly known saline formations using geologic models in a play approach. Resulting data sets are less detailed than in well-described examples but serve as an effective screening tool to identify prospects for more detailed work.

  9. FEMA: a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the construction, verification, and demonstration of a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The particular features of FEMA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Mechanisms included in FEMA are: carrier fluid advection, hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular diffusion, radioactive decay, sorption, source/sinks, and degradation due to biological, chemical as well as physical processes. Three optional sorption models are embodied in FEMA. These are linear isotherm and Freundlich and Langmuir nonlinear isotherms. Point as well as distributed source/sinks are included to represent artificial injection/withdrawals and natural infiltration of precipitation. All source/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed concentration on the Dirichlet boundary, given gradient on the Neumann boundary segment, and flux at each Cauchy boundary segment can vary independently of each other. The aquifer may consist of as many formations as desired. Either completely confined or completely unconfined or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. FEMA also includes transient leakage to or from the aquifer of interest through confining beds from or to aquifers lying below and/or above.

  10. Analysis of Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrade, M.; Rago, F.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Peters, E.; Dorfman, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer, located southeast of Lake Charles, Louisiana, is modeled by a two-dimensional geopressured-geothermal simulator. This aquifer is a sandstone within the Frio formation at depths between 15,000 to 15,640 ft with a net porous thickness of 250 ft, a calculated in-situ permeability (from drawdown data) of 17 md, an estimated porosity of 24%, a uniaxial compaction coefficient of 4.5 x 10/sup -7/ psi/sup -1/ and a solution gas-water ratio of 11 SCF/STB all at the initial reservoir pressure of 12,060 psi. These parameters are typically pressure sensitive in geopressured-geothermal aquifers and are critically important to aquifer performance. Several simulation experiments are conducted which investigate the effects of varying initial values for these parameters with the experimentally determined values as means. The simulations give both optimistic and pessimistic expectations for aquifer performance. The expected life of the geopressured-geothermal well is reported for each simulation.

  11. Multivariate analysis of cross-hole georadar velocity and attenuation tomograms for aquifer zonation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    for characterizing heterogeneous alluvial aquifers. A multivariate statistical technique, known as k-means cluster in a well-studied alluvial aquifer. A comparison of the clustered tomographic section with well-log data

  12. The 1997 Irrigation Suspension Program for the Edwards Aquifer: Evaluation and Alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keplinger, Keith O.; McCarl, Bruce A.

    (drought) Management Rules. The Aquifer region, however, experienced a wet Spring in 1997, so that even irrigators not enrolled in the program applied little or no irrigation water. If conditions were dry in Spring 1997, aquifer simulation results indicate...

  13. A simulation model for generation of aquifer characteristics and contaminant concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deena, Jayaram

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulation model was developed to generate aquifer characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity, porosity and organic carbon content. The variability of aquifer characteristics is represented by the fields generated using the simulation model. Random...

  14. Geochemical modeling of an aquifer storage and recovery project in Union County, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Ni, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sparta aquifer in Union County, Arkansas has served as an important potable water supply to the public and industrial sectors in the area. However, increasing water demand and sustained heavy pumping from the aquifer ...

  15. Estimation of Recharge to the Middle Trinity Aquifer of Central Texas Using Water-Level Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennings, Marshall; Chad, Thomas; Burch, John; Creutzburg, Brian; Lambert, Lance

    to the aquifer for 1999 and 2000. As part of the investigation, the Edwards Aquifer Research & Data Center (EARDC) staff worked with the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) and local groundwater conservation districts to install five new recording well monitors...

  16. Modeling the High Plains Aquifer's Response to Land Use and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dermyer, Reuben

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Plains Aquifer is extremely important to the economic life of Kansas and the surrounding states, but water is being withdrawn from the aquifer much faster than it is being recharged. Due to the importance of ...

  17. The 1997 Irrigation Suspension Program for the Edwards Aquifer: Evaluation and Alternatives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keplinger, Keith O.; McCarl, Bruce A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (drought) Management Rules. The Aquifer region, however, experienced a wet Spring in 1997, so that even irrigators not enrolled in the program applied little or no irrigation water. If conditions were dry in Spring 1997, aquifer simulation results indicate...

  18. A Farm-Level Evaluation of Agricultural Profit and Ground Water Quality: Texas Seymour Aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Manzoor; Lacewell, Ronald D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Ozuna, Teofilo Jr.; Benson, Verel W.; Harris, Billy L.; Dyke, Paul T.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seymour Aquifer of north-central Texas is known to have elevated levels of nitrates. The design of economically sound policies for reducing agriculture's nitrate contribution to the aquifer suggests a need to evaluate alternative management...

  19. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C.F. , 1980, "Aquifer Thermal Energy - Parameter Study" (infrom the Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No.studies in aquifer thermal energy , Presented at the ~~~~~~~

  20. Singlehole GPR reflection imaging of solute transport in a granitic aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Singlehole GPR reflection imaging of solute transport in a granitic aquifer Caroline Dorn,1 Niklas mmaperture fractures. A dipole tracer test was performed in a granitic aquifer by injecting a saline solution of solute transport in a granitic aquifer, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L08401, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL047152. 1

  1. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems, inTwin City district cogeneration system, in Proceedings,proposed system, based on cogeneration of power and heat by

  2. Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  3. Determining the Fate of Herbicides in the Ogallala Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, A. D.; Wiese, A. F.; Jones, O. R.; Mathers, A. C.

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8-1 1 12 August 1971 termining The Fate of Herbicides in the Ogallala Aquifer Fine textured soils "., ..'. ::: .::::.. a ...... Sandy rolls .. .... - [ Little or no water O Miles 100 U in Ogalla la formation Sand dunes -c Texas ABM... indicate that a dual-porpo+e "" in a sand aquifer that is accidentally contamin~r " by herbicides will not be a serious hazard if the '" l (1 is pumped soon after recharging. Since dual-purr. . wells are normally used for seasonal recharpinr I...

  4. Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Will Take Advantage of Abundant Water in Shallow Aquifer. Demonstrate Low Temperature GSHP System Design. Provides a Baseline for Local Industrial Geothermal Project Costs and Benefits.

  5. Comparing Approaches to Locating Boreholes in Spatially Heterogeneous Aquifers Sean A. McKenna, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenna, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico Abstract Limited sampling of an aquifer

  6. Investigating cross-contamination of aquifers Paul M. Santi John E. McCray Jamie L. Martens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Investigating cross-contamination of aquifers Paul M. Santi · John E. McCray · Jamie L. Martens Abstract Shallow aquifers can cross-contaminate deeper aquifers through penetration of an intervening of several of these techniques at three sites ex- periencing aquifer cross-contamination, the authors con

  7. Economic and Hydrologic Implications of Proposed Edwards Aquifer Management Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Carl R.; Jones, Lonnie L.; Williams, R. Lynn; Jordan, Wayne R.; McCarl, Bruce A.

    on water elevation in a reference well located in San Antonio. Four variants of the plans were analyzed using an annual economic/hydrologic simulation model of the aquifer. The model simulates water use by the agricultural, industrial and municipal sectors...

  8. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Interim Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W L

    2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine would be reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction. This process provides additional storage space (capacity) in the aquifer, reduces operational risks by relieving overpressure in the aquifer, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations for brines typical of CCS sites. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. This progress report deals mainly with our geochemical modeling of high-salinity brines and covers the first six months of project execution (September, 2008 to March, 2009). Costs and implementation results will be presented in the annual report. The brines typical of sequestration sites can be several times more concentrated than seawater, requiring specialized modeling codes typical of those developed for nuclear waste disposal calculations. The osmotic pressure developed as the brines are concentrated is of particular concern, as are precipitates that can cause fouling of reverse osmosis membranes and other types of membranes (e.g., NF). We have now completed the development associated with tasks (1) and (2) of the work plan. We now have a contract with Perlorica, Inc., to provide support to the cost analysis and nanofiltration evaluation. We have also conducted several preliminary analyses of the pressure effect in the reservoir in order to confirm that reservoir pressure can indeed be used to drive the reverse osmosis process. Our initial conclusions from the work to date are encouraging: (1) The concept of aquifer-pressured RO to provide fresh water associated with carbon dioxide storage appears feasible. (2) Concentrated brines such as those found in Wyoming are amenable to RO treatment. We have looked at sodium chloride brines from the Nugget Formation in Sublette County. 20-25% removal with conventional methods is realistic; higher removal appears achievable with NF. The less concentrated sulfate-rich brines from the Tensleep Formation in Sublette County would support >80% removal with conventional RO. (3) Brines from other proposed sequestration sites can now be analyzed readily. An osmotic pressure curve appropriate to these brines can be used to evaluate cost and equipment specifications. (4) We have examined a range of subsurface brine compositions that is potentially pertinent to carbon sequestration and noted the principal compositional trends pertinent to evaluating the feasibility of freshwater extraction. We have proposed a general categorization for the feasibility of the process based on total dissolved solids (TDS). (5) Withdrawing pressurized brine can have a very beneficial effect on reservoir pressure and total available storage capacity. Brine must be extracted from a deeper location in the aquifer than the point of CO{sub 2} injection to prevent CO{sub 2} from migrating to the brine extraction well.

  9. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common examples of saline formation waters. Therefore, they are expected to be representative of saline formation waters at actual and potential future CCS sites. We are using a produced waters database (Breit, 2002) covering most of the United States compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In one instance to date, we have used this database to find a composition corresponding to the brine expected at an actual CCS site (Big Sky CSP, Nugget Formation, Sublette County, Wyoming). We have located other produced waters databases, which are usually of regional scope (e.g., NETL, 2005, Rocky Mountains basins).

  10. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Key to Large-Scale Cogeneration?" Public Power, v, 35, no.Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems,"Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems, tion from

  11. Applications of Ensemble-based Data Assimilation Techniques for Aquifer Characterization using Tracer Data at Hanford 300 Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xingyuan; Hammond, Glenn E.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface aquifer characterization often involves high parameter dimensionality and requires tremendous computational resources if employing a full Bayesian approach. Ensemble-based data assimilation techniques, including filtering and smoothing, are computationally efficient alternatives. Despite the increasing number of applications of ensemble-based methods in assimilating flow and transport related data for subsurface aquifer charaterization, most are limited to either synthetic studies or two-dimensional problems. In this study, we applied ensemble-based techniques for assimilating field tracer experimental data obtained from the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at the Hanford 300 Area. The forward problem was simulated using the massively-parallel three-dimensional flow and transport code PFLOTRAN to effectively deal with the highly transient flow boundary conditions at the site and to meet the computational demands of ensemble-based methods. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of ensemble-based methods for characterizing a heterogeneous aquifer by sequentially assimilating multiple types of data. The necessity of employing high performance computing is shown to enable increasingly mechanistic non-linear forward simulations to be performed within the data assimilation framework for a complex system with reasonable turnaround time.

  12. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Technical and economic evaluation' of methods; sitefrom economic and systems analyses to evaluation and designeconomic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable sites, and evaluation

  13. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    baseload power and oil-fired boilers for peak and standbyoil-fired boilers used in the conventional system as a backup, and to meet peak

  14. Modeling of thermal energy storage in groundwater aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, David Bryan

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , nuclear fission, fusion, geo- thermal energy, and solar energy as potential alternate energy sources to replace natural gas and oil. Of these, soIar energy is one of the most promisino alternate energy sources for space heating and cooling. Solar...MODELING OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN GROUNDWATER AQUIFERS A Thesis by DAVID BRYAN REED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979...

  15. Geothermal development of the Madison group aquifer: a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, J.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geothermal well has been drilled at the St. Mary's Hospital in Pierre, South Dakota. The well is 2176 feet deep and artesian flows 375 gpm at 106/sup 0/F. The well is producing fluids from the Mississippian Madison Group, a sequence of carbonate rocks deposited over several western states. The project was funded to demonstrate the goethermal potential of this widespread aquifer. This case study describes the development of the project through geology, drilling, stimulation, and testing.

  16. Methanogens in Central Texas aquifers: a microbiological and molecular study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacRae, Martha Jean Davies

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) to determine if lithology and water characteristics favor one type of bacteria over another, 3) to determine if viable methanogens are present in the sampled aquifers; and 4) to determine if the abundance of biogenic methane correlates with the presence... flow filtration to recover viruses and dissolved DNA from eutrophic and oligotrophic seawater. Jiang et aL (44) also utilized vortex flow filtration to concentrate particulate DNA, chlorophyll a, and bacteria from fresh water, estuarine, coastal...

  17. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III, "Man-made Geothermal Energy," presented at MiamiA.C.Meyers III; "Manmade Geothermal Energy", Proc. of MiamiBlack is director of Geothermal Energy Systems, Fox Parry is

  18. The Edwards Aquifer: An Economic Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merrifield, John D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Griffin, Ronald C.; Emerson, Peter M.; Collinge, Robert A.

    Business as usual has ceased to be an acceptable system for the Edwards because of the burden it imposes upon regional competitiveness and welfare. Nonrevisionist strategies such as surface water development and spring flow augmentation address...

  19. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Switzerland, district heating accounts for 50% of totalproposed hot-water district heating system in the St. Paul/an industrial in a district heating Washington Market and

  20. Effect of sediment concentration on artificial well recharge in a fine sand aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Mohammed Ataur

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the aquifer and also the shape of the water profile in the model aquifer during the period of recharge. CHAPTER II REVIEW OF LITERATURE The flow of water through porous materials follows a law first discovered experimentally in 1856 by Henri Darcy (12), a... WITH TAP WATER AND SEDIMENT-LADEN WATER 74 76 77 Appendix AVERAGE CONDUCTIVITY IN ONE FOOT SECTIONS OF THE AQUIFER 84 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 3-1 Model Recharge Well with Accessori. es 14 3-2 Pie-shaped Model Well and Aquifer Sector Viewed...

  1. Sensitivity analysis of aquifer parameter estimations based on the Laplace equation with linearized boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    boundary conditions Jozsef Szilagyi Conservation and Survey Division, University of Nebraska analysis Citation: Szilagyi, J., Sensitivity analysis of aquifer parameter estimations based on the Laplace

  2. BPA, electric co-op and irrigation district testing aquifer recharge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electric co-op and irrigation district testing aquifer recharge Dispatching recharge pumping could save money and relieve electricity oversupply Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville...

  3. Redox Processes and Water Quality of Selected Principal Aquifer Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Similarly, the utilization of solid-phase electron acceptors such as Mn(IV) and Fe(III) is indicated observed at a regional scale. An important finding of this study was that samples indicating mixed redox such as dissolved ferrous iron (Fe21), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and methane (CH4) (Back and Barnes 1965; Baedecker

  4. On the solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bian, Aiguo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -aquitard boundary as a strict physical boundary with the requirement of continuity of solute concentration and the vertical flux. The new method is adopted throughout this study. In Chapter II, a review of numerical techniques on Inverse Laplace Transform...

  5. aquifer system fy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    funds. The 961 million in direct Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth 288 FY 2009 Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report EDUCATION; SAFETY, CODES AND STANDARDS; AND...

  6. aquifer system north: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 208 In Modeling the Innovation: Communications, Automation and...

  7. aquifer guarani system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    redox potential. STUDY SITE DESCRIPTION The location of this study is the Norman Landfill research site in Norman, OK, a closed municipal landfill near the Canadian River....

  8. aquifer system estimacion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    redox potential. STUDY SITE DESCRIPTION The location of this study is the Norman Landfill research site in Norman, OK, a closed municipal landfill near the Canadian River....

  9. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2006-November 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the third year of system operation, from December 1, 2006, until November 30, 2007. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4); groundwater treatment results (Section 5); and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation and provides some comparisons with system performance in previous years. The performance of the groundwater restoration systems at Utica in earlier years was summarized in greater detail previously (Argonne 2005, 2006).

  10. Abiotic/Biotic Degradation and Mineralization of N-Nitrosodimethylamine in Aquifer Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, James E.; McKinley, James P.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Crocker, Fiona H.

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) degradation rate and mineralization rate were measured in two aquifer sediments that received treatments to create oxic, reducing, and sequential reducing/oxic environments. Chemically reduced sediments rapidly abiotically degraded NDMA to nontoxic dimethylamine (DMA) to parts per trillion levels, then degraded to further products. NDMA was partially mineralized in reduced sediments (6 to 28 percent) at a slow rate (half-life 3,460 h) by an unknown abiotic/biotic pathway. In contrast, NDMA was mineralized more rapidly (half-life 342 h) and to a greater extent (30 to 81 percent) in oxic sediments with propane addition, likely by a propane monooxygenase pathway. NDMA mineralization in sequential reduced sediment followed by oxic sediment treatment did result in slightly more rapid mineralization and a greater mineralization extent relative to reduced systems. These increases were minor, so aerobic NDMA mineralization with oxygen and propane addition was the most viable in situ NDMA mineralization strategy.

  11. Critical analysis of plume containment modeling in a thin heterogeneous unconfined aquifer: application to a bulk fuel storage terminal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejia, Karl Edward

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reported hydrocarbon contamination and subsequent consultant work at a bulk fuel storage terminal has instigated the need to critically analyze modeling techniques in thin, heterogeneous, unconfined aquifers. This study provides an aquifer...

  12. Improving land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model better than a deeper soil profile?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer modelAL. : LAND-SURFACE MODEL HYDROLOGY Changnon, S. , et al. (land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model

  13. Interactions and Implications of a Collector Well with a River in an Unconfined Aquifer with Regional Background Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dugat, William D., IV

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    the petroleum industry and hydrologic sciences. This study improved the understanding of the interaction of collector wells and the aquifers/reservoirs they tap by numerically modeling flux exchanges between a collector well and a river in an unconfined aquifer...

  14. Critical analysis of plume containment modeling in a thin heterogeneous unconfined aquifer: application to a bulk fuel storage terminal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejia, Karl Edward

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reported hydrocarbon contamination and subsequent consultant work at a bulk fuel storage terminal has instigated the need to critically analyze modeling techniques in thin, heterogeneous, unconfined aquifers. This study provides an aquifer...

  15. Barriers to water marketing: opinions of major pumpers on water marketing issues in the Edwards Aquifer region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Laura Maureen

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater use is a contentious issue in the Edwards Aquifer region of Texas. Many environmentalists are advocating groundwater law reform, much to the chagrin of property rights advocates. Establishment of tighter controls in the Edwards Aquifer...

  16. Interactions and Implications of a Collector Well with a River in an Unconfined Aquifer with Regional Background Flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dugat, William D., IV

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    the petroleum industry and hydrologic sciences. This study improved the understanding of the interaction of collector wells and the aquifers/reservoirs they tap by numerically modeling flux exchanges between a collector well and a river in an unconfined aquifer...

  17. Storage capacity and injection rate estimates for CO? sequestration in deep saline aquifers in the conterminous United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szulczewski, Michael Lawrence

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A promising method to mitigate global warming is injecting CO? into deep saline aquifers. In order to ensure the safety of this method, it is necessary to understand how much CO? can be injected into an aquifer and at what ...

  18. Position paper on the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Uranium Mill Tailings Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the evaluation of the potential applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer underlying the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah. There are two goals for this evaluation: provide the landowner with information to make an early qualitative decision on the possible use of the Vitro property, and evaluate the proposed application of supplemental standards as the ground water compliance strategy at the site. Justification of supplemental standards is based on the contention that the uppermost aquifer is of limited use due to wide-spread ambient contamination not related to the previous site processing activities. In support of the above, this report discusses the site conceptual model for the uppermost aquifer and related hydrogeological systems and establishes regional and local background water quality. This information is used to determine the extent of site-related and ambient contamination. A risk-based evaluation of the contaminants` effects on current and projected land uses is also provided. Reports of regional and local studies and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site investigations provided the basis for the conceptual model and established background ground water quality. In addition, a limited field effort (4 through 28 March 1996) was conducted to supplement existing data, particularly addressing the extent of contamination in the northwestern portion of the Vitro site and site background ground water quality. Results of the field investigation were particularly useful in refining the conceptual site model. This was important in light of the varied ground water quality within the uppermost aquifer. Finally, this report provides a critical evaluation, along with the related uncertainties, of the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Salt Lake City Vitro processing site.

  19. Effect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    ) in deep saline aquifers is considered one of the most effective methods for carbon sequestration., 48, W09539, doi:10.1029/2012WR011939.* 1. Introduction [2] Carbon sequestration in deep salineEffect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers

  20. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 3. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains two appendices to the main report. The first lists the aquifers in the 12 geographic regions of the USA and characterizes each as containing sands and gravels or limestones or volcanic rock. The second appendix tabulates the hydrologic characteristics of each aquifer. (LCL)

  1. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

  2. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

  3. The Influence of Topology on Hydraulic Conductivity in a Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Influence of Topology on Hydraulic Conductivity in a Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer by Roger H. Morin1 and tracer testing was conducted in a single well that penetrated a sand-and-gravel aquifer at the U, and tortuosity that primarily control the hydraulic conductivity. Results show that F correlates well with K

  4. Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically confined, horizontal aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically confined, horizontal aquifers of carbon dioxide (CO2) into saline aquifers is a promising tool for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions. At reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 is buoyant relative to the ambient groundwater. The buoyant plume

  5. 1 Estimating aquifer hydraulic properties from the inversion of surface 2 Streaming Potential (SP) anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sailhac, Pascal

    1 Estimating aquifer hydraulic properties from the inversion of surface 2 Streaming Potential (SP with the geometry of the water table. It follows that 11 SP measurements can be used to estimate aquifer hydraulic and found that we 14 are able to estimate the hydraulic conductivity and the depth 15 and the thickness

  6. Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high-conductivity aquifer scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high for partially-penetrating slug tests in unconfined aquifers (Malama et al., in press) provides a semi the ultimate goal of determining aquifer properties such as hydraulic conductivity K and specific storage Ss

  7. Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards., 2007, Characterizing hydraulic properties and ground-water chemistry in fractured-rock aquifers: A user

  8. Limiting Pumping from the Edwards Aquifer: An Economic Investigation of Proposals, Water Markets and Springflow Guarantees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Limiting Pumping from the Edwards Aquifer: An Economic Investigation of Proposals, Water Markets for pumping and springflow which in turn provides water for recreation and habitat for several endangered species. A management authority is charged with aquifer management and is mandated to reduce pumping

  9. Measuring The Effectiveness of Groundwater Management Policies for the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamache, Kevin Robert

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    rate of decline in groundwater levels in the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer in Texas after establishment of a GCD. The data did not show a correlation between the water allocation method used and the impact on average annual drawdown of the aquifer. The study...

  10. A Fractal Interpretation of Controlled-Source Helicopter Electromagnetic Survey Data Seco Creek, Edwards Aquifer, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decker, Kathryn T.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Edwards aquifer lies in the structurally complex Balcones fault zone and supplies water to the growing city of San Antonio. To ensure that future demands for water are met, the hydrological and geophysical properties of the aquifer must be well...

  11. Aquifer operator scaling and the effect on solute mixing and dispersion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bäumer, Boris

    Aquifer operator scaling and the effect on solute mixing and dispersion David A. Benson Geology settings. Most previous models have used isotropic scaling characterized by a single scalar Hurst, are associated with thicker layering of aquifer sediments and more preferential, unmixed transport. Therefore

  12. Determining the Fate of Herbicides in the Ogallala Aquifer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, A. D.; Wiese, A. F.; Jones, O. R.; Mathers, A. C.

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifer A. D. SCHNEIDER, A. F. WIESE, 0. R. JONES AND A. C. M.~THERS* 11 , I jvi~i\\ \\~!~llI~llR~ ARE RECHARGED by nat~~ral or arti- ,, , iiti;~l jlrocesses, they may receive runoff from [I. , :iillltar;~l lands. In the Texas High Plains, dual- [, rp..., if needed. Nitrate and nitrite were cleterminetl by tl,c ,i~ mated, colormetric procedures of Kamphake, H.II~I~ - and Cohen (5). Herbicides in the water samples were dete~~ll~~ with a Barber-Coleman Moclel 5360 gas chromatoy equipped with a radium 226...

  13. Application of the decline curve method to aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potnis, Girish Vijay

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    k = value of pointin time = value of point in time n = value of point in time 39 REFERENCES 1. Fetkovich, M. J. : "Decline Curve Analysis Using Type Curves, " JPT (June 1980) 1065-1077. 2. Havlena, D. and Odeh, A. S. : "The Material Balance...APPLICATION OF THE DECLINE CURVE METHOD TO AQUIFERS A Thesis by GIRISH VIJAY POTNIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ADAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December...

  14. Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arreola-Triana, Alejandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource? Texas High Plains and Rolling Plain project. #31;e aim of this project is to understand how nitrates move through the soil and how they can be managed to improve water quality in underlying... it is a slow process and it may take several years before we see improvement.? Putting nitrates to work AgriLife Research environmental soil scientist Dr. Paul DeLaune is exploring one of these best management practices. Last July, Ale and De...

  15. Temporal and spatial scaling of hydraulic response to recharge in fractured aquifers: Insights from a frequency domain analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Temporal and spatial scaling of hydraulic response to recharge in fractured aquifers: Insights from investigate the hydraulic response to recharge of a fractured aquifer, using a frequency domain approach scaling of hydraulic response to recharge in fractured aquifers: Insights from a frequency domain analysis

  16. MODELING OF CO2 LEAKAGE UP THROUGH AN ABANDONED WELL FROM DEEP SALINE AQUIFER TO SHALLOW FRESH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 MODELING OF CO2 LEAKAGE UP THROUGH AN ABANDONED WELL FROM DEEP SALINE AQUIFER TO SHALLOW FRESH restricted to: (i) supercritical CO2 injection and storage within the Dogger reservoir aquifer, (ii) CO2 the cement-rock formation interface in the abandoned well (iii) impacts on the Albian aquifer water quality

  17. Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Chen, Zizhong; Kazemi, Hossein; Yin, Xiaolong; Pruess, Karsten; Oldenburg, Curt; Winterfeld, Philip; Zhang, Ronglei

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled “Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers.” The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, “Development of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module,” we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary “parasitic” reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, “Development of a Rock Mechanical Module,” we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For the former, we matched a one-dimensional consolidation problem and a two-dimensional simulation of the Mandel-Cryer effect. For the latter, we obtained a good match of temperature and gas saturation profiles, and surface uplift, after injection of hot fluid into a model of a caldera structure. In task, “Incorporation of Geochemical Reactions of Selected Important Species,” we developed a novel mathematical model of THMC processes in porous and fractured saline aquifers, simulating geo-chemical reactions associated with CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers. Two computational frameworks, sequentially coupled and fully coupled, were used to simulate the reactions and transport. We verified capabilities of the THMC model to treat complex THMC processes during CO2 sequestration by analytical solutions and we constructed reactive transport models to analyze the THMC process quantitatively. Three of these are 1D reactive transport under chemical equilibrium, a batch reaction model with equilibrium chemical reactions, and a THMC model with CO2 dissolution. In task “Study of Instability in CO2 Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection Processes,” We reviewed literature related to the study of density driven convective flows and on the instability of CO2 dissolution-diffusion-convection processes. We ran simulations that model the density-driven flow instability that would occur during CO2 sequestration. CO2 diffused through the top of the system and dissolved in the aqueous phase there, increasing its density. Density fingers formed along the top boundary, and coalesced into a few prominent ones, causing convective flow that forced the fluid to the system bottom. These simulations were in two and three dimensions. We ran additional simulations of convective mixing with density contrast caused by variable dissolved CO2 concentration in saline water, modeled after laboratory experiments in which supercritical CO2 was circulated in the headspace above a brine saturated packed sand in a pressure vessel. As CO2 dissolved into the upper part of the saturated sand, liquid phase density increases causing instability and setting off convective mixing. We obtained good agreement

  18. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2005-November 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the second year of system operation, from December 1, 2005, until November 31, 2006. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  19. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2007-November 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fourth year of system operation, from December 1, 2007, until November 30, 2008. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3). The report then describes groundwater production results (Section 4); groundwater treatment results (Section 5); and associated maintenance, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  20. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2009-November 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the sixth year of system operation, from December 1, 2009, until November 30, 2010. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation. Performance prior to December 1, 2009, has been reviewed previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a, 2010).

  1. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2008-November 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fifth year of system operation, from December 1, 2008, until November 30, 2009. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  2. The Composition of the Soils of South Central Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1917-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the air. TABLE 2-Continued. ds of Plant Food Per Acre to the Depth of - potash. fictive ! Total Active - -- phosphoric phosphol~ 1 u~iil solu~~t: acid acid. 1 potash. potash. 1 Type. - ................ Tishomingo gravelly sandy loam.... Tishomjngo loam. ......................... Tishomingo sandy loam. ........................ Tishomingo sandy loam.. ....................... Tishomingo stony clay Joam. .................... Tishomingo stony sandy loam.. .. .: .............. Travis eravelly...

  3. Growing Fall Vegetables and Annuals in South Central Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, Jerry; Cotner, Sam; Johnson, Jerral; Janne, Everett; Stewart, J. W.; Roberts, Roland; Johnson, Shirley

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetable Variety Selection.. . . . . .. .. . . .. .. .. 7 Micro-Gardens for Mini-Places ............... 18 Establishing Vegetables in Summer Heat ....... 8 Compost Pile Valuable ...................... 19 Watering...-Sept. 1 Radish Aug. 1-Nov. 1 Aug. 13-Nov. 25 Aug. 30-Dec. 1 Spinach Aug. 15-Sept. 30 Sept. 1-0ct. 15 Sept. 15-Dec. 1 Squash, summer July 30-Aug. 30 Aug. 13-Sept. 10 Sept. 1-0ct. 1 Squash, winter July 1-July 30 July 10-Aug. 10 Aug. 1-Sept. 1 Tomato...

  4. State and Local Code Implementation: South-central Region - 2014...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 BTO Peer Review State and Local Code Implementation: Northeast Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review State and Local Code Implementation: State Energy Officials - 2014 BTO Peer Review...

  5. area south central: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a factorial experiment carbohydrate remained above 36% in all treatments, so carbohydrate reserves did not limit regrowth Jackson, Robert B. 487 Seismic Attribute Analysis of the...

  6. areas south central: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a factorial experiment carbohydrate remained above 36% in all treatments, so carbohydrate reserves did not limit regrowth Jackson, Robert B. 487 Seismic Attribute Analysis of the...

  7. South Central Ark El Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonix Japan IncInformation South Carolina's

  8. Michigan South Central Pwr Agy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| Open EnergyEnergy InformationMichigan South

  9. South Central Public Pwr Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteelSolarSolkarTopics BackgroundBend,SouthSouthSouth

  10. Minimizing Energy Consumption in a Water Distribution System: A Systems Modeling Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, John

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In a water distribution system from groundwater supply, the bulk of energy consumption is expended at pump stations. These pumps pressurize the water and transport it from the aquifer to the distribution system and to elevated storage tanks. Each...

  11. Summary of first-year operations and performance of the Utica Aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands Restoration Project in October 2004-November 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.

    2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the initial period of system operation, from October 29, 2004, until November 31, 2005. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and modifications and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the first year of operation.

  12. Heat Transport in Groundwater Systems--Laboratory Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, D. B.; Reddell, D. L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into groundwater aquifers for long term energy storage. Of paramount importance to the success of such a system is the quality and the behavior of the aquifer used for hot water storage. In general, the problem is to obtain an accurate prediction of the response...

  13. Short-and long-time behavior of aquifer drainage after slow and sudden recharge according to the linearized Laplace equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    not fully penetrate the aquifer, the solution still produces good results [Szilagyi, J. Sensitivity analysis

  14. Geology and hydrogeology of the Edwards Aquifer Transition Zone, Bexar County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neathery, Jeffrey Stephen

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into the Edwards Aquifer (Figure 5). Rainfall and stream flow on the Balcones Fault Zone/Transition Zone also contributes to the water migrating to and recharging the Edwards Aquifer. Water 14 OKLAHOMA ARKANSAS TEXAS l a g/ CENTRAL I I(l TEXAS I I PLA M I... WATER LINE Glen Roee Llmeetone aneltlon Z one F Oem ~ lion FLOWING ARTESIAN WELL nanna fa an r aaneltlon Z one DWA AQUIFER EDWARDS PLATEAU BALCONES ESCARPMENT Glen Roe e Lime alone ALCONE FAULT ZONE Generalized cross section...

  15. Gas Geochemistry of the Dogger Geothermal Aquifer (Paris Basin, France)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criaud, A.; Fouillac, C.; Marty, B.; Brach, M.; Wei, H.F.

    1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The low enthalpy program developed in the Paris Basin provides the opportunity for studying the gas geochemistry of the calcareous aquifer of the Dogger. Hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} are mainly biogenic, He displays high concentrations. He, Ar and N{sub 2} have multiple origins (radioactive decay, atmospheric migration, biochemical processes). The distribution of the gases in the zones of the basin varies in relation to the general chemistry, sedimentology and hydrodynamics. The gas geothermometers do not apply to this environment but useful estimations of the redox potential of the fluid can be derived from CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}/NH{sub 4}{sup +} ratios. H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are involved in corrosion processes and scaling in the pipes. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Microbial ecology and carbon cycling in Texas aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Chuanlun; Grossman, E.L. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology); MacRae, M.; Ammerman, J.W. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Oceanography)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the relationship between microbial activity and carbon cycling in the subsurface, the authors performed geochemical and microbiological analyses on ground-waters from 15 wells in three aquifers in Texas--the Edwards (Ed), the Wilcox-Carrizo (WC), and the Sparta-Queen City (SQC). Samples were collected from 128 to 976 m depth. Total bacteria enumerated by direct count methodology range from 1.6 [times] 10[sup 3] to 4.0 [times] 10[sup 4] cells/ml. In both the (SQC) and (WC) aquifers, total bacterial counts decrease with depth. Total counts in (SQC) waters decrease from 6 [times] 10[sup 3] cells/ml at 217 m to 2 [times] 10[sup 3] cells/ml at 616 m; total counts in (WC) waters decrease from 32 [times] 10[sup 3] cells/ml at 369 m to [approximately]5 [times] 10[sup 3] cells/ml at 907 m. Except for two wells, all of the waters contained trace to large amounts of methane. Carbon isotopic analyses of dissolved and head-gas methane range from [minus]80 to [minus]9[per thousand]. Light [delta] C-13 values for methane indicate methane production by bacteria without secondary alteration while heavy [delta] C-13 values for methane strongly suggest methane oxidation, probably by sulfate reduction. delta C-13 values of DIC for high bicarbonate waters indicate a source of CO[sub 2] associated with methanogenesis through fermentation reactions and CO[sub 2] reduction. No correlation is found between the response to the archaebacterial probe and methane content in water, probably due to the limited sensitivity of the archaebacterial probe. However, anaerobic laboratory incubations of water samples in nutrient media showed significant production of methane for all cultured samples except those showing isotopic evidence for methane oxidation. This suggests that methanogens may be present in all waters except those in which methane oxidation has occurred.

  17. The Effect of Ashe Juniper Removal on Groundwater Recharge in the Edwards Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazan, Roberto

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding groundwater recharge rates has direct relevance for management of the Edwards Aquifer, which serves as the main source of fresh water for the city of San Antonio and surrounding communities. As population around San Antonio continues...

  18. CO[subscript 2] migration in saline aquifers. Part 2. Capillary and solubility trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMinn, C. W.

    The large-scale injection of carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) into saline aquifers is a promising tool for reducing atmospheric CO[subscript 2] emissions to mitigate climate change. An accurate assessment of the post-injection ...

  19. Weathered Diesel oil as a sorptive phase for hydrophobic organic compounds in aquifer materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Rondall James

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sorptive properties of weathered diesel oil were investigated by conducting miscible displacement experiments with three hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), acenapthene, fluorene, and dibenzothiophene, as tracers in columns containing aquifer...

  20. Hydrologic and hydraulic assessment of artificial recharge in the Sparta Aquifer of Union County, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sowby, Robert B

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater pumping from the Sparta aquifer in Union County, Arkansas, has long exceeded natural recharge, threatening the regional water supply. An alternative water-supply project, completed in 2004, now provides treated ...

  1. Simulation of microbial transport and carbon tetrachloride biodegradation in intermittently-fed aquifer columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulation of microbial transport and carbon tetrachloride biodegradation in intermittently associated with carbon tetrachloride (CT) biodegradation in laboratory aquifer columns operated with a pulsed Hydrology: Groundwater transport; KEYWORDS: biodegradation, carbon tetrachloride, microbial transport

  2. Geophysical constraints on contaminant transport modeling in a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    Geophysical constraints on contaminant transport modeling in a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer Jerry the geophysically derived hydraulic conductivity representation in numerical simulations of the natural the effectiveness of geophysically derived and flowmeter based representations of the hydraulic conductivity field

  3. The hydrogeochemistry of pond and rice field recharge : implications for the arsenic contaminated aquifers in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Rebecca B

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shallow aquifers in Bangladesh, which provide drinking water for millions and irrigation water for innumerable rice fields, are severely contaminated with geogenic arsenic. Water mass balance calculations show that ...

  4. Physical and chemical effects of CO2 storage in saline aquifers of the southern North Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Niklas

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most promising mitigation strategies for greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere is carbon capture and storage (CCS). Deep saline aquifers are seen as the most efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites, ...

  5. Rapid nutrient load reduction during infiltration of managed aquifer recharge in an agricultural groundwater basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    , treated wastewater and sources influenced by agricultural activity (Ma & Spalding, 1997; Drewes, 2009Rapid nutrient load reduction during infiltration of managed aquifer recharge in an agricultural; denitrification; agriculture; water quality Received 6 October 2010; Accepted 26 July 2011 INTRODUCTION Artificial

  6. STIMULATION OF GEOTHERMAL AQUIFERS Paul Kruger and Henry J. Ramey, J r .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . STIMULATION OF GEOTHERMAL AQUIFERS Paul Kruger and Henry J. Ramey, J r . Co o f Geothermal Formations . . . . . . . . 6 Table 2: Water Quali t y Constituents-Water Distribution Coefficients . . . . . . . . 62 Table 7: Gaseous Constituents i n Geothermal Fluids . . . . . . 64

  7. acidic uranium-contaminated aquifer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    availability of ground water and the impact of withdrawals on existing users and the environment Sand-And-Gravel Aquifer Santa; Christopher J. Richards 30 Water temperature as a...

  8. Seasonal dynamics in costal aquifers : investigation of submarine groundwater discharge through field measurements and numerical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, Holly Anne, 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fresh and saline groundwater flowing from coastal aquifers into the ocean comprise submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). This outflow is an important pathway for the transport of nutrients and contaminants, and has ...

  9. Regression Based Investigation of Pumping Limits and Springflow Within the Edwards Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Regression Based Investigation of Pumping Limits and Springflow Within the Edwards Aquifer K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 A Model to Study the Effects of Pumping Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Investigation of the Effects of Pumping Allocations on Springflow

  10. Simulation Study of Heat Transportation in an Aquifer about Well-water-source Heat Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong, X.; Liu, Y.; Yang, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of groundwater reinjection, pumping and heat transportation in an aquifer plays an important theoretical role in ensuring the stability of deep-well water reinjection and pumping as well as smooth reinjection. Based on the related...

  11. Rock-water interactions of the Madison Aquifer, Mission Canyon Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spicer, James Frank

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and provide an excellent framework in which to study rockwater interactions in highly saline aquifers. Geochemical speciation was coupled with data visualization interpretations in order to understand specific rock-water interactions that occur...

  12. Simulation Study of Heat Transportation in an Aquifer about Well-water-source Heat Pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong, X.; Liu, Y.; Yang, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of groundwater reinjection, pumping and heat transportation in an aquifer plays an important theoretical role in ensuring the stability of deep-well water reinjection and pumping as well as smooth reinjection. Based on the related...

  13. Weathered Diesel oil as a sorptive phase for hydrophobic organic compounds in aquifer materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Rondall James

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sorptive properties of weathered diesel oil were investigated by conducting miscible displacement experiments with three hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), acenapthene, fluorene, and dibenzothiophene, as tracers in columns containing aquifer...

  14. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Diffusion of 14C into Nevada Test Site Carbonate Aquifer Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Hershey; William Howcroft; Paul W. Reimus

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of groundwater flow velocities at the Nevada Test Site is important since groundwater is the principal transport medium of underground radionuclides. However, 14C-based groundwater velocities in the carbonate aquifers of the Nevada Test Site are several orders of magnitude slower than velocities derived from the Underground Test Area regional numerical model. This discrepancy has been attributed to the loss or retardation of 14C from groundwater into the surrounding aquifer matrix making 14C-based groundwater ages appear much older. Laboratory experiments were used to investigate the retardation of 14C in the carbonate aquifers at the Nevada Test Site. Three sets of experiments were conducted evaluating the diffusion of 14C into the carbonate aquifer matrix, adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the pore surfaces of the carbonate matrix, and adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the fracture surfaces of the carbonate aquifer. Experimental results a nd published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities from the Lower Carbonate Aquifer were applied to a 14C retardation model. The model produced an extremely wide range of retardation factors because of the wide range of published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities (over three orders of magnitude). Large retardation factors suggest that groundwater with very little measured 14C activity may actually be very young if matrix porosity is large relative to the fracture porosity. Groundwater samples collected from highly fractured aquifers with large effective fracture porosities may have relatively small correction factors, while samples from aquifers with a few widely spaced fractures may have very large correction factors. These retardation factors were then used to calculate groundwater velocities from a proposed flow path at the Nevada Test Site. The upper end of the range of 14C correction factors estimated groundwater velocities that appear to be at least an order of magnitude too high compared to published velocities. The lower end of the range of 14C correction factors falls within the range of reported velocities. From these results, future experimental studies (both laboratory and field scale) to support 14C groundwater age dating should focus on obtaining better estimates of aquifer properties including matrix and fracture porosities.

  15. An investigation of pneumatic control on immiscible contaminant migration in confined aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, John David

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF PNEUMATIC CONTROL ON IMMISCIBLE CONTAMINANT MIGRATION IN CONFINED AQUIFERS A Thesis by JOHN DAVID WATTS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF PNEUMATIC CONTROL ON IMMISCIBLE CONTAMINANT MIGRATION IN CONFINED AQUIFERS A Thesis by JOHN DAVID %VATTS Approved as to style and content by: W e . mes...

  16. Effect of sediment concentration on artificial well recharge in a fine sand aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Mohammed Ataur

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF SEDIMENT CONCENTRATION ON ARTIFICIAL WELL RECHARGE IN A FINE SAND AQUIFER A Thesis By MD. ATAUR RAHMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1968 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering EFFECT OF SEDIMENT CONCENTRATION ON ARTIFICIAL WELL RECHARGE IN A FINE SAND AqUIFER A Thesis By MD. ATAUR RAHMAN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ommitt ) ( a o...

  17. Geology and hydrogeology of the Edwards Aquifer Transition Zone, Bexar County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neathery, Jeffrey Stephen

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AQh University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geology GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Approved as to style and content by: Chris pher C. Mathewson...

  18. Effect of methane pulsation on methanotropic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in an in-situ model aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natarajan, Ranjan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF METHANE PULSATION ON METHANOTROPHIC BIODEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN AN IN-SITU MODEL AQUIFER A Thesis by RAN JAN NATARAJAN Submitted to the OIIice of Graduate Studies of Texas A8rM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering EFFECT OF MET~ PULSATION ON METHANOTROPHIC BIODEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN AN IN-SITU MODEL AQUIFER A Thesis by RAN JAN NATARA JAN Submitted...

  19. Effect of methane pulsation on methanotropic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in an in-situ model aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natarajan, Ranjan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF METHANE PULSATION ON METHANOTROPHIC BIODEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN AN IN-SITU MODEL AQUIFER A Thesis by RAN JAN NATARAJAN Submitted to the OIIice of Graduate Studies of Texas A8rM University in partial fulfillment... of Department) August 1993 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering ABSTRACT Effect of Methane Pulsation on Methanotrophic Biodegradation of Trichloroethylene in an in-situ Model Aquifer. (August 1993) Ranjan Natarajan, B. E. , P. S. G College...

  20. Site-specific investigations of aquifer thermal energy storage for space and process cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D R; Hattrup, M P; Watts, R L

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has completed three preliminary site-specific feasibility studies that investigated using aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) to reduce space and process cooling costs. Chilled water stored in an ATES system could be used to meet all or part of the process and/or space cooling loads at the three facilities investigated. The work was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Management. The ultimate goal of DOE's Thermal Energy Storage Program is to successfully transfer ATES technology to industrial and commercial sectors. The primary objective of this study was to identify prospective sites and determine the technical and economic feasibility of implementing chill ATES technology. A secondary objective was to identify site-specific factors promoting or inhibiting the application of chill ATES technology so that other potentially attractive sites could be more easily identified and evaluated. A preliminary investigation of the feasibility of commercializing chill ATES in automotive assembly facilities was completed. The results suggested that automotive assembly facilities was completed. The results suggested that automotive assembly facilities represent a good entry market for chill ATES, if the system is cost-effective. As a result, this study was undertaken to identify and evaluate prospective chill ATES applications in the automotive industry. The balance of the report contains two main sections. Section 2.0 describes the site identification process. Site feasibility is addressed in Section 3.0. Overall study conclusions and recommendations are than presented in Section 4.0.

  1. Developing conservation plan for the Edwards Aquifer: Stakeholders reach consensus resolution to balance protection of endangered species and water use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Courtney

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fall 2012 tx H2O 17 Story by Courtney Smith ] Comal and San Marcos springs are the only known habitats for eight federally listed threatened or endangered species. Photo courtesy of the Edwards Aquifer Authority. What does it take... Aquifer region of Texas achieved a milestone in a struggle that has lasted nearly six decades. Working together, participants in the Edwards Aquifer Recovery Implementation Program (EARIP) developed a habitat conservation plan that will protect...

  2. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

  3. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic gradients between aquifer types are downward throughout most of the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer, where both aquifers are present, is believed to be minor because of an intervening confining unit. Limited exchange of water between aquifer types occurs by diffuse flow through the confining unit, by focused flow along fault planes, or by direct flow where the confining unit is locally absent. Interflow between regional aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form intermediate and regional flow systems. The implications of these flow systems in controlling transport of radionuclides away from the underground test areas at the Nevada Test Site are briefly discussed. Additionally, uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers, the development of potentiometric contours, and the identification of flow systems are identified and evaluated. Eleven tributary flow systems and three larger flow systems are mapped in the Nevada Test Site area. Flow systems within the alluvial-volcanic aquifer dominate the western half of the study area, whereas flow systems within the carbonate aquifer are most prevalent in the southeastern half of the study area. Most of the flow in the regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer that moves through the underground testing area on Pahute Mesa is discharged to the land surface at springs and seeps in Oasis Valley. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer is internally compartmentalized by major geologic structures, primarily thrust faults, which constrain flow into separate corridors. Contaminants that reach the regional carbonate aquifer from testing areas in Yucca and Frenchman Flats flow toward downgradient discharge areas through the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek Ranch or Ash Meadows flow systems and their tributaries.

  4. Uranium partitioning under acidic conditions in a sandy soil aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, W.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center]|[Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Serkiz, S.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Johnson, L.M. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Environmental Systems Engineering] [and others

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The partitioning of uranium in an aquifer down gradient of two large mixed waste sites was examined with respect to the solution and soil chemistry (e.g., pH redox potential and contaminant concentration) and aqueous-phase chemical speciation. This involved generation of field-derived, batch sorption, and reactive mineral surface sorption data. Field-derived distribution coefficients for uranium at these waste sites were found to vary between 0.40 and 15,000. Based on thermodynamic speciation modeling and a comparison of field and laboratory data, gibbsite is a potential reactive mineral surface present in modified soils at the sites. Uranium partitioning data are presented from field samples and laboratory studies of background soil and the mineral surface gibbsite. Mechanistic and empirical sorption models fit to the field-derived uranium partitioning data show an improvement of over two orders of magnitude, as measured by the normalized sum of errors squared, when compared with the single K{sub d} model used in previous risk work. Models fit to batch sorption data provided a better fit of sorbed uranium than do models fit to the field-derived data.

  5. Evaluating impacts of CO2 gas intrusion into a confined sandstone aquifer: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the results from the batch experiments showed that the High Plains sediments mobilized only low concentrations of trace elements (potential contaminants), which were detected occasionally in the aqueous phase during these experiments. Importantly, these occurrences were more frequent in the calcite-free sediment. Results from these investigations provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.

  6. Aquifer restoration at in-situ leach uranium mines: evidence for natural restoration processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deutsch, W.J.; Serne, R.J.; Bell, N.E.; Martin, W.J.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments with aquifer sediments and leaching solution (lixiviant) from an in-situ leach uranium mine. The data from these laboratory experiments and information on the normal distribution of elements associated with roll-front uranium deposits provide evidence that natural processes can enhance restoration of aquifers affected by leach mining. Our experiments show that the concentration of uranium (U) in solution can decrease at least an order of magnitude (from 50 to less than 5 ppM U) due to reactions between the lixiviant and sediment, and that a uranium solid, possibly amorphous uranium dioxide, (UO/sub 2/), can limit the concentration of uranium in a solution in contact with reduced sediment. The concentrations of As, Se, and Mo in an oxidizing lixiviant should also decrease as a result of redox and precipitation reactions between the solution and sediment. The lixiviant concentrations of major anions (chloride and sulfate) other than carbonate were not affected by short-term (less than one week) contact with the aquifer sediments. This is also true of the total dissolved solids level of the solution. Consequently, we recommend that these solution parameters be used as indicators of an excursion of leaching solution from the leach field. Our experiments have shown that natural aquifer processes can affect the solution concentration of certain constituents. This effect should be considered when guidelines for aquifer restoration are established.

  7. Economic comparison of CAES designs employing hardrock, salt, and aquifer storage reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, R.W.; Schainker, R.B.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economic performance of three CAES designs is briefly examined. Each design was developed by a different A and E under different assumptions and constraints, and each employed a different type of air storage facility: a hardrock-mined cavity, a solution-mined salt deposit, and an aquifer. The results indicate that aquifer and salt storage facilities cost roughly 60 to 70% of the equivalent hardrock-mined cavern. In this comparison the aquifer storage facility was somewhat less expensive than the salt cavity, but this difference could be reversed with different salt and/or aquifer characteristics. For instance, if the aquifer had been less permeable, then more wells would have been required for the same power level, and total storage cost would have been higher. The major difference between the plant cost estimates lies not in the cost of storage facilities, but rather in vendor estimates of turbomachinery cost. And, since turbomachinery contributes about half of total plant cost, this difference could be critical to the decision to build a CAES plant.

  8. Inducinga CO2 leak into ashallow aquifer (CO2FieldLab EUROGIA+ project): Monitoring the CO2 plume in groundwaters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (saline aquifer, depleted oil/gas reservoir), aquifers are ubiquitousin the overlying sedimentary pile in case of unwanted CO2leakages from a storage site. Independently from the nature of the reservoir

  9. Managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline aquifer reservoirs through the creation of a hydraulic barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - up in the storage reservoir. For some man-made leakages (e.g. abandoned well), and more importantlyGHGT-10 Managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline aquifer reservoirs through the creation emissions. Depleted oil and gas fields or saline aquifers are seen as possible storage reservoirs

  10. Impact of porous medium desiccation during anhydrous CO2 injection in deep saline aquifers: up scaling from experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    flow rate and capillary properties on the desiccation mechanisms. Keywords: supercritical CO2, dryingImpact of porous medium desiccation during anhydrous CO2 injection in deep saline aquifers: up - France Abstract Injection of CO2 in geological reservoirs or deep aquifers is nowadays studied

  11. TWO-DIMENSIONAL REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING OF CO2 INJECTION IN A SALINE AQUIFER AT THE SLEIPNER SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    model of long-term geological storage of carbon dioxide. A data set from the Utsira formation assemblages are considered in the Utsira formation, a sand formation that is highly permeable and a shale or gas reservoirs, (ii) unmineable coal beds and (iii) saline aquifers. Deep saline aquifers offer

  12. Detections of MTBE in surficial and bedrock aquifers in New England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grady, S.J. [Geological Survey, Hartford, CT (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was detected in 24% of water samples collected from surficial and bedrock aquifers in areas of New England. MTBE was the most frequently detected volatile organic compound among the 60 volatile chemicals analyzed and was present in 33 of 133 wells sampled from July 1993 through September 1995. The median MTBE concentration measured in ground-water samples was 0.45 microgram per liter and concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 5.8 microgram per liter. The network of wells sampled for MTBE consisted of 103 monitoring wells screened in surficial sand-and-gravel aquifers and 30 domestic-supply wells in fractured crystalline bedrock aquifers. Seventy-seven percent of all MTBE detections were from 26 shallow monitoring wells screened in surficial aquifers. MTBE was detected in42% of monitoring wells in urban areas. In agricultural areas, MTBE was detected i 8% (2 of 24) of wells and was not detected in undeveloped areas. Sixty-two percent of the MTBE detections in surficial aquifers were from wells within 0.25 mile of gasoline stations or underground gasoline storage tanks; all but one of these wells were in Connecticut and Massachusetts, where reformulated gasoline is used. MTBE was detected in 23% of deep domestic-supply wells that tapped fractured bedrock aquifers. MTBE was detected in bedrock wells only in Connecticut and Massachusetts; land use near the wells was suburban to rural, and none of the sampled bedrock wells were within 0.25 mile of a gasoline station.

  13. Impact of background flow on dissolution trapping of carbon dioxide injected into saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapaka, Saikiran

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While there has been a large interest in studying the role of dissolution-driven free convection in the context of geological sequestration, the contribution of forced convection has been largely ignored. This manuscript considers CO$_2$ sequestration in saline aquifers with natural background flow and uses theoretical arguments to compute the critical background velocity needed to establish the forced convective regime. The theoretical arguments are supported by two dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations which demonstrate the importance of forced convection in enhancing dissolution in aquifers characterised by low Rayleigh numbers.

  14. The recovery of crude oil spilled on a ground water aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malter, Paul Lawrence

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE RECOVERY OF CRUDE OIL SPILLED ON A GROUND WATER AQUIFER A Thesis by PAUL LAWRENCE MALTER Approved as to style and content by: oy W, ann, J (Ch irman of Committee) / Dona McDona (Head of Department) as (Me ) 0 s Le a . ~e e (Member...) May 1983 ABSTRACT The Recovery of Crude Oil Spilled on a Ground Water Aquifer. (Nay 1983) Paul Lawrence Malter, B. S. , Texas A6K University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Roy W. Bann, Jr. Case histories of previous petroleum spill cleanups...

  15. Legal and regulatory issues affecting the aquifer thermal energy storage concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of legal and regulatory issus that potentially can affect implementation of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) concept are examined. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  16. Apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Moses, John M. (Dedham, MA); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from an aquifer remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating aquifers contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

  17. Control of water coning in gas reservoirs by injecting gas into the aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haugen, Sigurd Arild

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONTROL O' NATEP, CONING IN GAS RESERVOIRS BY INJECTII4G CAS INTO THE AQUIFER A Thesis by SIGURD ARILD HAUGEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... Member May 1980 I~SGi9". p ABSTRACT Control of Water Coninc ir, Gas Reservoirs by Injecting Gas into the Aquifer (May 1980) Sigurd Arild Haugen, Dis. Ing. , Roga)and Regional College Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. A. Morse The production...

  18. Update on the aquifer/wetlands restoration project at Utica, Nebraska, with recommendations for remapping of the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1992-1993, Argonne National Laboratory investigated potential carbon tetrachloride contamination that might be linked to the former grain storage facility operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) at Utica, Nebraska. These initial studies identified carbon tetrachloride in a plume of contaminated groundwater, extending approximately 3,500 ft southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, within a shallow upper aquifer that had been used previously as a municipal water source by the town (Figure 1.1). A deeper aquifer used as the current municipal water source was found to be free of carbon tetrachloride contamination. Although the shallow aquifer was no longer being used as a source of drinking water at Utica, additional studies indicated that the carbon tetrachloride could pose an unacceptable health threat to potential future residents who might install private wells along the expected downgradient migration pathway of the plume. On the basis of these findings, corrective action was recommended to decrease the carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the upper aquifer to acceptable levels (Argonne 1993a,b, 1995). Initial discussions with the Utica village board indicated that any restoration strategies involving nonbeneficial discharge of treated groundwater in the immediate vicinity of Utica would be unacceptable to the town. To address this concern, the CCC/USDA and Argonne, in cooperation with multiple federal and state regulatory and environmental agencies (Table 1.1) proposed a treatment strategy for the Utica groundwater employing groundwater extraction coupled with the seasonal use of agricultural spray irrigation equipment to simultaneously (1) remove carbon tetrachloride from the groundwater (by volatilization to the atmosphere) and (2) discharge the treated groundwater to enhance the development of wetlands in the North Lake Basin Wildlife Management Area, just north of the town (Argonne 2000). To develop this treatment approach, additional groundwater sampling was conducted to update the distribution of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater identified in the preliminary studies in 1992-1993. In March 1998, detailed mapping of the carbon tetrachloride plume was performed by using the Argonne cone penetrometer (CPT) vehicle to collect groundwater samples for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 13 locations (PS01-PS09, PS12, PS16, PS17, PS19; Figure 1.2). The samples were collected in vertical profiles through the aquifer, at 10-ft intervals. The results of this 1998 study (Table 1.2) demonstrated that the three-dimensional distribution of carbon tetrachloride in the aquifer is complex, with multiple 'hot spots' occurring in the plume at various depths and distances along its length (Argonne 2000). In October 2002, the CCC/USDA requested that Argonne perform targeted groundwater sampling at Utica to document the migration of the carbon tetrachloride plume since the 1998 sampling event. In February 2003, vertical-profile groundwater sampling for VOCs analyses was conducted at 8 selected locations (PS01, PS04-PS07, PS12, PS19, PS20; Figure 1.2 and Table 1.3). The lateral and vertical configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume, as identified in the 2003 study (Argonne 2003), is illustrated in Figures 1.3-1.7. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing four extraction wells (GWEX 1-GWEX 4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented at Utica, with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies identified in Table 1.1. The principal components of the Utica system (shown in Figure 1.8) are described briefly in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

  19. Natural arsenic contamination of Holocene alluvial aquifers by linked tectonic, weathering, and microbial processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayek, Mostafa

    Natural arsenic contamination of Holocene alluvial aquifers by linked tectonic, weathering tectonic, geochemical, and biologic processes lead to natural arsenic contamination of groundwater-bearing minerals occurs. We propose a ``GBH-As'' model that ties together all of the important tectonic, biologic

  20. Remediation of CO2 Leakage from Deep Saline Aquifer Storage Based on Reservoir and Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Remediation of CO2 Leakage from Deep Saline Aquifer Storage Based on Reservoir and Pollution Hazards and Safety of CO2 Storage" Division, Orléans, FRANCE www.brgm.fr References Audigane, P., Chiaberge, C., Lions, J., Humez, P., 2009. Modeling of CO2 leakage through an abandoned well from a deep

  1. Controls on the regional-scale salinization of the Ogallala aquifer, Southern High Plains, Texas, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0053, USA b Department of Geological Sciences, The University of TexasControls on the regional-scale salinization of the Ogallala aquifer, Southern High Plains, Texas, USA Sunil Mehtaa, *, Alan E. Fryara , Jay L. Bannerb a Department of Geological Sciences, University

  2. 2013 Faculty Publications A Cloud-Based Framework for Automating MODFLOW Simulations for Aquifer Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    2013 Faculty Publications A Cloud-Based Framework for Automating MODFLOW Simulations for Aquifer Performance-Based Liquefaction Triggering Models for the SPT. Seismological Society of America 2013 Annual. A Simplified Uniform Hazard Liquefaction Analysis Procedure for Bridges. Transportation Research Record. Kevin

  3. A numerical procedure to model and monitor CO2 sequestration in aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    sequestration over very long periods of time. The analysis of CO2 underground storage safety in the long term procedure to model and monitor CO2 sequestration in aquifers ­ p. #12;Introduction. I Storage of CO2 (31.6C, 7.38 MPa). First industrial scale CO2 injection project: Sleipner gas field (North Sea

  4. 1 Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically 2 confined, horizontal aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Jerome A.

    1 Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically 2 confined, horizontal] Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into saline aquifers is a promising tool for reducing 6 anthropogenic CO2 emissions. At reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 is buoyant relative 7 to the ambient groundwater

  5. AQUIFER BIOTHERMOREMEDIATION USING HEAT PUMPS: SOUND THEORETICAL BASIS AND RESULTS ON THERMAL, GEOCHEMICAL AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    example, the long-term use of groundwater heat pumps for air conditioning of homes or buildings can induce and hydrogeological background. The presence of organic pollutants in the aquifer can amplify these phenomena/or the well productivity, (ii) an inappropriate temperature for the use of groundwater heat pumps for air

  6. Evaluating the impact of aquifer layer properties on geomechanical response during CO2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical models play an essential role in understanding the facts of carbon dioxide (CO2) geological sequestration in the life cycle of a storage reservoir. We present a series of test cases that reflect a broad and realistic range of aquifer reservoir properties to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts on the geomechanical response to CO2 injection. In this study, a coupled hydro-mechanical model was introduced to simulate the sequestration process, and a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was introduced to efficiently sample the value of aquifer properties and geometry parameters. Aquifer permeability was found to be of significant importance to the geomechanical response to the injection. To study the influence of uncertainty of the permeability distribution in the aquifer, an additional series of tests is presented, based on a default permeability distribution site sample with various distribution deviations generated by the Monte Carlo sampling method. The results of the test series show that different permeability distributions significantly affect the displacement and possible failure zone.

  7. Chloride Analysis of the Soils Overlaying the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Emery

    2013-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    With a vast amount of people living in semi-arid to arid environments around the globe, the resource of water is valued very highly. The Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer in SW Texas is a semi-arid zone and was chosen as the site for this study. The Chloride...

  8. Using tracer experiments to determine deep saline aquifers caprocks transport characteristics for carbon dioxide storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    for carbon dioxide storage P. Bachaud1,2 , Ph. Berne1 , P. Boulin1,3,4 , F. Renard5,6 , M. Sardin2 , J caprocks from a deep saline aquifer in the Paris basin. Introduction Storage of carbon dioxide in deep bubble. Determination of the diffusion properties is also required since they will govern how dissolved

  9. Groundwater flow to a horizontal or slanted well in an unconfined aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    groundwater, vapor, or oil improves the effective recovery of fluids. In a case study in a thin oil reservoir with the horizontal aquifer units; (4) drilling oper- ations are feasible near the ground surfaces that are obstructed equal to that of 10 vertical wells. In the petroleum industry, horizontal wells improve oil recovery

  10. Monitoring aquifer storage and recovery using multiple geophysical methods , Kristofer Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -gravity methods to monitor an aquifer storage recovery (ASR) project. An abandoned coal mine has been developed into an underground water reservoir in Leyden, Colorado. Excess water from surface sources is injected into the reservoir during winter and then retrieved for use in the summer. Understanding the storage-recovery process

  11. Siderite zonation within the Brent Group: microbial influence or aquifer flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    isotopic data (n = 32) to determine which of these two controls (i.e. biochemistry or pore-water flowSiderite zonation within the Brent Group: microbial influence or aquifer flow? M. WILKINSON1 , *, R versa. There is a strong facies control upon siderite formation, with ripple cross-laminated sands being

  12. The Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs Sean T Description Date 0 Original document 1/29/2008 1 Estimate for carbon content of crude oil was incorrect (see p an invaluable summer at the Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas at Austin working with Sue

  13. Vadose zone influences on aquifer parameter estimates of saturated-zone hydraulic theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Szilagyi* Conservation and Survey Division, University of Nebraska, 113 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588 aquifer properties at the scale of the watershed (Szilagyi et al., 1998). Such work is of the utmost-mail address: jszilagyil@unl.edu (J. Szilagyi). #12;(Fig. 1), and h is the changing phreatic surface

  14. Reactive transport of trace elements and isotopes in the Eutaw coastal plain aquifer, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    geochemistry, mineralogy, and numerical modeling techniques to study the reactive transport of heavy metals ground- water geochemistry. Because the possible biogeochemical reactions in regional aquifers are quite suggest that that elevated metal concentrations may be derived from bacterial iron and manganese reduction

  15. Airflow induced by pumping tests in unconfined aquifer with a low-permeability cap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Airflow induced by pumping tests in unconfined aquifer with a low-permeability cap Jiu Jimmy Jiao1 October 2009. [1] Most analytical and numerical models developed to analyze pumping test data focus on saturated flow below the water table. Traditionally the soil above the initial water table prior to pumping

  16. The Different Characteristics of Aquifer Parameters and Their Implications on Pumping-Test Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    The Different Characteristics of Aquifer Parameters and Their Implications on Pumping-Test Analysis and storativity, under constant-rate pumping conditions. A two-way coordinate is such that the conditions implications on pumping-test designs and interpretation. For example, to estimate the parameters

  17. Shell Geologist: "It is Critical to Ensure Protection of Freshwater Aquifer Zones in Marcellus Shale Drilling"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Shell Geologist: "It is Critical to Ensure Protection of Freshwater Aquifer Zones in Marcellus Protection in Marcellus Development Wells, Tioga County," at 4 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 21. Open to the public, the talk will be held in 117 Earth-Engineering Sciences (EES) Building. While Marcellus natural gas

  18. Chloride Analysis of the Soils Overlaying the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Emery

    2013-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    With a vast amount of people living in semi-arid to arid environments around the globe, the resource of water is valued very highly. The Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer in SW Texas is a semi-arid zone and was chosen as the site for this study. The Chloride...

  19. HighResolution Numerical Methods for MicellarPolymer Flooding and Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trangenstein, John A.

    been used to study the micellar­ polymer flooding process in enhanced oil recovery [12], [18], [19 in practical im­ plementation of enhanced oil recovery techniques at this time, there is increasing interestHigh­Resolution Numerical Methods for Micellar­Polymer Flooding and Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer

  20. An analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal fluctuation in a leaky confined aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    of China. 1. Introduction In most coastal areas, groundwater and seawater are in con- stant communicationAn analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal fluctuation in a leaky confined aquifer Jiu of the solution presented in this paper. This solution is based on a conceptual model under the assumption

  1. Assessment of Managed Aquifer Recharge Site Suitability Using a GIS and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    with a regional groundwater model to assess the hydrologic impact of potential MAR placement and operating planning, including evaluation of options for enhancing groundwater resources. Introduction ManagedAssessment of Managed Aquifer Recharge Site Suitability Using a GIS and Modeling by Tess A. Russo1

  2. Estimation of regional aquifer parameters using baseflow recession data Victor M. Ponce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    's (1963) theoretical model of groundwater flow to a stream is used to estimate regional aquifer parameters diffusiv- ity, hydrogeology, Mexico, Papaloapan. 1 #12;1. Introduction In groundwater hydrology basin. More recent studies have applied Rorabaugh's model to estimate groundwater recharge in diverse

  3. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and competency. The results from these investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological, deep subsurface CO2 storage and sequestration.

  4. High Resolution Simulation and Characterization of Density-Driven Flow in CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are routinely used to study the process of carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in saline aquifers. In this paper TOUGH2-MP. 1. Introduction Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration involves injecting CO2

  5. The construction and use of aquifer influence functions in determining original gas in place for water-drive gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajdica, Ronald Joseph

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR WATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH GAJDICA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR MATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH...

  6. Options, knowledge, and satisfaction of Texas residents affected by Edwards Aquifer issues: implications for education and government 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Amy Suzette

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPINIONS, KNOWLEDGE, AND SATISFACTION OF TEXAS RESIDENTS AFFECTED BY EDWARDS AQUIFER ISSUES: IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATION AND GOVERNMENT A Thesis by AMY SUZETTE KINNEY Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... Education ABSTRACT Opinions, Knowledge, and Satisfaction of Texas Residents Affected by Edwards Aquifer Issues: Implications for Education and Government. (December 1994) Amy Suzette Kinney, B. S. , Tarleton State University Chair of Advisory Committee...

  7. aquifer thermal energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of California eScholarship Repository Summary: of Thermal Energy Energy Sources o Solar Heat o Winter Coldusual Solar Energy System which uses only a heat source andsources...

  8. Results of Aquifer Tests Performed Near R-Area, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R.A.

    2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aquifer testing described in this report was conducted in response to USEPA comments (WSRC, 1998) on the Rev. 0 R-Reactor Seepage Basins RFI/RI Report (WSRC, 1998a), Appendix G, Groundwater Contaminant Transport Modeling for the R-Reactor Seepage Basins (RRSB)/108-4R Overflow Basin Operable Unit. The R-area regional flow model described in Appendix G of the RFI/RI is based on small-scale and/or indirect measures of hydraulic conductivity, including laboratory tests, slug tests, cone penetration testing (CPT) and lithologic core descriptions. The USEPA proposed and SRS- agreed that large-scale conductivity estimates from multiple well pumping tests would be beneficial for validating the model conductivity field. Overall, the aquifer test results validate the 1998 R-area regional groundwater flow model.

  9. Chlorine isotope investigation of natural attenuation of trichloroethene in an aerobic aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Heraty, L.J.; Huang, L.; Holt, B.D.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Clausen, J.L. [Lockheed-Martin Energy Services, Inc., Kevil, KY (United States)] [Lockheed-Martin Energy Services, Inc., Kevil, KY (United States)

    1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural attenuation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) can be an important mechanism for groundwater remediation. It is difficult to determine the effectiveness of natural CAH attenuation from chemical analyses of groundwater samples because mixing, dispersion, and secondary reactions can mask the chemical evidence of attenuation. In this paper, the authors explore the application of stable chlorine isotope ratio measurements as a new tool for evaluating natural attenuation of CAHs. They report stable isotope ratios of chlorine in both trichloroethene (TCE) and inorganic chloride in groundwater from an aerobic aquifer beneath an extensively contaminated industrial site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky. Variations in the concentrations and chlorine isotope ratios of TCE and chloride in the groundwater are consistent with those expected from natural attenuation. These data support a model in which partial TCE degradation occurred in relatively impermeable, clay-rich sediments above the aquifer, and little or no further degradation of TCE occurred within the aquifer. A record of changing conditions within the TCE source area can be inferred from the spatial variation of chlorine isotope ratios for TCE and chloride within the plume.

  10. Geophysical modeling of the Franklin Township buried valley, and associated aquifer, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Yuejun; Palmer, D.F. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed geophysical survey was conducted in Franklin Township, Portage County, Ohio to delineate a buried valley. A combination of the gravity, electrical resistivity, and surface refraction seismic modeling has been applied to determine the bedrock topography, the lithology of the bedrock, the nature of the glacial fill, and the thickness of the associated aquifer. Three dimensional gravity modeling defines the size and shape of the glacial fill with low density compared to the surrounding bedrock and provides a bedrock topography map with a high resolution. The calculated bedrock topography coincides with the water well data available in the area. Resistivity modeling was used to search for a least-squares fit between the measured and the theoretical curves to evaluate the layer thickness and resistivity. The resistivity profile indicates that there exists an aquifer with the thickness about 50 feet within the glacial fill. The level of the soil moisture and the water table is suggested by the resistivity data as well. The seismic profile supports the bedrock boundary calculated by gravity modeling, and shows that the upper part of the bedrock consists of three layers, upper sandstone, shale, and lower sandstone. The comprehensive geophysical interpretation infers that the pre-glacial valley, cut through Sharon Sandstone, Meadville Shale to Berea Sandstone, was extended and deepened at the northern end, and filled with glacial material derived from the north during the later glacial period, resulting in a thick aquifer in the glacial fill.

  11. Edmund G. Brown Jr. CONJUNCTIVE USE OF AQUIFERS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Research Program Prepared By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · EnergyRelated Environmental Research · Energy Systems Authorization Number 040) conducted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The information from this project

  12. Contaminant Transport in Hydrogeologic Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, C.; Redden, D. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the evaluation of dispersivity under field conditions is a costly and time consuming job. The process of transporting a specific conservative ion species in an aquifer is analogous to the transport of heat in the system. Because of this analogy, the original...

  13. Compressed air energy storage: preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Final draft, Task 1: establish facility design criteria and utility benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compressed air energy storage (CAES) has been identified as one of the principal new energy storage technologies worthy of further research and development. The CAES system stores mechanical energy in the form of compressed air during off-peak hours, using power supplied by a large, high-efficiency baseload power plant. At times of high electrical demand, the compressed air is drawn from storage and is heated in a combustor by the burning of fuel oil, after which the air is expanded in a turbine. In this manner, essentially all of the turbine output can be applied to the generation of electricity, unlike a conventional gas turbine which expends approximately two-thirds of the turbine shaft power in driving the air compressor. The separation of the compression and generation modes in the CAES system results in increased net generation and greater premium fuel economy. The use of CAES systems to meet the utilities' high electrical demand requirements is particularly attractive in view of the reduced availability of premium fuels such as oil and natural gas. This volume documents the Task 1 work performed in establishing facility design criteria for a CAES system with aquifer storage. Information is included on: determination of initial design bases; preliminary analysis of the CAES system; development of data for site-specific analysis of the CAES system; detailed analysis of the CAES system for three selected heat cycles; CAES power plant design; and an economic analysis of CAES.

  14. Electrodic voltages accompanying stimulated bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Druhan, J.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Lovley, D.R.; Banfield, J.F.

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The inability to track the products of subsurface microbial activity during stimulated bioremediation has limited its implementation. We used spatiotemporal changes in electrodic potentials (EP) to track the onset and persistence of stimulated sulfate-reducing bacteria in a uranium-contaminated aquifer undergoing acetate amendment. Following acetate injection, anomalous voltages approaching -900 mV were measured between copper electrodes within the aquifer sediments and a single reference electrode at the ground surface. Onset of EP anomalies correlated in time with both the accumulation of dissolved sulfide and the removal of uranium from groundwater. The anomalies persisted for 45 days after halting acetate injection. Current-voltage and current-power relationships between measurement and reference electrodes exhibited a galvanic response, with a maximum power density of 10 mW/m{sup 2} during sulfate reduction. We infer that the EP anomalies resulted from electrochemical differences between geochemically reduced regions and areas having higher oxidation potential. Following the period of sulfate reduction, EP values ranged from -500 to -600 mV and were associated with elevated concentrations of ferrous iron. Within 10 days of the voltage decrease, uranium concentrations rebounded from 0.2 to 0.8 {mu}M, a level still below the background value of 1.5 {mu}M. These findings demonstrate that EP measurements provide an inexpensive and minimally invasive means for monitoring the products of stimulated microbial activity within aquifer sediments and are capable of verifying maintenance of redox conditions favorable for the stability of bioreduced contaminants, such as uranium.

  15. Single-well tracer methods for hydrogeologic evaluation of target aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, S.H.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing an efficient well field for an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project requires measuring local groundwater flow parameters as well as estimating horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity. Effective porosity determines the volume of aquifer needed to store a given volume of heated or chilled water. Ground-water flow velocity governs the migration of the thermal plume, and dispersion and heat exchange along the flow path reduces the thermal intensity of the recovered plume. Stratigraphic variations in the aquifer will affect plume dispersion, may bias the apparent rate of migration of the plume, and can prevent efficient hydraulic communication between wells. Single-well tracer methods using a conservative flow tracer such as bromide, along with pumping tests and water-level measurements, provide a rapid and cost-effective means for estimating flow parameters. A drift-and-pumpback tracer test yields effective porosity and flow velocity. Point-dilution tracer testing, using new instrumentation for downhole tracer measurement and a new method for calibrating the point-dilution test itself, yields depth-discrete hydraulic conductivity as it is affected by stratigraphy, and can be used to estimate well transmissivity. Experience in conducting both drift-and-pumpback and point-dilution tests at three different test sites has yielded important information that highlights both the power and the limitations of the single-well tracer methods. These sites are the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center (UASRC) ATES well field and the VA Medical Center (VA) ATES well field, both located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and the Hanford bioremediation test site north of Richland, Washington.

  16. Well injectivity during CO2 storage operations in deep saline aquifers6 1: Experimental investigation of drying effects, salt precipitation and7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a technique than can potentially limit the accumulation29-17Jan2014 #12;3 1. Introduction51 52 Geological sequestration of CO2 into deep saline aquifers studied54 much less than mature oil & gas reservoirs. Injection of carbon dioxide into saline aquifers55

  17. Experimental assessment of CO2-mineral-toxic ion interactions in a1 simplified freshwater aquifer: Implications for CO2 leakage from deep2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Experimental assessment of CO2-mineral-toxic ion interactions in a1 simplified freshwater aquifer: Implications for CO2 leakage from deep2 geological storage3 4 German Montes-Hernandez*a , François Renarda, b : 10.1021/es3053448 #12;2 Abstract1 The possible intrusion of CO2 into a given freshwater aquifer due

  18. Kinetics of CO2-Fluid-Rock Reactions in a Basalt Aquifer, Soda Springs, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maskell, Alexandra; Kampman, Niko; Chapman, Hazel; Condon, Daniel J.; Bickle, Mike

    2015-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    of the fluvial Salt Lake Formation unconformably above Proterozoic and Palaeozoic rocks characterise this extensional period (e.g. Miller, 1991; Oriel, 1968; Oriel and Platt, 1980; Sacks and Platt, 1985). Several generations of faults cut the Salt Lake... 30.2' ???? ? ??? ??? [1] This gave a bulk hydraulic conductivity of 1.2 x 10-4 ± 1.8 x 10-5 m/min. Uncertainty was calculated using the equations in Appendix A. Drilling conducted by the U.S. Army Engineers (1968) in the upper aquifer...

  19. Hydrogen Chemistry of Basalt Aquifers --Treiman et al. 282 (5397): 21... http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/282/5397/2194e?maxtosh... 1 of 2 2/19/2008 1:26 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Hydrogen Chemistry of Basalt Aquifers -- Treiman et al. 282 (5397): 21... http. 2194 DOI: 10.1126/science.282.5397.2194e LETTERS Hydrogen Chemistry of Basalt Aquifers In their report "Evidence against hydrogen-based microbial ecosystems in basalt aquifers" (14 Aug., p. 976), Robert T

  20. Dynamics of microbial community composition and function during in-situ bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nostrand, J.D. Van; Wu, L.; Wu, W.M.; Huang, A.; Gentry, T.J.; Deng, Y.; Carley, J.; Carrol, S.; He, Z.; Gu, B.; Luo, J.; Criddle, C.S.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Tiedje, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale system was established to examine the feasibility of in situ U(VI) immobilization at a highly contaminated aquifer (U.S. DOE Integrated Field Research Challenge site, Oak Ridge, TN). Ethanol was injected intermittently as an electron donor to stimulate microbial U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) concentrations fell to below the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard (0.03 mg liter{sup -1}). Microbial communities from three monitoring wells were examined during active U(VI) reduction and maintenance phases with GeoChip, a high-density, comprehensive functional gene array. The overall microbial community structure exhibited a considerable shift over the remediation phases examined. GeoChip-based analysis revealed that Fe(III)-reducing bacterial (FeRB), nitrate-reducing bacterial (NRB), and sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) functional populations reached their highest levels during the active U(VI) reduction phase (days 137 to 370), in which denitrification and Fe(III) and sulfate reduction occurred sequentially. A gradual decrease in these functional populations occurred when reduction reactions stabilized, suggesting that these functional populations could play an important role in both active U(VI) reduction and maintenance of the stability of reduced U(IV). These results suggest that addition of electron donors stimulated the microbial community to create biogeochemical conditions favorable to U(VI) reduction and prevent the reduced U(IV) from reoxidation and that functional FeRB, SRB, and NRB populations within this system played key roles in this process.

  1. Dynamics of Microbial Community Composition and Function during In Situ Bioremediation of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D. [Oklahoma University; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Wu, Weimin [Stanford University; Huang, Zhijian [Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Deng, Ye [University of Oklahoma; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Georgia Institute of Technology; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hazen, Terry [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale system was established to examine the feasibility of in situ U(VI) immobilization at a highly contaminated aquifer (U.S. DOE Integrated Field Research Challenge site, Oak Ridge, TN). Ethanol was injected intermittently as an electron donor to stimulate microbial U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) concentrations fell to below the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard (0.03 mg liter 1). Microbial communities from three monitoring wells were examined during active U(VI) reduction and maintenance phases with GeoChip, a high-density, comprehensive functional gene array. The overall microbial community structure exhibited a considerable shift over the remediation phases examined. GeoChip-based analysis revealed that Fe(III)-reducing bacterial (FeRB), nitrate-reducing bacterial (NRB), and sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) functional populations reached their highest levels during the active U(VI) reduction phase (days 137 to 370), in which denitrification and Fe(III) and sulfate reduction occurred sequentially. A gradual decrease in these functional populations occurred when reduction reactions stabilized, suggesting that these functional populations could play an important role in both active U(VI) reduction and maintenance of the stability of reduced U(IV). These results suggest that addition of electron donors stimulated the microbial community to create biogeochemical conditions favorable to U(VI) reduction and prevent the reduced U(IV) from reoxidation and that functional FeRB, SRB, and NRB populations within this system played key roles in this process.

  2. The construction and use of aquifer influence functions in determining original gas in place for water-drive gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajdica, Ronald Joseph

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at the water contact to a unit rate of water influx. For constant water influx rates, the relationship between pressure, flow rate, and the aquifer influence function is given by p - p(t) = q F(t) Terms are defined in the Nomenclature. The pressure... points taken from a continuous curve. See Fig. l. Inspection of the above equations reveals that if the pressure vector and the water flow rate vector are known, then the aquifer influence function vector can be calculated. The pressure vector...

  3. Options, knowledge, and satisfaction of Texas residents affected by Edwards Aquifer issues: implications for education and government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Amy Suzette

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Dr. James E. Christiansen The Edwards Aquifer is an important source of water for the city of San Antonio in Texas. In fact, it is the city's only source of water. Recently, new regulations (Senate Bill 1477) require a limit on the use of water...), to regulate pumping from the eight counties that use the aquifer for their water supply. To determine the public's opinion of this new regulation and to determine concerns over water conservation and water supply, 1, 008 questionnaires were sent to a random...

  4. Flow Instabilities During Injection of CO2 into SalineAquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Julio E.; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factor of 15. Because of the lower viscosity, the CO{sub 2} displacement front will have a tendency towards instability so that waves or rounded lobes of saturation may appear and grow into fingers that lead to enhanced dissolution, bypassing, and possibly poor sweep efficiency. This paper presents an analysis, through high-resolution numerical simulations, of the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. We explore the influence of viscosity ratio, relative permeability functions, and capillary pressure on finger growth and spacing. In addition, we address the issues of finger triggering, convergence under grid refinement and boundary condition effects. Simulations were carried out on scalar machines, and on an IBM RS/6000 SP (a distributed-memory parallel computer with 6080 processors) with a parallelized version of TOUGH2.

  5. Stochastic estimation of aquifer geometry using seismic refraction data with borehole depth constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jinsong [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Korneev, V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gaines, David [University of Tennessee; Baker, Gregory S. [University of Tennessee; Watson, David [ORNL

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a Bayesian model to invert surface seismic refraction data with depth constraints from boreholes for characterization of aquifer geometry and apply it to seismic and borehole data sets collected at the contaminated Oak Ridge National Laboratory site in Tennessee. Rather than the traditional approach of first inverting the seismic arrival times for seismic velocity and then using that information to aid in the spatial interpolation of wellbore data, we jointly invert seismic first arrival time data and wellbore based information, such as depths of key lithological boundaries. We use a staggered grid finite difference algorithm with second order accuracy in time and fourth order accuracy in space to model seismic full waveforms and use an automated method to pick the first arrival times. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to draw many samples from the joint posterior probability distribution, on which we can estimate the key interfaces and their associated uncertainty as a function of horizontal location and depth. We test the developed method on both synthetic and field case studies. The synthetic studies show that the developed method is effective at rigorous incorporation of multiscale data and the Bayesian inversion reduces uncertainty in estimates of aquifer zonation. Applications of the approach to field data, including two surface seismic profiles located 620 m apart from each other, reveal the presence of a low velocity subsurface zone that is laterally persistent. This geophysically defined feature is aligned with the plume axis, suggesting it may serve as an important regional preferential flow pathway.

  6. The effects of faults on the groundwater system in the Hickory Sandstone Aquifer in Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randolph, Leslie Carolyn

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    imgation interval . . Relationship of the water-level slope in the southern end of Region C and the water-level difference between well 426 in Region A and well 427 in Region C . . . 47 . . 47 25 Well locations and water-level characteristics...) of this subunit is coarser grained and has few laterally extensive silt and clay beds compared to the overlying 150 ft (46 m). The frequency of silt and clay interbeds increases progressively in the upper half of the subunit. Extensive cultivation on soils...

  7. Revised Hydrogeology for the Suprabasalt Aquifer System, 200-East Area and Vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Bruce A.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.

    2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This study supports the Hanford Groundwater/Vadose integration project objectives to better understand the risk of groundwater contamination and potential risk to the public via groundwater flow paths. The primary objective of this study was to refine the conceptual groundwater flow model for the 200-East Area and vicinity.

  8. Increased fermentation activity and persistent methanogenesis in a model aquifer system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    source removal of an ethanol blend release Jie Ma a,1 , William G. Rixey b , Pedro J.J. Alvarez a 2014 Accepted 10 October 2014 Available online 17 October 2014 Keywords: Groundwater Ethanol Source contamination by ethanol-blended fuel calls for improved understanding of how remediation efforts affect

  9. ALCOHOL FLUSHING FOR REMOVING DNAPL'S FROM CLAY AND SAND LAYERED AQUIFER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.J. Hayden; P. Padgett; C. Farrell; J. Diebold; X. Zhou; M. Hood

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alcohol flushing, also called cosolvent flushing, is a relatively new in-situ remediation technology that shows promise for removing organic solvents from the soil and groundwater. Soil and groundwater contamination from organic solvents and petroleum products is one of the most serious and widespread environmental problems of our time. Most of the DOE facilities and inactive sites are experiencing soil and groundwater contamination from organic solvents. These water immiscible solvents have entered the subsurface from leaking underground storage tanks and piping, and from past waste handling and disposal practices such as leaking lagoons, holding ponds and landfills. In many cases, they have traveled hundreds of feet down into the saturated zone. If left in the soil, these chemicals may pose a significant environmental and human health risk. Alcohol flushing has potential for application to spilled solvents located deep within the saturated zone which are difficult if not impossible to remove by current remediation strategies, thus, greatly expediting restoration time, reducing total remediation cost and reducing risk.

  10. Large sedimentary aquifer system and sustainable management: investigations of hydrogeological and geochemical variations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -GIRAUD 3 , P. DURST 1 1 BRGM, Regional Geological Survey Service Bordeaux, France, 2 BRGM, Metrology, from several tens of metres to a hundred metres. The deposit sequences characterizing the Eocene management is the lack of knowledge in the central part of this area, due to a lack of geological prospection

  11. TWO WELL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR COMBINED HEATING AND AIRCONDITIONING BY GROUNDWATER HEATPUMPS IN SHALLOW AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelka, Walter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 20. Cold water well extraction - Boundary conditions.Figure 20. Cold water well extraction - Boundary conditions.that the warm water well extraction also is not fully

  12. Three-dimensional conceptual model for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system, FY 1993 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.; Spane, F.A. Jr.; Vermeul, V.R.; Webber, W.D.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ground water underlying parts of the Hanford Site (Figure 1.1) contains radioactive and chemical contaminants at concentrations exceeding regulatory standards (Dresel et al. 1993). The Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is responsible for monitoring the movement of these contaminants to ensure that public health and the environment are protected. To support the monitoring effort, a sitewide three-dimensional ground-water flow model is being developed. This report provides an update on the status of the conceptual model that will form the basis for constructing a numerical three-dimensional flow model for, the site. Thorne and Chamness (1992) provide additional information on the initial development of the three-dimensional conceptual model.

  13. TWO WELL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR COMBINED HEATING AND AIRCONDITIONING BY GROUNDWATER HEATPUMPS IN SHALLOW AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelka, Walter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In warmer climates air source heat pumps have gained widestadvantages over air source heat pumps. For example, theair conditioning is required, water is pumped from the cold water well to the heat pump.

  14. An analytical solution of two-dimensional reactive solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Hongbin Zhan,1 Zhang Wen,2 and Guangyao Gao3 Received 27 September 2008; revised 7 May 2009; accepted 21

  15. System Design and Optimization of CO2 Storage in Deep Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamshiri, Hossein

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization of waterflooding sweep efficiency has been widely applied in reservoir engineering to improve hydrocarbon recovery while delaying water breakthrough and minimizing the bypassed oil in reservoirs. We develop a new framework to optimize...

  16. Degradation rates of CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-113 in anoxic shallow aquifers of Araihazar, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, David

    Degradation rates of CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-113 in anoxic shallow aquifers of Araihazar, Bangladesh that these compounds are not stable under anaerobic conditions. To determine the degradation rates of CFCs observed in 3 H/3 He dated groundwater were used to estimate degradation rates in the saturated zone

  17. Time-lapse gravity monitoring: A systematic 4D approach with application to aquifer storage and recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . An abandoned underground coal mine has been developed into a subsurface water reservoir. Water from surface reservoirs use valuable land needed for develop- ment or the preservation of open space and can have of such reservoirs can reach tens of millions of dollars. The aquifer storage recovery ASR process Pyne, 1995 pro

  18. Hydraulic interference testbetween several doublets in the Dogger aquifer in Ile-de-France region (Val-de-Marne)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydraulic interference testbetween several doublets in the Dogger aquifer in Ile-de-France region of the "thermal breakthrough".One uncertainty of these models is the hydraulic interference between the different of the hydraulic test whichwas carried out in September 2013.The test included 5 geothermal doublets (Cachan 1

  19. Origin of groundwater salinity and hydrogeochemical processes in the confined Quaternary aquifer of the Pearl River Delta, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Origin of groundwater salinity and hydrogeochemical processes in the confined Quaternary aquifer of groundwater salinity and the major hydrogeochemical processes controlling the groundwater evolution­2009, and groundwater samples were collected for major ion (Ca2ț ; Mg2ț ; Naț ; Kț ; NHț 4 ; Cl À ; SO2À 4 and HCOÀ 3

  20. CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND-SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE BOISE HYDROGEOPHYSICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND- SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM Crosswell seismic data contain first-arrival information for velocity inversion and reflec- tions for seismic stratigraphic analysis. Seismic velocity information is useful for directly com- paring to

  1. Determining flow, recharge, and vadose zonedrainage in anunconfined aquifer from groundwater strontium isotope measurements, PascoBasin, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mjsingleton@lbl.gov

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium isotope compositions (87Sr/86Sr) measured in groundwater samples from 273 wells in the Pasco Basin unconfined aquifer below the Hanford Site show large and systematic variations that provide constraints on groundwater recharge, weathering rates of the aquifer host rocks, communication between unconfined and deeper confined aquifers, and vadose zone-groundwater interaction. The impact of millions of cubic meters of wastewater discharged to the vadose zone (103-105 times higher than ambient drainage) shows up strikingly on maps of groundwater 87Sr/86Sr. Extensive access through the many groundwater monitoring wells at the site allows for an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate the strontium geochemistry of a major aquifer, hosted primarily in unconsolidated sediments, and relate it to both long term properties and recent disturbances. Groundwater 87Sr/86Sr increases systematically from 0.707 to 0.712 from west to east across the Hanford Site, in the general direction of groundwater flow, as a result of addition of Sr from the weathering of aquifer sediments and from diffuse drainage through the vadose zone. The lower 87Sr/86Sr groundwater reflects recharge waters that have acquired Sr from Columbia River Basalts. Based on a steady-state model of Sr reactive transport and drainage, there is an average natural drainage flux of 0-1.4 mm/yr near the western margin of the Hanford Site, and ambient drainage may be up to 30 mm/yr in the center of the site assuming an average bulk rock weathering rate of 10-7.5 g/g/yr.

  2. Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

  3. Effect of immiscible liquid contaminants on P-wave transmission through natural aquifer samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, Jil T.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Majer, Ernest L.

    2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed core-scale laboratory experiments to examine the effect of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants on P-wave velocity and attenuation in heterogeneous media. This work is part of a larger project to develop crosswell seismic methods for minimally invasive NAPL detection. The test site is the former DOE Pinellas Plant in Florida, which has known NAPL contamination in the surficial aquifer. Field measurements revealed a zone of anomalously high seismic attenuation, which may be due to lithology and/or contaminants (NAPL or gas phase). Intact core was obtained from the field site, and P-wave transmission was measured by the pulse-transmission technique with a 500 kHz transducer. Two types of samples were tested: a clean fine sand from the upper portion of the surficial aquifer, and clayey-silty sand with shell fragments and phosphate nodules from the lower portion. Either NAPL trichloroethene or toluene was injected into the initially water-saturated sample. Maximum NAPL saturations ranged from 30 to 50% of the pore space. P-wave velocity varied by approximately 4% among the water-saturated samples, while velocities decreased by 5 to 9% in samples at maximum NAPL saturation compared to water-saturated conditions. The clay and silt fraction as well as the larger scatterers in the clayey-silty sands apparently caused greater P-wave attenuation compared to the clean sand. The presence of NAPLs caused a 34 to 54% decrease in amplitudes of the first arrival. The central frequency of the transmitted energy ranged from 85 to 200 kHz, and was sensitive to both grain texture and presence of NAPL. The results are consistent with previous trends observed in homogeneous sand packs. More data will be acquired to interpret P-wave tomograms from crosswell field measurements, determine the cause of high attenuation observed in the field data and evaluate the sensitivity of seismic methods for NAPL detection.

  4. Spatial and temporal dynamics of the microbial community in the Hanford unconfined aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Kaluzny, Rachael M.; Lauber, C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Knight, Robbie C.; Konopka, Allan

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes was used to study temporal dynamics of groundwater Bacteria and Archaea over 10 months within 3 well clusters separated by ~30 m and located 250 m from the Columbia River on the Hanford Site, WA. Each cluster contained 3 wells screened at different depths ranging from 10 to 17 m that differed in hydraulic conductivities. Representative samples were selected for analyses of prokaryotic 16S and eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene copy numbers. Temporal changes in community composition occurred in all 9 wells over the 10 month sampling period. However, there were particularly strong effects near the top of the water table when the seasonal rise in the Columbia River caused river water intrusion at the top of the aquifer. The occurrence and disappearance of some microbial assemblages (such as Actinobacteria ACK-M1) were correlated to river water intrusion. This seasonal impact on microbial community structure was greater in the shallow saturated zone than deeper in the aquifer. Spatial and temporal patterns for several 16S rRNA gene operational taxonomic units associated with particular physiological functions (e.g.methane oxidizers and metal reducers) suggests dynamic changes in fluxes of electron donors and acceptors over an annual cycle. In addition, temporal dynamics in eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene copies and the dominance of protozoa in 18S clone libraries suggest that bacterial community dynamics could be affected not only by the physical and chemical environment, but also by top-down biological control.

  5. Scaling of capillary trapping in unstable two-phase flow: Application to CO[subscript 2] sequestration in deep saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szulczewski, Michael L.

    The effect of flow instabilities on capillary trapping mechanisms is a major source of uncertainty in CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers. Standard macroscopic models of multiphase flow in porous media are unable to ...

  6. Spatial and temporal controls on biogeochemical indicators at the small-scale interface between a contaminated aquifer and wetland surface water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez-Cazull, Susan Enid

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    from three locations exhibiting upward, downward, and negligent hydrologic flow between aquifer and wetland. PCA was used to identify the principal biogeochemical processes and to obtain factor scores for evaluating significant seasonal and hydrological...

  7. The Footprint of the CO[subscript 2] Plume during Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Aquifers: Storage Efficiency for Capillary Trapping at the Basin Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juanes, Ruben

    We study a sharp-interface mathematical model of CO[subscript 2] migration in deep saline aquifers, which accounts for gravity override, capillary trapping, natural groundwater flow, and the shape of the plume during the ...

  8. A study of wind-speed maxima near the surface over the south central United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckman, Samuel Karl

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GMT, 28 April 1967, showing isotachs and fronts. . . . . . 26 12. Synoptic map for 1200 GMT, 28 April 1967. . 28 13. Time cross section for Abilene, Texas, April 1967. . . . 11 14. Change in the wind-speed profile ot Oklahoma City, Oklahoma..., but the summer months had more days with low-level jets. They further stated that the jets occurred in all seasons and should be related to the synoptic conditions. Crawford and Hudson (1970), using observations from a 1500-ft television tower at Oklahoma...

  9. Reservoir characterization and development opportunities in Jacob Field, South-Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez Depaz, Mirko Joshoe

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the study, determine the oil potential, and make recommendations to improve production. Since no previous reservoir study was performed in this field, the original oil in place and the current status of depletion was unknown. Therefore a complete integrated...

  10. Cloud-to-ground lightning-precipitation relationships in the South Central United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott Christopher

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between the data sets 79 Monthly mean PP values for each region for Categories 2, 3, and 4 10 12 13 14 Same as Figure 8, except for MNM Same as Figure 8, except for MPM Same as Figure 8, except for MNC Same as Figure 8, except for MPC Same... MNC MNM MPC Measured (Total) Ground Flash Density Mean Negative (First Stroke Peak) Current Mean Negative Multiplicity Mean Positive (First Stroke Peak) Current flashes / 100 km kA strokes / flash kA MPM PCPN PGFD PP Mean Positive...

  11. Rooftop Membrane Temperature Reductions with Green Roof Technology in South-Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvorak, B.

    Early green roof cooling and energy reduction research in North America took place in Canada and the northern latitudes of the United States, where green roofs reduced rooftop temperatures by 70% to 90%. Less is known about green roof technology...

  12. Immigrants' Acculturation as Expressed in Architecture: 19th Century Churches and Courthouses in South Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jacob James

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    for Heritage Conservation ..................................................................... 160 OPPORTUNITIES FOR FUTURE RESEARCH .......................................................... 162 REFERENCES... of the study for the practice of heritage conservation are then described. ? The Opportunities for Further Research section suggests and describes areas of potential future research. ? The References section lists all resources utilized in the study. 5...

  13. Geology of north-central Burleson and south-central Milam counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Eldon Ray

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lix t ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ t ~ ~ ~ ~ r r ~ I 8 i 3 l 1 ogx lE ~ ' Q ~ ~ t ~ ~ r ~ ~ ~ t ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 7 e Zi nr also cuesta ~ ~ ~ i ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ a 0 t ~ ~ ~ ~ &r. "er ( ar. iso clay ar, locality C-Z 12 14 Carrizo s"+as at locality C-5 ~. . . . . . . . lg U: i a. risc n, wv. Dt...ca fozmaticmx of the QlaiboxxLe gaea@+ Miss Ellisos (leal) ~ ta q ~ Ci~ ~s to fatti~ stat a+4 this ~ has bocA follcwro4 by Reuiek and, StoaaoX, (lQ51), StexLsoi 09~ sa4 1N 5)c aa4 bacxlay (1/55) ~ ~~z xmhsRkaa ~ 4 gently xelliag& satoxo...

  14. Evolution of a mafic volcanic field in the central Great Basin, south central Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Naumann, T. R.; Smith, E. I.; Bradshaw, T. K.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1996-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    2 (basanites and hawaiites) is more restricted (0.7035 - 0.7037, Figure 10). Neodymium isotopes are also more variable in basalts of episode I than episode 2, though the differences are not as great as for Sr (Figure 10). A similar pattern can... Sr=850 ppm .  Nd=10 ppm _ Xl Nd=85) . I I I I I I I 0.70800 0.71000 Figure 12. Neodymium-Sr isotope correlation diagram for Reveille Range basalts with binary mixing lines between low 87Sr/86Sr episode 2 basalts (hawaiites and basanites...

  15. Chronological refinement of an ice core record at Upper Fremont Glacier in south central North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Paul F. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States); White, David E. [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States)] [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States); Naftz, David L. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Cecil, L. DeWayne [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

    2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to use ice cores from alpine glaciers in the midlatitudes to reconstruct paleoclimatic records has not been widely recognized. Although excellent paleoclimatic records exist for the polar regions, paleoclimatic ice core records are not common from midlatitude locations. An ice core removed from the Upper Fremont Glacier in Wyoming provides evidence for abrupt climate change during the mid-1800s. Volcanic events (Krakatau and Tambora) identified from electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) and isotopic and chemical data from the Upper Fremont Glacier were reexamined to confirm and refine previous chronological estimates of the ice core. At a depth of 152 m the refined age-depth profile shows good agreement (1736{+-}10 A.D.) with the {sup 14}C age date (1729{+-}95 A.D.). The {delta}{sup 18}O profile of the Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) ice core indicates a change in climate known as the Little Ice Age (LIA). However, the sampling interval for {delta}{sup 18}O is sufficiently large (20 cm) such that it is difficult to pinpoint the LIA termination on the basis of {delta}{sup 18}O data alone. Other research has shown that changes in the {delta}{sup 18}O variance are generally coincident with changes in ECM variance. The ECM data set contains over 125,000 data points at a resolution of 1 data point per millimeter of ice core. A 999-point running average of the ECM data set and results from f tests indicates that the variance of the ECM data decreases significantly at about 108 m. At this depth, the age-depth profile predicts an age of 1845 A.D. Results indicate the termination of the LIA was abrupt with a major climatic shift to warmer temperatures around 1845 A.D. and continuing to present day. Prediction limits (error bars) calculated for the profile ages are {+-}10 years (90% confidence level). Thus a conservative estimate for the time taken to complete the LIA climatic shift to present-day climate is about 10 years, suggesting the LIA termination in alpine regions of central North America may have occurred on a relatively short (decadal) timescale. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  16. Immigrants' Acculturation as Expressed in Architecture: 19th Century Churches and Courthouses in South Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jacob James

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    of cultural heritage and reflect the collective memory of immigrants’ homeland. Courthouses have been considered as the predominant symbol of self-government and of community’s civic pride. Thus, the county courthouse served as the icon of immigrants...

  17. Greybull Sandstone Petroleum Potential on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, David A.

    2002-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this project was to explore for stratigraphic traps that may be present in valley-fill sandstone at the top of the Lower Cretaceous Kootenai Formation. This sandstone interval, generally known as the Greybull Sandstone, has been identified along the western edge of the reservation and is a known oil and gas reservoir in the surrounding region. The Greybull Sandstone was chosen as the focus of this research because it is an excellent, well-documented, productive reservoir in adjacent areas, such as Elk Basin; Mosser Dome field, a few miles northwest of the reservation; and several other oil and gas fields in the northern portion of the Bighorn Basin.

  18. A study of wind-speed maxima near the surface over the south central United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckman, Samuel Karl

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the front is indicated by a wind shift, pressure change, or a decrease in moisture. In some cases the position of the cold front may be confused with the position of a dew-point front (Henry and Thompson, 1963) which is active in west Texas, eastern New... N. A wind speed of at least 30 kt was considered to be strong. The initial flow is confined on both the east and west sides. The mountains restrict the western extent of the southerly flow. The eastward extent of the southerly flow is determined...

  19. Geologic and geomorphic analysis of the Organ Mountains fault, south-central New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beehner, Terri S.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . 21 . . . . . 21 21 METHODOLOGY . Page . . 23 Imagery Analysis. Topographic Map Analysis . . . Field Investigations Trenching . Surveys. . . . 24 . . . 24 . . . 28 . . . 28 . . . 28 RESULTS . . . . . 41 Imagery, Maps and Surveys... and the lines surveyed across the Cox Ranch (T = trench survey), Rock Springs (4, 5), and WSMR Reentrant (6) sectors of the Organ Mountains fault. . . . 12 Figure 8. Apollo VI photograph showing the locations of important physiographic features in south...

  20. Influence of burning and mowing on an eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides) community in South Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cadenhead, James Frank

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This tall, robust grass attracted the settlers and was often first to be fenced and utilized as pasture (Polk and Adcook 1964). Eastern gamagrass dominated grasslands were once extensively distributed and widely utilized for human food (Komarek 1965...), wildlife and livestock grazing, and hay (Polk and Adcock 1964). Gamagrass has, however, been eliminated or greatly reduced in abundanoe in relation to its former distribution. This reduction was primarily due to overgrazing, extensive hay production...

  1. Gravity anomaly patterns in the south-central Zimbabwe Archaean craton and their geological interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction Parts of the southeastern region of the Archaean Zimba- bwe craton (Fig. 1) have been used

  2. Effects of prescribed seasonal burning on a Combretum-Commiphora plant community in South Central Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinyamario, Jenesio Ikindu

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) I NRRS Headquarters Kiboko z B eb Nairobi referee N. R. R. S TANZANIA 0 000 K Mombasa 0 oq 2'20'5 NATIONAL RANGE RESEARCH STATION 0 oi oi Z 0 Z D 0 Aug Control Nov Reserve BLOCK I Jan Jul Mar X e 0 0 5 37'50'E Jut... Reserve Jul Msr 0 s o N Jan Cofilrol Reserve Aug Aug Nov Jan Nov Z ei Z c 37 50'E Plot~s 2' 20'S Experimental BLOCK III Mar Control BLOCK II Experimental plots 200 180 160 140 A verage Rainfall ~ tace CZ2 t904-t990 Average...

  3. Seismic Attribute Analysis of the Mississippian Chert at the Wellington Field, south-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirazhiev, Ayrat

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Mississippian chert reservoirs, important hydrocarbon resources in North America, are highly heterogeneous, typically below seismic resolution and, therefore, present a challenging task for predicting reservoir properties from seismic data...

  4. Exotic Goods, Chivay Obsidian, and Sociopolitical Change in the South-Central Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripcevich, Nicholas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peru and northern Bolivia. Journal of World Prehistory, 14(into middle horizon Tiwanaku, Bolivia. In J.E. Staller, R.H.the altiplano of Peru and Bolivia. Ńawpa Pacha, 13, 45–83.

  5. Chillicothe High School wins 2015 South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments4 Chairs Meeting - April 2014 DOE-HDBK-1139/1-2006Department| Department

  6. Heat Flow And Geothermal Potential In The South-Central United States |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategyHayes CenterHearthStone Homes JumpOpen

  7. State and Local Code Implementation: South-central Region - 2014 BTO Peer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of Staffing Model5 FOA Informational| Department ofReview

  8. Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in A/M Area Crouch Branch (Cretaceous) Aquifer characterization samples: 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.B.; Haselow, J.S.; Keenan, M.A.; Van Pelt, R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Rossabi, J.; Simmons, J.L.

    1993-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples were collected during the A/M Area Crouch Branch (Cretaceous) Aquifer Characterization (Phase I) Program. The samples were analyzed for chlorinated VOCs by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and MicroSeeps Ltd. All samples were sealed in the field immediately upon retrieval of the core and subsampling. A total of 113 samples locations were selected for analysis. The Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of SRTC analyzed all locations in duplicate (226 samples). MicroSeeps Ltd was selected as the quality assurance (QA) check laboratory. MicroSeeps Ltd analyzed 40 locations with 4 duplicates (44 samples). The samples were collected from seven boreholes in A/M Area in the interval from 200 feet deep to the total depth of the boring (360 feet deep nominal); samples were collected every 10 feet within this interval. The sampling zone corresponds approximately to the Crouch Branch Aquifer in A/M Area. The overall A/M Area Crouch Branch Aquifer characterization objectives, a brief description of A/M Area geology and hydrology, and the sample locations, field notes, driller lithologic logs, and required procedural documentation are presented in WSRC (1993).

  9. Single-cell genomics reveal metabolic strategies for microbial growth and survival in an oligotrophic aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Kennedy, David W.; Castelle, Cindy; Field, Erin; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteria from the genus Pedobacter are a major component of microbial assemblages at Hanford Site and have been shown to significantly change in abundance in response to the subsurface intrusion of Columbia River water. Here we employed single cell genomics techniques to shed light on the physiological niche of these microorganisms. Analysis of four Pedobacter single amplified genomes (SAGs) from Hanford Site sediments revealed a chemoheterotrophic lifestyle, with the potential to exist under both aerobic and microaerophilic conditions via expression of both aa3­?type and cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases. These SAGs encoded a wide-range of both intra-and extra­-cellular carbohydrate-active enzymes, potentially enabling the degradation of recalcitrant substrates such as xylan and chitin, and the utilization of more labile sugars such as mannose and fucose. Coupled to these enzymes, a diversity of transporters and sugar-binding molecules were involved in the uptake of carbon from the extracellular local environment. The SAGs were enriched in TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs), which play a key role in uptake of substrates resulting from degradation of recalcitrant carbon. CRISPR-Cas mechanisms for resisting viral infections were identified in all SAGs. These data demonstrate the potential mechanisms utilized for persistence by heterotrophic microorganisms in a carbon-limited aquifer, and hint at potential linkages between observed Pedobacter abundance shifts within the 300 Area subsurface and biogeochemical shifts associated with Columbia River water intrusion.

  10. Uncertainty analyses of CO2 plume expansion subsequent to wellbore CO2 leakage into aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Bacon, Diana H.; Engel, David W.; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Fang, Zhufeng

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we apply an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to CO2 sequestration problems. In one scenario, we look at the risk of wellbore leakage of CO2 into a shallow unconfined aquifer in an urban area; in another scenario, we study the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on CO2 migration. We combine various sampling approaches (quasi-Monte Carlo, probabilistic collocation, and adaptive sampling) in order to reduce the number of forward calculations while trying to fully explore the input parameter space and quantify the input uncertainty. The CO2 migration is simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). For computationally demanding simulations with 3D heterogeneity fields, we combined the framework with a scalable version module, eSTOMP, as the forward modeling simulator. We built response curves and response surfaces of model outputs with respect to input parameters, to look at the individual and combined effects, and identify and rank the significance of the input parameters.

  11. Analysis of Fault Permeability Using Mapping and Flow Modeling, Hickory Sandstone Aquifer, Central Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieto Camargo, Jorge E., E-mail: jorge.nietocamargo@aramco.com; Jensen, Jerry L., E-mail: jjensen@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering (Canada)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reservoir compartments, typical targets for infill well locations, are commonly created by faults that may reduce permeability. A narrow fault may consist of a complex assemblage of deformation elements that result in spatially variable and anisotropic permeabilities. We report on the permeability structure of a km-scale fault sampled through drilling a faulted siliciclastic aquifer in central Texas. Probe and whole-core permeabilities, serial CAT scans, and textural and structural data from the selected core samples are used to understand permeability structure of fault zones and develop predictive models of fault zone permeability. Using numerical flow simulation, it is possible to predict permeability anisotropy associated with faults and evaluate the effect of individual deformation elements in the overall permeability tensor. We found relationships between the permeability of the host rock and those of the highly deformed (HD) fault-elements according to the fault throw. The lateral continuity and predictable permeability of the HD fault elements enhance capability for estimating the effects of subseismic faulting on fluid flow in low-shale reservoirs.

  12. Optimal design of pump-and-treat systems under uncertain hydraulic conductivity and plume distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bau, Domenico A.

    Optimal design of pump-and-treat systems under uncertain hydraulic conductivity and plume of the cleanup by pump-and-treat of polluted shallow aquifers. In the problem being investigated, hydraulic accordingly the design of the pump-and-treat system for the remainder of the remedial process. The study

  13. Semi-distributed lumped model of a karst system under active1 management2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    system27 28 Keywords29 Impulse response30 Groundwater flow modeling31 Groundwater level fluctuations32 Pumping33 Introduction34 Numerical models for karst aquifers usually fall within two main categories1 Semi-distributed lumped model of a karst system under active1 management2 Bernard LADOUCHE1

  14. Impact of Two Water Management Systems on Arsenic Speciation and Microbial Populations in Rice Rhizosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somenahally, Anil Kumar C.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ., 2003). In the South-Central USA, arsenic in the form of sodium hydroxymethylarsinate (commonly known as monosodium methane-arsonate (MSMA)) and disodium methyl-dioxido- oxoarsorane (commonly known as disodium methane-arsonate (DSMA)), which were...

  15. Impact of Two Water Management Systems on Arsenic Speciation and Microbial Populations in Rice Rhizosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somenahally, Anil Kumar C.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ., 2003). In the South-Central USA, arsenic in the form of sodium hydroxymethylarsinate (commonly known as monosodium methane-arsonate (MSMA)) and disodium methyl-dioxido- oxoarsorane (commonly known as disodium methane-arsonate (DSMA)), which were...

  16. Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Kate M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Peacock, Aaron D.; Lesher, E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Bargar, John R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Figueroa, Linda A.; Ranville, James; Davis, James; Long, Philip E.

    2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Localized zones or lenses of naturally reduced sediments have the potential to play a significant role in the fate and transport of redox-sensitive metals and metalloids in aquifers. To assess the mineralogy, microbiology, and redox processes that occur in these zones, we examined several cores from a region of naturally occurring reducing conditions in a uranium-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO). Sediment samples from a transect of cores ranging from oxic/suboxic Rifle aquifer sediment to naturally reduced sediment were analyzed for uranium and iron content, oxidation state, and mineralogy, reduced sulfur phases, and solid phase organic carbon content using a suite of analytical and spectroscopic techniques on bulk sediment and size fractions. Solid-phase uranium concentrations were higher in the naturally reduced zone, with a high proportion of the uranium present as reduced U(IV). The sediments were also elevated in reduced sulfur phases and Fe(II), indicating it is very likely that U(VI), Fe(III), and sulfate reduction occurred or is occurring in the sediment. The microbial community was assessed using lipid- and DNA-based techniques, and statistical redundancy analysis was performed to determine correlations between the microbial community and the geochemistry. Increased concentration of solid phase organic carbon and biomass in the naturally reduced sediment suggests that natural bioreduction is stimulated by a zone of increased organic carbon concentration associated with fine-grained material and lower permeability to groundwater flow. Characterization of the naturally bioreduced sediment provides an understanding of the natural processes that occur in the sediment under reducing conditions and how they may impact natural attenuation of radionuclides and other redox sensitive materials. Results also suggest the importance of recalcitrant organic carbon for maintaining reducing conditions and uranium immobilization.

  17. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orozco, A. Flores; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Kemna, A.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer - a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  18. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores-Orozco, Adrian; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Kemna, Andreas

    2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments at the Department of Energy’s Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer – a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  19. Effect of Ethanol and Methyl-tert-Butyl Ether on Monoaromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation: Response Variability for Different Aquifer Materials Under Various Electron-Accepting Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Aguilar, G L; Fernandez-Sanchez, J M; Kane, S R; Kim, D; Alvarez, P J

    2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifer microcosms were used to determine how ethanol and methyl-tert-butyl ether (MtBE) affect monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation under different electron-accepting conditions commonly found in contaminated sites experiencing natural attenuation. Response variability was investigated by using aquifer material from four sites with different exposure history. The lag phase prior to BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) and ethanol degradation was typically shorter in microcosms with previously contaminated aquifer material, although previous exposure did not always result in high degradation activity. Toluene was degraded in all aquifer materials and generally under a broader range of electron-accepting conditions compared to benzene, which was degraded only under aerobic conditions. MtBE was not degraded within 100 days under any condition, and it did not affect BTEX or ethanol degradation patterns. Ethanol was often degraded before BTEX compounds, and had a variable effect on BTEX degradation as a function of electron-accepting conditions and aquifer material source. An occasional enhancement of toluene degradation by ethanol occurred in denitrifying microcosms with unlimited nitrate; this may be attributable to the fortuitous growth of toluene-degrading bacteria during ethanol degradation. Nevertheless, experiments with flow-through aquifer columns showed that this beneficial effect could be eclipsed by an ethanol-driven depletion of electron acceptors, which significantly inhibited BTEX degradation and is probably the most important mechanism by which ethanol could hinder BTEX natural attenuation. A decrease in natural attenuation could increase the likelihood that BTEX compounds reach a receptor as well as the potential duration of exposure.

  20. Ground-water flow and recharge in the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer, east-central Illinois: A conceptual model based on hydrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panno, S.V.; Hackley, K.C.; Cartwright, K.; Liu, C.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major-ion and isotopic analyses of ground water have been used to develop a conceptual model of flow and recharge to the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MVA). The MVA is composed of clean, permeable sands and gravels and forms a basal'' fill up to 60 m thick in a buried, west-trending bedrock valley. A thick succession of glacial tills, some containing interbedded lenses of sand and gravel, covers the MVA. Three regions within the MVA have hydrochemically distinct ground-water types. A fourth ground-water type was found at the confluence of the MVA and the Mackinaw Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MAK) to the west.

  1. Estimating spatially-variable rate constants of denitrification in irrigated agricultural groundwater systems using an Ensemble Smoother

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bau, Domenico A.

    an irrigated agricultural river-aquifer system using measurements of (i) nitrate concen- trationEstimating spatially-variable rate constants of denitrification in irrigated agricultural groundwater systems using an Ensemble Smoother Ryan T. Bailey , Domenico A. Baù, Timothy K. Gates Department

  2. Pajarito Plateau Groundwater Flow and Transport Modeling Process-Level and Systems Models of Groundwater Flow and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    Pajarito Plateau Groundwater Flow and Transport Modeling 1 Process-Level and Systems Models of Groundwater Flow and Transport Beneath the Pajarito Plateau: Migration of High Explosives from Technical Area Groundwater Modeling Project Systems Model Vadose Zone Model Regional Aquifer Model #12;Pajarito Plateau

  3. Predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations in the Puget Sound Basin: Implications for aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesoriero, A.J.; Voss, F.D. [Geological Survey, Tacoma, WA (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The occurrence and distribution of elevated nitrate concentrations in ground water in the Puget Sound Basin, Washington, were determined by examining existing data from more than 3,000 wells. Models that estimate the probability that a well has an elevated nitrate concentration were constructed by relating the occurrence of elevated nitrate concentrations to both natural and anthropogenic variables using logistic regression. The variables that best explain the occurrence of elevated nitrate concentrations were well depth, surficial geology, and the percentage of urban and agricultural land within a radius of 3.2 kilometers of the well. From these relations, logistic regression models were developed to assess aquifer susceptibility and ground-water vulnerability. Both models performed well at predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations in an independent data set. This approach to assessing aquifer susceptibility and ground-water vulnerability has the advantages of having both model variables and coefficient values determined on the basis of existing water quality information and does not depend on the assignment of variables and weighting factors based on qualitative criteria.

  4. Biotransformation involved in sustained reductive removal of uranium in contaminant aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress made from August 2004 to July 2005. During this period research focused primarily on obtaining a better understanding of the factors controlling the reduction of U(VI) during in situ uranium bioremediation as well as investigating the potential for using electrodes as an alternative electron donor to promote in situ uranium reduction. Analysis of the 2003 experiment at the field study site in Rifle, CO was completed. The results demonstrated the substantial heterogeneity of the zone undergoing bioremediation, both in terms of geochemistry and microbiology. The lack of U(VI) reduction under sulfate-reducing conditions was clearly documented. The need for more detailed sampling both with time and with depth in the aquifer was demonstrated. For the first time a comparison between the composition of the microbial community in the sediments and the microbes in the corresponding groundwater was attempted. The findings from this study are important not only in further demonstrating the potential for in situ uranium bioremediation, but also for indicating how methods and sampling approaches should be improved in the future. A manuscript summarizing these findings has been accepted for publication in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. In summer of 2004 a new field experiment was conducted at the Rifle site. A novel feature of this study was much more intensive sampling in order to better define the progression of microbial processes during in situ uranium bioremediation. The results demonstrated that stimulation of in situ uranium bioremediation with added acetate was a repeatable phenomenon and that U(VI) reduction was clearly linked to the presence and activity of microorganisms in the family Geobacteraceae. A manuscript summarizing these results is in preparation. A surprising result of the field studies at the Rifle site was that although Geobacter species actively reduced U(VI) in the groundwater, removing it from solution, a high percentage of the uranium in sediments was recovered as U(VI). In order to evaluate this further, studies were conducted in which sediments from the Rifle site were incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. This permitted accurate monitoring of the uranium speciation in the sediments as well as in the groundwater over time. When acetate was added to simulate the in situ uranium bioremediation strategy, U(VI) in the groundwater was reduced with a corresponding increase in U(IV) in the sediments. However, the U(VI) in the sediments was not reduced, even after long-term incubations. The resistance of U(VI) adsorbed to sediments to microbial reduction was not previously suspected and has important implications for in situ uranium bioremediation.

  5. How the world's largest seawater injection system was designed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, J.B.; Jorque, M.A.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world's largest seawater injection system went on stream in Saudi Arabia in June 1978 to furnish 4.2 million bpd of water for pressure maintenance in the Uthmaniyah sector of the giant Ghawar Field. The operator, Aramco, first began water injection along the flanks in this field in 1966 using gravity injection wells. This gravity system gave way to a pressurized system under a program started in 1973. During this period, the primary source for injection was saline water from the Wasia Aquifer in the Uthmaniyah area. In 1974 it was determined that this aquifer could not supply the design requirement of 4.2 million bpd of saline water. Therefore, it was decided to convert the injection system to seawater obtained from the Arabian Gulf. This required the design and construction of a seawater treating plant and installation of pipelines and intermediate pump stations to transport the water from the treating plant to the existing Uthmaniyah Water Supply Station.

  6. System for enhanced longevity of in situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carman, M. Leslie (San Ramon, CA); Taylor, Robert T. (Roseville, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  7. Optimal Well-Group Distribution of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Lu, L.; Yoshida, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is critical to determine how the well group arranges for application of the GWSHP system. Based on the fact that water movement is the most important factor influencing heat transfer in an aquifer, this paper presents a two-step analysis method...

  8. The Well-Group Distribution of Groundwater Source Heat Pump System Optimized Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Lu, L.; Yoshida, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is the key question that how does the well group arrange for application of GWSHP system. Based on the fact that the water movement is the important factor of heat transfer on aquifer, this paper presents two steps analysis method and analyze...

  9. Optimal Well-Group Distribution of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Lu, L.; Yoshida, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is critical to determine how the well group arranges for application of the GWSHP system. Based on the fact that water movement is the most important factor influencing heat transfer in an aquifer, this paper presents a two-step analysis method...

  10. The Well-Group Distribution of Groundwater Source Heat Pump System Optimized Research 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Lu, L.; Yoshida, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is the key question that how does the well group arrange for application of GWSHP system. Based on the fact that the water movement is the important factor of heat transfer on aquifer, this paper presents two steps analysis method and analyze...

  11. Hydrogeological aspects of fault zones on various scales in the Roer Valley Rift System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bense, Victor

    within fault zones has important implications for the modeling of groundwater flow in sedimentary aquifer; Groundwater flow; Unconsolidated sediments; The Netherlands 1. Introduction Numerous studies carried out, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands Abstract The impact of faults on the groundwater flow system

  12. Simulation of hysteretic effects in multi-phase flows in aquifers N. D. Botkin, M. Brokate, K.-H. Hoffmann, O. A. Pykhteev, and V. L. Turova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turova, Varvara

    permeable rocks that are saturated with salt water, called brine. Terrestrial saline aquifers are saline be injected into such a formation. Because the supercritical CO2 is less dense than the brine, it will rise up and become trapped by the caprock above. Additionally, some CO2 will be dissolved in the brine. Injection

  13. Well injectivity during CO2storage operations in deep saline aquifers 6 Part 2: Numerical simulations of drying, salt deposit mechanisms and role of7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 1 2 3 4 5 Well injectivity during CO2storage operations in deep saline aquifers ­6 Part 2 or industrial units and stored in underground geological reservoirs.30 Return on experience withCO2 injection-well field scale is proposed. This approach is of major40 importance because it makes it possible

  14. Modeling Density Effects in CO2 Injection in Oil Reservoirs and A Case Study of CO2 Sequestration in a Qatari Saline Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Tausif

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    in southwest Qatar is used as a case study for CO2 sequestration. A compositional simulation model is prepared for the Aruma aquifer using the available log data and flow test data. It was found that the grid size is a key parameter in modeling CO2...

  15. Development of a Darcy-Brinkman model to simulate water flow and tracer transport in a heterogeneous karstic aquifer (Val d'Orlans, France)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modelling karstic aquifers is problematic because the equation of references (i.e. Darcy) is adapted: i) the Darcy law used to describe the hydraulic behaviour of massive limestone, and ii) the equationDevelopment of a Darcy- Brinkman model to simulate water flow and tracer transport

  16. Hydraulic interactions between fractures and bedding planes in a carbonate aquifer studied by means of experimentally induced water-table fluctuations (Coaraze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Hydraulic interactions between fractures and bedding planes in a carbonate aquifer studied high and low permeability regions are controlled by the hydraulic head gradient. Past studies have addressed this problem mainly considering steady- state hydraulic conditions. To study such exchanges during

  17. Hydrothermal system in Southern Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, A.H.; Sorey, M.L.; Olmsted, F.H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern Grass Valley is a fairly typical extensional basin in the Basin and Range province. Leach Hot Springs, in the southern part of the valley, represents the discharge end of an active hydrothermal flow system with an estimated deep aquifer temperature of 163 to 176/sup 0/C. Results of geologic, hydrologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations are discussed in an attempt to construct an internally consistent model of the system.

  18. HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

  19. Accounting for StreamAquifer Interactions in the State-Space Discretization of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    ­Milyukov­Nash Cascade for Streamflow Forecasting Jozsef Szilagyi1 Abstract: A sample-data system discretization

  20. Semi-Analytical Solutions of One-Dimensional Multispecies Reactive Transport in a Permeable Reactive Barrier-Aquifer System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieles, John Michael

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    At many sites it has become apparent that most chemicals of concern (COCs) in groundwater are persistent and not effectively treated by conventional remediation methods. In recent years, the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology has proven...

  1. Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 1. Systems. 1.1. On Line. In this introductory section we will pose no exercises, but instead, will detail. how to use Maple to solve problems in linear ...

  2. Field-Derived Hydraulic Properties for Perched-Water Aquifer Wells 299-E33-350 and 299-E33-351, Hanford Site B-Complex Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During February and March 2014, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted hydraulic (slug) tests at 200-DV-1 Operable Unit wells 299-E33-350 (C8914) and 299-E33-351 (C8915) as part of B-Complex Area Perched-Water characterization activities at the Hanford Site 200-East Area. During the construction/completion phase of each well, two overlapping depth intervals were tested within the unconfined perched-water aquifer contained in the silty-sand subunit of the Cold Creek Unit. The purpose of the slug-test characterization was to provide estimates of transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity for the perched-water aquifer at these selected well locations.

  3. Subsurface Biogeochemical Heterogeneity (Field-scale removal of U(VI) from groundwater in an alluvial aquifer by electron donor amendment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Derek R. Lovley; A. L. N’Guessan; Kelly Nevin; C. T. Resch; Evan Arntzen; Jenny Druhan; Aaron Peacock; Brett Baldwin; Dick Dayvault; Dawn Holmes; Ken Williams; Susan Hubbard; Steve Yabusaki; Yilin Fang; D.C. White; John Komlos; Peter Jaffe

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determine if biostimulation of alluvial aquifers by electron donor amendment can effectively remove U(VI) from groundwater at the field scale. Uranium contamination in groundwater is a significant problem at several DOE sites. In this project, the possibility of accelerating bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) as a means of decreasing U(VI) concentrations in groundwater is directly addressed by conducting a series of field-scale experiments. Scientific goals include demonstrating the quantitative linkage between microbial activity and U loss from groundwater and relating the dominant terminal electron accepting processes to the rate of U loss. The project is currently focused on understanding the mechanisms for unexpected long-term ({approx}2 years) removal of U after stopping electron donor amendment. Results obtained in the project successfully position DOE and others to apply biostimulation broadly to U contamination in alluvial aquifers.

  4. AN EVALUATION OF HYDROSTRATIGRAPHIC CHARACTERIZATION METHODS BASED ON WELL LOGS FOR GROUNDWATER MODELING OF THE HIGH PLAINS AQUIFER IN SOUTHWEST KANSAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitzer, Sarah R.

    2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    unconfined aquifer that consists mainly of unconsolidated to cemented deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel. Measures of saturated thickness (ST) assume that all saturated deposits contribute water to pumping wells equally. However, fine...-grained sediments like clay and silt, as well as locally cemented zones, form low permeability units that impede ground-water flow (Gutentag et al., 1981; Macfarlane and Wilson, 2006; Macfarlane, 2009). In southwest Kansas, unconsolidated sand and gravel deposits...

  5. Baseline mapping study of the Steed Pond aquifer and vadose zone beneath A/M Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G. Jr.

    2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the second phase of a baseline mapping project conducted for the Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) at Savannah River Site. The purpose of this second phase is to map the structure and distribution of mud (clay and silt-sized sediment) within the vadose zone beneath A/M Area. The results presented in this report will assist future characterization and remediation activities in the vadose zone and upper aquifer zones in A/M Area.

  6. Revised Geostatistical Analysis of the Inventory of Carbon Tetrachloride in the Unconfined Aquifer in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Christopher J.; Bott, Yi-Ju

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an updated estimate of the inventory of carbon tetrachloride (CTET) in the unconfined aquifer in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The contaminant plumes of interest extend within the 200-ZP-1 and 200-UP-1 operable units. CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) currently is preparing a plan identifying locations for groundwater extraction wells, injection wells, transfer stations, and one or more treatment facilities to address contaminants of concern identified in the 200-ZP-1 CERCLA Record of Decision. To accomplish this, a current understanding of the inventory of CTET is needed throughout the unconfined aquifer in the 200 West Area. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) previously developed an estimate of the CTET inventory in the area using a Monte Carlo approach based on geostatistical simulation of the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of CTET and chloroform in the aquifer. Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) (the previous site contractor) requested PNNL to update that inventory estimate using as input a set of geostatistical realizations of CTET and chloroform recently created for a related but separate project, referred to as the mapping project. The scope of work for the inventory revision complemented the scope of work for the mapping project, performed for FH by PNNL. This report briefly describes the spatial and univariate distribution of the CTET and chloroform data, along with the results of the geostatistical analysis and simulation performed for the mapping project.

  7. Demonstration of Eastman Christensen horizontal drilling system -- Integrated Demonstration Site, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative horizontal drilling system was used to install two horizontal wells as part of an integrated demonstration project at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. The SRS is located in south-central South Carolina in the upper Coastal Plain physiographic province. The demonstration site is located near the A/M Area, and is currently known as the Integated Demonstration Site. The Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies for cleanup of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in soils and groundwater at the SRS in 1989. The overall goal of the program is to demonstrate, at a single location, multiple technologies in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation. Innovative technologies are compared to one another and to baseline technologies in terms of technical performance and cost effectiveness. Transfer of successfully demonstrated technologies and systems to DOE environmental restoration organizations, to other government agencies, and to industry is a critical part of the program.

  8. Demonstration of Eastman Christensen horizontal drilling system -- Integrated Demonstration Site, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative horizontal drilling system was used to install two horizontal wells as part of an integrated demonstration project at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. The SRS is located in south-central South Carolina in the upper Coastal Plain physiographic province. The demonstration site is located near the A/M Area, and is currently known as the Integated Demonstration Site. The Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies for cleanup of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in soils and groundwater at the SRS in 1989. The overall goal of the program is to demonstrate, at a single location, multiple technologies in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation. Innovative technologies are compared to one another and to baseline technologies in terms of technical performance and cost effectiveness. Transfer of successfully demonstrated technologies and systems to DOE environmental restoration organizations, to other government agencies, and to industry is a critical part of the program.

  9. Reactive geochemical transport simulation to study mineral trapping for CO2 disposal in deep saline arenaceous aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport numerical model for evaluating long-term CO{sub 2} disposal in deep aquifers has been developed. Using this model, we performed a number of sensitivity simulations under CO{sub 2} injection conditions for a commonly encountered Gulf Coast sediment to analyze the impact of CO{sub 2} immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Geochemical models are needed because alteration of the predominant host rock aluminosilicate minerals is very slow and is not amenable to laboratory experiment under ambient deep-aquifer conditions. Under conditions considered in our simulations, CO{sub 2} trapping by secondary carbonate minerals such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), dolomite (CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and dawsonite (NaAlCO{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}) could occur in the presence of high pressure CO{sub 2}. Variations in precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals strongly depend on rock mineral composition and their kinetic reaction rates. Using the data presented in this paper, CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capability after 10,000 years is comparable to CO{sub 2} dissolution in pore waters (2-5 kg CO{sub 2} per cubic meter of formation). Under favorable conditions such as increase of the Mg-bearing mineral clinochlore (Mg{sub 5}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 10}(OH){sub 8}) abundance, the capacity can be larger (10 kg CO{sub 2} per cubic meter of formation) due to increase of dolomite precipitation. Carbon dioxide-induced rock mineral alteration and the addition of CO{sub 2} mass as secondary carbonates to the solid matrix results in decreases in porosity. A maximum 3% porosity decrease is obtained in our simulations. A small decrease in porosity may result in a significant decrease in permeability. The numerical simulations described here provide useful insight into sequestration mechanisms, and their controlling conditions and parameters.

  10. North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central","Mountain","Pacific"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65 2013

  11. North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central","Mountain","Pacific"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65 2013A4. Census Region and

  12. Simplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater recharge in Chalk catchments Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(5), 927937 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    rainfall. Keywords: Chalk, modelling, groundwater recharge Introduction The Chalk is the main aquiferSimplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater recharge in Chalk catchments 927 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(5), 927­937 (2002) © EGS Simplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater

  13. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative to volcanic-rock units is exemplified by the large difference in their estimated maximum hydraulic conductivity; 4,000 and 400 feet per day, respectively. Simulated minimum estimates of hydraulic conductivity are inexact and represent the lower detection limit of the method. Minimum thicknesses of lithologic intervals also were defined for comparing AnalyzeHOLE results to hydraulic properties in regional ground-water flow models.

  14. ECO2N - A New TOUGH2 Fluid Property Module for Studies of CO2Storage in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, Karsten; Spycher, Nicholas

    2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ECO2N is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.0) that was designed for applications to geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers. It includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamics and thermophysical properties of H{sub 2}O-NaCl-CO{sub 2} mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for the temperature, pressure and salinity conditions of interest(10 C {le} T {le} 110 C; P {le} 600 bar; salinity up to full halite saturation). Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO{sub 2}-rich) phase, as well as two-phase mixtures. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. ECO2N can model super- as well as sub-critical conditions, but it does not make a distinction between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. This paper highlights significant features of ECO2N, and presents illustrative applications.

  15. Compilation of the Dakota Aquifer Project isotope data and publications: The Isotope Hydrology Program of the Isotope Sciences Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Smith, D.K.; Hudson, G.B.; Niemeyer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Macfarlane, P.A.; Whittemore, D.O. [Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY92 the then Nuclear Chemistry Division embarked on a scientific collaboration with the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) to characterize with isotope techniques groundwater of the Dakota Formation of Kansas. The Dakota Formation is a Cretaceous-aged marine sandstone hosting potable groundwater in most regions of Kansas whose use will serve to partially offset the severe overdraft problems in the overlying Ogallala Formation. The isotope characterization of the Dakota groundwater has generated data that delineates sources, ages, and subsurface controls on the water quality. Initial interpretations of the data have been published in abstract volumes of (1) the 1993 Geological Society of America National Meeting, (2) the 8th International Conference on Geochronology, Cosmochronology and Isotope Geology, and (3) the 1994 Dakota Aquifer Workshop and Clinic. Copies of all abstracts are included in this brief review. One report will focus on the sources and ages of the groundwater, and the other will focus on the subsurface controls on the natural water quality.

  16. High-Density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Piceno, Y. M.; Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Peacock, Aaron D.; Bargar, John; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional capacities of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Information about which community members respond to stimulation can guide the interpretation and development of remediation approaches. To comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns among a suite of samples associated with uranium bioremediation experiments we employed a high?density microarray (PhyloChip). Samples were unstimulated, naturally reducing, or collected during Fe(III) (early) and sulfate reduction (late biostimulation) from an acetate re?amended/amended aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field?collected materials. Deep community sampling with PhyloChip identified hundreds?to?thousands of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) present during amendment, and revealed close similarity among highly enriched taxa from drill?core and groundwater well?deployed column sediment. Overall, phylogenetic data suggested stimulated community membership was most affected by a carryover effect between annual stimulation events. Nevertheless, OTUs within the Fe(III)? and sulfate?reducing lineages, Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales, were repeatedly stimulated. Less consistent, co?enriched taxa represented additional lineages associated with Fe(III) and sulfate reduction (for example, Desulfovibrionales; Syntrophobacterales; Peptococcaceae) and autotrophic sulfur oxidation (Sulfurovum; Campylobacterales). These data imply complex membership among highly stimulated taxa, and by inference biogeochemical responses to acetate, a non?fermentable substrate.

  17. Stimulating the in situ activity of Geobacter species to remove uranium from the groundwater of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert T. Anderson; Helen A. Vrionis; Irene Ortiz-bernad; Charles T. Resch; Philip E. Long; Richard Dayvault; Ken Karp; Sam Marutzky; Donald R. Metzler; Aaron Peacock; David C. White; Mary Lowe; Derek R. Lovley

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for removing uranium from contaminated groundwater by stimulating the in situ activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms was evaluated in a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, Colo. Acetate (1 to 3 mM) was injected into the subsurface over a 3-month period via an injection gallery composed of 20 injection wells, which was installed upgradient from a series of 15 monitoring wells. U(VI) concentrations decreased in as little as 9 days after acetate injection was initiated, and within 50 days uranium had declined below the prescribed treatment level of 0.18 ?M in some of the monitoring wells. Analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences and phospholipid fatty acid profiles demonstrated that the initial loss of uranium from the groundwater was associated with an enrichment of Geobacter species in the treatment zone. Fe(II) in the groundwater also increased during this period, suggesting that U(VI) reduction was coincident with Fe(III) reduction. As the acetate injection continued over 50 days there was a loss of sulfate from the groundwater and an accumulation of sulfide and the composition of the microbial community changed. Organisms with 16S rDNA sequences most closely related to those of sulfate reducers became predominant,

  18. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

  19. Final report : results of aquifer pumping and groundwater sampling at Everest, Kansas, in January-March 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 8-9, 2005, representatives of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), and Argonne National Laboratory met at the KDHE's offices in Topeka to review the status of the CCC/USDA's environmental activities in Kansas. As a result of this meeting, the KDHE recommended several additional activities to augment the CCC/USDA's investigations at Everest, Kansas, and assist in the selection of remedial approaches to be evaluated as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for this site. The requested actions included the following: (1) Construction of several additional interpretive cross sections illustrating the hydrogeologic setting along the apparent main plume migration pathway to the north-northwest of the former CCC/USDA facility, as well as in the vicinity of the Nigh property. (2) Installation of additional permanent monitoring wells, to better constrain the apparent western, northern, and northwestern margins of the existing groundwater plume. (3) Development of technical recommendations for a phased pumping study of the Everest aquifer unit in the area near and to the north of the Nigh property.

  20. Sequence Stratigraphy and Detrital Zircon Provenance of the Eureka Quartzite in South-Central Nevada and Eastern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workman, Benjamin David

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................................... 53 APPENDIX C ........................................................................................................... 54 APPENDIX D ........................................................................................................... 63... s A s s o c i a t i o n F a c i e s N a m e D e s c r i p t io n D e p o s i t i o n a l E n v ir o n m e n t L o c a t i o n s o b s e r v e d A S h a l e G e n e r a...

  1. Effects of defoliation frequency and intensity on production of four burned and unburned bushed grassland communities in south central Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Too, Daniel Kipkoech

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Esti- mated bush/tree cover of the exclosure was less than 3%. The top 30 cm of soil is firm dark reddish sandy clay loam. Below this level the soil turns reddish brown sandy clay. Gravel and rock occur at 120 cm and below. Runoff is minimal because...

  2. Uranium potential of precambrian rocks in the Raft River area of northwestern Utah and south-central Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, B.A.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 1214 geochemical samples were collected and analyzed. The sampling media included 334 waters, 616 stream sediments, and 264 rocks. In addition, some stratigraphic sections of Elba and Yost Quartzites and Archean metasedimentary rock were measured and sampled and numerous radiation determinations made of the various target units. Statistical evaluation of the geochemical data permitted recognition of 156 uranium anomalies, 52 in water, 79 in stream sediment, and 25 in rock. Geographically, 68 are located in the Grouse Creek Mountains, 43 in the Raft River Mountains, and 41 in the Albion Range. Interpretation of the various data leads to the conclusion that uranium anomalies relate to sparingly and moderately soluble uraniferous heavy minerals, which occur as sparse but widely distributed magmatic, detrital, and/or metamorphically segregated components in the target lithostratigraphic units. The uraniferous minerals known to occur and believed to account for the geochemical anomalies include allanite, monazite, zircon, and apatite. In some instances samarskite may be important. These heavy minerals contain uranium and geochemically related elements, such as Th, Ce, Y, and Zr, in sufficient quantities to account for both the conspicuous lithologic preference and the generally observed low amplitude of the anomalies. The various data generated in connection with this study, as well as those available in the published literature, collectively support the conclusion that the various Precambrian W and X lithostratigraphic units pre-selected for evaluation probably lack potential to host important Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerate uranium deposits. Moreover it is also doubted that they possess any potential to host Proterozoic unconformity-type uranium deposits.

  3. Spatial and temporal climate variations influencing medium-range temperature predictions over south-central European Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jeffrey Edward

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JOHNSON Approved as to style and content by: ohn F. Gri hs tChair of Cotnmittee) Steven W. L ons t 1VIember) . J. Freund Member) James R. Scoggins tHead of Department) May 1990 ABSTRACT Spatial and Temporal Climate Variations Influencing Medium... det. ailed climatology. A monthly overview f' or 9 stations in the region is given for the weather elements as stated above. Pentad and 3-hourly averages are also included. The detailed climatology is helpful in orienting a. new weather forecaster...

  4. The Savannah River Site (SRS) is located in south-central South Carolina approximately 100 miles from the Atlantic Coast

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand WaterThe FutureRiskSalt Defense

  5. The Savannah River Site (SRS) is located in south-central South Carolina approximately 100 miles from the Atlantic Coast

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand WaterThe FutureRiskSalt

  6. Biofouling of groundwater distribution systems by Thiothrix spp.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Martin, H.W. [National Spleological Society, Greenville, DE (United States); Aldrich, H.C. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Microbiology & Cell Science

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thiothrix spp., sulfide oxidizing filamentous bacteria, were found to be the main bacterial component of aquatic biofilms causing biofouling in selected municipal water storage tanks, private wells, and drip irrigation systems in Florida. The water originated from the upper Floridan aquifer and associated aquifers in Central and North Florida. Samples were examined where visible biofilms had a white, slimy, filamentous appearance indicative of Thiothrix spp. The detection of Thiothrix spp. was confirmed by enzyme-liked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). These observations confirm that these bacteria and associated extracellular material play an important role in formation of biofilms, which in turn may induce physical changes leading to significant biofouling. These studies suggest that Thiothrix spp.-associated biofouling occurs at an interface where reduced sulfide-containing water contacts aerated water and a surface or substrate is available for attachment.

  7. Controlled-source electromagnetic mapping of a faulted sandstone aquifer in central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorman, Erin Margaret

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    noise level, therefore if a traverse passes over particularly resistive material, for instance the Lower Hickory which is less than the 0.002 S/m detection limit, all the system can detect is noise. To test the ability of the time-domain survey...

  8. Book Review/ Alan Fryar, Book Editor Aquifer Storage and Recovery and Managed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    (well design, performance, and system operation). There follows sections on water pretreatment worked problems, and there do not appear to be any instructor supplements such as question banks, data of the illustrations and data plots is outstanding, some of the best I have seen in recent years. The writing

  9. Seawater intrusion and aquifer freshening near reclaimed coastal area of Shenzhen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    to a modern city. Meanwhile, large-scale land reclamation was carried out to meet the needs of various. Keywords Coastal groundwater; land reclamation; seawater intrusion; Shenzhen Introduction The study area and land reclamation are believed to have significant impact on coastal groundwater flow systems both

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Reactions and reaction rates in the regional aquifer beneath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    properties. Keywords Feldspar Á Inverse mass balance modeling Á USA Á Geochemistry Á Kinetics Introduction modeling with petro- graphic assessment to further knowledge and under- standing of complex natural hydrologic systems. Groundwater geochemistry shows marked evolution along assumed flow paths. The flow path

  11. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

    2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

  12. Stimulating the In Situ Activity of Geobacter Species to Remove Uranium from the Groundwater of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R. T.; Vrionis, Helen A.; Ortiz-Bernad, Irene; Resch, Charles T.; Long, Philip E.; Dayvault, R. D.; Karp, Ken; Marutzky, Sammy J.; Metzler, Donald R.; Peacock, Aaron D.; White, David C.; Lowe, Mary; Lovley, Derek R.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for removing uranium from contaminated groundwater by stimulating the in situ activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms was evaluated in a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, Colo. Acetate (1 to 3 mM) was injected into the subsurface over a 3-month period via an injection gallery composed of 20 injection wells, which was installed upgradient from a series of 15 monitoring wells. U(VI) concentrations decreased in as little as 9 days after acetate injection was initiated, and within 50 days uranium had declined below the prescribed treatment level of 0.18 _M in some of the monitoring wells. Analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences and phospholipid fatty acid profiles demonstrated that the initial loss of uranium from the groundwater was associated with an enrichment of Geobacter species in the treatment zone. Fe(II) in the groundwater also increased during this period, suggesting that U(VI) reduction was coincident with Fe(III) reduction. As the acetate injection continued over 50 days there was a loss of sulfate from the groundwater and an accumulation of sulfide and the composition of the microbial community changed. Organisms with 16S rDNA sequences most closely related to those of sulfate reducers became predominant, and Geobacter species became a minor component of the community. This apparent switch from Fe(III) reduction to sulfate reduction as the terminal electron accepting process for the oxidation of the injected acetate was associated with an increase in uranium concentration in the groundwater. These results demonstrate that in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater is feasible but suggest that the strategy should be optimized to better maintain long-term activity of Geobacter species.

  13. High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly E.; Piceno, Y. M.; Anderson, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N'Guessan, A. L.; Peacock, Aaron; Bargar, John R.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional diversity of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Understanding the response of communities to stimulation, including flanking taxa, presents important opportunities for optimizing remediation approaches. We used high-density PhyloChip microarray analysis to comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns amongst a suite of samples from U(VI) bioremediation experiments. Samples were unstimulated or collected during Fe(III) and sulfate reduction from an acetate-augmented aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Results showed the greatest diversity in abundant SRB lineages was present in naturally-reduced sediment. Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales were consistently identified as the dominant Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (IRB and SRB) throughout acetate amendment experiments. Stimulated communities also exhibited a high degree of functional redundancy amongst enriched flanking members. Not surprisingly, competition for both sulfate and iron was evident amongst abundant taxa, but the distribution and abundance of these ancillary SRB (Peptococcaceae, Desulfovibrionales and Syntrophobacterales), and lineages containing IRB (excluding Desulfobacteraceae) was heterogeneous amongst sample types. Interesting, amongst the most abundant taxa, particularly during sulfate reduction, were Epsilonproteobacteria that perform microaerobic or nitrate-dependant sulfur oxidation, and a number of bacteria other than Geobacteraceae that may enzymatically reduce U(VI). Finally, in depth community probing with PhyloChip determined the efficacy of experimental approaches, notably revealing striking similarity amongst stimulated sediment (from drill cores and in-situ columns) and groundwater communities, and demonstrating that sediment-packed in-situ (down-well) columns served as an ideal method for subsurface biostimulation.

  14. Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

  15. Machel, H.G., Buschkuehle, B.E. and Michael, K., 2001, Squeegee flow in Devonian carbonate aquifers in Alberta, Canada. In: Cidu, R. (ed.), Water-Rock Interaction, Vol. 1. Proceedings of the Tenth International Symposium on Water-Rock-Interaction WRI-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    four regionally extensive Devonian aquifers and/or hydrocarbon reservoir levels, traditionally called D in thickness. Across much of the basin the four Devonian aquifers, which contain oil, sweet and sour gas reservoirs, are interbedded with marly and evaporitic aquitards, and are confined by tight evaporites

  16. Molecular analysis of phosphate limitation in Geobacteraceae during the bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N'Guessan, L.A.; Elifantz, H.; Nevin, K.P.; Mouser, P.J.; Methe, B.; Woodard, T. L.; Manley, K.; Williams, K. H.; Wilkins, M. J.; Larsen, J.T.; Long, P. E.; Lovley, D. R.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrient limitation is an environmental stress that may reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation strategies, especially when the contaminants are organic compounds or when organic compounds are added to promote microbial activities such as metal reduction. Genes indicative of phosphate-limitation were identified via microarray analysis of chemostat cultures of Geobacter sulfureducens. This analysis revealed that genes in the pst-pho operon, which is associated with a high affinity phosphate uptake system in other microorganisms, had significantly higher transcript abundance under phosphate-limiting conditions, with the genes pstB and phoU the most up-regulated. Quantitative PCR analysis of pstB and phoU transcript levels in G. sulfurreducens grown in chemostats demonstrated that the expression of these genes increased when phosphate was removed from the culture medium. Transcripts of pstB and phoU within the subsurface Geobacter species predominating during an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment were more abundant than in chemostat cultures of G. sulfurreducens that were not limited for phosphate. Addition of phosphate to incubations of subsurface sediments did not stimulate dissimilatory metal reduction. The added phosphate was rapidly adsorbed onto the sediments. The results demonstrate that Geobacter species can effectively reduce U(VI) even when experiencing suboptimal phosphate concentrations and that increasing phosphate availability with phosphate additions is difficult to achieve due to the high reactivity of this compound. This transcript-based approach developed for diagnosing phosphate limitation should be applicable to assessing the potential need for additional phosphate in other bioremediation processes.

  17. Molecular Analysis of Phosphate Limitation in Geobacteraceae During the Bioremediation of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Elifantz, H.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Mouser, Paula; Methe, Barbara; Woodard, Trevor L.; Manley, Kimberley; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Larsen, Joern T.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrient limitation is an environmental stress that may reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation strategies, especially when the contaminants are organic compounds or when organic compounds are added to promote microbial activities such as metal reduction. Genes indicative of phosphate-limitation were identified via microarray analysis of chemostat cultures of Geobacter sulfureducens. This analysis revealed that genes in the pst-pho operon, which is associated with a high affinity phosphate uptake system in other microorganisms, had significantly higher transcript abundance under phosphate-limiting conditions, with the genes pstB and phoU the most up-regulated. Quantitative PCR analysis of pstB and phoU transcript levels in G. sulfurreducens grown in chemostats demonstrated that the expression of these genes increased when phosphate was removed from the culture medium. Transcripts of pstB and phoU within the subsurface Geobacter species predominating during an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment were more abundant than in chemostat cultures of G. sulfurreducens that were not limited for phosphate. Addition of phosphate to incubations of subsurface sediments did not stimulate dissimilatory metal reduction. The added phosphate was rapidly adsorbed onto the sediments. The results demonstrate that Geobacter species can effectively reduce U(VI) even when experiencing suboptimal phosphate concentrations and that increasing phosphate availability with phosphate additions is difficult to achieve due to the high reactivity of this compound. This transcript-based approach developed for diagnosing phosphate limitation should be applicable to assessing the potential need for additional phosphate in other bioremediation processes.

  18. Molecular analysis of phosphate limitation in Geobacteraceae during the bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Elifantz, H.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Mouser, Paula; Methe, Barbara; Woodard, Trevor L.; Manley, Kimberley; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Larsen, Joern T.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrient limitation is an environmental stress that may reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation strategies, especially when the contaminants are organic compounds or when organic compounds are added to promote microbial activities such as metal reduction. Genes indicative of phosphatelimitation were identified by microarray analysis of chemostat cultures of Geobacter sulfureducens. This analysis revealed that genes in the pst-pho operon, which is associated with a high-affinity phosphate uptake system in other microorganisms, had significantly higher transcript abundance under phosphate-limiting conditions, with the genes pstB and phoU upregulated the most. Quantitative PCR analysis of pstB and phoU transcript levels in G. sulfurreducens grown in chemostats demonstrated that the expression of these genes increased when phosphate was removed from the culture medium. Transcripts of pstB and phoU within the subsurface Geobacter species predominating during an in situ uranium-bioremediation field experiment were more abundant than in chemostat cultures of G. sulfurreducens that were not limited for phosphate. Addition of phosphate to incubations of subsurface sediments did not stimulate dissimilatory metal reduction. The added phosphate was rapidly adsorbed onto the sediments. The results demonstrate that Geobacter species can effectively reduce U(VI) even when experiencing suboptimal phosphate concentrations and that increasing phosphate availability with phosphate additions is difficult to achieve because of the high reactivity of this compound. This transcript-based approach developed for diagnosing phosphate limitation should be applicable to assessing the potential need for additional phosphate in other bioremediation processes.

  19. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Catherine A

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemical reactions in deep subsurface environments are complicated by the consolidated nature and mineralogical complexity of sedimentary rocks. Understanding the kinetics of these reactions is critical to our ability to make long-term predictions about subsurface processes such as pH buffering, alteration in rock structure, permeability changes, and formation of secondary precipitates. In this project, we used a combination of experiments and numerical simulation to bridge the gap between our knowledge of these reactions at the lab scale and rates that are meaningful for modeling reactive transport at core scales. The focus is on acid-driven mineral dissolution, which is specifically relevant in the context of CO2-water-rock interactions in geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The project led to major findings in three areas. First, we modeled reactive transport in pore-network systems to investigate scaling effects in geochemical reaction rates. We found significant scaling effects when CO2 concentrations are high and reaction rates are fast. These findings indicate that the increased acidity associated with geological sequestration can generate conditions for which proper scaling tools are yet to be developed. Second, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the extent to which SO2, if co-injected with CO2, would acidify formation brines. We found that there exist realistic conditions in which the impact on brine acidity will be limited due to diffusion rate-limited SO2 dissolution from the CO2 phase, and the subsequent pH shift may also be limited by the lack of availability of oxidants to produce sulfuric acid. Third, for three Viking sandstones (Alberta sedimentary basin, Canada), we employed backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to statistically characterize mineral contact with pore space. We determined that for reactive minerals in sedimentary consolidated rocks, abundance alone is not a good predictor of mineral accessible surface area, and should not be used in reactive transport modeling. Our work showed that reaction rates would be overestimated by three to five times.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN APPLICATIONS FOR MODELING AND ASSESSING CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN SALINE AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, John

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was a computer modeling effort to couple reservoir simulation and ED/RSM using Sensitivity Analysis, Uncertainty Analysis, and Optimization Methods, to assess geologic, geochemical, geomechanical, and rock-fluid effects and factors on CO2 injectivity, capacity, and plume migration. The project objective was to develop proxy models to simplify the highly complex coupled geochemical and geomechanical models in the utilization and storage of CO2 in the subsurface. The goals were to investigate and prove the feasibility of the ED/RSM processes and engineering development, and bridge the gaps regarding the uncertainty and unknowns of the many geochemical and geomechanical interacting parameters in the development and operation of anthropogenic CO2 sequestration and storage sites. The bottleneck in this workflow is the high computational effort of reactive transport simulation models and large number of input variables to optimize with ED/RSM techniques. The project was not to develop the reactive transport, geomechanical, or ED/RSM software, but was to use what was commercially and/or publically available as a proof of concept to generate proxy or surrogate models. A detailed geologic and petrographic mineral assemblage and geologic structure of the doubly plunging anticline was defined using the USDOE RMOTC formations of interest data (e.g., Lower Sundance, Crow Mountain, Alcova Limestone, and Red Peak). The assemblage of 23 minerals was primarily developed from literature data and petrophysical (well log) analysis. The assemblage and structure was input into a commercial reactive transport simulator to predict the effects of CO2 injection and complex reactions with the reservoir rock. Significant impediments were encountered during the execution phase of the project. The only known commercial reactive transport simulator was incapable of simulating complex geochemistry modeled in this project. Significant effort and project funding was expended to determine the limitations of both the commercial simulator and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) R&D simulator, TOUGHREACT available to the project. A simplified layer cake model approximating the volume of the RMOTC targeted reservoirs was defined with 1-3 minerals eventually modeled with limited success. Modeling reactive transport in porous media requires significant computational power. In this project, up to 24 processors were used to model a limited mineral set of 1-3 minerals. In addition, geomechanical aspects of injecting CO2 into closed, semi-open, and open systems in various well completion methods was simulated. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) as a storage method was not modeled. A robust and stable simulation dataset or base case was developed and used to create a master dataset with embedded instructions for input to the ED/RSM software. Little success was achieved toward the objective of the project using the commercial simulator or the LBNL simulator versions available during the time of this project. Several hundred realizations were run with the commercial simulator and ED/RSM software, most having convergence problems and terminating prematurely. A proxy model for full field CO2 injection sequestration utilization and storage was not capable of being developed with software available for this project. Though the chemistry is reasonably known and understood, based on the amount of effort and huge computational time required, predicting CO2 sequestration storage capacity in geologic formations to within the program goals of ±30% proved unsuccessful.

  1. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Discharge Using Ground- Water Storage," Transactions1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Gravel Ground,"

  2. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or (2) from solar energy collectors, and to retrieve the hotof Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors," Proceedings of

  3. Mapping DNAPL transport contamination in sedimentary and fractured rock aquifers with high resolution borehole seismic imaging Project No. SF11SS13 FY01 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, J.T.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Williams, K.H.; Flexser, S.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the work performed in the first year of a three-year project funded by the USDOE's Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area (SCFA). The objectives of this project are to develop, demonstrate and evaluate, at appropriate field sites, the utility of high frequency seismic imaging methods to detect and characterize non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination in sedimentary and fractured rock aquifers. Field tests consist of crosswell seismic tomography acquired before, during and after any remediation action that would potentially affect fluid distributions. Where feasible, other characterization data is obtained, such as crosswell radar, borehole conductivity and cone penetration testing (CPT). Crosswell data are processed to obtain tomographic images, or two-dimensional distributions, of velocity and attenuation. The interpretation of the tomograms utilizes all available site characterization data to relate the geophysical attributes to lithology and fluid phase heterogeneities. Interpretations are validated by evaluation and testing of field cores. Laboratory tests on core retrieved from surveyed locations are performed to determine the relationships between geophysical parameters and solid and fluid phase composition. In the case of sedimentary aquifers, proof of principle has been demonstrated previously in homogeneous sand-packs at the centimeter and half-meter scale (Geller and Myer, 1995; Geller et al., 2000). The field tests will provide proof-of-principle at the field-scale, by working in an unconsolidated sand aquifer with known presence of NAPL. The ability to upscale from the laboratory to the field is evaluated by conducting field measurements over a range of frequencies that overlap the lowest frequencies used in the laboratory tests. In the fractured rock case, previous field work has shown that fracture zones can be detected by crosswell seismic tomography (Daley et al., 2001; Daley et al., 2000). Laboratory studies have demonstrated that the seismic wave signature is sensitive to the fracture stiffness, and that stiffness is affected by fracture-filling fluids (Pyrak-Nolte and Morris, 2000; Pyrak-Nolte, 1996). The field and laboratory experience provide a physical basis for the potential detection of fractures that would be the important flow paths for NAPL contaminants.

  4. Heat Transport in Groundwater Systems--Finite Element Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grubaugh, E. K.; Reddell, D. L.

    into groundwater aquifers for long term energy storage. Analytical solutions are available that predict water temperatures as hot water is injected into a groundwater aquifer, but little field and laboratory data are available to verify these models. The objectives...

  5. Heat Transport in Groundwater Systems--Finite Element Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grubaugh, E. K.; Reddell, D. L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into groundwater aquifers for long term energy storage. Analytical solutions are available that predict water temperatures as hot water is injected into a groundwater aquifer, but little field and laboratory data are available to verify these models. The objectives...

  6. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

  7. Monitoring CO 2 sequestration into deep saline aquifer and associated salt intrusion using coupled multiphase flow modeling and time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuan Lu; CHI Zhang; Hai Hanag; Timothy C. Johnson

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful geological storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) require efficient monitoring of the migration of CO2 plume during and after large-scale injection in order to verify the containment of the injected CO2 within the target formation and to evaluate potential leakage risk. Field studies have shown that surface and cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be a useful tool in imaging and characterizing solute transport in heterogeneous subsurface. In this synthetic study, we have coupled a 3-D multiphase flow model with a parallel 3-D time-lapse ERT inversion code to explore the feasibility of using time-lapse ERT for simultaneously monitoring the migration of CO2 plume in deep saline formation and potential brine intrusion into shallow fresh water aquifer. Direct comparisons of the inverted CO2 plumes resulting from ERT with multiphase flow simulation results indicate the ERT could be used to delineate the migration of CO2 plume. Detailed comparisons on the locations, sizes and shapes of CO2 plume and intruded brine plumes suggest that ERT inversion tends to underestimate the area review of the CO2 plume, but overestimate the thickness and total volume of the CO2 plume. The total volume of intruded brine plumes is overestimated as well. However, all discrepancies remain within reasonable ranges. Our study suggests that time-lapse ERT is a useful monitoring tool in characterizing the movement of injected CO2 into deep saline aquifer and detecting potential brine intrusion under large-scale field injection conditions.

  8. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

  9. Results of 2001 Groundwater Sampling in Support of Conditional No Longer Contained-In Determination for the Snake River Plain Aquifer in the Vicinity of the INTEC at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meachum, Teresa Ray

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of sampling five groundwater monitoring wells in the vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in 2001. Information on general sampling practices, quality assurance practices, parameter concentrations, representativeness of sampling results, and cumulative cancer risk are presented. The information is provided to support a conditional No Longer Contained-In Determination for the Snake River Plain Aquifer in the vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center.

  10. Results of 2001 Groundwater Sampling in Support of Conditional No Longer Contained-In Determination for the Snake River Plain Aquifer in the Vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meachum, T.R.

    2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of sampling five groundwater monitoring wells in the vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in 2001. Information on general sampling practices, quality assurance practices, parameter concentrations, representativeness of sampling results, and cumulative cancer risk are presented. The information is provided to support a conditional No Longer Contained-In Determination for the Snake River Plain Aquifer in the vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center.

  11. Analysis of Hydraulic Responses from the ER-6-1 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the interpretation and analysis of the hydraulic data collected for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test-Tracer Test (MWAT-TT) conducted at the ER-6-1 Well Cluster in Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The MWAT-TT was performed to investigate CAU-scale groundwater flow and transport processes related to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the NTS through the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) Hydrostratigraphic Unit (HSU). The ER-6-1 MWAT-TT was planned and executed by contractor participants for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the Environmental Restoration (ER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Participants included Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor; Bechtel Nevada (BN); the Desert Research Institute (DRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center. The SNJV team consists of the S.M. Stoller Corporation, Navarro Research and Engineering, Battelle Memorial Institute, INTERA Inc., and Weston Solutions, Inc. The MWAT-TT was implemented according to the ''Underground Test Area Project, ER-6-1 Multi-Well Aquifer Test - Tracer Test Plan'' (SNJV, 2004a) issued in April 2004. The objective of the aquifer test was to determine flow processes and local hydraulic properties for the LCA through long-term constant-rate pumping at the well cluster. This objective was to be achieved in conjunction with detailed sampling of the composite tracer breakthrough at the pumping well, as well as with depth-specific sampling and logging at multiple wells, to provide information for the depth-discrete analysis of formation hydraulic properties, particularly with regard to fracture properties.

  12. Geothermal resource assessment for the state of Texas: status of progress, November 1980. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, C.M. Jr.; Caran, S.C.; Gever, C.; Henry, C.D.; Macpherson, G.L.; McBride, M.W.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data pertaining to wells and thermal aquifers and data interpretation methods are presented. Findings from a program of field measurements of water temperatures (mainly in South-Central Texas) and an assessment of hydrologic properties of three Cretaceous aquifers (in North-Central Texas) are included. Landsat lineaments and their pertinance to the localization of low-temperature geothermal resources are emphasized. Lineament data were compared to structural and stratigraphic features along the Balcones/Ouachita trend in Central Texas to test for correlations. (MHR)

  13. In Situ Production of Chlorine-36 in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho: Implications for Describing Ground-Water Contamination Near a Nuclear Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. D. Cecil; L. L. Knobel; J. R. Green (USGS); S. K. Frape (University of Waterloo)

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to describe the calculated contribution to ground water of natural, in situ produced 36Cl in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer and to compare these concentrations in ground water with measured concentrations near a nuclear facility in southeastern Idaho. The scope focused on isotopic and chemical analyses and associated 36Cl in situ production calculations on 25 whole-rock samples from 6 major water-bearing rock types present in the eastern Snake River Plain. The rock types investigated were basalt, rhyolite, limestone, dolomite, shale, and quartzite. Determining the contribution of in situ production to 36Cl inventories in ground water facilitated the identification of the source for this radionuclide in environmental samples. On the basis of calculations reported here, in situ production of 36Cl was determined to be insignificant compared to concentrations measured in ground water near buried and injected nuclear waste at the INEEL. Maximum estimated 36Cl concentrations in ground water from in situ production are on the same order of magnitude as natural concentrations in meteoric water.

  14. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Asa S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with HDD65 ≀ 2800 All Texas West South Central outside ofSouth Central West South Central / Texas Pacific outsideWest South Central outside Texas with HDD65 <

  15. Contaminant Transport in Hydrogeologic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, C.; Redden, D. L.

    ) of an aquifer. Therefore, additional objectives were developed to (1) derive analytical solutions describing the steady and unsteady temperature distribution around a well with a finite caprock thickness and (2) establish a technique for determining the thermal...

  16. GeoChip-based analysis of functional microbial communities in a bioreduced uranium-contaminated aquifer during reoxidation by oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Nostrand, J.D.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; Deng, Y.; Carley, J.; Carroll, S.; He, Z.; Gu, B.; Luo, J.; Criddle, C. S.; Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P. M.; Tiedje, J. M.; Hazen, T. C.; Zhou, J.

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale system was established for in situ biostimulation of U(VI) reduction by ethanol addition at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Field Research Center (Oak Ridge, TN). After achieving U(VI) reduction, stability of the bioreduced U(IV) was evaluated under conditions of (i) resting (no ethanol injection), (ii) reoxidation by introducing dissolved oxygen (DO), and (iii) reinjection of ethanol. GeoChip, a functional gene array with probes for N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation genes, was used for monitoring groundwater microbial communities. High diversity of all major functional groups was observed during all experimental phases. The microbial community was extremely responsive to ethanol, showing a substantial change in community structure with increased gene number and diversity after ethanol injections resumed. While gene numbers showed considerable variations, the relative abundance (i.e. percentage of each gene category) of most gene groups changed little. During the reoxidation period, U(VI) increased, suggesting reoxidation of reduced U(IV). However, when introduction of DO was stopped, U(VI) reduction resumed and returned to pre-reoxidation levels. These findings suggest that the community in this system can be stimulated and that the ability to reduce U(VI) can be maintained by the addition of electron donors. This biostimulation approach may potentially offer an effective means for the bioremediation of U(VI)-contaminated sites.

  17. Fate of human viruses in groundwater recharge systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Landry, E.F.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this research program was to determine the ability of a well-managed tertiary effluent-recharge system to return virologically acceptable water to the groundwater aquifer. The study assessed the quality of waters renovated by indigenous recharge operations and investigated a number of virus-soil interrelationships. The elucidation of the interactions led to the establishment of basin operating criteria for optimizing virus removal. Raw influents, chlorinated tertiary effluents, and renovated wastewater from the aquifer directly beneath a uniquely designed recharge test basin were assayed on a weekly basis for the presence of human enteroviruses and coliform bacteria. High concentrations of viruses were routinely isolated from influents but were isolated only on four occasions from tertiary-treated sewage effluents. In spite of the high quality effluent being recharged, viruses were isolated from the groundwater observation well, indicating their ability to penetrate the unsaturated zone. Results of poliovirus seeding experiments carried out in the test basin clearly indicated the need to operate recharge basins at low (e.g. 1 cm/h) infiltration rates in areas having soil types similar to those found at the study site. The method selected for reducing the test basin infiltration rate involved clogging the basin surface with settled organic material from highly turbid effluent. Alternative methods for slowing infiltration rates are discussed in the text.

  18. A stratigraphic study of the Georgetown Formation (Washita Division, Lower Cretaceous) on the north flank of the San Marcos Platform, south-central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowling, Sharron Lea

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Georgetown Formation is subdivided into seven members: Kiamichi (at base), Duck Creek, Fort Worth, Denton, Weno, Pawpaw and Main Street. As the formation approaches the San Marcos Platform it thins from approximately 375 feet in Cooke and Grayson Counties... shale. The majority of the thinning of the Georgetown Formation can be attributed to the southward thinning of these shale beds. This thinning suggests a northern source area with occasional periods of erosion. Subsurface work by Tucker ( 1962...

  19. A stratigraphic study of the Georgetown Formation (Washita Division, Lower Cretaceous) on the north flank of the San Marcos Platform, south-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowling, Sharron Lea

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shale. The majority of the thinning of the Georgetown Formation can be attributed to the southward thinning of these shale beds. This thinning suggests a northern source area with occasional periods of erosion. Subsurface work by Tucker ( 1962... renam1ng by Vaughan. Adkins and Lozo (1951) used the Brazos River as the arbitrary line between the Grayson shale to the north and the Del Rio clay to the south. The Grayson shale is a brownish-gray shale to marl with many limestone beds in the upper...

  20. Effects of Nitrate Exposure on the Functional Structure of a Microbial Community in a Uranium-contaminated Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Nostrand, Joy; Waldron, P.; Wu, W.; Zhou, B.; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; Carley, J.; He, Zhili; Gu, B.; Luo, J.; Criddle, C.; Jardine, P.; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing nitrogen deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and decreasing biodiversity are three main environmental changes occurring on a global scale. The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) ecological experiment site at the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve started in 1997, to better understand how these changes would affect soil systems. To understand how increasing nitrogen deposition affects the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure impact soil microbial communities, 12 samples were collected from the BioCON plots in which nitrogenous fertilizer was added to simulate the effect of increasing nitrogen deposition and 12 samples from without added fertilizer. DNA from the 24 samples was extracted using a freeze-grind protocol, amplified, labeled with a fluorescent dye, and then hybridized to GeoChip, a functional gene array containing probes for genes involved in N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all genes detected was performed to analyze microbial community patterns. The first two axes accounted for 23.5percent of the total variation. The samples fell into two major groups: fertilized and non-fertilized, suggesting that nitrogenous fertilizer had a significant impact on soil microbial community structure and diversity. The functional gene numbers detected in fertilized samples was less that detected in non-fertilizer samples. Functional genes involving in the N cycling were mainly discussed.