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1

Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration Program Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration Program Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration Program Year 1986 Url [[File:|160px|link=http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/search/pagedetails.action?browsePath=Title+42%2FChapter+6a%2FSubchapter+Xii%2FPart+C%2FSec.+300h-6&granuleId=USCODE-2010-title42-chap6A-subchapXII-partC-sec300h-6&packageId=USCODE-2010-title42&collapse=true&fromBrowse=true&bread=true]] Description References US GPO - 42 USC 300H-6[1] Key Dates in Water History[2] The Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration Program provides funding to identify and provide the special protections needed for sole source aquifers. This statute required States with primacy to adopt regulations and begin enforcing them within 18 months of the EPA's promulgation.

2

Montana ICTL Demonstration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana ICTL Demonstration Program Montana ICTL Demonstration Program Background The Department of Energy (DOE) funds basic and applied research toward the development of technologies that will allow the U.S. to depend to a greater extent on renewable fuels, especially those derived from domestic sources of energy. Coal is one of the nation's most abundant domestic energy resources; however, conventional technologies using coal release large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO

3

Fuel Cell Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance, installation, and decommissioning the total project budget was approximately $3.7 million.

Gerald Brun

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii's Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

Kinoshita, C.M. (ed.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCTDP Major Demonstrations Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) was launched in 1986 as a multibillion dollar...

8

Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grant Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project Description: Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants The Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants was established to demonstrate the benefits of new propane equipment. The US Department of Energy, the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) and the Propane Vehicle Council (PVC) partnered in this program. The project impacted ten different states, 179 vehicles, and 15 new propane fueling facilities. Based on estimates provided, this project generated a minimum of 1,441,000 new gallons of propane sold for the vehicle market annually. Additionally, two new off-road engines were brought to the market. Projects originally funded under this project were the City of Portland, Colorado, Kansas City, Impco Technologies, Jasper Engines, Maricopa County, New Jersey State, Port of Houston, Salt Lake City Newspaper, Suburban Propane, Mutual Liquid Propane and Ted Johnson.

Jack Mallinger

2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

9

Hanford Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Program  

Hanford Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Program EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange November 17, 2010 Mike Thien

10

SRS - Traveling Science Demonstration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

02012 SEARCH GO spacer CSRA College Night DOE Savannah River Regional Science Bowl Innovative Teaching Mini-Grants Program "Future City" Competition Savannah River Regional...

11

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

Prater, L.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Operational Demonstration Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Demonstration Program Operational Demonstration Program Operational Demonstration Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate $500,000 Program Info Funding Source CEFIA Start Date 2005 State Connecticut Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount $150,000 - $500,000 Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority This program is currently closed. Applications were due in February 2012.

15

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results. Also includes Power Plant Improvement Initiative Projects.

Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 1998  

SciTech Connect

Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Danielle Sass Byrnett Better Buildings Residential Building Technologies Office Program Solution Center Demonstration Outline * Goals, History, Content Sources * Tour: Organization - Program Components - Handbooks * Tour: Navigation Options * Tour: Examples * Next Steps * Questions & Feedback 2 eere.energy.gov Overview 3 eere.energy.gov Purpose: Support Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs & Partners * Provide an easily accessed repository for key lessons, resources, and knowledge collected from the experience of past programs. * Help programs and their partners plan, implement, manage, and evaluate better * Help stakeholders leapfrog past missteps en route to a larger and more successful industry. 4 eere.energy.gov Intended Audiences

18

Technoclimat- Green Technologies Demonstration Program (Quebec, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Green technologies demonstration program aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is a product of Measure 20 of the 2006-2012 Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). This CCAP measure encourages...

19

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program The Office of Fossil Energy's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (1986-1993) laid...

20

ESS 2012 Peer Review - DOE Smart Grid Demonstration Program ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demonstration Program Smart Grid Energy Storage Demonstrations Overview Ron Staubly - National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Smart Grid Demonstration Program The Program At a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Think City Electric Vehicle Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The THINK city Electric Vehicle (EV) Demonstration Program Project, initiated late 2001, has been successfully completed as of April 2005. US. Partners include Federal, State and Municipal agencies as well as commercial partners. Phase I, consisting of placement of the vehicles in demonstration programs, was completed in 2002. Phase II, the monitoring of these programs was completed in 2004. Phase III, the decommissioning and/or exporting of vehicles concluded in 2005. Phase I--the Program successfully assigned 192 EV's with customers (including Hertz) in the state of California, 109 in New York (including loaner and demo vehicles), 16 in Georgia, 7 to customers outside of the US and 52 in Ford's internal operations in Dearborn Michigan for a total of 376 vehicles. The Program was the largest operating Urban EV Demonstration Project in the United States. Phase II--the monitoring of the operational fleet was ongoing and completed in 2004, and all vehicles were returned throughout 2004 and 2005. The Department of Energy (DOE) was involved with the monitoring of the New York Power Authority/THINK Clean Commute Program units through partnership with Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (ETEC), which filed separate reports to DOE. The remainder of the field fleet was monitored through Ford's internal operations. Vehicles were retired from lease operation throughout the program for various operator reasons. Some of the vehicles were involved in re-leasing operations. At the end of the program, 376 vehicles had been involved, 372 of which were available for customer use while 4 were engineering prototype and study vehicles. Phase III--decommissioning and/or export of vehicles. In accordance with the NHTSA requirement, City vehicles could not remain in the United States past their three-year allowed program timeframe. At the end of leases, City vehicles have been decommissioned and/or exported to KamKorp in Norway.

Ford Motor Company

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii`s Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

Kinoshita, C.M. [ed.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Fuel consolidation demonstration program: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI, Northeast Utilities, Baltimore Gas and Electric, the US Department of Energy and Combustion Engineering are engaged in a program to develop a system for consolidating spent fuel and a method of storing the consolidated fuel in the spent fuel storage pool which is licensable by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Fuel consolidation offers a means of substantially increasing the capacity of spent fuel storage pools. This is a final report of the Fuel Consolidation Demonstration Program. It provides a review of the overall program, a summary of the results obtained, the lessons learned, and an assessment of the present status of the consolidation system developed in the program. 7 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Airborne Process Commercial Scale Demonstration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCPI 2) CCPI 2) contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Mustang Clean Energy, LLC, a subsidiary of Peabody Energy St. Louis, MO. Airborne Process(tm) commerciAl scAle DemonstrAtion ProgrAm (withDrAwn Prior to AwArD) Project Description Mustang Clean Energy will design, construct, and operate a full scale sodium-based multi-pollutant scrubber in conjunction with a revenue-generating fertilizer by-product processing plant at Mustang Energy Company, LLC's Mustang Generating Station. Both Mustang Clean Energy and Mustang Energy Company are subsidiaries of Peabody Energy, the world's largest coal company. The 300 MW (net) station will

25

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Program update 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program) is a $7.14 billion cost-shared industry/government technology development effort. The program is to demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies, with the most promising technologies being moved into the domestic and international marketplace. Clean coal technologies being demonstrated under the CCT program are creating the technology base that allows the nation to meet its energy and environmental goals efficiently and reliably. The fact that most of the demonstrations are being conducted at commercial scale, in actual user environments, and under conditions typical of commercial operations allows the potential of the technologies to be evaluated in their intended commercial applications. The technologies are categorized into four market sectors: advanced electric power generation systems; environmental control devices; coal processing equipment for clean fuels; and industrial technologies. Sections of this report describe the following: Role of the Program; Program implementation; Funding and costs; The road to commercial realization; Results from completed projects; Results and accomplishments from ongoing projects; and Project fact sheets. Projects include fluidized-bed combustion, integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants, advanced combustion and heat engines, nitrogen oxide control technologies, sulfur dioxide control technologies, combined SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} technologies, coal preparation techniques, mild gasification, and indirect liquefaction. Industrial applications include injection systems for blast furnaces, coke oven gas cleaning systems, power generation from coal/ore reduction, a cyclone combustor with S, N, and ash control, cement kiln flue gas scrubber, and pulse combustion for steam coal gasification.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Clean coal technology demonstration program: Program update 1996-97  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (known as the CCT Program) reached a significant milestone in 1996 with the completion of 20 of the 39 active projects. The CCT Program is responding to a need to demonstrate and deploy a portfolio of technologies that will assure the U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 297 billion tons could continue to supply the nation`s energy needs economically and in a manner that meets the nation`s environmental objectives. This portfolio of technologies includes environmental control devices that contributed to meeting the accords on transboundary air pollution recommended by the Special Envoys on Acid Rain in 1986. Operational, technical, environmental, and economic performance information and data are now flowing from highly efficient, low-emission, advanced power generation technologies that will enable coal to retain its prominent role into the next millennium. Further, advanced technologies are emerging that will enhance the competitive use of coal in the industrial sector, such as in steelmaking. Coal processing technologies will enable the entire coal resource base to be used while complying with environmental requirements. These technologies are producing products used by utilities and industrial processes. The capability to coproduce products, such as liquid and solid fuels, electricity, and chemicals, is being demonstrated at a commercial scale by projects in the CCT Program. In summary, this portfolio of technologies is satisfying the national need to maintain a multifuel energy mix in which coal is a key component because of its low-cost, availability, and abundant supply within the nation`s borders.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Prickett and Lonnquist aquifer simulation program for the Apple II minicomputer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Prickett and Lonnquist two-dimensional groundwater model has been programmed for the Apple II minicomputer. Both leaky and nonleaky confined aquifers can be simulated. The model was adapted from the FORTRAN version of Prickett and Lonnquist. In the configuration presented here, the program requires 64 K bits of memory. Because of the large number of arrays used in the program, and memory limitations of the Apple II, the maximum grid size that can be used is 20 rows by 20 columns. Input to the program is interactive, with prompting by the computer. Output consists of predicted lead values at the row-column intersections (nodes).

Hull, L.C.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Geothermal Energy Research Development and Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Federal program's goal, strategy, plans, and achievements are summarized. In addition, geothermal development by state and local governments and, where available, by the private sector is described. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Technology Program: PFBC Utility Demonstration Project (Feb 1990) U.S. Department of Energy report DOEFE-0159 (Available from NTIS as DE90008094) PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS No...

30

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program: Warren Station EFCC Demonstration Project (June 1994) U.S. Department of Energy report DOEFE-0316P. (Available from NTIS as DE94017288) PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS...

31

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Clean Coal Technology Program: Combustion Engineering IGCC Repowering Project, Clean Energy Demonstration Project (Oct 1994) -- Not Available PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS...

32

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Program: Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project (Sept 1992) U.S. Department of Energy report DOEFE-0264P (Available from NTIS as DE93000960) PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS...

33

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Reburning for Cyclone Boiler NOx Control - Project Brief PDF-320KB The Babcock & Wilcox Company, Cassville, WI Program Publications Final Reports Demonstration of Coal...

34

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration - Project Brief PDF-192KB Rosebud SynCoal Partnership, Colstrip, MT PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Advanced Coal Conversion...

35

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustor with Internal Sulfur, Nitrogen, and Ash Control - Project Brief PDF-302KB Coal Tech Corp., Williamsport, PA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Demonstration of an...

36

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Applications Blast Furnace Granular-Coal Injection System Demonstration Project - Project Brief PDF-314KB Bethlehem Steel Corp., Burns Harbor, IN PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS...

37

National Rural Electric Cooperative Association: Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association's work, under contract to DOE's Distribution and Interconnection R&D, to create a residential fuel cell demonstration program.

Not Available

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Advanced Combustion Systems Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project - Project Brief PDF-57KB Arthur D. Little, Inc., Fairbanks, AK PROGRAM...

39

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Program update 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes activities of the U.S. Clean Coal Technology Program for the time of 1985-1995. Various clean coal technologies are described.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

New Technology Demonstration Program FEMPFederal Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as 6 TWh/year. While data processing equipment decisions are made on the basis of many criteria other than energy efficiency, and no systematic effort was made in this demonstration to estimate the cost capacity commonly known as data centers. For these users, the critical importance of information processing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Data handbook for the National Solar Energy Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This preliminary document provides information in a matrix format which lists technical and programmatic data concerning the various project sites selected for the National Solar Energy Demonstration Program. It incorporates into one handbook the commercial, residential, and other demonstration projects which are now a part of the national program. It can be used as a reference source for technical and research purposes on a state-by-state basis.

Christensen, D.L.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation Emergency Management Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation Emergency Management Program Independent Oversight Review of the Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance September 2000 OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................... 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................... 4 2.0 RESULTS ......................................................................................... 7 Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessment .................................... 7 Program Plans and Procedures ..................................................... 8 Emergency Responder Performance .......................................... 10 Feedback and Continuous Improvement....................................

44

Clean coal technologies: Research, development, and demonstration program plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, has structured an integrated program for research, development, and demonstration of clean coal technologies that will enable the nation to use its plentiful domestic coal resources while meeting environmental quality requirements. The program provides the basis for making coal a low-cost, environmentally sound energy choice for electric power generation and fuels production. These programs are briefly described.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Daemen Alternative Energy/Geothermal Technologies Demonstration Program Erie County  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US DOE Geothermal Program US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Public Service of Colorado Ponnequin Wind Farm Geothermal Technologies Program 2010 Peer Review Daemen Alternative Energy/Geothermal Technologies Demonstration Program Erie County Robert C. Beiswanger, Jr. Daemen College May 20, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Insert photo of your choice 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov DAEMEN COLLEGE Open Loop, Geo-exchange System Geothermal Technologies Program 2010 Peer Review May 20, 2010 3 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov DAEMEN COLLEGE Open Loop, Geo-exchange System Principal Investigators Robert C. Beiswanger Jr. Vice President for Business Affairs and Treasurer Dr. Edwin G. Clausen Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College

46

Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: West Valley Demonstration Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Valley Demonstration West Valley Demonstration Project Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley Demonstration Project The Seneca Nation of Indians has interests and concerns regarding the West Valley Demonstration Project Site. Like at Hanford, DOE environmental cleanup activities have the potential to impact natural and cultural resources and to interfere with American Indian religious practices. Through a cooperative agreement, tribal staff is engaged on a frequent basis with DOE and its contractors. The principle activities engaged by tribes include reviewing and commenting on plans and documents, participating in meetings at the request of DOE, monitoring cultural resource sites, participating in site surveys, and identifying issues that

47

DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies March 11, 2009 - 3:18pm Addthis Statement of Victor K. Der, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Fossil Energy before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment, Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to provide testimony on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced coal research, development, and demonstration program to develop low-carbon emission coal technologies. Introduction Fossil fuel resources represent a tremendous national asset. An abundance

48

DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies March 11, 2009 - 3:18pm Addthis Statement of Victor K. Der, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Fossil Energy before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment, Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to provide testimony on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced coal research, development, and demonstration program to develop low-carbon emission coal technologies. Introduction Fossil fuel resources represent a tremendous national asset. An abundance

49

Low-cost flywheel demonstration program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Applied Physics Laboratory/Department of Energy Low Cost Flywheel Demonstration Program was initiated on 1 October 1977 and was successfully concluded on 31 December 19'9. The total cost of this program was $355,190. All primary objectives were successfully achieved as follows: demonstration of a full-size, 1)kWh flywheel having an estimated cost in large-volume production of approximately $50/kWh; developmeNt of a ball-bearing system having losses comparable to the losses in a totally magnetic suspension system; successful and repeated demonstration of the low-cost flywheel in a complete flywheel energy-storage system based on the use of ordinary house voltage and frequency; and application of the experience gained in the hardware program to project the system design into a complete, full-scale, 30-kWh home-type flywheel energy-storage system.

None

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fuel cycle and waste management demonstration in the IFR Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argonne's National Laboratory's Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is the main element in the US advanced reactor development program. A unique fuel cycle and waste process technology is being developed for the IFR. Demonstration of this technology at engineering scale will begin within the next year at the EBR-II test facility complex in Idaho. This paper describes the facility being readied for this demonstration, the process to be employed, the equipment being built, and the waste management approach.

Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; Benedict, R.W. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Laidler, J.J.; Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fuel cycle and waste management demonstration in the IFR Program  

SciTech Connect

Argonne`s National Laboratory`s Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is the main element in the US advanced reactor development program. A unique fuel cycle and waste process technology is being developed for the IFR. Demonstration of this technology at engineering scale will begin within the next year at the EBR-II test facility complex in Idaho. This paper describes the facility being readied for this demonstration, the process to be employed, the equipment being built, and the waste management approach.

Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; Benedict, R.W. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Laidler, J.J.; Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Scale Demonstration of Low-NOx Cell Burner Retrofit - Project Brief [PDF-294KB] Full-Scale Demonstration of Low-NOx Cell Burner Retrofit - Project Brief [PDF-294KB] The Babcock & Wilcox Company, Aberdeen, OH PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Full-Scale Demonstration of Low-NOx Cell Burner Retrofit, Final Report [PDF-3.6MB] (July 1994) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Full-Scale Demonstration of Low-NOx Cell Burner Retrofit, Project Performance Summary [PDF-1.18MB] (June 1999) Full-Scale Demonstration of Low-NOx Cell Burner Retrofit: A DOE Assessment [PDF-1.1MB] (Nov 2000) Reducing Emissions of Nitrogen Oxides via Low-NOx Burner Technologies, Topical Report No. 5 [PDF-825KB] (Sept 1996) Design Reports Full-Scale Demonstration of Low-NOx Cell Burner Retrofit, Public Design Report [PDF-2.68MB] (Aug 1991)

53

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOx-NOx-Rox Box(tm) Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-317KB] SOx-NOx-Rox Box(tm) Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-317KB] The Babcock & Wilcox Co., Dilles Bottom, OH PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports SOx-NOx-Rox Box(tm) Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Final Report [PDF-27.5MB] (Sept 1995) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports SOx-NOx-Rox Box(tm) Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration: A DOE Assessment [PDF-296KB] (Dec 2000) SOx-NOx-Rox Box(tm) Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Project, Project Performance Summary [PDF-1.4MB] (June 1999) Technologies for the Combined Control of Sulfur Dioxide and Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers, Topical Report No. 13 [PDF-500KB] (May 1999) Design Reports 5 MWe SNRBT Demonstration Facility: Detailed Design Report [PDF-4.5MB] (Nov 1992)

54

Review of the Vortec soil remediation demonstration program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of the METC/Vortec program is to develop and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Vortec CMS in remediating soils contaminated with hazardous materials and/or low levels of radionuclides. To convincingly demonstrate the CMS`s capability, a Demonstration Plant will be constructed and operated at a DOE site that has a need for the remediation of contamination soil. The following objectives will be met during the program: (1) establish the glass chemistry requirements to achieve vitrification of contaminated soils found at the selected DOE site; (2) complete the design of a fully integrated soil vitrification demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (3) establish the cost of a fully integrated soil demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (4) construct and operate a fully integrated demonstration plant; (5) analyze all influent and effluent streams to establish the partitioning of contaminants and to demonstrate compliance with all applicable health, safety, and environmental requirements; (6) demonstrate that the CMS technology has the capability to produce a vitrified product that will immobilize the hazardous and radionuclide materials consistent with the needs of the specific DOE waste repositories.

Patten, J.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-250KB] Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-250KB] Pure Air on the Lake L.P., Chesterton, IN PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project, Final Technical Report, Volume II: Project Performance and Economics [PDF-25MB] (Apr 1996) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-235KB] (Aug 2001) Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization Demonstration Project, Project Performance Summary [PDF-1.96MB] (June 1999) Advanced Technologies for the Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers, Topical Report No.12 [PDF-1.28MB] (June 1999) Design Reports

56

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Fluidized Bed Combustion JEA Large-Scale CFB Combustion Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-169KB] JEA, Jacksonville, FL PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Final Technical Report for the JEA Large-Scale CFB Combustion Demonstration Project [PDF-438KB](July 2005) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports JEA Large-Scale CFB Combustion Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-177KB] (Nov 2005) The JEA Large-Scale CFB Combustion Demonstration Project, Topical Report No.22 [PDF-2.1MB] (Mar 2003) Design Reports Detailed Public Design Report for the JEA Large-Scale CFB Combustion Demonstration Project [PDF-2.5MB] (June 2003) Appendices 4, 5, and 6: Major Equipment List,

57

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-80KB] Kentucky Pioneer Energy, L.L.C.; Trapp, Clark County, KY PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Report Kentucky Pioneer Energy LLC Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project: 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration [PDF-3.2MB] (Apr 2006) Design Reports Kentucky Pioneer Energy IGCC CCT Demonstration Project, 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration, Basis of Design [PDF-696KB] (May 2002) Environmental Reports Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project: Final Environmental Impact Statement, [PDF-5.7MB] (Nov 2002) Appendices A-C and E [PDF-965KB] Appendix D, Pages 1-40 [PDF-5.2MB] Appendix D, Pages 41-71 [PDF-4.3MB]

58

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration - Project Brief [PDF-192KB] Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration - Project Brief [PDF-192KB] Rosebud SynCoal Partnership, Colstrip, MT PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Final Technical Report [PDF-362KB] (Sept 2004) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Annual Technical Progress Reports January - December 1991 [PDF-920KB] January - December 1992 [PDF-2.9MB] January - December 1993 [PDF-3.3MB] January - December 1995 [PDF-2.9MB] January - December 1996 [PDF-250KB] January - December 1997 [PDF-264KB] January - December 1998 [PDF-188KB] January - December 1999 [PDF-212KB] January - December 2000 [PDF-231KB] Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Quarterly Technical Progress Reports

59

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Environmental Control Technologies - Combined SO2 /NOx Control Technologies Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-342KB] New York State Electric & Gas Corporation, Lansing, NY PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project, Project Performance and Economics Report, Final Report (Apr 1999) Volume 1 [PDF-12.4MB] Volume 2 [PDF-15.7MB] CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project, Project Performance Summary [PDF-1.4MB] (Nov 2002) Milliken Clean Coal Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-1.1MB] (Aug 2001) Advanced Technologies for the Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers, Topical Report No.12 [PDF-1.28MB] (June 1999)

60

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOx Control Technologies NOx Control Technologies 180-MWe Demonstration of Advanced Tangentially-Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of NOx Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers - Project Brief [PDF-280KB] Southern Company Services, Inc., Lynn Haven, FL PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports 180-MWe Demonstration of Advanced Tangentially-Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers, Final Report and Key Project Findings [PDF-4.6MB] (Feb 1994) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports 180-MWe Demonstration of Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of NOx Emissions, Project Performance Summary [PDF-1.9MB] (June 1999) The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-243KB] (Mar 2000)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Environmental Control Technologies - SO2 Control Technologies 10-MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption - Project Brief [PDF-342KB] Airpol, Inc., West Paducah, KY PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Clean Coal Technology III: 10-MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption, Final Project Performance and Economics Report [PDF-8.2MB] ((June 1995) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports 10-MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption, Project Performance Summary [PDF-2.0MB] ((June 1999) The Removal of SO2 Using Gas Suspension Absorption Technology Demonstration Project - A DOE Assessment (Sept 1996) [PDF-212KB] SO2 Removal Using Gas Suspension Absorption Technology, Topical Report No. 4 [PDF-680KB] (Apr 1995)

62

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Environmental Control Technologies - SO2 Control Technologies Demonstration of Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process - Project Brief [PDF-265KB] Southern Company Services, Newnan, GA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Demonstration of Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process, Final Report (Jan 1997) Volume 1, Executive Summary [PDF-4.6MB] Volume 2, Operation [PDF-32.8MB] Volume 2 Appendices [PDF-6.3MB] Volume 3, Equipment Vol 3a, Materials and Maintenance [PDF-34.6MB] Vol 3b, Instrumentation and Control [PDF-1.2MB] Vol 3c, Materials Test & Evaluation Program [PDF-28.2MB] Volume 4, Gypsum Stacking &Byproduct Evaluation [PDF-11.3MB] Volume 5, Environmental Monitoring Plan [PDF-3MB] Volume 5 Appendices [PDF-5.8MB]

63

HUD Residential Solar Demonstration Program data. Data file  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential Solar Data Center (SDC) at the National Bureau of Standards was responsible for the establishment and operation of a computerized data base containing data collected from the DOE/HUD Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program. This card-image tape contains the files which comprised the solar data base including: grant, grantee reports, technical descriptions, technical concerns, marketing survey; and utility consumption. NBSIR 81-2369, Residential Solar Data Center: Data Resources and reports, describes these files in detail.

Christopher, P.M.; Freeborne, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration program data report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration program, hosted by Fernald Environmental Management Project, was established to investigate technologies that are applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. An important part of this effort was evaluating field-screening tools potentially capable of acquiring high-resolution information on uranium contamination distribution in surface soils. Further-more, the information needed to be obtained in a cost- and time-efficient manner. Seven advanced field-screening technologies were demonstrated at a uranium-contaminated site at Fernald, located 29 kilometers northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. The seven technologies tested were: (1) alpha-track detectors, (2) a high-energy beta scintillometer, (3) electret ionization chambers, (4) and (5) two variants of gamma-ray spectrometry, (6) laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, and (7) long-range alpha detection. The goals of this field demonstration were to evaluate the capabilities of the detectors and to demonstrate their utility within the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration Program. Identical field studies were conducted using four industry-standard characterization tools: (1) a sodium-iodide scintillometer, (2) a low-energy FIDLER scintillometer, (3) a field-portable x-ray fluorescence detector, and (4) standard soil sampling coupled with laboratory analysis. Another important aspect of this program was the application of a cost/risk decision model to guide characterization of the site. This document is a compilation of raw data submitted by the technologies and converted total uranium data from the 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration.

Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cromer, M.V. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newman, G.C. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beiso, D.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Performance demonstration program plan for analysis of simulated headspace gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for analysis of headspace gases will consist of regular distribution and analyses of test standards to evaluate the capability for analyzing VOCs, hydrogen, and methane in the headspace of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles will provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for TRU waste characterization. Laboratory performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste drum headspace gases according to the criteria set within the text of this Program Plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAPP QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization gas samples. Analyses which are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories which have demonstrated acceptable performance in the PDP.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Industrial Applications Advanced Cyclone Combustor with Internal Sulfur, Nitrogen, and Ash Control - Project Brief [PDF-302KB] Coal Tech Corp., Williamsport, PA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Demonstration of an Advanced Cyclone Coal Combustor with Internal Sulfur Nitrogen, and Ash Control for the Conversion of a 23-MMBtu/Hour Oil Fired Boiler to Pulverized Coal (Aug 1991) Volume 1: Final Technical Report [PDF-5.9MB] Appendixes I through VI [PDF-8.9MB] CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports The Coal Tech Advanced Cyclone Combustor Demonstration Project -- A DOE Assessment [PDF-234KB] (May 1993) Environmental Reports Annual Environmental Report for The Demonstration of an Advanced Cyclone Coal Combustor, with Internal Sulfur, Nitrogen, and Ash Control for the Conversion of a 23 MMBtu/Hour Boiler to Coal [PDF-812KB] (Sept 1987)

67

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indirect Liquefaction Indirect Liquefaction Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid-Phase Methanol (LPMEOH(tm)) Process - Project Brief [PDF-282KB] Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P., Kingsport, TN PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH(tm)) Process, Final Report [PDF-3.5MB] (June 2003) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH(tm)) Process, Technical Progress Reports No. 34, October - December 2002 [PDF-448KB] No. 33, July - September 2002 [PDF-116KB] No. 32, April - June 2002 [PDF-148KB] No. 31, January - March 2002 [PDF-156KB] No. 30, October - December 2001 [PDF-141KB] No. 29, July - September 2001 [PDF-129KB] No. 28, April - June 2001 [PDF-154KB]

68

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Environmental Control Technologies - NOx Control Technologies Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology for the Control of NOx Emissions from High-Sulfur Coal-Fired Boilers - Project Brief [PDF-247KB] Southern Company Services, Pensacola, FL PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Innovative Clean Coal Technologies (ICCT) Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Technology for the Control of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Emissions from High-Sulfur Coal-Fired Boilers Volume 1, Final Report [PDF-29MB] (Oct 1996) Volume 2, Appendices A-N [PDF-20.2MB] (Oct 1996) Volume 3, Appendices O-T [PDF-17.9MB] (Oct 1996) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Demonstration Of Selective Catalytic Reduction For The Control Of NOx Emissions From High-Sulfur Coal-Fired Boilers, Project Performance Summary [PDF-1.1MB] (Nov 2002)

69

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined SO2 / NOx Control Technologies Combined SO2 / NOx Control Technologies SNOX(tm) Flue Gas Cleaning Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-359KB] ABB Environmental Systems, Niles, OH PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Final Report Volume II: Project Performance and Economics [PDF-10.2MB] (July 1996) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports ABB Environmental Systems SNOX(tm) Flue Gas Cleaning Demonstration Project, Project Performance Summary [PDF-450KB] (June 1999) SNOX(tm) Flue Gas Cleaning Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-185KB] (June 2000) Technologies for the Combined Control of Sulfur Dioxide and Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers, Topical Report No. 13 [PDF-500KB] (May 1999) Design Reports Final Report Volume I: Public Design [PDF-3.9MB] (July 1996)

70

Geothermal Energy Research, Development and Demonstration Program. First annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are discussed: program achievements and progress, interagency coordination and program management, international cooperation program, non-federal activities, and future program plans. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Reports on Withdrawn & Terminated Projects Warren Station Externally Fired Combined-Cycle Demo. Project - (There is no Project Brief for this project) Pennsylvania Electric Company PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Comprehensive Report to Congress Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Program: Warren Station EFCC Demonstration Project (June 1994) U.S. Department of Energy report DOE/FE-0316P. (Available from NTIS as DE94017288) PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS Externally Fired Combined Cycle: An Effective Coal-Fueled Technology for Repowering and New Generation (Mar 1995) L.E. Stoddard et al., (Black and Veatch), 20th International Technical Conference on Coal Utilization and Fuels Systems. U.S. Department of Energy Report CONF-950313-2 and DOE/MC/31327-95/C0451 (Available from NTIS as DE95012295).

72

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Applications Industrial Applications Blast Furnace Granular-Coal Injection System Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-314KB] Bethlehem Steel Corp., Burns Harbor, IN PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System Demonstration Project, Project Performance and Economics, Final Report Vol. 2 [PDF-3.8MB] (Oct 1999) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection Project, Annual Reports January - December 1998 [PDF-1.7MB] January - December 1997 [PDF-1.7MB] January - December 1996 [PDF-1.7MB] January - December 1995 [PDF-2.6MB] January - December 1994 [PDF-2MB] (July 1995) January - December 1993[PDF-1.5MB] (June 1994) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports

73

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Control Technologies - Combined SO2/NOx Control Technologies Environmental Control Technologies - Combined SO2/NOx Control Technologies Commercial Demonstration of the NOXSO SO2/NOx Removal Flue Gas Cleanup System - Project Brief [PDF-188KB] NOXSO Corporation - Alcoa Warrick Power Station, Hammond, IN Program Publications Final Reports Not Available Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Commercial Demonstration of the NOXSO SO2/NOx Removal Flue Gas Cleanup System Quarterly Technical Progress Reports Report No. 16. December 1994 - February 1995 [PDF-2.3MB] Report No. 15. (Sept - November 1994 [PDF-2.0MB] Report No. 14. June - August 1994 [PDF-2.8MB] Report No. 13. March - May 1994 [PDF-2.4MB] Report No. 12. December 1993 - February 1994 [PDF-3.0MB] Report No. 11. (Sept - November 1993 [PDF-3.3MB] Report No. 10. June - August 1993 [PDF-3.8MB]

74

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mild Gasification Mild Gasification ENCOAL® Mild Coal Gasification Project - Project Brief [PDF-279KB] ENCOAL Corporation, Gillette, WY PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project Final Reports [PDF-6.8MB] (Sept 1997) (Includes the following 3 reports) ENCOAL Project Final Report [PDF-460KB] (Sept 1997) Final Design Modifications Report [PDF-5.2MB] (Sept 1997) Commercial Plant Feasibility Study [PDF-1MB] (Sept 1997) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project Annual Report, October 1994 - September 1995 [PDF-2.6MB] (Jan 1996) ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Demonstration Project, Annual Report, October 1993-September 1994 [PDF-1.5MB] (Mar 1995) ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Demonstration Project, Annual Report [PDF-1.6MB] (Oct 1993)

75

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Fluidized Bed Combustion McIntosh Unit 4A PCFB Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-186KB] Lakeland Department of Electric & Water, Lakeland, FL PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) Repowering Project, Annual Report, January - December 1993 (Apr 1994) -- Not Available Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) Repowering Project, Annual Report, August 1991 - December 1992 (Apr 1993) -- Not Available Interim Reports Karhula Hot Gas Cleanup Test Results (June 1994) -- Not Available PCFB Repowering Project 80 MW Plant Description (May 1994) -- Not Available Comprehensive Report to Congress Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Progam: Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project (June 1991) -- Not Available

76

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOx Control Technologies NOx Control Technologies Demonstration of Coal Reburning for Cyclone Boiler NOx Control - Project Brief [PDF-320KB] The Babcock & Wilcox Company, Cassville, WI Program Publications Final Reports Demonstration of Coal Reburning for Cyclone Boiler NOx Control, Final Project Report [PDF-14.4MB] (Feb 1994) Appendices 1 - 5 [PDF-2.6MB] (Feb 1994) Appendix 1: Small Boiler Simulator Description Appendix 2: Statement of Work by Task and Subtask Appendix 3: Evaluation of Reburning for NOx Control from Lignite-Fired Cyclone Boilers Appendix 4: Nelson Dewey In-Furnace gas Species and Temperature Measurements Appendix 5: Balance of Plant Details Appendix 6: Test Report - Nelson Dewey Cyclone Reburn Optimization and Performance Environmental Tests [PDF-6.2MB] (Feb 1994)

77

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Advanced Combustion Systems Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-57KB] Arthur D. Little, Inc., Fairbanks, AK PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Not Available CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-590KB] (July 2007) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Coal Diesel Combined-Cycle Project, Annual Report [PDF-2.7MB] (June 1998) January 1996 - January 1997 Interim Reports Coal-Fueled Diesel System for Stationary Power Applications - Technology Development Topical Report [PDF-9.5 MB] (Aug 1995) Final Report [PDF-12.4 MB] March 1988 - June 1994 (Oct 1995) Environmental Reports Environmental Assessment - Coal-Fired Diesel Generator [PDF-4.2MB] (May 1997)

78

Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO2 sequestration in Arbuckle Saline Aquifer and by CO2-EOR at Wellington field, Sumner County, Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO 2 sequestration in Arbuckle Saline Aquifer and by CO 2 -EOR at Wellington field, Sumner County, Kansas -- W. Lynn Watney and Jason Rush Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting October 15-17, 2011 Pittsburgh, PA Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000441 Contract #FE0006821 $11,484,499 DOE $3.236 million cost share KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 12/2/2011 1 Outline * Background * The Participants * The Plan * Leveraging Current Research at Wellington Field * Inject, Monitor, Verification, and Accounting of CO 2 2 ORGANIZATION CHART Kansas Geological Survey Name Project Job Title Primary Responsibility Lynn Watney Project Leader, Joint Principal Investigator

79

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement facilities must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for routine waste characterization analyses of WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes sample gases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for analysis. Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement facilities must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for routine waste characterization analyses of WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement facilities must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for routine waste characterization analyses of WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

82

Integrated demonstrations, integrated programs, and special programs within DOE`s Office of Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

This poster session presents information on integrated demonstrations, integrated programs, and special programs within the EM Office of Technology Development that will accelerate cleanup of sites within the Nuclear Weapons Complex. Presented topics include: Volatile organic compounds in soils and ground water, uranium in soils, underground storage tanks, mixed waste landfills, decontamination and decommissioning, in situ remediation, and separations technology.

Peterson, M.E.; Frank, C.; Stein, S.; Steele, J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Fuel Cell Demonstration Program - Central and Remote Sites 2003  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 25 Lorax 4.5 units operated under this Award from April 2003 to December 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government, commercial, and residential customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. The deployment of the 20 Lorax 4.5 units for the Remote Sites phase of the project began in October 2004. To date, 10 fuel cells have completed their demonstrations while 10 fuel cells are currently being monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. As of June 30, 2006 the 45 fuel cells operating under this Award produced a total of 1,585,093 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included increases in system efficiency and availability. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance, installation, and decommissioning the total project budget was approximately $3.7 million.

Gerald Brun

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

TH!NK city - Electric Vehicle Demonstration Program - Annual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(ETA), is monitoring the operations of the 100 THNK city EVs in the New York Power AuthorityTHNK Clean Commute Program (Clean Commute Program). Both ETA and the...

85

Geothermal energy, research, development and demonstration program. Second annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discussion is presented under the following section headings: executive summary; national geothermal utilization estimates; Federal Geothermal Energy Program objective; Federal Geothermal Energy strategy; Federal Program planning, implementation, and progress monitoring; organization of the report; national progress and achievements; regional progress and accomplishments; fiscal year 1978 activities; federal program activities in fiscal year 1979 and beyond; Appendix A--interagency coordination and program management Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council (IGCC); and appendix B--international activities.

Not Available

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project - Project Brief PDF-250KB Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture West Terre Haute, IN Program...

87

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mild Gasification ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project - Project Brief PDF-279KB ENCOAL Corporation, Gillette, WY PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports ENCOAL Mild Coal...

88

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comprehensive Report to Congress Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Program: Pion Pine IGCC Power Project PDF-335KB (June 1992) PAPERS AND...

89

Geothermal energy, research, development and demonstration program. Third annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: the geothermal resource potential in the U.S., national geothermal utilization estimates, the Federal geothermal development strategy and program, Federal progress and achievements FY 1978, regional progress FY 1978, and Federal program plans for FY 1979. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Flame Doctor for Cyclone Boilers: Beta Demonstration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the beta demonstration of the Flame Doctor system as it is applied to cyclone boilers.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

91

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Technologies - Combined SO2 NOx Control Technologies Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project - Project Brief PDF-342KB New York State Electric &...

92

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Environmental Control Technologies - NOx Control Technologies Micronized Coal Reburning Demonstration for NOx Control - Project Brief PDF-245KB New York State Electric & Gas...

93

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas Resources Contacts Coal & Power Systems Major Demonstrations Innovations for Existing Plants Gasification...

94

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Fluidized Bed Combustion McIntosh Unit 4A PCFB Demonstration Project - Project Brief PDF-186KB Lakeland Department of Electric & Water,...

95

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of the Coal Quality Expert(tm) - Project Brief PDF-313KB ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc., and CQ, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA and Homer City, PA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final...

96

ATTACHMENT O RECENT DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS FUNDED BY THE IAW PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation in Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors This project is to demonstrate on a pilot scale the ability and demonstrate the direct steam generation (DSG) technology in the #12;receiver tube of a line focus parabolic trough collector, first in a single row, and then to simulate operations in multiple rows. From

97

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers, Phases 1 - 3B, Final Report PDF-21MB (Jan 1998) 500 MW Demonstration...

98

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Environmental Control Technologies - Combined SO2 / NOx Control Technologies Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection - Project Brief [PDF-328KB] Energy and Environmental Research Inc., Springfield/Hennepin, IL PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection Volume 1: Program Overview, Part A-Final Public Design Report, Part B-Project Performance and Economics [PDF-17MB] (Feb 1997) Volume 2: Gas Reburning-Sorbent injection at Hennepin Unit 1 [PDF-12MB] (Mar 1996) Volume 3: Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection at Edwards Unit 1 [PDF-3.8MB] (Mar 1996) Volume 4: Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection at Lakeside Unit 7 [PDF-21.9MB] (Mar1996) Volume 5: Guideline Manual [PDF-6.9MB] (Sept 1998)

99

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay for the TRU Waste Characterization Program. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Nondestructive Assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests conducted on a regular frequency to evaluate the capability for nondestructive assay of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed with TRU waste characterization systems. Measurement facility performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples according to the criteria set by this Program Plan. Intercomparison between measurement groups of the DOE complex will be achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar or identical blind samples reported by the different measurement facilities. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs). As defined for this program, a PDP sample consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. These PDP sample components, once manufactured, will be secured and stored at each participating measurement facility designated and authorized by Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) under secure conditions to protect them from loss, tampering, or accidental damage.

None

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Demonstration of wind turbine. Final technical report at grant program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposal F-602 is a demonstration of a commercially available wind-electric device - an Enertech Corp. Series 1800 model wind turbine. The demonstration site selected was the New Directions school campus, a public school facility, in Sarasota, Florida. During testing, an investigation of the wind power potential for the area was undertaken. In addition, negotiations with the Florida Power and Light Company for parallel operation of the wind system (utility interface), were initiated. An Operating Agreement contract is now pending approval by the Sarasota County School Board. The results to date, of this site's wind power potential, have been well below computational expectancies based upon wind speed data for the area. Analysis will continue, to determine the cause of the windplant's low net output.

Pendola, W. Jr.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Caterpillar MorElectric DOE Idle Reduction Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project titled 'Demonstration of the New MorElectric{trademark} Technology as an Idle Reduction Solution' is one of four demonstration projects awarded by the US Department of Energy in 2002. The goal of these demonstration and evaluation projects was to gather objective in-use information on the performance of available idle reduction technologies by characterizing the cost; fuel, maintenance, and engine life savings; payback; and user impressions of various systems and techniques. In brief, the Caterpillar Inc. project involved applying electrically driven accessories for cab comfort during engine-off stops and for reducing fuel consumption during on-highway operation. Caterpillar had equipped and operated five new trucks with the technology in conjunction with International Truck and Engine Corporation and COX Transfer. The most significant result of the project was a demonstrated average idle reduction of 13.8% for the 5 truck MEI fleet over the control fleet. It should be noted that the control fleet trucks were also equipped with an idle reduction device that would start and stop the main engine automatically in order to maintain cab temperature. The control fleet idle usage would have been reduced by 3858 hours over the 2 year period with the MEI system installed, or approximately 2315 gallons of fuel less (calculations assume a fuel consumption of 0.6 gallons per hour for the 13 liter engine at idle). The fuel saved will be significantly larger for higher displacement engines without idle reduction equipment such as the engine auto start/stop device used by COX Transfer. It is common for engines to consume 1.0 gallons per hour which would increase the fuel savings to approximately 1260 gallons per truck per year of typical idling (1800 hours idle/yr).

John Bernardi

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Station design alternatives report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of investigating the basis for including Station Design Alternatives (SDAs) in the regulatory guidance given for nuclear plant environmental reports (ERs), explains approaches or processes for evaluating SDAs at the early site permit (ESP) stage, and applies one of the processes to each of the ten systems or subsystems considered as SDAS. The key objective o this report s to demonstrate an adequate examination of alternatives can be performed without the extensive development f design data. The report discusses the Composite Suitability Approach and the Established Cutoff Approach in evaluating station design alternatives and selects one of these approaches to evaluate alternatives for each of the plant or station that were considered. Four types of ALWRs have been considered due to the availability of extensive plant data: System 80+, AP600, Advanced Boiling Reactor (ABWR), and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). This report demonstrates the feasibility of evaluating station design alternatives when reactor design detail has not been determined, quantitatively compares the potential ental impacts of alternatives, and focuses the ultimate selection of a alternative on cost and applicant-specific factors. The range of alternatives system is deliberately limited to a reasonable number to demonstrate the or to the three most commonly used at operating plants.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Daemen Alternative Energy/Geothermal Technologies Demonstration Program Erie County  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Daemen Alternative Energy/Geothermal Technologies Demonstration Project is to demonstrate the use of geothermal technology as model for energy and environmental efficiency in heating and cooling older, highly inefficient buildings. The former Marian Library building at Daemen College is a 19,000 square foot building located in the center of campus. Through this project, the building was equipped with geothermal technology and results were disseminated. Gold LEED certification for the building was awarded. 1) How the research adds to the understanding of the area investigated. This project is primarily a demonstration project. Information about the installation is available to other companies, organizations, and higher education institutions that may be interested in using geothermal energy for heating and cooling older buildings. 2) The technical effectiveness and economic feasibility of the methods or techniques investigated or demonstrated. According to the modeling and estimates through Stantec, the energy-efficiency cost savings is estimated at 20%, or $24,000 per year. Over 20 years this represents $480,000 in unrestricted revenue available for College operations. See attached technical assistance report. 3) How the project is otherwise of benefit to the public. The Daemen College Geothermal Technologies Ground Source Heat Pumps project sets a standard for retrofitting older, highly inefficient, energy wasting and environmentally irresponsible buildings�¢����quite typical of many of the buildings on the campuses of regional colleges and universities. As a model, the project serves as an energy-efficient system with significant environmental advantages. Information about the energy-efficiency measures is available to other colleges and universities, organizations and companies, students, and other interested parties. The installation and renovation provided employment for 120 individuals during the award period. Through the new Center, Daemen will continue to host a range of events on campus for the general public. The College does not charge fees for speakers or most other events. This has been a long-standing tradition of the College.

Robert C. Beiswanger, Jr.

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project - Project Brief [PDF-250KB] Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project - Project Brief [PDF-250KB] Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture West Terre Haute, IN Program Publications Final Reports Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project, Final Technical Report [PDF-8.2MB] (Aug 2000) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project, Annual Technical Progress Reports 1995 [PDF-1.7MB] (Mar 1999) 1996 [PDF-3.8MB] (Feb 2000) 1997 [PDF-4.8MB] 1998 [PDF-3.6MB] 1999 [PDF-3.4MB] (June 2000) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project, Project Performance Summary [PDF-2.5MB] (June 2002) Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-295KB] (Jan 2002)

105

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Engineering IGCC Repowering Project - (There is no Project Brief for this project) Combustion Engineering IGCC Repowering Project - (There is no Project Brief for this project) ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc. Program Publications Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports IGCC Repowering Project, Clean Coal II Project, Annual Report, (Oct 1992 - (Sept 1993 [PDF-7MB] (Oct1993) Annual Report, January - December 1992. U.S. Department of Energy report DOE/MC/26308-3645 (Available from NTIS as DE94004063). Interim Reports Use of the Lockheed Kinetic Extruder for Coal Feeding, Topical Report (Feb 1994) U.S. Department of Energy report DOE/MC/26308-3646 (Available from NTIS as DE94004066) Controls and Instrumentation, Topical Report (Dec 1993) U.S. Department of Energy report DOE/MC/26308-3648 (Available from NTIS as DE94004068) Topical Report: Sulfuric Acid Plant, Topical Report (Dec 1993)

106

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Advanced Combustion Systems Healy Clean Coal Project - Project Brief [PDF-226KB] Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority, Healy, AK PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Healy Clean Coal Project, Project Performance and Economics Report, Final Report: Volume 2 [PDF-1.2MB] (Apr 2001) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Healy Clean Coal Project , Quarterly Technical Progress Reports Numbers 1 and 2, January - June 1991 [PDF-1.3MB] Number 3, July - September 1991 [PDF-579KB] Number 4, October - December 1991 [PDF-862KB] Number 5, January - March 1992 [PDF-668KB] Number 6, April - June 1992 [PDF-1.2MB] Number 14, April - June 1994 [PDF-311KB] Numbers 16-19, October 1994 - September 1995 [PDF-1.3MB] Number 20, October - December 1995 [PDF-653KB]

107

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Environmental Control Technologies - SO2 Control Technologies Confined Zone Dispersion Flue Gas Desulfurization Demo. - Project Brief [PDF-296KB] Bechtel Corp., Seward, PA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Confined Zone Dispersion Project, Final Technical Report [PDF-7.8MB] ((June 1994) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Confined Zone Dispersion Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-178KB] (Nov 1999) Design Reports Confined Zone Dispersion Project, Public Design Report (Oct 1993) U.S. Department of Energy report DOE/PC/90456-T10 Cover page through Section 3.5.3 [PDF-6.3 MB] (Oct 1993) Section 3.6 through a portion of Appendix C [PDF-6.1 MB] (Oct 1993) Balance of Appendix C [PDF-5.7 MB] (Oct 1993) Interim Reports

108

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of the Coal Quality Expert(tm) - Project Brief [PDF-313KB] Development of the Coal Quality Expert(tm) - Project Brief [PDF-313KB] ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc., and CQ, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA and Homer City, PA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Final Report: Development of a Coal Quality Expert [PDF-6.9MB] (June 1998) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Development of a Coal Quality ExpertT: A DOE Assessment [PDF-1.5MB] (Nov 2000) Interim Reports Characterization and Evaluation of the Cleanability of Subbituminous Coals from Powder River Basin [PDF-18.4MB] (June 1993) Coal Cleanability Characterization of Pratt and Utley Seam Coal [PDF-10.1MB] (Aug 1992) Coal Cleanability Characterization of Pratt and Utley Seam Coal, Trace Element Addendum [PDF-10.1MB] (June 1993)

109

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Industrial Applications Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber - Project Brief [PDF-247KB] Passamaquoddy Technology Limited Partnership, Thomaston, ME Program Publications Final Reports Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber(tm) Final Report, Volume 1 [PDF-5.4MB] (Feb 1994) Final Report, Volume 2 and Appendices A - M [PDF-10.4MB] (Feb 1994) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-246KB] (Nov 2001) Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber, Project Performance Summary [PDF-2MB] (June 1999) Design Reports Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber(tm) Public Design Report (Oct 1993) [PDF-2.7MB) Interim Reports Interim Technical Report [PDF-973KB] (Mar 1992)

110

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Integrated Gasification/Combined Cycle Tampa Electric Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Project - Project Brief [PDF-241KB] Tampa Electric Co., Tampa, FL Program Publications Final Reports Tampa Electric Polk Power Station Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Final Technical Report [PDF-5MB] (Aug 2002) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Tampa Electric Company - IGCC Project, Quarterly Reports April - June 1997 [PDF-698KB] January - March 1997 [PDF-465KB] October - December 1996 [PDF-1.04MB] July - September 1996 [PDF-863KB] April - June 1996 [PDF-544KB] January - March 1996 [PDF-2.2MB] October - December 1995 [PDF-684KB] July - September 1995 [PDF-307KB] April - June 1995 [PDF-150KB] Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, Annual Reports

111

DOE standard compliance demonstration program: An office building example  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) issued interim new building energy standards (10 CFR 435 1989) to achieve maximum energy efficiency in the designs of new buildings. DOE then entered into a project to demonstrate and assess the impact of these standards on the design community. One area of focus was a test to see how a less conventional design-focused building would meet the standards` requirements -- DOE wanted to demonstrate that compliance with energy standards does not mean compromising the architectural intent of a building. This study, which was initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), illustrated the process by which compliance with the standards can be proven for a highly {open_quotes}design-oriented{close_quotes} office building. The study also assessed the impact of the whole building simulation compliance alternatives on design. This report documents the compliance requirements, gives a description of the sample building chosen for the study, provides general guidance for the compliance process, documents the method of compliance that was undertaken for the sample building, presents the results of the study, and provides a recommendation on how the compliance requirements could be improved to reflect more realistic use types.

Bailey, S.A.; Keller, J.M.; Wrench, L.E.; Williams, C.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Piñon Pine IGCC Power Project - Project Brief [PDF-313KB] Piñon Pine IGCC Power Project - Project Brief [PDF-313KB] Sierra Pacific Power Company, Reno, NV PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Piñon Pine IGCC Project, Final Technical Report [PDF-14.1MB] (Jan 2001) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Piñon Pine Power Project Annual Reports August 1992 - December 1993 [PDF-2.4MB] January - December 1994 [PDF-2.3MB] January - December 1995 [PDF-3.1MB] January - December 1996 [PDF-6.1MB] CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Piñon Pine IGCC Power Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-321KB] (Dec 2002) Topical Report Number 8: The Piñon Pine Power Project [PDF-850KB] (Dec 1996) Design Reports Tracy Power Station-Unit No. 4 Piñon Pine Power Project Public Design Report [PDF-4.7MB] (Dec 1994)

113

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler - Project Brief [PDF-252KB] Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler - Project Brief [PDF-252KB] Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Denver, CO PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler: Performance and Economics Report, Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System, Cherokee Station Unit No. 3, Final Report [PDF-17.2MB] (July 1998) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler: A DOE Assessment [PDF-309KB] (Feb 2001) Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers, Topical Report No.14 [PDF-1.2MB] ((May 1999) Reduction of NOx and SO2 Using Gas Reburning, Sorbent Injection, and Integrated Technologies, Topical Report No. 3 [PDF-1MB] ((Sept 1993)

114

A superwindow field demonstration program in northwest Montana  

SciTech Connect

Of all building envelope elements, windows always have had the highest heat loss rates. However, recent advances in window technologies such as low-emissivity (low-E) coatings and low-conductivity gas fillings have begun to change the status of windows in the building energy equation, raising the average R-value (resistance to heat flow) from 2 to 4 h-ft{sup 2}-{degree}F/Btu. Building on this trend and using a novel combination of low-E coatings, gas-fills, and three glazing layers, the authors developed a design concept for R-6 to R-10 super'' windows. Three major window manufacturers produced prototype superwindows based on this design for testing and demonstration in three utility-sponsored and -monitored energy-conserving homes in northwestern Montana. This paper discusses the design and tested performance of these three windows and identifies areas requiring further research if these window concepts are to be successfully developed for mass markets. 11 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Arasteh, D.; Selkowitz, S.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the ESPDP is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. The results of the technical and licensing evaluations are presented in this report. The purpose, background, and organization of the ESPDP is delineated in Section 1. Section 11 contains flowcharts defining siting application requirements, environmental report requirements, and emergency planning/preparedness requirements for ALWRS. The licensing and technical review results are presented in Section III.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect

On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

Not Available

1993-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

117

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Nondestructive Assay (NDA) is a test program designed to yield data on measurement system capability to characterize drummed transuranic (TRU) waste generated throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The tests are conducted periodically and provide a mechanism for the independent and objective assessment of NDA system performance and capability relative to the radiological characterization objectives and criteria of the Office of Characterization and Transportation (OCT). The primary documents requiring an NDA PDP are the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC), which requires annual characterization facility participation in the PDP, and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD). This NDA PDP implements the general requirements of the QAPD and applicable requirements of the WAC. Measurement facilities must demonstrate acceptable radiological characterization performance through measurement of test samples comprised of pre-specified PDP matrix drum/radioactive source configurations. Measurement facilities are required to analyze the NDA PDP drum samples using the same procedures approved and implemented for routine operational waste characterization activities. The test samples provide an independent means to assess NDA measurement system performance and compliance per criteria delineated in the NDA PDP Plan. General inter-comparison of NDA measurement system performance among DOE measurement facilities and commercial NDA services can also be evaluated using measurement results on similar NDA PDP test samples. A PDP test sample consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum containing a waste matrix type representative of a particular category of the DOE waste inventory and nuclear material standards of known radionuclide and isotopic composition typical of DOE radioactive material. The PDP sample components are made available to participating measurement facilities as designated by the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO). The nuclear material type, mass and associated alpha activity of the NDA PDP radioactive standard sets have been specified and fabricated to allow assembly of PDP samples that simulate TRU alpha activity concentrations, radionuclidic/isotopic distributions and physical forms typical of the DOE TRU waste inventory. The PDP matrix drum waste matrix types were derived from an evaluation of information contained in the Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (TWBIR) to ensure representation of prevalent waste types and their associated matrix characteristics in NDA PDP testing. NDA drum analyses required by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) may only be performed by measurement facilities that comply with the performance criteria as set forth in the NDA PDP Plan. In this document, these analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the wastes on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP wastes.

Carlsbad Field Office

2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

118

DOE and NYSERDA Join in $7.1 Million Program to Demonstrate Advanced  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE and NYSERDA Join in $7.1 Million Program to Demonstrate DOE and NYSERDA Join in $7.1 Million Program to Demonstrate Advanced Electric Energy Storage Devices DOE and NYSERDA Join in $7.1 Million Program to Demonstrate Advanced Electric Energy Storage Devices Two major energy storage projects to demonstrate advanced electric energy storage devices in New York State have been selected as part of a joint initiative between the Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Storage Research Program and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority(NYSERDA). DOE and NYSERDA Join in $7.1 Million Program to Demonstrate Advanced Electric Energy Storage Devices More Documents & Publications Projects Selected for Funding Under the Joint NYSERDA / DOE Energy Storage Initiative Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications

119

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Aquifer stability investigations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous rock reservoirs is carried out within the Reservoir Stability Studies Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the study is to establish criteria for long-term stability of aquifer CAES reservoirs. These criteria are intended to be guidelines and check lists that utilities and architect-engineering firms may use to evaluate reservoir stability at candidate CAES sites. These criteria will be quantitative where possible, qualitative where necessary, and will provide a focal point for CAES relevant geotechnical knowledge, whether developed within this study or available from petroleum, mining or other geotechnical practices using rock materials. The Reservoir Stability Studies Program had four major activities: a state-of-the-art survey to establish preliminary stability criteria and identify areas requiring research and development; numerical modeling; laboratory testing to provide data for use in numerical models and to investigate fundamental rock mechanics, thermal, fluid, and geochemical response of aquifer materials; and field studies to verify the feasibility of air injection and recovery under CAES conditions in an aquifer, to validate and refine the stability criteria, and to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical and experimental methodologies developed in previous work. Three phases of study, including preliminary criteria formulation, numerical model development, and experimental assessment of CAES reservoir materials have been completed. Present activity consists of construction and operation of the aquifer field test, and associated numerical and experimental work in support of that activity. Work is presently planned to be complete by 1983 at the end of the field test. At that time the final stability criteria for aquifers will be issued. Attached here also are preliminary criteria for aquifers.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

An Update of the U.S. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19931994 An Update of the U.S. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. DepaNnent of Energy Clean Coal Briefs Plans are moving ahead for the Thud...

123

Data handbook for the National Solar Energy Demonstration Program. Preliminary issue  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This preliminary document provides information in a matrix format which lists technical and programmatic data concerning the various project sites selected for the National Solar Energy Demonstration Program. It incorporates into one handbook the commercial, residential and other demonstration projects which are now a part of the national program. It can be used as a reference source for technical and research purposes on a state-by-state basis.

Christensen, D.L.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194. Edwards,modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers, ProceedingsAquifer Thermal Energy Storage Programs (in preparation).

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.Proceedings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Low-cost flywheel demonstration program. Final report, 1 October 1977-31 December 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Applied Physics Laboratory/Department of Energy Low Cost Flywheel Demonstration Program was initiated on 1 October 1977 and was successfully concluded on 31 December 1979. The total cost of this program was $355,190. All primary objectives were successfully achieved as follows: demonstration of a full-size, 1-kWh flywheel having an estimated cost in large-volume production of approximately $50/kWh; development of a ball-bearing system having losses comparable to the losses in a totally magnetic suspension system; successful and repeated demonstration of the low-cost flywheel in a complete flywheel energy-storage system based on the use of ordinary house voltage and frequency; and application of the experience gained in the hardware program to project the system design into a complete, full-scale, 30-kWh home-type flywheel energy-storage system.

Rabenhorst, D.W.; Small, T.R.; Wilkinson, W.O.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Status of the Virginia Power/DOE Cooperative Cask Testing/Demonstration Program: A video presentation  

SciTech Connect

This paper is documentation of a video presentation and provides a brief summary of the Virginia power/US Department of Energy Cooperative Cask Testing/Demonstration Program. The program consists of two phases. The first phase has been completed and involved the unlicensed performance testing (heat transfer and shielding) of three metal spent fuel storage casks at the federally owned Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The second phase is ongoing and consists of licensed demonstrations of standard casks from two different vendors and of one or two enhanced capacity casks. 6 refs., 1 tab.

McKinnon, M.A.; Creer, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Collantes, C.E. (Department of Energy, Richland, WA (USA). Richland Operations Office)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Waste immobilization demonstration program for the Hanford Site`s Mixed Waste Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the Waste Receiving and Processing facility, Module 2A> waste immobilization demonstration program, focusing on the cooperation between Hanford Site, commercial, and international participants. Important highlights of the development and demonstration activities is discussed from the standpoint of findings that have had significant from the standpoint of findings that have had significant impact on the evolution of the facility design. A brief description of the future direction of the program is presented, with emphasis on the key aspects of the technologies that call for further detailed investigation.

Burbank, D.A.; Weingardt, K.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Annual progress report, January-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program is to demonstrate the feasibility of converting agglomerating and high sulfur coal to clean fuel gas and utilizing this gas in a commercial application. Specific objectives are to conduct process analysis, design, construction, testing, operation and evaluation of a plant based on the U-Gas process for converting coal to industrial fuel gas. Phase I of the MLGW Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program started in September, 1977. In the first quarter of 1978, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was started, together with environmental monitoring activities and technical support work at the U-Gas pilot plant. After a series of successful pilot plant runs during the October 1978-March 1979 period, design work on the Demonstration Plant commenced. With the exception of Task I - Design and Evaluation of Commercial Plant, the majority of all other efforts were completed in 1979. These tasks are listed.

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Office of Technology Development Program for Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation. FY 1993 Program Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE has set a goal to clean up its complex and to bring all sites into compliance with applicable environmental regulations. This initiative is slated for completion by the year 2019. Four years ago there was no coordinated plan for identifying or cleaning these contaminated sites. Since 1989, DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management has invested time, money, and manpower to establish a wide range of programs to meet this immense challenge. DOE is responsible for waste management and clean up of more than 100 contaminated installations in 36 states and territories. This includes 3,700 sites: over 26,000 acres, with hazardous or radioactive contaminated surface or groundwater, soil, or structures; over 26,000 acres requiring remediation, with the number growing as new sites are defined; 500 surplus facilities awaiting decontamination and decommissioning and approximately 5,000 peripheral properties (residences, businesses) that have soil contaminated with uranium tailings.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Plan for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. This document describes the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality requirements for conducting BWID activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Topics discussed in this report, as they apply to BWID operations, include Federal, State of Idaho, and Environmental Protection Agency regulations, Health and Safety Plans, Quality Program Plans, Data Quality Objectives, and training and job hazard analysis. Finally, a discussion is given on CERCLA criteria and System and Performance audits as they apply to the BWID Program.

Walker, S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Dept. of Energy/Dept. of Transportation Gas Turbine Transit Bus Demonstration Program: program plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is the program plan for a cooperative project of the Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA) of the Department of Transportation and the Division of Transportation Energy Conservation (TEC) of the Department of Energy to test and evaluate the use of gas-turbine engines in transit buses. UMTA is responsible for furnishing buses from UMTA grantees, technical direction for bus/engine integration, and coordination of operational use of buses in selected cities. TEC is responsible for providing gas turbines, data acquisition/reduction services, and management for the complete project. The project will be carried out in three phases. In Phase I, prototype turbine engines will be used. One turbine-powered bus and diesel-powered bus will be tested at a test facility to obtain baseline data. Five turbine-powered buses will be evaluated in revenue service in one city. In Phase II, preproduction turbine engines will be used. One turbine-powered bus and diesel-powered bus will be baseline tested and ten turbine-powered buses will be evaluated in two cities. In Phase III, production gas turbine engines will be used. Only the turbine-powered bus will run baseline tests in this phase. Ten turbine-powered buses will be evaluated in two cities.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Intertechnology Corporation proposed test and evaluation plan, commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has three major parts. The first of these derives the requirements for the Test and Evaluation plan from the System Level Plan which is summarized in Section II. The second part contains the proposed plan to fill these requirements and includes hardware and software recommendations as well as procedures and management considerations. Primary emphasis has been given to the remote site because this is the area in which the commercial part of the demonstration is most unique. Finally, some pre-demonstration activities are described. The pilot program is intended to resolve a number of issues which arose in the course of the T and E plan. These relate to choice of scan frequencies, compression algorithms, etc. It is also intended to confirm performance and cost effectiveness of the site data collection package. The base line measurements of attitudes, etc. provide a reference mark against which one can measure the non-technical effectiveness of the demonstration program. (WDM)

None

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

MHK Projects/NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6032,"lon":-74.3401,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

135

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Plant parameters envelope report. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Early Site Permit (ESP) Demonstration Program is the nuclear industry`s initiative for piloting the early resolution of siting-related issues before the detailed design proceedings of the combined operating license review. The ESP Demonstration Program consists of three phases. The plant parameters envelopes task is part of Phase 1, which addresses the generic review of applicable federal regulations and develops criteria for safety and environmental assessment of potential sites. The plant parameters envelopes identify parameters that characterize the interface between an ALWR design and a potential site, and quantify the interface through values selected from the Utility Requirements Documents, vendor design information, or engineering assessments. When augmented with site-specific information, the plant parameters envelopes provide sufficient information to allow ESPs to be granted based on individual ALWR design information or enveloping design information for the evolutionary, passive, or generic ALWR plants. This document is expected to become a living document when used by future applicants.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Home energy saver's program: a report on a demonstration project undertaken in Utah  

SciTech Connect

A demonstration project undertaken in Utah designed to test a Home Energy Saver Program (funded by the Federal Energy Administration) is described. The basic purposes of the program were: (1) to encourage and bring about a significant reduction in home energy use, and (2) to test the impact of various energy conservation research elements on homeowners' participation. The principal research elements tested were: direct mailing of HESP workbooks to single family homeowners; use of a telephone hotline; use of workshops; use of a coordinated media program; and use of church and community support. In addition, the impact of a contest drawing, designed to motivate homeowners to compute their potential annual energy savings, was tested. (MCW)

Jensen, G.F.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Demonstration of the Environmental Data Corporation Spectral Fuel Conservation System program plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program is to demonstrate and quantify the amount of fuel that can be saved if the Spectral Fuel Conservation System (SFCS) developed by the Environmental Data Corporation (EDC) is installed in coal-fired industrial boilers. Of central importance to the program are the selection of an appropriate test site and the preparation and methodical application of a comprehensive test strategy. Consequently, the sections dealing with these topics in the proposal have been considerably expanded in this program plan to include as much preparatory thinking as is possible at this early stage. The remainder of this document is essentially an update version of the technical portion of the proposal. No change in the schedule is anticipated.

1979-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Project fact sheets 2000, status as of June 30, 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program), a model of government and industry cooperation, responds to the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable. The CCT Program represents an investment of over $5.2 billion in advanced coal-based technology, with industry and state governments providing an unprecedented 66 percent of the funding. With 26 of the 38 active projects having completed operations, the CCT Program has yielded clean coal technologies (CCTs) that are capable of meeting existing and emerging environmental regulations and competing in a deregulated electric power marketplace. The CCT Program is providing a portfolio of technologies that will assure that U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 274 billion tons can continue to supply the nation's energy needs economically and in an environmentally sound manner. As the nation embarks on a new millennium, many of the clean coal technologies have realized commercial application. Industry stands ready to respond to the energy and environmental demands of the 21st century, both domestically and internationally, For existing power plants, there are cost-effective environmental control devices to control sulfur dioxide (S02), nitrogen oxides (NO,), and particulate matter (PM). Also ready is a new generation of technologies that can produce electricity and other commodities, such as steam and synthetic gas, and provide efficiencies and environmental performance responsive to global climate change concerns. The CCT Program took a pollution prevention approach as well, demonstrating technologies that remove pollutants or their precursors from coal-based fuels before combustion. Finally, new technologies were introduced into the major coal-based industries, such as steel production, to enhance environmental performance. Thanks in part to the CCT Program, coal--abundant, secure, and economical--can continue in its role as a key component in the U.S. and world energy markets. The CCT Program also has global importance in providing clean, efficient coal-based technology to a burgeoning energy market in developing countries largely dependent on coal. Based on 1997 data, world energy consumption is expected to increase 60 percent by 2020, with almost half of the energy increment occurring in developing Asia (including China and India). By 2020, energy consumption in developing Asia is projected to surpass consumption in North America. The energy form contributing most to the growth is electricity, as developing Asia establishes its energy infrastructure. Coal, the predominant indigenous fuel, in that region will be the fuel of choice in electricity production. The CCTs offer a means to mitigate potential environmental problems associated with unprecedented energy growth, and to enhance the U.S. economy through foreign equipment sales and engineering services.

NONE

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Market diffusion and the effect of demonstrations : a study of the Denver Metro Passive Solar Home program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a report on the reactions to and effects of the Denver Metro Passive Solar Home demonstration program, conducted in the Spring of 1981. The purpose of the program was to provide impetus to builders for ...

Lilien, Gary L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

DoD Fuel Cell Demonstration Program: Energy Savings and Emissions Reductions to Date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under the Department of Defense (DoD) Fuel Cell Demonstration Program managed by the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL), 200 kW Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) power plants have been installed and made operational at 30 DoD sites located throughout the U.S. All of the fuel cells in the DoD fleet are being monitored for electrical and thermal efficiency, and total availability. Additionally, a subset of the DoD fleet is being monitored for pollutant emissions including NOx, SOx, CO, CO2, total hydrocarbons, and non-methane hydrocarbons. As of January of 1998, the 30 installed PAFCs have generated 35,967 MWh of electricity, 46,117 MBtus of thermal energy, and saved $1,288,746 in displaced electrical and thermal energy costs. In addition, these fuel cells have abated an estimated 179 tons of SOx, 67 tons of NOx, and have an adjusted availability rate of 81%. Additional program and site-specific information can be found at the official website of the DoD Fuel Cell Demonstration Program, located at http://www.dodfuelcell.com.

Holcomb, F. H.; Binder, M. J.; Taylor, W. R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Isotope Brayton ground demonstration testing and flight qualification. Volume 1. Technical program  

SciTech Connect

A program is proposed for the ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a radioisotope nuclear heated dynamic power system for use on space missions beginning in the 1980's. This type of electrical power system is based upon and combines two aerospace technologies currently under intense development; namely, the MHW isotope heat source and the closed Brayton cycle gas turbine. This power system represents the next generation of reliable, efficient economic electrical power equipment for space, and will be capable of providing 0.5 to 2.0 kW of electric power to a wide variety of spacecraft for earth orbital and interplanetary missions. The immediate design will be based upon the requirements for the Air Force SURVSATCOM mission. The proposal is presented in three volumes plus an Executive Summary. This volume describes the tasks in the technical program.

1974-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

142

TEMPERATURE-PROGRAMMED DESORPTION: PRINCIPLES, INSTRUMENT DESIGN, AND DEMONSTRATION WITH NAALH4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article is a brief introduction to temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), an analytical technique devised to analyze, in this case, materials for their potential as hydrogen storage materials. The principles and requirements of TPD are explained and the different components of a generic TPD apparatus are described. The construction of a modified TPD instrument from commercially available components is reported together with the control and acquisition technique used to create a TPD spectrum. The chemical and instrumental parameters to be considered in a typical TPD experiment and the analytical utility of the technique are demonstrated by the dehydrogenation of titanium-doped NaAlH{sub 4} by means of thermally programmed desorption.

Stowe, A; Ragaiy Zidan, R

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

143

Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Task III, Demonstration plant safety, industrial hygiene, and major disaster plan (Deliverable No. 35)  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan has been adopted by the IFG Demonstration Plant managed by Memphis Light, Gas and Water at Memphis, Tennessee. The plan encompasses the following areas of concern: Safety Plan Administration, Industrial Health, Industrial Safety, First Aid, Fire Protection (including fire prevention and control), and Control of Safety Related Losses. The primary objective of this plan is to achieve adequate control of all potentially hazardous activities to assure the health and safety of all employees and eliminate lost work time to both the employees and the company. The second objective is to achieve compliance with all Federal, state and local laws, regulations and codes. Some thirty specific safe practice instruction items are included.

None

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for RCRA Constituent Analysis of Solidified Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents distributes test samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and metals in solid matrices. Each distribution of test samples is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department. The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the RCRA PDP. Participating laboratories demonstrate acceptable performance by successfully analyzing single- blind performance evaluation samples (subsequently referred to as PDP samples) according to the criteria established in this plan. PDP samples are used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). The concentrations of analytes in the PDP samples address levels of regulatory concern and encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in waste characterization samples. The WIPP requires analyses of homogeneous solid wastes to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples. Participating laboratories must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

Why sequence archaea in a terrestrial subsurface aquifer?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genome sequencing. Principal Investigators: Wen-Tso Liu, University of Illinois Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence archaea in a terrestrial subsurface aquifer...

146

Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Hydrogen production from liquid hydrocarbons demonstration program. Final report, 26 August 1985-1 September 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force now uses diesel-engine generators as sources of heat and electricity at selected remotes sites. Simultaneously, it has investigated alternative cogeneration candidates that offer improved reliability, maintain ability, and economics. One system that shows high potential is a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plant consisting of a fuel conditioner to convert logistic fuels such as DEF-2, DF-a and JP-4 to a hydrogen-rich gas, and a power conditioner to convert the direct-current power to alternating current. The objective of the project work was to define, and demonstrate, a fuel conditioner to meet performance criteria established for the Air Force Remote Site Fuel Cell Power Plant program. Key criteria included high fuel-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency, rapid startup and load-following capability, and minimum water consumption during operations. A process configuration which has the potential to produce a minimum of 0.365 pound of hydrogen per pound of feed diesel consumed is described. The hydrogen-containing product is a suitable fuel for phosphoric-acid fuel-cell power plant. A 2 mole per hour (hydrogen) demonstration plant was designed, constructed and started up. Results are summarized.

O'Hara, J.B.; Chow, T.K.; Ling, J.K.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Occupational Safety and Health Program at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The West Valley Nuclear Services Co. LLC (WVNS) is committed to provide a safe, clean, working environment for employees, and to implement U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements affecting worker safety. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Occupational Safety and Health Program is designed to protect the safety, health, and well-being of WVDP employees by identifying, evaluating, and controlling biological, chemical, and physical hazards in the work place. Hazards are controlled within the requirements set forth in the reference section at the end of this report. It is the intent of the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program to assure that each employee is provided with a safe and healthy work environment. This report shows the logical path toward ensuring employee safety in planning work at the WVDP. In general, planning work to be performed safely includes: combining requirements from specific programs such as occupational safety, industrial hygiene, radiological control, nuclear safety, fire safety, environmental protection, etc.; including WVDP employees in the safety decision-making processes; pre-planning using safety support re-sources; and integrating the safety processes into the work instructions. Safety management principles help to define the path forward for the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program. Roles, responsibilities, and authority of personnel stem from these ideals. WVNS and its subcontractors are guided by the following fundamental safety management principles: ''Protection of the environment, workers, and the public is the highest priority. The safety and well-being of our employees, the public, and the environment must never be compromised in the aggressive pursuit of results and accomplishment of work product. A graded approach to environment, safety, and health in design, construction, operation, maintenance, and deactivation is incorporated to ensure the protection of the workers, the public, and the environment.'' These principles are demonstrated through: Conducting all activities in an atmosphere of trust and confidence based on open, honest, and responsive communication. Using innovative and effective approaches to risk identification and management. Applying a systematic approach to planning and execution of all activities that affect the environment, safety, and health through use of the Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System. Holding line management fully accountable to effectively plan and integrate environment, safety, and health activities into field activities. Providing clear policy and direction on environment, safety, and health issues to guide field work. Encouraging and promoting the sharing of environment, safety, and health information and resources. Empowering employees through training, information, tools, and program involvement to effectively protect themselves and the environment. Ensuring it is every employees' responsibility to identify and report potential safety and health hazards and environmental noncompliance. Together, as a team, we accomplish our mission while protecting the environment and preserving the safety and health of each employee and the public.

L. M. Calderon

1999-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Uranium removal from soils: An overview from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

An integrated approach to remove uranium from uranium-contaminated soils is being conducted by four of the US Department of Energy national laboratories. In this approach, managed through the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, these laboratories are developing processes that selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste that is difficult to manage or dispose of. These processes include traditional uranium extractions that use carbonate as well as some nontraditional extraction techniques that use citric acid and complex organic chelating agents such as naturally occurring microbial siderophores. A bench-scale engineering design for heap leaching; a process that uses carbonate leaching media shows that >90% of the uranium can be removed from the Fernald soils. Other work involves amending soils with cultures of sulfur and ferrous oxidizing microbes or cultures of fungi whose role is to generate mycorrhiza that excrete strong complexers for uranium. Aqueous biphasic extraction, a physical separation technology, is also being evaluated because of its ability to segregate fine particulate, a fundamental requirement for soils containing high levels of silt and clay. Interactions among participating scientists have produced some significant progress not only in evaluating the feasibility of uranium removal but also in understanding some important technical aspects of the task.

Francis, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brainard, J.R.; York, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chaiko, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matthern, G. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 4.0 Systems Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Analysis Systems Analysis Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 4 - 1 4.0 Systems Analysis The Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCT Program) conducts a coordinated, comprehensive effort in modeling and analysis to clarify where hydrogen and fuel cells can be most effective from an economic, environmental, and energy security standpoint, as well as to guide RD&D priorities and set program goals. These activities support the FCT Program's decision- making process by evaluating technologies and pathways and determining technology gaps, risks, and benefits. The Systems Analysis sub-program works at all levels of the program, including technology analysis for specific sub-programs, policy and infrastructure analysis, and high-level implementation and

151

Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program final report. Volume 1: Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles in typical applications in New York State. During 3 years of collecting data, 7.3 million miles of driving were accumulated, 1,003 chassis-dynamometer emissions tests were performed, 862,000 gallons of conventional fuel were saved, and unique information was developed about garage safety recommendations, vehicle performance, and other topics. Findings are organized by vehicle and fuel type. For light-duty compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, technology has evolved rapidly and closed-loop, electronically-controlled fuel systems provide performance and emissions advantages over open-loop, mechanical systems. The best CNG technology produces consistently low tailpipe emissions versus gasoline, and can eliminate evaporative emissions. Reduced driving range remains the largest physical drawback. Fuel cost is low ($/Btu) but capital costs are high, indicating that economics are best with vehicles that are used intensively. Propane produces impacts similar to CNG and is less expensive to implement, but fuel cost is higher than gasoline and safety codes limit use in urban areas. Light-duty methanol/ethanol vehicles provide performance and emissions benefits over gasoline with little impact on capital costs, but fuel costs are high. Heavy-duty CNG engines are evolving rapidly and provide large reductions in emissions versus diesel. Capital costs are high for CNG buses and fuel efficiency is reduced, but the fuel is less expensive and overall operating costs are about equal to those of diesel buses. Methanol buses provide performance and emissions benefits versus diesel, but fuel costs are high. Other emerging technologies were also evaluated, including electric vehicles, hybrid-electric vehicles, and fuel cells.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: Multiyear Research, Development and Demonstration Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen Program.

Milliken, J.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: Multiyear Research, Development and Demonstration Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen Program.

Milliken, J.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Geopressured aquifer simulator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ten natural gas companies have funded the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) development of a laboratory facility for fluid and core analyses at temperatures and pressures characteristic of geopressured aquifers. The facility has been designed and constructed to measure the following parameters at pressures up to 20,000 psi and temperatures to 450/sup 0/F: solubility of methane in brines from actual geopressured aquifers; dependence of compression and compaction reservoir drive upon pressure; dependence of permeability upon reservoir pressure and temperatures; dependence of relative permeabilities to gas and to water upon the water saturation of pores, pressure, and temperature. Brine pumped through the core can be either gas-free or from a reservoir of brine with gas in solution. The facility is modular in design with major components including the reservoir of gas-saturated brine, high-pressure positive displacement pumps, and the core holder housed in a large oven. All components contacted by high-pressure, high-temperature brine are fabricated from Hastelloy C-276, Elgaloy, or Inconel 625 to avoid corrosion. The temperatures, pressures, differential pressure, and flow rates are controlled and/or recorded by a digital microcomputer/microprocessor. Operation will be controlled from a separate room and programmed; hands-off operation will be the normal mode of operation. The facility has been constructed and is now being tested.Following performance testing with Berea sandstone, initial emphasis will be upon studies of brine and available core from DOE's Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2 wells.

Byrnes, A.P.; Rockar, E.M.; Randolph, P.L.; Kelkar, S.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Commercialization strategy for the Department of Energy's Solar Buildings Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts reported include: conducting a survey of existing commercial demonstration projects, categorizing these projects, determining criteria for evaluating the feasibility of continuing/aborting demonstration projects, and applying the criteria and making recommendations for which projects to continue and abort. It is recommended to refurbish 114 of the projects examined and to abandon 41. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Analysis of Hydraulic Responses from the ER-6-1 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the interpretation and analysis of the hydraulic data collected for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test-Tracer Test (MWAT-TT) conducted at the ER-6-1 Well Cluster in Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The MWAT-TT was performed to investigate CAU-scale groundwater flow and transport processes related to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the NTS through the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) Hydrostratigraphic Unit (HSU). The ER-6-1 MWAT-TT was planned and executed by contractor participants for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the Environmental Restoration (ER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Participants included Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor; Bechtel Nevada (BN); the Desert Research Institute (DRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center. The SNJV team consists of the S.M. Stoller Corporation, Navarro Research and Engineering, Battelle Memorial Institute, INTERA Inc., and Weston Solutions, Inc. The MWAT-TT was implemented according to the ''Underground Test Area Project, ER-6-1 Multi-Well Aquifer Test - Tracer Test Plan'' (SNJV, 2004a) issued in April 2004. The objective of the aquifer test was to determine flow processes and local hydraulic properties for the LCA through long-term constant-rate pumping at the well cluster. This objective was to be achieved in conjunction with detailed sampling of the composite tracer breakthrough at the pumping well, as well as with depth-specific sampling and logging at multiple wells, to provide information for the depth-discrete analysis of formation hydraulic properties, particularly with regard to fracture properties.

Greg Ruskauff

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Home Energy Savers' Program. A report on a demonstration project undertaken in Utah  

SciTech Connect

The Utah Home Energy Savers Program (HESP) is described and results are summarized. The project basically tested the impact of several research elements on homeowners participation through the use of: a direct mailing of 276,000 HESP workbooks to single-family homeowners; a telephone hotline to respond to incoming calls and to conduct an energy conservation survey; workshops to acquaint the citizenry with the facts of the national and statewide energy situation and the contents of the HESP workbook; a professional, commercial promotional firm to undertake a coordinated media program in support of the mailing of the HESP workbook; church and community sponshorship of the program; and selected methods of reaching sparsely populated areas.

Jensen, G.F.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM BIM and Demonstrating Code Compliance TOPIC BRIEF 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIM and Demonstrating Code Compliance TOPIC BRIEF 1 BIM and Demonstrating Code Compliance TOPIC BRIEF 1 Building Information Modeling and Demonstrating Code Compliance Demonstrating or verifying compliance with codes, standards, or other criteria governing building design is achieved through a set of specific tasks. These include producing construction documents; providing specifications for the products, materials, equipment, and systems to be used; and describing how they come together to create the envisioned building. W hen building construction documents and specifications are produced, they should include all information necessary to prescribe how the building is to be constructed. Plans and specifications should be readily usable to verify compliance with prescriptive requirements of codes, standards, or other desired

159

NAS battery demonstration at American Electric Power:a study for the DOE energy storage program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first U.S. demonstration of the NGK sodium/sulfur battery technology was launched in August 2002 when a prototype system was installed at a commercial office building in Gahanna, Ohio. American Electric Power served as the host utility that provided the office space and technical support throughout the project. The system was used to both reduce demand peaks (peak-shaving operation) and to mitigate grid power disturbances (power quality operation) at the demonstration site. This report documents the results of the demonstration, provides an economic analysis of a commercial sodium/sulfur battery energy storage system at a typical site, and describes a side-by-side demonstration of the capabilities of the sodium/sulfur battery system, a lead-acid battery system, and a flywheel-based energy storage system in a power quality application.

Newmiller, Jeff (Endecon Engineering, San Ramon, CA); Norris, Benjamin L. (Norris Energy Consulting Company, Martinez, CA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 5.0 Systems Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 3.8 Page 3.8 2012 Systems Integration Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 5 - 1 5.0 Systems Integration The Systems Integration function of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (the Program) provides independent, strategic, systems-level expertise and processes to enable system-level planning, data-driven decision-making, effective portfolio management, and program integration. System Integration ensures that system-level targets are developed, verified, and met and that the sub- programs are well-coordinated. Systems Integration provides tailored technical and programmatic support to ensure a disciplined approach to the research, design, development, and validation of complex systems. Systems Integration provides

162

General Electric Company design review manual, commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual is intended to serve as a guide to the Solar Energy Division of ERDA for preparing instructions for and evaluating the proposals resulting from the issuance of Program Opportunity Notices (PON's) for Commercial Buildings. The manual is meant to amplify Program Opportunity Notice DSE-75-2, with respect to site, building, and system selection and evaluation. The manual contains two major sections, one addressing the project concept and the other the design features. The project concept section provides for a description and evaluation of the site, the commercial building, the system application, the system predicted performance, and the long term economics of the application. The projects could be screened using the information from this section alone. Projects that remain acceptable can be further evaluated through design considerations as outlined in the second section. (WDM)

None

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The Current Fuel Cell Scooter Demonstration and Promotion Program in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the fuel cell market in Taiwan is still in its early stages, the government has not only invested heavily in the research and development of fuel cell technology but also has been promoting fuel cells through The Fuel Cell Demonstration and Promotion ... Keywords: fuel cell, scooter, reliability

Chia-Mei Liu; H. H. Lin; Y. L. Lin; Chang-Chung Yang; Sheng-Yuan Huang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

National Earth Comfort Program, Geothermal Heat Pump Market Mobilization and Technology Demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Late 1994, the Geothermal Heat Pump Consortium (GHPC) was launched as a non-profit collaborative effort between the United States Department of Energy, US electric utilities and the GeoExchange (geothermal heat pump) industry to make ''geothermal heat pumps'' a significant component of the HVAC industry and avoid 1.5 million metric tons of carbon equivalent per year. The goal was to create a self-sustainable GeoExchange market. This report offers a summary of some of the lessons learned and an overview of some of the programs major accomplishments.

Wael M. El-Sharif

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

Steam Generator Management Program: Site Specific Performance Demonstration (SSPD) Version 3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The  Site Specific Performance Demonstration (SSPD) software assists in training and testing of SG eddy current personnel for the upcoming outage.  The software will help ensure that analysts have read the outage guidelines and are knowledge about the typical degradations found in the steam generator.Benefits & Value:The Pressurized Water Reactor Steam Generator Examination Guidelines, 1013706, requires steam generator analysts to pass an exam ...

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

Siemens Westinghouse

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three-month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

Siemens Westinghouse

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

Siemens Westinghouse

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.6 Technology Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Validation Technology Validation Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.6 - 1 3.6 Technology Validation The Technology Validation sub-program tests, demonstrates, and validates hydrogen (production, delivery, storage) and fuel cell systems and their integrated components in real-world environments. Feedback provided to the DOE hydrogen and fuel cell research and development (RD&D) projects, industry partners, and end users helps determine the additional RD&D required to move the technologies forward or to determine whether the technologies are ready for commercialization. Evaluations conducted include the following: * Applications - transportation; primary power; combined heat and power (CHP); combined

170

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Appendix E: Acronyms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E - Acronyms E - Acronyms Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page E - 1 Appendix E - Acronyms AEI Advanced Energy Initiative AEO Annual Energy Outlook AFC Alkaline Fuel Cell AHJ Authorities Having Jurisdiction AMFC Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells AMR Annual Merit Review ANL (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory APU Auxiliary Power Unit ARRA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 ASES American Solar Energy Society ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers AST Accelerated Stress Test ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials ATP Adenosine-5'-Triphosphate Bchl Bacteriochlorophyll BES (DOE Office of) Basic Energy Sciences BEV Battery Electric Vehicle BNL (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory BOP Balance of Plant

171

An Update of the U.S. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department ol Energy Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department ol Energy Notable First Annual Clean Coal Conference -Technology Developers Linked with Wide Range of Users- Clean Coal Briefs MuchoftheDepartmentofEnergy's tftmtion this summer in the Clean 7oal Technology Program focused on L series of public "scoping" meetings hat were held across the nation. These nettings are one of the first steps aded for the Department to com- ~IeteanEnvironmentalImpactState- nent. a comprehensive analysis re- luired by the National Environmen- ,a1 Policy Act (NEPA) for certain mjects. While a requirement of law, hex meetings--as well as the entire 'JEPA process-provide excellent opportunities for the Department and he industrial project sponsors to work with local communities, both educat-

172

An Update of the U.S. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ofiice of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Ofiice of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Clean Coal Briefs Progress continued in the program this quarteras Southern Company Servic- es' SCR test project became the 23rd government/industry cooperative ven- ture to move into operations (see story p, 7). Look for results and other data in future issues of Clean Coul Today. Tthe Second Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference was held in Atlanta,GA,fromSeptember7-9,1993. This year's conference attracted a large number of overseas visitors who are interested in learning more about the clean coal technologies being demon- strated in the United States. Special thanks to the Southern States Energy Board for its help and hospitality this year, and to Georgia Power Company for its kind hospitality during the tour of

173

Federal loan guaranty programs management report, Task III, Item 005. Tab I. Electric and hybrid vehicle research, development, and demonstration project. Tab II. Geothermal loan guaranty program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The guaranty program on electric and hybrid vehicle research, development, and demonstration considers two aspects of loan guaranties: (1) how is the loan guaranty, as an incentive device, best integrated into an overall project strategy, and (2) to what extent can cost-effectiveness measurements be introduced to the loan guaranty review and approval process. The report on the geothermal loan guaranty program is an overview of a large number of existing program elements which, in the opinion of the financial community or the historical record of predecessor loan guaranty programs, can be seen to be (or have potential to become) troublesome. Included are relevant administrative, regulatory, and managerial guidelines, commentary, and ideas. (MCW)

Not Available

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

InterTechnology Corporation cost/benefit analysis report and supporting opinion survey commerical buildings National Solar Demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration program, solar heated and cooled commercial buildings are to be constructed throughout the nation to show the technical and economic feasibility of solar energy systems and, most importantly, to establish an economically viable solar industry. The questions arise: How many solar energy systems must be installed and where should they be installed to meet these objectives. This report presents an answer to these questions.

None

1976-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large quantities of hot water produced (1) as a by-productin one well and reservoir water is produced in another. Thesupply: produced from the aquifer. hot water is Spring (90

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The U.S. Department of Energy`s integrated gasification combined cycle research, development and demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

Historically, coal has played a major role as a fuel source for power generation both domestically and abroad. Despite increasingly stringent environmental constraints and affordable natural gas, coal will remain one of the primary fuels for producing electricity. This is due to its abundance throughout the world, low price, ease of transport an export, decreasing capital cost for coal-based systems, and the need to maintain fuel diversity. Recognizing the role coal will continue to play, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is working in partnership with industry to develop ways to use this abundant fuel resource in a manner that is more economical, more efficient and environmentally superior to conventional means to burn coal. The most promising of these technologies is integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. Although IGCC systems offer many advantages, there are still several hurdles that must be overcome before the technology achieves widespread commercial acceptance. The major hurdles to commercialization include reducing capital and operating costs, reducing technical risk, demonstrating environmental and technical performance at commercial scale, and demonstrating system reliability and operability. Overcoming these hurdles, as well as continued progress in improving system efficiency, are the goals of the DOE IGCC research, development and demonstrate (RD and D) program. This paper provides an overview of this integrated RD and D program and describes fundamental areas of technology development, key research projects and their related demonstration scale activities.

Brdar, R.D.; Cicero, D.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Stirling Engine Natural Gas Combustion Demonstration Program. Final report, October 1989-January 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fueled on natural gas, the Stirling engine is an inherently clean, quiet, and efficient engine. With increasing environmental concern for air quality and the increasingly more stringent requirements for low engine exhaust emissions, the Stirling engine may be an attractive alternative to internal combustion (IC) engines. The study has demonstrated that ultra low emissions can be attained with a Stirling-engine-driven electric generator configured to burn natural gas. Combustion parameters were optimized to produce the lowest possible exhaust emissions for a flame-type combustor without compromising overall engine thermal efficiency. A market application survey and manufacturing cost analysis indicate that a market opportunity potentially exists in the volumes needed to economically manufacture a newly designed Stirling engine (Mod III) for stationary applications and hybrid vehicles. The translation of such potential markets into actual markets does, however, pose difficult challenges as substantial investments are required. Also, the general acceptance of a new engine type by purchasers requires a considerable amount of time.

Ernst, W.; Moryl, J.; Riecke, G.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

New Technology Demonstration Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Information Systems (EMCIS). The available features for these products are summarized and analyzed with regard approaches to open communications. The third article [3] evaluated several products that exemplify decisions relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement, and energy savings

179

New Technology Demonstration Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the third in a series, we provide an evaluation of several products that exemplify the current state for these products are summarized and analyzed with regard to emerging trends in EMCIS and potential benefits to help make decisions relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement

180

Initial study of thermal energy storage in unconfined aquifers. [UCATES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Convective heat transport in unconfined aquifers is modeled in a semi-analytic way. The transient groundwater flow is modeled by superposition of analytic functions, whereby changes in the aquifer storage are represented by a network of triangles, each with a linearly varying sink distribution. This analytic formulation incorporates the nonlinearity of the differential equation for unconfined flow and eliminates numerical dispersion in modeling heat convection. The thermal losses through the aquifer base and vadose zone are modeled rather crudely. Only vertical heat conduction is considered in these boundaries, whereby a linearly varying temperature is assumed at all times. The latter assumption appears reasonable for thin aquifer boundaries. However, assuming such thin aquifer boundaries may lead to an overestimation of the thermal losses when the aquifer base is regarded as infinitely thick in reality. The approach is implemented in the computer program UCATES, which serves as a first step toward the development of a comprehensive screening tool for ATES systems in unconfined aquifers. In its present form, the program is capable of predicting the relative effects of regional flow on the efficiency of ATES systems. However, only after a more realistic heatloss mechanism is incorporated in UCATES will reliable predictions of absolute ATES efficiencies be possible.

Haitjema, H.M.; Strack, O.D.L.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nuclear Power 2010 Program Lessons Learned Report on the Combined Construction and Operating License/Design Certification Demonstration Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Power 2010 Program Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report August 30, 2012 Prepared by Longenecker and Associates DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not

182

The role of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle in the USDOE`s Clean Coal Research, Development and Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect

For many years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been funding research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to develop advanced power generation technologies. The goal of this activity is to catalyze the private sector to commercialize technologies that will provide reasonably priced electricity and still meet stringent environmental standards. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are emerging as one of the more attractive candidate technologies to meet this goal. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has been assigned the responsibility for implementing IGCC projects in DOE`s Clean Coal RD&D program. The IGCC technology offers the potential for significant Improvements in environmental performance, compared to today`s coal-fired power plants. Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from IGCC systems will be less than one-tenth of existing environmental standards. Thus, the IGCC technology will make coal-based plants as clean as plants that bum natural gas.

Bajura, R.A.; Schmidt, D.K.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

FY 1994 program summary: Office of Technology Development, Office of Research and Development, Office of Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management, formerly the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), was established in November 1989 as the first step toward correcting contamination problems resulting from nearly 50 years of nuclear weapons production and fuel processing activities. EM consolidates several DOE organizations previously responsible for the handling, treatment, and disposition of radioactive and hazardous waste. Within EM, the Office of Technology Development (OTD/EM-50) is responsible for developing technologies to meet DOE`s goal for environmental restoration. OTD manages an aggressive national program of applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT and E) for environmental cleanup, waste management, and related technologies. The program is designed to resolve major technical issues, to rapidly advanced beyond current technologies for environmental restoration and waste management operations, and to expedite compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations. This report summarizes Fiscal Year 1994 (FY94) programmatic information, accomplishments, and planned activities relevant to the individual activities within OTD`s RDDT and E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Compressed air energy storage: preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Final draft, Task 1: establish facility design criteria and utility benefits  

SciTech Connect

Compressed air energy storage (CAES) has been identified as one of the principal new energy storage technologies worthy of further research and development. The CAES system stores mechanical energy in the form of compressed air during off-peak hours, using power supplied by a large, high-efficiency baseload power plant. At times of high electrical demand, the compressed air is drawn from storage and is heated in a combustor by the burning of fuel oil, after which the air is expanded in a turbine. In this manner, essentially all of the turbine output can be applied to the generation of electricity, unlike a conventional gas turbine which expends approximately two-thirds of the turbine shaft power in driving the air compressor. The separation of the compression and generation modes in the CAES system results in increased net generation and greater premium fuel economy. The use of CAES systems to meet the utilities' high electrical demand requirements is particularly attractive in view of the reduced availability of premium fuels such as oil and natural gas. This volume documents the Task 1 work performed in establishing facility design criteria for a CAES system with aquifer storage. Information is included on: determination of initial design bases; preliminary analysis of the CAES system; development of data for site-specific analysis of the CAES system; detailed analysis of the CAES system for three selected heat cycles; CAES power plant design; and an economic analysis of CAES.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Treatment plan for aqueous/organic/decontamination wastes under the Oak Ridge Reservation FFCA Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which seeks to facilitate the treatment of low-level mixed wastes currently stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in violation of the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The FFCA establishes schedules for DOE to identify treatment for wastes, referred to as Appendix B wastes, that current have no identified or existing capacity for treatment. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DDT&E) program was established to provide the support necessary to identify treatment methods for mixed was meeting the Appendix B criteria. The Program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs for major categories of the Appendix B wastes based on the waste characteristics and possible treatment technologies. The Aqueous, Organic, and Decontamination (A/O/D) project team was established to identify pretreatment options for aqueous and organic wastes which will render the waste acceptable for treatment in existing waste treatment facilities and to identify the processes to decontaminate heterogeneous debris waste. In addition, the project must also address the treatment of secondary waste generated by other DDT&E projects. This report details the activities to be performed under the A/O/D Project in support of the identification, selection, and evaluation of treatment processes. The goals of this plan are (1) to determine the major aqueous and organic waste streams requiring treatment, (2) to determine the treatment steps necessary to make the aqueous and organic waste acceptable for treatment in existing treatment facilities on the ORR or off-site, and (3) to determine the processes necessary to decontaminate heterogeneous wastes that are considered debris.

Backus, P.M.; Benson, C.E.; Gilbert, V.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accumulation of Solar Energy in an Aquifer. Geliotekhnika.Aquifer Heating in Solar-Energy Accumulation, Gelioteknhika.presented at Int. Solar Energy Soc. (American Sec. ) "Solar

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aquifers of Hot Water from Solar Power Systems," presentedof hot water from solar power systems. Lawrence BerkeleyAquifers of Hot Water from Solar Power Systems," Proceedings

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Learning from Consumers: Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) Demonstration and Consumer Education, Outreach, and Market Research Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and thetechnology: California's electric vehicle program. Scienceand Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options for a Compact

Kurani, Kenneth S; Axsen, Jonn; Caperello, Nicolette; Davies, Jamie; Stillwater, Tai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

InterTechnology Corporation proposed systems level plan for solar heating and cooling commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of the National Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program for non-residential buildings are embodied in the following: (1) Demonstrate the ultimate economic and technical feasibility of solar heating and combined heating and cooling. (2) Stimulate industry to produce and market solar equipment. (3) Stimulate a commercial market for solar systems. The systems level plan is designed to address the above stated goals as they relate to the building community associated with the commercial sector of the economy. (WDM)

None

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Microsoft Word - S08542_Aquifer  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Work Plan for the Enhanced Work Plan for the Enhanced Characterization of the Surficial Aquifer Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site June 2012 LMS/RVT/S08542 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RVT/S08542 Work Plan for the Enhanced Characterization of the Surficial Aquifer Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site June 2012 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Work Plan for the Enhanced Characterization of the Surficial Aquifer, Riverton, Wyoming June 2012 Doc. No. S08542 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. ii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

192

Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

Jenne, E.A. (ed.)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

UWM-CBU Concrete Materials Technology Series Program No. 72 Construction Demonstration for Use of Residuals and Reject Fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Products Utilization, Milwaukee, WI August 28, 2008, Brookfield, WI Best Western Midway Hotel-Brookfield, 1005 S-Products Utilization NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION 3200 North Cramer Street, Room W309 U.S. POSTAGE P. O. Box 784 PAID will be presented. #12;PROGRAM August 28, 2008 Best Western Midway Hotel-Brookfield, 1005 S. Moorland Rd. (I-94

Saldin, Dilano

194

Demonstration of the BNL Continuous Dual Trap Analyzer to Detect Perfluorocarbon Tracers for the Tag, Track and Location Program  

SciTech Connect

The Tag, Track and Location System (TTL) Program is investigating methods of tracking an asset using perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT). The success of any TTL method requires sound detection/location instrumentation. Tracer Detection Technologies Corp (TDT), through a contract with the Office of Naval Research (ONR), is investigating different detection systems. The detections systems generally fall into two categories; proximity detectors and standoff detectors. Proximity detectors, as the name implies, need to be in close proximity (e.g., meter to 10's of meters) to the PFT source. Standoff detection searches for the PFT from a greater distance away from the source (e.g., 100's of meters to kilometers). Gas Chromatographs (GC) are generally considered a proximity detection systems, but in the case of PFTs should be considered for both proximity and standoff detection with the caveat that in standoff use the GC needs to be somewhere in the PFT plume, i.e., generally downwind of the source. With a properly sized PFT source, the right GC can afford fairly large standoff (distance from the source) distances; 100's of meters to kilometers downwind. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has such a GC system and offered to demonstrate the CDTA for TTL as a no cost addition to the TDTTTL project, of which BNL was a participant. BNL is a leading authority on the sampling, collection, release and detection of PFTs. In addition, the BNL team has extensive background in atmospheric dispersion, the application of PFTs to such studies and the development of applications utilizing PFTs such as building infiltration measurements, control room integrity determination, leak location and environmental investigations. This experience and expertise is essential in developing any PFT application were dispersion, dilution and overcoming environmental conditions and interferences are integral to success. BNL has developed sophisticated gas chromatography methods and instruments that allow detection of up to seven PFTs at part per quadrillion levels (1015) with sample times as short as 60 seconds. The Continuous Dual-Trap Analyzer (CDTA) was developed for leak hunting applications and can continuously sample the air for PFTs without interruption. Sample time can be as short as 60 seconds. The CDTA has been extensively used in the commercial sector to detect PFTs that have been introduced to leaking buried dielectric fluid-filled cables or leaking subsurface gas lines. The PFTs travel through the cable or pipe until they reach the leak site. PFTs then escape into the surrounding soil and permeate/diffuse to the surface where they can be detected with the CDTA. Typically a cable is tagged with ppm levels of PFTs resulting in ppt to ppq concentrations in the air at the leak site. The CDTA is proven to be rugged, reliable and has a proven track record of successful leak location. The application of the CDTA to PFT detection for TTL is identical to application for leak detection. The CDTA operator has a general idea, with a few miles of roadway, where the leak is located, but no specific knowledge of the location (it can be any where along the road). The CDTA is mounted in a Chevy Astro Van and is dispatched to the field. In the field the van is driven at nominally 15 mph along the road. The CDTA continuously samples the air outside the van (via a 1/4-inch plastic sample tube stuck out a side window) until a positive detection occurs. The van then covers the road section where the detection occurred at a slightly slower pace to pin-point the area where the leak is and to direct soil probe samples. The soil probe samples take soil gas samples every 10 yards or so and the samples are analyzed on the CDTA. The leak can be located to within a few feet in 95% of the cases. To date the CDTA has been successful in every leak hunt performed by BNL. One interesting case was a leak hunt that resulted in repeated negative detections. The confidence in the CDTA forced the utility to recheck its 'plumbing' which lead to the discovery that a valve was turned that sho

Heiser,J.H.; Adams, J.; Dietz, R..; Milian, L.; Watson, T.

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

Office of Technology Development FY 1993 program summary: Office of Research and Development, Office of Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes significant FY93 programmatic information and accomplishments relevant to the individual activities within the Office of Technology Development Program for Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E). A brief discussion of the mission of the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Technology Development is presented. An overview is presented of the major problem areas confronting DOE. These problem areas include: groundwater and soils cleanup; waste retrieval and processing; and pollution prevention. The organizational elements within EM are highlighted. An EM-50 Funding Summary for FY92 and FY93 is also provided. RDDT&E programs are discussed and their key problem areas are summarized. Three salient program-formulating concepts are explained. They are: Integrated Demonstrations, Integrated Programs, and the technology window of opportunity. Detailed information for each of the programs within RDDT&E is presented and includes a fact sheet, a list of technical task plans and an accomplishments and objectives section.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems program (ATS) technical readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. First quarterly report, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally-superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability- Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase 1 of the ATS program, Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is re-configured with closed- loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to bum coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. Future Phase IV activities consist of manufacturing, constructing,

Brushwood, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power Industrial Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Kriston P. Brooks (Primary Contact), Siva P. Pilli, Dale A. King Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: (509) 372-4343 Email: kriston.brooks@pnnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Peter Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Subcontractor: ClearEdge Power, Portland, OR Project Start Date: May 2010 Project End Date: September 2012

198

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration (MYRDD) Plan - Section 1.0: Introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 1 - 1 Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 1 - 1 1.0 Introduction The U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's or the Department's) hydrogen and fuel cell efforts are part of a broad portfolio of activities to build a competitive and sustainable clean energy economy to secure the nation's energy future. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent by 2050 1 and eliminating dependence on imported fuel will require the use of diverse domestic energy sources and advanced fuels and technologies in all sectors of the economy. Achieving these goals requires a robust, comprehensive research and development (R&D) portfolio that balances short-term

199

New Technology Demonstration Program - Results of an Attempted Field Test of Full-Spectrum Polarized Lighting in a Mail Processing/Office Space  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the potential energy savings associated with the use of full-spectrum polarized lighting in a work space was initiated as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) in 1997. This project was intended to provide information on the effectiveness and application of this technology that could help federal energy managers and other interested individuals determine whether this technology had benefits for their occupied spaces. The use of an actual mail processing/office work area provided the capability of evaluating the technologies effectiveness in the real world.

Richman, Eric E.

2001-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

200

New Technology Demonstration Program - Results of an Attempted Field Test of Multi-Layer Light Polarizing Panels in an Office Space  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the potential energy savings associated with the use of multi-layer light polarizing panels in an office space was initiated as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) in 1997. This project was intended to provide information on the effectiveness and application of this technology that could help federal energy managers and other interested individuals determine whether this technology had benefits for their occupied spaces. The use of an actual working office area provided the capability of evaluating the technology's effectiveness in the real world.

Richman, Eric E.

2001-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

New Technology Demonstration Program - Results of an Attempted Field Test of Full-Spectrum Polarized Lighting in a Mail Processing/Office Space  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the potential energy savings associated with the use of full-spectrum polarized lighting in a work space was initiated as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) in 1997. This project was intended to provide information on the effectiveness and application of this technology that could help federal energy managers and other interested individuals determine whether this technology had benefits for their occupied spaces. The use of an actual mail processing/office work area provided the capability of evaluating the technologies effectiveness in the real world.

Richman, Eric E.

2001-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

202

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Oil-Free Centrifugal Hydrogen Compression Technology Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Hooshang Heshmat Mohawk Innovative Technology, Inc. (MiTi) 1037 Watervliet Shaker Road Albany, NY 12205 Phone: (518) 862-4290 Email: HHeshmat@miti.cc DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18060 Subcontractor: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Compressor Corporation, Hiroshima, Japan Project Start Date: September 25, 2008 Project End Date: May 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Design a reliable and cost-effective centrifugal compressor for hydrogen pipeline transport and delivery: Eliminate sources of oil/lubricant contamination * Increase efficiency by using high rotational speeds *

204

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Material Handling Equipment Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3704 Email: todd.ramsden@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Peter Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: Oorja Protonics, Inc., Fremont, CA Project Start Date: June 1, 2010 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Operate and maintain fuel-cell-powered material * handling equipment (MHE) using direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology. Compile operational data of DMFCs and validate their * performance under real-world operating conditions. Provide an independent technology assessment that * focuses on DMFC system performance, operation, and

205

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxiliary Power Unit Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Dan Hennessy (Primary Contact), Jim Banna Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC 300 University Drive m/c 480-300-385 Auburn Hills, MI 48326 Phone: (248) 732-0656 Email: daniel.t.hennessy@delphi.com DOE Managers HQ: Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Phone: (202) 586-5463 Email: Dimitrios.Papageorgopoulos@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000478 Subcontractors: * Electricore, Inc., Valencia, CA * PACCAR, Inc., Bellevue, WA * TDA Research, Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO Project Start Date: August 1, 2009 Project End Date: April 30, 2013 Objectives

206

Chemical Hydride Rate Modeling, Validation, and System Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Troy A. Semelsberger (Primary Contact), Biswajit Paik, Tessui Nakagawa, Ben Davis, and Jose I. Tafoya Los Alamos National Laboratory MS J579, P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 665-4766 Email: troy@lanl.gov DOE Managers HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Project Start Date: February 2009 Project End Date: February 2014 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Investigate reaction characteristics of various fluid-phase * ammonia-borane (AB)-ionic liquid (IL) compositions Identify and quantify hydrogen impurities and develop *

207

FEMA: a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the construction, verification, and demonstration of a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The particular features of FEMA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Mechanisms included in FEMA are: carrier fluid advection, hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular diffusion, radioactive decay, sorption, source/sinks, and degradation due to biological, chemical as well as physical processes. Three optional sorption models are embodied in FEMA. These are linear isotherm and Freundlich and Langmuir nonlinear isotherms. Point as well as distributed source/sinks are included to represent artificial injection/withdrawals and natural infiltration of precipitation. All source/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed concentration on the Dirichlet boundary, given gradient on the Neumann boundary segment, and flux at each Cauchy boundary segment can vary independently of each other. The aquifer may consist of as many formations as desired. Either completely confined or completely unconfined or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. FEMA also includes transient leakage to or from the aquifer of interest through confining beds from or to aquifers lying below and/or above.

Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.2 Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Plan - Delivery Technical Plan - Delivery Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.2 - 1 3.2 Hydrogen Delivery Delivery is an essential component of any future hydrogen infrastructure. It encompasses those processes needed to transport hydrogen from a central or semi-central production facility to the final point of use and those required to load the energy carrier directly onto a given fuel cell system. Successful commercialization of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell systems, including those used in vehicles, back-up power sources, and distributed power generators, will likely depend on a hydrogen delivery infrastructure that provides the same level of safety, convenience, and functionality as existing liquid and gaseous fossil

209

Renewable energy for America's cities: Advanced Community Energy Systems Proposed Research, Development and Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect

The first purpose of this paper is to describe ACES technologies and their potential impact on the environment, the US energy supply system and economy. The second purpose is to recommend an R,D D program to the US Department of Energy which has as its goal the rapid development of the most promising of the new technologies. ACES supply thermal energy to groups of buildings, communities and cities in the form of hot or chilled water for building space heating, domestic hot water or air conditioning. The energy is supplied via a network of insulated, underground pipes linking central sources of supply with buildings. ACES, by definition, employ very high energy efficiency conversion technologies such as cogeneration, heat pumps, and heat activated chillers. These systems also use renewable energy sources such as solar energy, winter cold, wind, and surface and subsurface warm and cold waters. ACES compose a new generation of community-scale building heating and air conditioning supply technologies. These new systems can effect a rapid and economical conversion of existing cities to energy supply by very efficient energy conversion systems and renewable energy systems. ACES technologies are the most promising near term means by which cities can make the transition from our present damaging dependence on fossil fuel supply systems to an economically and environmentally sustainable reliance on very high efficiency and renewable energy supply systems. When fully developed to serve an urban area, ACES will constitute a new utility system which can attain a level of energy efficiency, economy and reliance on renewable energy sources not possible with currently available energy supply systems.

Gleason, T.C.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO2 sequestration in Arbuckle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO 2 sequestration in Arbuckle Saline Aquifer and by CO 2 -EOR at Wellington field, Sumner County, Kansas -- W. Lynn Watney and Jason Rush Kansas...

211

An Update ofthe U.S. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Issue No. 4, Fat, ,991 3 Issue No. 4, Fat, ,991 An Update ofthe U.S. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Nine New Clean Coal Technology Projects Selected In Fourth Round of Competition Clean Coal Briefs Highlights ofthis past quarter of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstra- tion Program include the addition 01 nine new projects selected for funding under the fourth round of competition, a new $203 million cooperative agree- ment for a pressurized circulating flu- idized bed combustion plant in Des Moines, Iowa, and the kick-off of next year's planned fifth round with the announcement of public meetings (see separate stories for details). The 42 government-industry projects now in the Clean Coal Pro- gram family-with a total value ex-

212

Innovation Demonstration Fund (Ontario, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Innovation Demonstration Fund (IDF) is a discretionary, non-entitlement funding program administered by the Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation. The program focuses on emerging...

213

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.7 Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety, Codes and Standards Safety, Codes and Standards Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.7 - 1 3.7 Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards The United States and many other countries have established laws and regulations that require commercial products and infrastructure to meet all applicable codes and standards to demonstrate that they are safe, perform as designed and are compatible with the systems in which they are used. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies have a history of safe use with market deployment and commercialization underway. The Safety, Codes and Standards sub-program (SCS) facilitates deployment and commercialization of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies by developing information resources for their safe use. SCS relies on extensive input from automobile

214

Official Program Nanogram Demonstration Competition ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... by "defenders" (polymer posts) and a ball handling drill that requires ... Contact: Craig McGray, NIST Electronics and Electrical Engineering laboratory ...

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

215

Seasonal thermal energy storage program. Progress report, January 1980-December 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program is to demonstrate the economic storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis, using heat or cold available from waste sources or other sources during a surplus period to reduce peak period demand, reduce electric utilities peaking problems, and contribute to the establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. Aquifers, ponds, earth, and lakes have potential for seasonal storage. The initial thrust of the STES Program is toward utilization of ground-water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage. Program plans for meeting these objectives, the development of demonstration programs, and progress in assessing the technical, economic, legal, and environmental impacts of thermal energy storage are described. (LCL)

Minor, J.E.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Implementation of California's Cal-Learn Demonstration Project, A Process Evaluation: Program Planning and Implementation From June 1993 Through June 1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cal-Learn Case Management Program Training packet, Augusttraining program for its new case managers on AFLP case management

Cunniff, James; Dillon, Nara; Hirshberg, Diane; Medlin, Carol; Malvin, Janet

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Geothermal development of the Madison group aquifer: a case study  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal well has been drilled at the St. Mary's Hospital in Pierre, South Dakota. The well is 2176 feet deep and artesian flows 375 gpm at 106/sup 0/F. The well is producing fluids from the Mississippian Madison Group, a sequence of carbonate rocks deposited over several western states. The project was funded to demonstrate the goethermal potential of this widespread aquifer. This case study describes the development of the project through geology, drilling, stimulation, and testing.

Martinez, J.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Descriptive analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) was examined. A key to ATESs attractiveness is its simplicity of design and construction. The storage device consists of two ordinary water wells drilled into an aquifer, connected at the surface by piping and a heat exchanger. During the storage cycle water is pumped out of the aquifer, through the heat exchanger to absorb thermal energy, and then back down into the aquifer through the second well. The thermal storage remains in the aquifer storage bubble until required for use, when it is recovered by reversing the storage operation. For many applications the installation can probably be designed and constructed using existing site-specific information and modern well-drilling techniques. The potential for cost-effective implementation of ATES was investigated in the Twin Cities District Heating-Cogeneration Study in Minnesota. In the study, ATES demonstrated a net energy saving of 32% over the nonstorage scenario, with an annual energy cost saving of $31 million. Discounting these savings over the life of the project, the authors found that the break-even capital cost for ATES construction was $76/kW thermal, far above the estimated ATES development cost of $23 to 50/kW thermal. It appears tht ATES can be highly cost effective as well as achieve substantial fuel savings. ATES would be environmentally beneficial and could be used in many parts of the USA. The existing body of information on ATES indicates that it is a cost-effective, fuel-conserving technique for providing thermal energy for residential, commercial, and industrial users. The negative aspects are minor and highly site-specific, and do not seem to pose a threat to widespread commercialization. With a suitable institutional framework, ATES promises to supply a substantial portion of the nation's future energy needs. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withGeneration and Energy Storage," presented at Frontiers ofStudy of Underground Energy Storage Using High-Pressure,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theand J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

224

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.R. Tek. 1970. Storage of Natural Gas in Saline Aquifers.petroleum, underground storage of natural gas, large scale

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy storage in Aquifers.In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

Tsang, Chin Fu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground...

227

Effects of Barometric Fluctuations on Well Water-Level Measurements and Aquifer Test Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, as part of the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project, examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within underlying aquifer systems. Well water-level elevation measurements from selected wells within these aquifer systems commonly form the basis for delineating groundwater-flow patterns (i.e., flow direction and hydraulic gradient). In addition, the analysis of water-level responses obtained in wells during hydrologic tests provides estimates of hydraulic properties that are important for evaluating groundwater-flow velocity and transport characteristics. Barometric pressure fluctuations, however, can have a discernible impact on well water-level measurements. These barometric effects may lead to erroneous indications of hydraulic head within the aquifer. Total hydraulic head (i.e., sum of the water-table elevation and the atmospheric pressure at the water-table surface) within the aquifer, not well water-level elevation, is the hydrologic parameter for determining groundwater-flow direction and hydraulic gradient conditions. Temporal variations in barometric pressure may also adversely affect well water-level responses obtained during hydrologic tests. If significant, adjustments or removal of these barometric effects from the test-response record may be required for quantitative hydraulic property determination. This report examines the effects of barometric fluctuations on well water-level measurements and evaluates adjustment and removal methods for determining areal aquifer head conditions and aquifer test analysis. Two examples of Hanford Site unconfined aquifer tests are examined that demonstrate barometric response analysis and illustrate the predictive/removal capabilities of various methods for well water-level and aquifer total head values. Good predictive/removal characteristics were demonstrated with best corrective results provided by multiple-regression deconvolution methods.

FA Spane, Jr.

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

228

SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program. Semiannual technical progress report for period ending March 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Semiannual Technical Progress Report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the Prime Contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories during the first half of the Government Fiscal Year (GFY) 1993. SPI`s subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The Point Design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Time scales of DNAPL migration in sandy aquifers examined via numerical simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time required for dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) to cease migrating following release to the subsurface is a valuable component of a site conceptual model. This study uses numerical simulation to investigate the migration of six different DNAPLs in sandy aquifers. The most influential parameters governing migration cessation time are the density and viscosity of the DNAPL and the mean hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer. Releases of between 1 and 40 drums of chlorinated solvent DNAPLs, characterized by relatively high density and low viscosity, require on the order of months to a few years to cease migrating in a heterogeneous medium sand aquifer having an average hydraulic conductivity of 7.4 x 10{sup -3} cm/s. In contrast to this, the release of 20 drums of coal tar {rho}{sub D} = 1061 kg/m{sup 3}, {mu}{sub D} = 0.161 Pa(.)s) requires more than 100 years to cease migrating in the same aquifer. Altering the mean hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer results in a proportional change in cessation times. Parameters that exhibit relatively little influence on migration time scales are the DNAPL-water interfacial tension, release volume, source capillary pressure, mean aquifer porosity, and ambient ground water hydraulic gradient. This study also demonstrates that low-density DNAPLs (e.g., coal tar) give rise to greater amounts of lateral spreading and greater amounts of pooling on capillary barriers than high-density DNAPLs such as trichloroethylene or tetrachloroethylene.

Gerhard, J.I.; Pang, T.; Kueper, B.H. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Inst. of Infrastructure & Environmental

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

TRUEX hot demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration A DOE Assessment DOENETL-20051217 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy...

232

Interactions and Implications of a Collector Well with a River in an Unconfined Aquifer with Regional Background Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ranney radial collector wells consist of an array of horizontal lateral wells arranged radially around and connected to the base of a vertical well. They offer numerous advantages over traditional vertical wells with application in both the petroleum industry and hydrologic sciences. This study improved the understanding of the interaction of collector wells and the aquifers/reservoirs they tap by numerically modeling flux exchanges between a collector well and a river in an unconfined aquifer with regional background flow. Modeling demonstrated that flux along each horizontal lateral increased with distance from the vertical well stem following a third order polynomial function. Ultimately these models demonstrated that in the collector well/aquifer/river system, the pumping rate of the collector well was the dominant factor in controlling flux between the river and aquifer under various conditions. This study can be used to project the maximum allowable pumping rate without causing an initially gaining river to become a losing river.

Dugat, William D., IV

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Assessment of Potential Benzene Contamination of the Ogallala Aquifer at the Pantex Plant, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Potential Benzene Contamination of the Ogallala Aquifer at the Pantex Plant, Texas National Laboratory Brian Looney, Savannah River Site Background and Objectives: In 1999 the Pantex Plant by these sampling results, Pantex Plant personnel initiated an internal investigative program to determine

Hazen, Terry

234

Integrated Agricultural Technologies Demonstrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major challenges currently face California's agricultural community. Increasingly stringent environmental and regulatory controls mandate changes in the use and disposal of agricultural chemicals, require the more aggressive management of farm wastes, and impose new responsibilities for water use. This program demonstrated a number of energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies designed to address these issues.

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

235

Building Mashups by Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The latest generation of WWW tools and services enables Web users to generate applications that combine content from multiple sources. This type of Web application is referred to as a mashup. Many of the tools for constructing mashups rely on a widget ... Keywords: Mashups, information integration, programming by demonstration

Rattapoom Tuchinda; Craig A. Knoblock; Pedro Szekely

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HAUSZ, W. , 1977. "Seasonal Storage in District Heating,"District Heating, July-August-September, 1977, pp. 5-11.aquifer storage for district heating and cooling. C. W.

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersA. 1957. Steady State Free Thermal Convection of Liquid in a1958. An Experiment on Free Thermal Convection of Water in

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jamaica Bay water nor cooling tower "agothy Fm, Elevation ofJFK. Investment Cost of Cooling Tower Case. Table 3. Annualthe JFK Aquifer System. I. Cooling Tower Case Winter Cooling

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, LawrenceF.P. "Thermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer- Second

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Impact of background flow on dissolution trapping of carbon dioxide injected into saline aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While there has been a large interest in studying the role of dissolution-driven free convection in the context of geological sequestration, the contribution of forced convection has been largely ignored. This manuscript considers CO$_2$ sequestration in saline aquifers with natural background flow and uses theoretical arguments to compute the critical background velocity needed to establish the forced convective regime. The theoretical arguments are supported by two dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations which demonstrate the importance of forced convection in enhancing dissolution in aquifers characterised by low Rayleigh numbers.

Rapaka, Saikiran

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

242

ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~rmal1980), 'I'hermal energy storage? in a confined aquifer·--al modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~1980), Aquifer Thermal Energy Sto:t'age--·a survey, Invit.edal modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Benefits from flywheel energy storage for area regulation in California - demonstration results : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a high-level analysis of the benefit and cost for flywheel energy storage used to provide area regulation for the electricity supply and transmission system in California. Area regulation is an 'ancillary service' needed for a reliable and stable regional electricity grid. The analysis was based on results from a demonstration, in California, of flywheel energy storage developed by Beacon Power Corporation (the system's manufacturer). Demonstrated was flywheel storage systems ability to provide 'rapid-response' regulation. Flywheel storage output can be varied much more rapidly than the output from conventional regulation sources, making flywheels more attractive than conventional regulation resources. The performance of the flywheel storage system demonstrated was generally consistent with requirements for a possible new class of regulation resources - 'rapid-response' energy-storage-based regulation - in California. In short, it was demonstrated that Beacon Power Corporation's flywheel system follows a rapidly changing control signal (the ACE, which changes every four seconds). Based on the results and on expected plant cost and performance, the Beacon Power flywheel storage system has a good chance of being a financially viable regulation resource. Results indicate a benefit/cost ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 using what may be somewhat conservative assumptions. A benefit/cost ratio of one indicates that, based on the financial assumptions used, the investment's financial returns just meet the investors target.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Benefits from flywheel energy storage for area regulation in California - demonstration results : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a high-level analysis of the benefit and cost for flywheel energy storage used to provide area regulation for the electricity supply and transmission system in California. Area regulation is an 'ancillary service' needed for a reliable and stable regional electricity grid. The analysis was based on results from a demonstration, in California, of flywheel energy storage developed by Beacon Power Corporation (the system's manufacturer). Demonstrated was flywheel storage systems ability to provide 'rapid-response' regulation. Flywheel storage output can be varied much more rapidly than the output from conventional regulation sources, making flywheels more attractive than conventional regulation resources. The performance of the flywheel storage system demonstrated was generally consistent with requirements for a possible new class of regulation resources - 'rapid-response' energy-storage-based regulation - in California. In short, it was demonstrated that Beacon Power Corporation's flywheel system follows a rapidly changing control signal (the ACE, which changes every four seconds). Based on the results and on expected plant cost and performance, the Beacon Power flywheel storage system has a good chance of being a financially viable regulation resource. Results indicate a benefit/cost ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 using what may be somewhat conservative assumptions. A benefit/cost ratio of one indicates that, based on the financial assumptions used, the investment's financial returns just meet the investors target.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. (1990). Natural Gas Engineering: Production and Storage.experience with natural gas ?a, storage in aquifers in the

Garcia, Julio Enrique

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation Emergency Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation Emergency Management Program Independent Oversight Review of the Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance...

249

Summary and evaluation of hydraulic property data available for the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system. For the past 40 years, hydrologic testing of the upper basalt confined aquifer has been conducted by a number of Hanford Site programs. Hydraulic property estimates are important for evaluating aquifer flow characteristics (i.e., ground-water flow patterns, flow velocity, transport travel time). Presented are the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydraulic properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). Available hydrologic test data were reevaluated using recently developed diagnostic test analysis methods. A comparison of calculated transmissivity estimates indicates that, for most test results, a general correspondence within a factor of two between reanalysis and previously reported test values was obtained. For a majority of the tests, previously reported values are greater than reanalysis estimates. This overestimation is attributed to a number of factors, including, in many cases, a misapplication of nonleaky confined aquifer analysis methods in previous analysis reports to tests that exhibit leaky confined aquifer response behavior. Results of the test analyses indicate a similar range for transmissivity values for the various hydro-geologic units making up the upper basalt confined aquifer. Approximately 90% of the calculated transmissivity values for upper basalt confined aquifer hydrogeologic units occur within the range of 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 2} m{sup 2}/d, with 65% of the calculated estimate values occurring between 10{sup 1} to 10{sup 2} m{sup 2}d. These summary findings are consistent with the general range of values previously reported for basalt interflow contact zones and sedimentary interbeds within the Saddle Mountains Basalt.

Spane, F.A. Jr.; Vermeul, V.R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Estimation of hydraulic properties and development of a layered conceptual model for the Snake River plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho INEL Oversight Program, in association with the University of Idaho, Idaho Geological Survey, Boise State University, and Idaho State University, developed a research program to determine the hydraulic properties of the Snake River Plain aquifer and characterize the vertical distribution of contaminants. A straddle-packer was deployed in four observation wells near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Pressure transducers mounted in the straddle-packer assembly were used to monitor the response of the Snake River Plain aquifer to pumping at the ICPP production wells, located 2600 to 4200 feet from the observation wells. The time-drawdown data from these tests were used to evaluate various conceptual models of the aquifer. Aquifer properties were estimated by matching time-drawdown data to type curves for partially penetrating wells in an unconfined aquifer. This approach assumes a homogeneous and isotropic aquifer. The hydraulic properties of the aquifer obtained from the type curve analyses were: (1) Storativity = 3 x 10{sup -5}, (2) Specific Yield = 0.01, (3) Transmissivity = 740 ft{sup 2}/min, (4) Anisotropy (Kv:Kh)= 1:360.

Frederick, D.B.; Johnson, G.S.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Programming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programming for Exascale Computers William Gropp and Marc Snir April 15, 2013 Abstract Exascale systems will present programmers with many challenges. We review the...

252

An Update of the U.S. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Power Generation Future Bright Advanced Power Generation Future Bright With Coal Gasification-Combined Cycle Clean Coal Briefs Six Major Projects in DOE's CCT Program American Electric Power's (AEP) Tidd plant continues to break new ground in its performance as the Nation's first operating pressurized lluidized hcd combustion (PFBC) power plant. In rcccnt operations at Ohio Power Company's Brilliant, Ohio plant site, the unit reached a gross electric power output of 71 megawatts--its full power capacity. Two other milestones--a maximum bed height of 140 inches and a nrar- maximum bed temperature of I575 degrees F-were also attained during the tests. Power production in the U.S. is expected to increase rapidly during the next 20 years. Totalconsumption ofelectricity isexpectedtoriscfrom 2.7 trillionkilnvett-

253

An Update of the U.S. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCR Holds Promise for Effective NO, Control SCR Holds Promise for Effective NO, Control CCT Projects Address Higher Costs, Limited U.S. Experience Clean Coal Briefs This quarter saw several major projects in the Clelm Coal Technology Program complete construction activi- ties and move into initial opcretions, bringing to 17 the total number of operatingf~cilitiesin theprogram Data generated from these projects will help utilities form their stratcgics for corn- pliance with the IYYO Clean Air Act Amendmxlts. Pure Air began running its first advanced flue gas desulfurization unit on June 2. The scrubber is running well, capturing more than YO percent of the SO, emissions from two units at Northern Indiana Public Service k's Bailly Station Construction of the 528 MW scrubber was completed

254

Aquifer thermal energy storage: a survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The disparity between energy production and demand in many power plants has led to increased research on the long-term, large-scale storage of thermal energy in aquifers. Field experiments have been conducted in Switzerland, France, the United States, Japan, and the People's Republic of China to study various technical aspects of aquifer storage of both hot and cold water. Furthermore, feasibility studies now in progress include technical, economic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable storage sites, and evaluation and design of pilot plants. Several theoretical and modeling studies are also under way. Among the topics being studied using numerical models are fluid and heat flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the efficiency of different injection/withdrawal schemes, buoyancy tilting, numerical dispersion, the use of compensation wells to counter regional flow, steam injection, and storage in narrow glacial deposits of high permeability. Experiments to date illustrate the need for further research and development to ensure successful implementation of an aquifer storage system. Some of the areas identified for further research include shape and location of the hydrodynamic and thermal fronts, choice of appropriate aquifers, thermal dispersion, possibility of land subsidence or uplift, thermal pollution, water chemistry, wellbore plugging and heat exchange efficiency, and control of corrosion.

Tsang, C.F.; Hopkins, D.; Hellstroem, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

Terry W. Battiest

2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

256

Technology summary of the in situ bioremediation demonstration (methane biostimulation) via horizontal wells at the Savannah River Site Integrated Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, has been sponsoring full-scale environmental restoration technology demonstrations for the past 4 years. The Savannah River Site Integrated Demonstration focuses on ``Clean-up of Soils ad Groundwater Contaminated with Chlorinated VOCs.`` Several laboratories including our own had demonstrated the ability of methanotrophic bacteria to completely degrade or mineralize chlorinated solvents, and these bacteria were naturally found in soil and aquifer material. Thus the test consisted of injection of methane mixed with air into the contaminated aquifer via a horizontal well and extraction from the vadose zone via a parallel horizontal well.

Hazen, T.C.; Looney, B.B.; Fliermans, C.B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Lombard, K.H. [Bechtel Savannah River, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States); Enzien, M.V. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dougherty, J.M. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Irving, TX (United States); Wear, J. [Catawba State Coll., Salisbury, NC (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Independent Oversight Review, West Valley Demonstration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review, West Valley Demonstration Project Independent Oversight Review, West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation - September 2000 Independent Oversight Review, West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation - September 2000 September 2000 Transportation Emergency Management Review of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and National Transportation Program (NTP)/Transportation Compliance Evaluation/Assistance Program (TCEAP) The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Emergency Management Oversight, within the Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance, conducted a transportation emergency management review of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and National Transportation Program (NTP)/Transportation Compliance Evaluation/Assistance Program (TCEAP) in September 2000.

258

Department of Energy's solar update. Four regional conferences highlighting the objectives, plans, and experience of the National Commercial Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program and the National Solar Data Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the entire proceedings of the solar update. All papers presented by DOE officials, DOE contractors, and demonstration site representatives are presented, as well as summaries of all workshops, comments from questionnaires, and a listing of all participants. Twenty-eight papers are included. Two were abstracted previously for EDB. Separate abstracts were prepared for twenty-six. (MHR)

None

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Unconfined Aquifer Flow Theory - from Dupuit to present  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytic and semi-analytic solution are often used by researchers and practicioners to estimate aquifer parameters from unconfined aquifer pumping tests. The non-linearities associated with unconfined (i.e., water table) aquifer tests makes their analysis more complex than confined tests. Although analytical solutions for unconfined flow began in the mid-1800s with Dupuit, Thiem was possibly the first to use them to estimate aquifer parameters from pumping tests in the early 1900s. In the 1950s, Boulton developed the first transient well test solution specialized to unconfined flow. By the 1970s Neuman had developed solutions considering both primary transient storage mechanisms (confined storage and delayed yield) without non-physical fitting parameters. In the last decade, research into developing unconfined aquifer test solutions has mostly focused on explicitly coupling the aquifer with the linearized vadose zone. Despite the many advanced solution methods available, there still exists a need for realism ...

Mishra, Phoolendra K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Santa Clara Demonstration Status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is in the fourth year of a DOE Cooperative Agreement Program (private-sector cost-shared) aimed at the demonstration of ERC's direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology at full scale. FCE is a wholly owned subsidiary of Energy Research Corporation (ERC), which has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, cogeneration, industrial, and defense applications. This project is an integral part of the ERC effort to commercialize the technology to serve these applications. Potential users of the commercial DFC power plant under development at ERC will require that the technology be demonstrated at or near the full scale of the commercial products. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is to provide the first such demonstration of the technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere [1]. Briefly, an aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing contact with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: The Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. The commercial product specifications have been developed by working closely with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG). FCCG members include municipal utilities, rural electric co-ops, and investor owned utilities who have expressed interest in being the initial purchasers of the first commercial DFC power plants. The utility participants in the SCDP have been drawn from the membership of FCCG. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant, and FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer for the design and construction of the plant, and also provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

Leo, Anthony J.; Skok, Andrew J.; O'Shea, Thomas P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Santa Clara Demonstration Status  

SciTech Connect

Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is in the fourth year of a DOE Cooperative Agreement Program (private-sector cost-shared) aimed at the demonstration of ERC's direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology at full scale. FCE is a wholly owned subsidiary of Energy Research Corporation (ERC), which has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, cogeneration, industrial, and defense applications. This project is an integral part of the ERC effort to commercialize the technology to serve these applications. Potential users of the commercial DFC power plant under development at ERC will require that the technology be demonstrated at or near the full scale of the commercial products. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is to provide the first such demonstration of the technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere [1]. Briefly, an aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing contact with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: The Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. The commercial product specifications have been developed by working closely with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG). FCCG members include municipal utilities, rural electric co-ops, and investor owned utilities who have expressed interest in being the initial purchasers of the first commercial DFC power plants. The utility participants in the SCDP have been drawn from the membership of FCCG. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant, and FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer for the design and construction of the plant, and also provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

Leo, Anthony J.; Skok, Andrew J.; O' Shea, Thomas P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Aquifer Management for CO2 Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage of carbon dioxide is being actively considered for the reduction of green house gases. To make an impact on the environment CO2 should be put away on the scale of gigatonnes per annum. The storage capacity of deep saline aquifers is estimated to be as high as 1,000 gigatonnes of CO2.(IPCC). Published reports on the potential for sequestration fail to address the necessity of storing CO2 in a closed system. This work addresses issues related to sequestration of CO2 in closed aquifers and the risk associated with aquifer pressurization. Through analytical modeling we show that the required volume for storage and the number of injection wells required are more than what has been envisioned, which renders geologic sequestration of CO2 a profoundly nonfeasible option for the management of CO2 emissions unless brine is produced to create voidage and pressure relief. The results from our analytical model match well with a numerical reservoir simulator including the multiphase physics of CO2 sequestration. Rising aquifer pressurization threatens the seal integrity and poses a risk of CO2 leakage. Hence, monitoring the long-term integrity of CO2 storage reservoirs will be a critical aspect for making geologic sequestration a safe, effective and acceptable method for greenhouse gas control. Verification of long-term CO2 residence in receptor formations and quantification of possible CO2 leaks are required for developing a risk assessment framework. Important aspects of pressure falloff tests for CO2 storage reservoirs are discussed with a focus on reservoir pressure monitoring and leakage detection. The importance of taking regular pressure falloffs for a commercial sequestration project and how this can help in diagnosing an aquifer leak will be discussed. The primary driver for leakage in bulk phase injection is the buoyancy of CO2 under typical deep reservoir conditions. Free-phase CO2 below the top seal is prone to leak if a breach happens in the top seal. Consequently, another objective of this research is to propose a way to engineer the CO2 injection system in order to accelerate CO2 dissolution and trapping. The engineered system eliminates the buoyancy-driven accumulation of free gas and avoids aquifer pressurization by producing brine out of the system. Simulations for 30 years of CO2 injection followed by 1,000 years of natural gradient show how CO2 can be securely and safely stored in a relatively smaller closed aquifer volume and with a greater storage potential. The engineered system increases CO2 dissolution and capillary trapping over what occurs under the bulk phase injection of CO2. This thesis revolves around identification, monitoring and mitigation of the risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration.

Anchliya, Abhishek

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

TRUEX hot demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy, Energy Storage Division through thegeneration and energy storage, Presented at Frontiers ofIn Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

Tsang, Chin Fu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Simulation analysis of...

266

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Tour: Navigation Options * Tour: Examples * Next Steps * Questions & Feedback 2 eere.energy.gov Overview 3 eere.energy.gov Purpose: Support Residential Energy Efficiency...

267

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 1: Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The significant accomplishments of this program included (1) identification of the geopressured-geothermal onshore fairways in Louisiana and Texas, (2) determination that high brine flow rates of 20,000--40,000 barrels a day can be obtained for long periods of time, (3) brine, after gas extraction can be successfully reinjected into shallow aquifers without affecting the surface waters or the fresh water aquifers, (4) no observable subsidence or microseismic activity was induced due to the subsurface injection of brine, and no detrimental environmental effects attributable to geopressured-geothermal well testing were noticed, (5) sanding can be controlled by reducing flow rates, (6) corrosion controlled with inhibitors, (7) scaling controlled by phosphonate scale inhibitors, (8) demonstrated that production of gas from saturated brine under pressure was viable and (9) a hybrid power system can be successfully used for conversion of the thermal and chemical energy contained in the geopressured-geothermal resource for generation of electricity.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation's energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University's use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

PFBC Utility Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Extremophiles 2004 Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles SEPTEMBER 19 -23, 2004 CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles © 2004, American Society for Microbiology 1752 N Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036-2904 Phone: 202-737-3600 World Wide Web: www.asm.org All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 1-55581 324-0 TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information Scientific Program Abstracts for Oral Sessions Abstracts for Poster Sessions Index 4 10 18 42 144 4 ASM Conferences EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Frank Robb, Chair University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute Michael W. Adams University of Georgia Koki Horikoshi Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology Robert M. Kelly North Carolina State University Jennifer Littlechild

271

SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence BerkeleyP, Andersen, "'rhermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer~University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment." Lawrence

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspects of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrencethe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Geopressured-geothermal aquifers. Final contract report  

SciTech Connect

Task 1 is to provide petrophysical and reservoir analysis of wells drilled into geopressured-geothermal aquifers containing dissolved methane. The list of Design Wells and Wells of Opportunity analyzed: Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 (WOO), Pleasant Bayou No. 2 (Design), Amoco Fee No. 1 (Design), G.M. Koelemay No. 1 (WOO), Gladys McCall No. 1 (Design), P.R. Girouard No. 1 (WOO), and Crown Zellerbach No. 2 (WOO). Petrophysical and reservoir analysis of the above wells were performed based on availability of data. The analysis performed on each well, the assumptions made during simulation, and conclusions reached.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole is disclosed. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

Burklund, P.W.

1984-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is known. Moreover, since specific storage S/sub s/ quantifies a drained behavior of the porous medium, one cannot

276

Feasibility studies of aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determining the feasibility of using aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for a particular heating or cooling application is an interdisciplinary effort, requiring (at a minimum) expertise in engineering and hydrology. The feasibility study should proceed in two distinct stages. The first stage, which is limited in scope and detail, is intended to show if an ATES system is technically and economically suited to the application. Focus of this preliminary investigation is on revealing the existence of factors that might weigh heavily against the use of ATES methods, and, in the absence of such factors, on choosing a suitable scale for the ATES plant and well field. The results of the preliminary investigation are used to determine if more detailed investigation--including field studies--are justified, and to facilitate comparing the advantages of ATES to those of other means of providing heating or cooling. The second stage of the feasibility study focuses on detailed aquifer characterization, refinement of engineering design and cost estimates, and economic and environmental risk analysis. The results of this investigation, if favorable, will be used to justify the expense of constructing the ATES system.

Hall, S H

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Natural gas content of geopressured aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is hypothesized that free, but immobile, natural gas is trapped in pores in geopressured aquifers and that this gas becomes mobile as aquifer pressure is reduced by water production. Computer simulation reveals this hypothesis is a plausible explanation for the high gas/water ratio observed from the No. 1 sand in the Edna Delcambre No. 1 well. In this Delcambre well test, the gas/water ratio increased from the solution gas value of less than 20 SCF/bbl to more than 50 SCF/bbl during production of 32,000 barrels of water in 10 days. Bottom hole pressure was reduced from 10,846 to 9,905 psia. The computer simulation reveals that such increased gas production requires relative permeability to gas(k{sub rg}) increase from less than 10{sup -4} to about 10{sup -3} due to a decrease in fractional water saturation of pores (S{sub w}) of only about 0.001. Further, assuming drainage relative permeabilities are as calculated by the method of A.T. Corey{sup 1}, initial gas saturation of pores must be greater than 0.065. Means for achieving these initial conditions during geological time will be qualitatively discussed, and the effect of trapped gas upon long-term production will be described.

Randolph, Philip L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/25/2011 eere.energy.gov | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/25/2011 eere.energy.gov Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Ned Stetson Storage Tech Team Lead Fuel Cell Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy 12/13/2011 Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Marni Lenahan December 13, 2011 Database Background * The Hydrogen Storage Materials Database was built to retain information from DOE Hydrogen Storage funded research and make these data more accessible. * Data includes properties of hydrogen storage materials investigated such as synthesis conditions, sorption and release conditions, capacities, thermodynamics, etc. http://hydrogenmaterialssearch.govtools.us Current Status * Data continues to be collected from DOE funded research.

279

Status of IFR fuel cycle demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The next major step in Argonne`s Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program is demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle, in conjunction with continued operation of EBR-II. The Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) is being readied for this mission. This paper will address the status of facility systems and process equipment, the initial startup experience, and plans for the demonstration program.

Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; McFarlane, H.F.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

DOE/EPA site demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Health and Safety Plan applies to the technology demonstration of the Retech, Inc., centrifugal furnace under the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Evaluation (SITE) Program. Retech will conduct a series of furnace tests at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana. MSE, operating contractor of the CDIF, will evaluate the furnace technology and determine the feasibility of further testing based on these demonstrations. This plan applies to the field demonstration at DOE's CDIF. This plan is designed to cover most work assignment activities under the Retech furnace evaluation to ensure safe and healthful conditions. Specific guidance is necessary for workers at the CDIF for the entire demonstration, addressing each of the known or expected safety hazards and contaminants. The layout of the exclusion zone and decontamination areas at the CDIF has been incorporated into this plan. This plan has been prepared in accordance with applicable federal regulations, but should the regulations be changed or if other situations require, the plan will be modified by the SITE Program Health and Safety Manager. The following items are covered in the plan: organization and responsibilities for the demonstration; hazard evaluation of the technology, test waste, and test site; contamination control zones; standard operating procedures (SOP) for the demonstration; protective and emergency equipment; exposure monitoring during test operations; medical surveillance; applicable safety and health regulations; and, references. 6 refs., 2 figs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Aquitard control of stream-aquifer interaction and flow to a horizontal well in coastal aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is composed of three parts of major contributions: In Chapter II, we developed a new conceptual model and derived a new semi-analytical model for flow to a horizontal well beneath a water reservoir. Instead of treating the leakage from aquitard as a source term inside the aquifer which is called Hantush�s assumption (1964), we linked flows in aquitard and aquifer by the idea of continuity of flux and drawdown. The result in this chapter is compared with that of Zhan and Park in 2003 which Hantush�s assumption is adopted at various hydraulic and well configurations. It shows that Hantush�s assumption becomes inaccurate in regions where vertical velocity components are significant. In Chapter III, we deal with the interaction of an aquifer with two parallel surface water bodies such as two streams or canals. In this chapter, new closed-form analytical and semi-analytical solutions are acquired for the pumping induced dynamic interaction between two streams and ground water for two different cases. In the first case, the sediment layers separating the streams from the aquifer ground water do not exist. In the second case, the two low permeable layers are considered. The effect of aquitard and water right competition is addressed in this chapter. This model can be used for interpreting and deriving hydrologic parameters of aquitard and aquifer when pumping occurs between two channels. It can also be used to predict stream depletion which is essential for water management and ecology conservation. In Chapter IV, we investigated the three dimensional upconing due to a finite-length of horizontal well and its critical conditions. The results are compared with those of vertical wells. The critical condition which includes the critical rise and the critical time at a certain pumping rate depends on the well length, the initial interface location, the well location, and the pumping rate. Our results show that horizontal well might be a better tool for coastal groundwater resources development. In real field applications, installing long wells as shallow as possible is always desirable for sustaining long periods of pumping with significant rates.

Sun, Dongmin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Transportable Combustion Turbine Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New York State Electric and Gas Corporation (NYSEG) installed a 7.15-MW Solar® Taurus™ 70 (nominal 7 MW) gas combustion turbine (CT) at its State Street substation in Auburn, New York. As a demonstration project supported through EPRI's Tailored Collaboration (TC) program, it is intended to aid in better understanding the "complete picture" for siting this particular technology as a distributed resource (DR).

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

283

Expert Diagnostic Systems Demonstration (EPSS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following Electronic Performance Support System Maintenance Case Study is a collaborative research and development effort between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and REI Systems, Inc. (REI), in support of EPRI's Program 69: Maintenance Management and Technology (formerly Maintenance Optimization). This report documents the development of a demonstration Electronic Performance Support System (EPSS) software module for use within a coal-fired power pl...

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

284

Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This study covers about 1000 mi2 (2600 km2) of the southern Raft River drainage basin in south-central Idaho and northwest Utah. The main area of interest, approximately 200 mi2 (520 km2) of semiarid agricultural and rangeland in the southern Raft River Valley that includes the known Geothermal Resource Area near Bridge, Idaho, was modelled numerically to evaluate the hydrodynamics of the unconfined aquifer. Computed and estimated transmissivity values range from 1200 feet squared per day (110

285

Theoretical analysis of heat transfer in semi-infinite aquifer  

SciTech Connect

A simple model for temperature within an unconfined semi-infinite aquifer is proposed with ground water flowing perpendicular to heat flow. The authors results show that it is possible to correct the observed geothermal gradient in order to obtain the undisturbed gradient, to identify the portion of the aquifer where the perturbation produced by water motion is unimportant, and to recognize the depth and distance from the recharge zone where water temperature is higher and can be exploited for low enthalpy utilization.

Mongelli, F. (Univ. di Bari (Italy). Dipt. di Geologia e Geofisica)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home  

SciTech Connect

This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Thermophysical behavior of St. Peter sandstone: application to compressed air energy storage in an aquifer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-term stability of a sandstone reservoir is of primary importance to the success of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in aquifers. The purpose of this study was to: develop experimental techniques for the operation of the CAES Porous Media Flow Loop (PMFL), an apparatus designed to study the stability of porous media in subsurface geologic environments, conduct experiments in the PMFL designed to determine the effects of temperature, stress, and humidity on the stability of candidate CAES reservoir materials, provide support for the CAES field demonstration project in Pittsfield, Illinois, by characterizing the thermophysical stability of Pittsfield reservoir sandstone under simulated field conditions.

Erikson, R.L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Radiation Emergency Procedure Demonstrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Radiation Emergencies Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstrations Procedure Demonstrations Note: RealPlayer is needed for listening to the narration that accompany these demonstrations. Real Player Dressing To Prevent the Spread of Radioactive Contamination This demonstration shows how your team can dress to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Click to begin presentation on dressing to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Preparing The Area This demonstration shows basic steps you can take to gather equipment and prepare a room to receive a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material. Click to begin presentation on preparing a room to receive a radioactive contaminated patient. Removing Contaminated Clothing This demonstration shows the procedure for removing clothing from a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material.

289

NETL: Major Demonstrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstrations performed to date have made significant contributions related to environmental performance and efficiency, the greatest challenges may lie ahead from...

290

Commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. The purpose of the study was to develop and screen a list of potential entry market applications for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Several initial screening criteria were used to identify promising ATES applications. These include the existence of an energy availability/usage mismatch, the existence of many similar applications or commercial sites, the ability to utilize proven technology, the type of location, market characteristics, the size of and access to capital investment, and the number of decision makers involved. The in-depth analysis identified several additional screening criteria to consider in the selection of an entry market application. This analysis revealed that the best initial applications for ATES are those where reliability is acceptable, and relatively high temperatures are allowable. Although chill storage was the primary focus of this study, applications that are good candidates for heat ATES were also of special interest. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

Hattrup, M.P.; Weijo, R.O.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020{degree}F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

Virr, M.J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020[degree]F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

Virr, M.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal Technology Program Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2005/1217 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2005 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

294

CAES Demonstration Newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

295

CAES Demonstration Newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Solar energy demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

The solar heating demonstration system at the DOE cafeteria at Grand Junction, Colorado, is briefly described. The system will supply an estimated 40 percent of the energy required for domestic hot water and building heat. (WHK)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

successfully demonstrated the separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

successfully demonstrated the separation and capture of 90 percent successfully demonstrated the separation and capture of 90 percent of the c arbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a pulve rized coal plant. In t he ARRA-funded project, Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR) and its partners tested the Polaris(tm) membrane system, which uses a CO 2 -selective polymeric membrane material and module to capture CO 2 from a plant's flue gas. Since the Polaris(tm) membranes

298

Aquifer test at Comore Loma No. 4, Idaho Falls, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An aquifer test was conducted at Comore Loma Well {number_sign}4 to determine the aquifer hydraulic characteristics at this location on July 11 and 12, 1991. Water was withdrawn from Comore Loma Well {number_sign}4 at approximately 850 gallons per minute for 8 hours while monitoring the water level in the plumping well and an observation well 930 ft away. The pumped well showed over 12 ft of drawdown with no discernable drawdown in the observation well. The drawdown in the pumped well was nearly instantaneous, showing little additional drawdown after 1 minute. The transmissivity was calculated to be approximately 140,000 ft{sup 2}/day using the Jacob solution. This gives a hydraulic conductivity of 1300 ft/day for the 110 ft interval tested. The high transmissivity and geologic setting suggest the aquifer may in part produce water from the Snake River Plain aquifer. However, the warm water temperature (71{degrees}F) indicates the presence of a geothermal source typical of the foothills aquifer. The storage coefficient could not be calculated since no water level decline was detected in the observation well.

Hubbell, J.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project, A DOE Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program is a government and industry co-funded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes. One goal of the program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a variety of energy efficient, environmentally superior coal-based technologies. Demonstration projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising coal technologies that have proceeded beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This report is a post-project assessment of the DOE CCT Demonstration Program, the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project. A major objective of the CCT Program is to provide the technical data necessary for the private sector to proceed confidently with the commercial replication of the demonstrated technologies. An essential element of meeting this goal is the dissemination of results from the demonstration projects. This post-project assessment (PPA) report is an independent DOE appraisal of the successes that the completed project had in achieving its objectives and aiding in the commercialization of the demonstrated technology. The report also provides an assessment of the expected technical, environmental, and economic performance of the commercial version of the technology, as well as an analysis of the commercial market.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.F. , 1980, "Aquifer Thermal Energy - Parameter Study" (infrom the Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No.studies in aquifer thermal energy , Presented at the ~~~~~~~

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geochemical modeling of an aquifer storage and recovery project in Union County, Arkansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sparta aquifer in Union County, Arkansas has served as an important potable water supply to the public and industrial sectors in the area. However, increasing water demand and sustained heavy pumping from the aquifer ...

Zhu, Ni, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The Virginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The Virginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Areas related to low-temperature geothermal applications include the recognition of and exploration for deep fracture permeability in crystalline rocks. It is well known that the best currently available downhole techniques to identify the locations of fracture zones in crystalline rocks depend upon the measurement of some thermal parameter such as temperature or heat flow. The temperature-depth profiles and their derivatives provide a direct indication of those fracture zones that

303

Why sequence Sulfur cycling in the Frasassi aquifer?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sulfur cycling in the Frasassi aquifer? sulfur cycling in the Frasassi aquifer? The terrestrial subsurface remains one of the least explored microbial habitats on earth, and is critical for understanding pollutant migration and attenuation, subsurface processes such as limestone dissolution (affecting porosity), and the search for life elsewhere in the solar system and beyond. The deep and sulfidic Frasassi aquifer (of Ancona, Italy) has emerged as a model system for studying sulfur cycling in the terrestrial subsurface, and this sequencing project has relevance for developing applications for wastewater treatment and capabilities relevant for radionuclide, metal and organic pollutant remediation that can be applied at environments at DOE subsurface sites. Principal Investigators: Jennifer Macalady, Penn State University

304

Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Volcano (Rome, Italy)- Geochemical Evidence Of Magmatic Degassing? Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Volcano (Rome, Italy)- Geochemical Evidence Of Magmatic Degassing? Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent studies suggested that Alban Hills (Rome) is a quiescent and not an extinct volcano, as it produced Holocene eruptions and several lahars until Roman times by water overflow from the Albano crater lake. Alban Hills are presently characterized by high PCO2 in groundwaters and by several cold gas emissions usually in sites where excavations removed the

305

Thermal Energy Storage Evaluation Program: 1986 annual report. [Economic planning, technical assessment, field tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermal Energy Storage Evaluation Program activities were initiated to provide economic planning, technical assessment and field testing support for the thermal energy storage program, as well as management of the overall program for the DOE. Economic planning included two assessment studies. In technical assessment, issues that might affect an assessment were outlined for the development of a standard methodology to conduct assessments; work is underway to establish ''market-based'' cost and performance goals for cool storage technologies in residential applications; planning has begun for investigation of benefits in incorporating aquifer thermal energy storage with heat pumps; and plans are being formulated to evaluate the potential benefit of using aquifer thermal energy storage to augment power plant cooling. Field testing to develop technologies for the recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat began with the instrumentation design for the ceramic/salt matrix in an operating brick-making plant. Work in advanced studies by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory continued on thermochemical conversion and storage using small particles as the heat exchanger catalyst. In SO/sub 3/ dissociation experiments at 645/sup 0/C using light and dark conditions, results clearly demonstrated the benefit in directly radiantly heating the catalyst to accomplish the endothermic step of a thermochemical storage reaction.

Drost, M.K.; Bates, J.M.; Brown, D.R.; Weijo, R.O.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Marketing Plan for Demonstration and Validation Assets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), is to be sustained by various programs, including technology demonstration and evaluation (DEMVAL). This project assists companies in developing technologies under the National Security Technology Incubator program (NSTI) through demonstration and validation of technologies applicable to national security created by incubators and other sources. The NSPP also will support the creation of an integrated demonstration and validation environment. This report documents the DEMVAL marketing and visibility plan, which will focus on collecting information about, and expanding the visibility of, DEMVAL assets serving businesses with national security technology applications in southern New Mexico.

None

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration. [Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0{sub 2} removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0{sub 2} emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

308

The Research Program | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Research Program The Research Program What is the chemical and physical form of uranium in reduced aquifers? Uranium behavior in the Rifle, CO, aquifer. In order to directly interrogate the chemical and physical form of reduced uranium (U(IV)) in bioremediated sediments within the contaminated aquifer at the Rifle site, a novel technique was developed based on reactors installed in wells (center right). U(IV) was found to be bound to biomass (structural model shown in upper left-hand) within thin (microns) sulfide-rich coatings on mineral grains (bottom left). Uranium in its oxidized (U(VI)) form, is one of the most common, abundant, and problematic subsurface contaminants at legacy nuclear sites. In contrast, the tetravalent form of uranium (U(IV) ) is relatively insoluble

309

Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

Hendrickson, P.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Development of a linear predictive model for carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline carbonate aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO"2 injection into deep saline aquifers is a preferred method for mitigating CO"2 emission. Although deep saline aquifers are found in many sedimentary basins and provide very large storage capacities, several numerical simulations are needed before ... Keywords: CO2 sequestration, Deep saline carbonate aquifer, Latin hypercube space filling design, Predictive model

Sultan Anbar; Serhat Akin

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Modelling well leakage in multilayer aquifer systems using the extended finite element method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extended finite element method (XFEM) is applied to the problem of predicting the steady-state leakage from layered sedimentary aquifer systems perforated by abandoned wells. Multi-aquifer systems are modelled using a quasi-three-dimensional model ... Keywords: Extended finite element method, GFEM, Generalised finite element method, Leakage, Multi-aquifer systems, XFEM

Robert Gracie; James R. Craig

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Simulation of coastal groundwater remediation: the case of Nardò fractured aquifer in Southern Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new theoretical approach for evaluating the sharp interface position in a fractured aquifer was applied to the Nardo aquifer (Southern Italy). The results, based on Dupuit and Ghyben-Herzberg approximations, clearly show both the extent of seawater ... Keywords: Coastal springs, Fractured aquifers, Mathematical models, Seawater intrusion

Costantino Masciopinto

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Coal Energy Conversion with Aquifer-Based Carbon Sequestration: An Approach to Electric Power Generation with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal Energy Conversion with Aquifer-Based Carbon Sequestration: An Approach to Electric Power an impermeable seal to prevent it from escaping the aquifer. The proposed alternative technology processes coal carbon and non-mineral coal combustion products in the process. This stream is denser than the aquifer

Nur, Amos

314

Analysis of the semianalytical method for matching aquifer influence functions using an analytical model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a heterogeneous aquifer of unknown size and shape, ics. Aquifer Influence Functions (AIF) can be used to model the aquifer pressure behavior from field production and pressure data. Two methods have been used in the past to accomplish this, namely Linear Programming (LP) and the Semianalytical technique. The latter is based on the analytical solution form of a heterogeneous aquifer of any size and shape. The approximating AIF is a continuous function, which is a truncated series of the exact analytical solution. This Semianalytical function is fitted to field data by the use of nonlinear least squares fitting. It has the advantages over the LP method that it is much faster, uses less computer space, and does not require evenly spaced production periods. For the cases in which the OGIP is unknown, a technique was proposed in the past in which the term Relative Error is defined. Several values of OGIP are assumed, and the one that yields the minimum Relative Error is the actual or optimum value of OGIP. Because of the nonlinear nature of the optimization procedure, when the Semianalytical technique is used along with the Relative Error technique, it tends to be caught in the so-called local minima, which lead to the determination of spurious values of the AIF and the optimum OGIP. Both the LP and the Semianalytical techniques have been validated using field data. However, when the latter is used, weird variations of the Relative Error function, and unrealistically low values of the optimum OGIP are observed. A simple analytical model is used in this project. It allows the generation of synthetic data. The objective is to use those as input data to the Semianalytical and Relative Error techniques and determine their effectiveness to determine the AIF and the optimum OGIP which are known in advance. A modification is proposed in the current research to prevent the nonlinear regression from getting caught in the local minima. After this goal is attained, typical features in the normalized Relative Error and allows the determination of the drive mechanism and the OGIP even in gas reservoirs whose histories are so brief that the use of the p/Z technique becomes prohibitive.

Vega, Leonardo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation`s energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University`s use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Automatic lighting controls demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least 50% using various combinations of control strategies. By reducing light levels over circulation areas (tuning) and reducing after hours light levels to accommodate the less stringent lighting demands of the cleaning crew (scheduling), lighting energy consumption on weekdays was reduced an average of 54% relative to the initial condition. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

AVNG system demonstration  

SciTech Connect

An attribute measurement system (AMS) measures a number of unclassified attributes of potentially classified material. By only displaying these unclassified results as red or green lights, the AMS protects potentially classified information while still generating confidence in the measurement result. The AVNG implementation that we describe is an AMS built by RFNC - VNIIEF in Sarov, Russia. To provide additional confidence, the AVNG was designed with two modes of operation. In the secure mode, potentially classified measurements can be made with only the simple red light/green light display. In the open mode, known unclassified material can be measured with complete display of the information collected from the radiation detectors. The AVNG demonstration, which occurred in Sarov, Russia in June 2009 for a joint US/Russian audience, included exercising both modes of AVNG operation using a number of multi-kg plutonium sources. In addition to describing the demonstration, we will show photographs and/or video taken of AVNG operation.

Thron, Jonathan Louis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mac Arthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kondratov, Sergey [VNIIEF; Livke, Alexander [VNIIEF; Razinkov, Sergey [VNIIEF

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

Not Available

1988-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full-scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO and NO emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

Not Available

1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Nucla CFB Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Security Technology Demonstration and Validation Sustainability Plan  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the process of creating continuity and sustainability for demonstration and validation (DEMVAL) assets at the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI). The DEMVAL asset program is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The mission of the NSTI program is to identify, incubate, and accelerate technologies with national security applications at various stages of development by providing hands-on mentoring and business assistance to small businesses and emerging or growing companies. Part of this support is envisioned to be research and development of companies’ technology initiatives, at the same time providing robust test and evaluation of actual development activities. This program assists companies in developing technologies under the NSTI program through demonstration and validation of technologies applicable to national security created by incubators and other sources. The NSPP also will support the creation of an integrated demonstration and validation environment. Development of the commercial potential for national security technologies is a significant NSTI focus. As part of the process of commercialization, a comprehensive DEMVAL program has been recognized as an essential part of the overall incubator mission. A number of resources have been integrated into the NSTI program to support such a DEMVAL program.

None

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Water geochemistry and hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer at Roosevelt Hot Springs, southern Utah: A hot dry rock prospect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On the western edge of the geothermal field, three deep holes have been drilled that are very hot but mostly dry. Two of them (Phillips 9-1 and Acord 1-26 wells) have been studied by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resources evaluation program. A review of data and recommendations have been formulated to evaluate the HDR geothermal potential at Roosevelt. The present report is directed toward the study of the shallow aquifer of the Milford Valley to determine if the local groundwater would be suitable for use as make-up water in an HDR system. This investigation is the result of a cooperative agreement between Los Alamos and Phillips Petroleum Co., formerly the main operator of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Unit. The presence of these hot dry wells and the similar setting of the Roosevelt area to the prototype HDR site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, make Roosevelt a very good candidate site for creation of another HDR geothermal system. This investigation has two main objectives: to assess the water geochemistry of the valley aquifer, to determine possible problems in future make-up water use, such as scaling or corrosion in the wells and surface piping, and to assess the hydrogeology of the shallow groundwaters above the HDR zone, to characterize the physical properties of the aquifer. These two objectives are linked by the fact that the valley aquifer is naturally contaminated by geothermal fluids leaking out of the hydrothermal reservoir. In an arid region where good-quality fresh water is needed for public water supply and irrigation, nonpotable waters would be ideal for an industrial use such as injection into an HDR energy extraction system. 50 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

Vuataz, F.D.; Goff, F.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system`s design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system's design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Estimation of formation strength index of aquifer from neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to construct a model that predicts an aquifer's formation strength index (the ratio of shear modulus and bulk compressibility, G/C"b) from geophysical well logs by using a back-propagation neural network (BPNN). The BPNN ... Keywords: Back-propagation neural networks, Geophysical well logs, Groundwater, Soft computing

Bieng-Zih Hsieh; Chih-Wen Wang; Zsay-Shing Lin

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers by Tom Myers Abstract Hydraulic fracturing of deep shale beds to develop natural gas has caused concern regarding the potential and preferential flow through fractures--could allow the transport of contaminants from the fractured shale

327

Switchgrass Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Develop a pilot study that establishes up to 120 acres of cropland in switchgrass and 20 acres on a TN Experiment Station Farm. This subtask would assess production of switchgrass within the state of Tennessee under a variety of conditions and topography through on-farm production totaling 120 acres. Farms would be selected to participate through a bid process. Costs of establishment and maintenance of the switchgrass would be covered. In addition, allowances would be made for covering land rent and providing a yield incentive. An information and education program would be provided to producers prior to the bid process to assist producers in their bid decision. Agronomic, logistic, energy conversion and farming system issues associated with commercialization of a biomass energy industry are evaluated. Information on the opportunities for producing switchgrass as an energy feedstock are extended

Burton C. English and Daniel De La Torre Ugarte

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

328

AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining and losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.

PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO; VANMIDDLESWORTH PE

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

329

Aquifer characterization at the Veterans Administration Hospital, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Veterans Administration (VA) is studying the feasibility of aquifer thermal storage (ATES) at their Tuscaloosa, Alabama, facility. To determine the characteristics of the aquifer underlying the facility, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory gathered information about the environment of the aquifer and conducted tests to estimate the aquifer's transmissivity, ground-water flow direction, and velocity. Seven wells were drilled at the VA site. It was found that ground-water flow direction at the site is generally toward the southwest. The magnitude of the gradient is approximately 2.5 {times} 10{sup -3} to 3 {times} 10{sup -3} ft/ft. For six of the seven wells, clay lenses or thick clay layers appear to be acting locally as confining or semi-confining layers. Three types of test were conducted at the site: a step drawdown test, a constant discharge and recover test, and a single-well tracer test. The data yielded responses suggesting leaky confined or delayed yield models for the aquifer. Drawdown and recovery versus time were matched type curves for delayed yield to obtain estimates of transmissivity and storage. This recovery method gave the best fit to the drawdown-versus-time curves. Using this method it was found that transmissivity ranged from 500 to 9000 ft{sup 2}/day and storage ranged from 1.5 {times} 10{sup -4} to 4.5 {times} 10{sup -2} for the wells tested. Using the results of the pump and tracer tests simultaneously, ground-water velocity was estimated to be approximately 0.8 ft/day, with an effective porosity of approximately 12%. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Cronin, W.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Hall, S.H.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Design, performance, and analysis of an aquifer thermal-energy-storage experiment using the doublet-well configuration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In March 1980 Auburn University began series of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) experiments using the doublet well configuration. The test site was in Mobile, Alabama. The objectives of the three experimental cycles were to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the ATES concept, to identify and resolve operational problems, and to acquire a data base for developing and testing mathematical models. Pre-injection tests were performed and analyses of hydraulic, geochemical, and thermodynamic data were completed. Three injection-storage-recovery cycles had injection volumes of 25,402 m/sup 3/, 58,010 m/sup 3/, and 58,680 m/sup 3/ and average injection temperatures of 58.5/sup 0/C, 81.0/sup 0/C, and 79.0/sup 0/C, respectively. The first cycle injection began in February 1981 and the third cycle recovery was completed in November 1982. Attributable to the doublet well configuration no clogging of injection wells occurred. Energy recovery percentages based on recovery volumes equal to the injection volumes were 56, 45, and 42%. Thermal convection effects were observed. Aquifer nonhomogeneity, not detectable using standard aquifer testing procedures, was shown to reduce recovery efficiency.

Molz, F.J.; Melville, J.G.; Gueven, O.; Parr, A.D.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Applications of Ensemble-based Data Assimilation Techniques for Aquifer Characterization using Tracer Data at Hanford 300 Area  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface aquifer characterization often involves high parameter dimensionality and requires tremendous computational resources if employing a full Bayesian approach. Ensemble-based data assimilation techniques, including filtering and smoothing, are computationally efficient alternatives. Despite the increasing number of applications of ensemble-based methods in assimilating flow and transport related data for subsurface aquifer charaterization, most are limited to either synthetic studies or two-dimensional problems. In this study, we applied ensemble-based techniques for assimilating field tracer experimental data obtained from the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at the Hanford 300 Area. The forward problem was simulated using the massively-parallel three-dimensional flow and transport code PFLOTRAN to effectively deal with the highly transient flow boundary conditions at the site and to meet the computational demands of ensemble-based methods. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of ensemble-based methods for characterizing a heterogeneous aquifer by sequentially assimilating multiple types of data. The necessity of employing high performance computing is shown to enable increasingly mechanistic non-linear forward simulations to be performed within the data assimilation framework for a complex system with reasonable turnaround time.

Chen, Xingyuan; Hammond, Glenn E.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Zachara, John M.

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

CCUS Demonstrations Making Progress  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, First Quarter, 2013 9, First Quarter, 2013 www.fossil.energy.gov/news/energytoday.html HigHligHts inside 2 CCUS Demonstrations Making Progress A Column from the Director of Clean Energy Sys- tems, Office of Clean Coal 4 LNG Exports DOE Releases Third Party Study on Impact of Natural Gas Exports 5 Providing Emergency Relief Petroleum Reservers Helps Out with Hurricane Relief Efforts 7 Game-Changing Membranes FE-Funded Project Develops Novel Membranes for CCUS 8 Shale Gas Projects Selected 15 Projects Will Research Technical Challenges of Shale Gas Development A project important to demonstrat- ing the commercial viability of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology has completed the first year of inject-

333

Jennings Demonstration PLant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

Russ Heissner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

300kW Energy Storage Demonstration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kW Energy Storage Demonstration Project Technical Overview Presented at: Annual Doe Peer Review Meeting 2008 DOE Energy Storage & Power Electronics Research Programs By Ib I....

335

Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles James Francfort (PI) Timothy...

336

Demonstrating Economic and Operational Viability of 72-Hour Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems to Support Emergency Communications on the Sprint Nextel Network - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Kevin Kenny Sprint Nextel 12000 Sunrise Valley Drive MS: VARESQ0401-E4064 Reston, VA 20191 Phone: (703) 592-8272 Email: kevin.p.kenny@sprint.com DOE Managers HQ: Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-7925 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov GO: James Alkire Phone: (720) 356-1426 Email: James.Alkire@go.doe.gov Contract Number: EE-0000486 Project Partners: * Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (Fuel Project Partner) * Altergy Systems, Folsum, CA (PEM Fuel Cell Project Partner) * Black & Veatch Corporation, Overland Park, KS (A&E

337

Appendix B Surface Infiltration and Aquifer Test Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

B B Surface Infiltration and Aquifer Test Data This page intentionally left blank Infiltration Tests This page intentionally left blank 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 TIME (MIN) 200 250 TIME (MIN) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 TIME (MIN) zoo 800 1000 TIME (MIN) 0 150 300 450 600 750 , 900 1050 1200 1350 1500 1650 1800 TIME (MIN) TIME (MIN) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 TIME (MIN) INF-8 TEST I 300 400 TIME (MIN) INF-8 TEST 2 200 250 300 TIME (MIN) 200 250 TIME (MIN) zoo 800 1000 TIME (MIN) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 TIME (MIN) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 TIME (MIN) September 1997 Alluvial Aquifer Tests This page intentionally left blank - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

338

Sizing a water softener for aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) installations, ground water is circulated between an aquifer and heat exchangers via a well field. It is often necessary to soften the water to prevent carbonate scaling in pipes, heat exchangers, and well screens. Most ATES projects requiring water softening will be best served by using synthetic ion-exchange resins. The size of the resin beds, the resin regeneration cycle, and the amount of NaCl brine used in each regeneration depend on several factors. These are (1) the chemistry of the native ground water, (2) allowable residual hardness after softening, (3) the maximum flow rate of water through the ATES plant, and (4) exchange characteristics of the resin. Example calculations are given for a three-bed water softening system.

Hall, S.H.; Jenne, E.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hydrogeophysical methods for analyzing aquifer storage and recovery systems  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogeophysical methods are presented that support the siting and monitoring of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems. These methods are presented as numerical simulations in the context of a proposed ASR experiment in Kuwait, although the techniques are applicable to numerous ASR projects. Bulk geophysical properties are calculated directly from ASR flow and solute transport simulations using standard petrophysical relationships and are used to simulate the dynamic geophysical response to ASR. This strategy provides a quantitative framework for determining site-specific geophysical methods and data acquisition geometries that can provide the most useful information about the ASR implementation. An axisymmetric, coupled fluid flow and solute transport model simulates injection, storage, and withdrawal of fresh water (salinity {approx}500 ppm) into the Dammam aquifer, a tertiary carbonate formation with native salinity approximately 6000 ppm. Sensitivity of the flow simulations to the correlation length of aquifer heterogeneity, aquifer dispersivity, and hydraulic permeability of the confining layer are investigated. The geophysical response using electrical resistivity, time-domain electromagnetic (TEM), and seismic methods is computed at regular intervals during the ASR simulation to investigate the sensitivity of these different techniques to changes in subsurface properties. For the electrical and electromagnetic methods, fluid electric conductivity is derived from the modeled salinity and is combined with an assumed porosity model to compute a bulk electrical resistivity structure. The seismic response is computed from the porosity model and changes in effective stress due to fluid pressure variations during injection/recovery, while changes in fluid properties are introduced through Gassmann fluid substitution.

Minsley, B.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Morgan, F.D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Nuclear Power 2010 Program Dominion Virginia Power Cooperative Project U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-05ID14635 Construction and Operating License Demonstration Project Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves to summarize the major activities completed as part of Virginia Electric and Power Company's North Anna construction and operating license demonstration project with DOE. Project successes, lessons learned, and suggestions for improvement are discussed. Objectives of the North Anna COL project included preparation and submittal of a COLA to the USNRC incorporating ESBWR technology for a third unit a the North Anna Power Station site, support for the NRC review process and mandatory hearing, obtaining NRC approval of the COLA and issuance of a COL, and development of a business case necessary to support a decision on building a new nuclear power plant at the North Anna site.

Eugene S. Grecheck David P. Batalo

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Highly Efficient, 5-kW CHP Fuel Cells Demonstrating Durability and Economic Value in Residential and Light Commercial Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report James Petrecky Plug Power 968 Albany Shaker Road Latham, NY 12110 Phone: (518) 782-7700 ext: 1977 Email: james_petrecky@plugpower.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Vendor: ClearEdge Power, Hillsboro, OR Project Start Date: October 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 15, 2013 Objectives Quantify the durability of proton exchange membrane * (PEM) fuel cell systems in residential and light commercial combined heat and power (CHP) applications in California. Optimize system performance though testing of multiple * high-temperature units through collection of field data.

342

Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

Allen, R.D.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Optimizing the design and operation of aquifer thermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) systems is complicated by significant uncertainties in ones ability to reliably predict the response of the aquifer to fluid and thermal fluxes. Overdesigning the system, to compensate for these uncertainties, reduces the potential economic and energy benefits of an ATES system. Underdesigning the system results in systems that fail to meet design targets. Unfortunately, standard aquifer characterization methods and hydrologic models do not provide adequate information to overcome these uncertainties. Thus, expensive full-scale tests are generally recommended to develop an adequate-understanding of the systems response. However, the standard engineering {open_quotes}design-build-operate{close_quotes} process is not. appropriate for ATES systems because an optimal design cannot be completed without some operational experience, i.e., field tests. A more adaptive engineering process is required. This engineering process should be flexible enough to allow the design to be adjusted during the operation, as monitoring data become available and as an understanding of the system response increases. Engineering approaches being developed for environmental restoration of contaminated soil and groundwater can be adapted to optimally design and operate ATES systems.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Operational results of National Solar Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Included in the National Solar Demonstration Program are examples of earth-sheltered, passive solar designs. The data obtained from these sites presents an interesting look at what is both technically and economically feasible. Data from four demonstration sites that are members of the National Solar Data Network are utilized to present an economic and technical analyses of a group of four sites. Three of these sites are earth sheltered residential structures, the fourth is a commercial passive structure. This sample of four demonstration sites is not intended to provide a statistical representation of passive earth sheltered structures, but rather, an example of the type of information available through the National Solar Data Program and how this information may be utilized.

Waite, E.V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Data-collection instrumentation and interpretation for geopressured aquifer well tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wells of Opportunity program funded by the Department of Energy, sought to determine the amount of natural gas and thermal energy entrained in geopressured, geothermal aquifers of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast fairways. This determination was made by bringing representative wells onto production for periods long enough to ascertain such characteristics as temperature, gas/brine ratio, reservoir boundaries and permeabilities. During testing, amounts of produced gas and brine were carefully monitored through a computer controlled instrumentation station, which provided reliable and precise indications of the amounts of recoverable gas being produced from the reservoir. A data collection system was designed to be integrated into the surface test equipment to provide real-time control and data compilation during the well tests. Strip chart records provided real-time control information during the test. All pressures, both differential pressures, brine and gas temperatures, and sand detector signals were displayed, and the physical records were maintained for interpretation of well performance. The data collection system coupled with the interpretation software permitted gas/brine ratio to be determined with accuracy of five percent for values as low as 0.02 MCF/STB. In addition, graphical representation of well performance, brine flow rates, gas production, pressure histories, etc., could be made as the test progressed. Data system reliability was very high. Downtime was minimal even under relatively harsh environmental conditions for electronic equipment. This data collection system, while designed initially for geopressured aquifers, is adaptable to the automated collection of scientific and engineering information for the interpretation of well tests of other petroleum resources.

Rose, R.E.; Doherty, M.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Geochemical Determination of the Fate and Transport of Injected Fresh Wastewater to a Deep Saline Aquifer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Deep well injection into non-potable saline aquifers of treated domestic wastewater has been used in Florida for decades as a safe and effective alternative… (more)

Walsh, Virginia M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

40 Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 40 Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France edit Details Activities (0) Areas (0)...

348

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aquifer Storage of Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors.of International Solar Energy Congress, New Delhi, India.Thermal Storage of Solar Energy 11 , Amsterdam, The

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer  

SciTech Connect

Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer - a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

Orozco, A. Flores; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Kemna, A.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has selected six integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports the CCT program, and addresses long-term improvements in support of IGCC technology. This overview briefly describes the CCT projects and the supporting RD&D activities.

Ness, H.M.; Reuther, R.B.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The report summarizes unit operating experience and test program progress for 1989 on Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla CFB Demonstration Program. During this period, the objectives of the Nucla Station operating group were to correct problems with refractory durability, resolve primary air fan capacity limitations, complete the high ash and high sulfur coal tests, switch to Salt Creek coal as the operating fuel, and make the unit available for testing without capacity restrictions. Each of these objectives was addressed and accomplished, to varying degrees, except for the completion of the high sulfur coal acceptance tests. (VC)

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Buried waste integrated demonstration configuration management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document defines plans for the configuration management requirements for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program. Since BWID is managed programmatically by the Waste Technology Development Department (WTDD), WTDD Program Directive (PD) 1.5 (Document Preparation, Review, Approval, Publication, Management and Change Control) is to be followed for all internal EG&G Idaho, Inc., BWID programmatic documentation. BWID documentation generated by organizations external to EG&G Idaho is not covered by this revision of the Configuration Management Plan (CMP), but will be addressed in subsequent revisions.

Cannon, P.G.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Buried waste integrated demonstration configuration management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document defines plans for the configuration management requirements for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program. Since BWID is managed programmatically by the Waste Technology Development Department (WTDD), WTDD Program Directive (PD) 1.5 (Document Preparation, Review, Approval, Publication, Management and Change Control) is to be followed for all internal EG G Idaho, Inc., BWID programmatic documentation. BWID documentation generated by organizations external to EG G Idaho is not covered by this revision of the Configuration Management Plan (CMP), but will be addressed in subsequent revisions.

Cannon, P.G.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

System Design and Optimization of CO2 Storage in Deep Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of waterflooding sweep efficiency has been widely applied in reservoir engineering to improve hydrocarbon recovery while delaying water breakthrough and minimizing the bypassed oil in reservoirs. We develop a new framework to optimize flooding sweep efficiency in geologic formations with heterogeneous properties and demonstrate its application to waterflooding and geological CO2 sequestration problems. The new method focuses on equalizing and delaying (under constant total injected volume) the breakthrough time of the injected fluid at production wells. For application to CO2 sequestration where producers may not be present, we introduce the concept of pseudo production wells that have insignificant production rates (with negligible effect on the overall flow regime) for quantification of hypothetical breakthrough curves that can be used for optimization purpose. We apply the new method to waterflooding and CO2 sequestration optimization using two heterogeneous reservoir models. We show that in water flooding experiments, the proposed method improves the sweep efficiency by delaying the field breakthrough and equalizing breakthrough times in all production wells. In this case, the optimization results in increased oil recovery and decreased water production. We apply a modified version of the proposed algorithm to geologic CO2 sequestration problems to maximize the storage capacity of aquifers by enhancing the residual and dissolution trapping. The results from applying the proposed approach to optimization of geologic CO2 storage problems illustrate the effectiveness of the algorithm in improving residual and solubility trapping by increasing the contact between available fresh brine and the injected CO2 plume through a more uniform distribution of CO2 in the aquifer.

Shamshiri, Hossein

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

NONE

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

356

Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration stakeholder involvement model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Stakeholder participation in the DOE Environmental Management decision-making process is critical to remediation efforts. Appropriate mechanisms for communication with the public, private sector, regulators, elected officials, and others are being aggressively pursued by BWID to permit informed participation. This document summarizes public outreach efforts during FY-93 and presents a strategy for expanded stakeholder involvement during FY-94.

Kaupanger, R.M.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Milam, L.M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Tubular solid oxide fuel cell demonstration activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This reports on a solid oxide fuel cell demonstration program in which utilities are provided fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems. These field units serve to demonstrate to customers first hand the beneficial attributes of the SOFC, to expose deficiencies through experience in order to guide continued development, and to garner real world feedback and data concerning not only cell and stack parameters, but also transportation, installation, permitting and licensing, start-up and shutdown, system alarming, fault detection, fault response, and operator interaction.

Ray, E.R.; Veyo, S.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Learning Demonstration Interim Progress Report -- July 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses key results based on data through December 2009 from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project, also referred to as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration. The report serves to help transfer knowledge and lessons learned within various parts of DOE's hydrogen program, as well as externally to other stakeholders. It is the fourth such report in a series, with previous reports being published in July 2007, November 2007, and April 2008.

Wipke, K.; Spirk, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal heat source.  

SciTech Connect

The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal heat source was investigated. This investigation considers only the storage of energy from a seasonal heat source. Cost estimates are based upon the assumption that all of the energy is stored in the aquifer before delivery to the end user. Costs were estimated for point demand, residential development, and multidistrict city ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR which was developed specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on ATES costs were: cost of purchased thermal energy; cost of capital; source temperature; system size; transmission distance; and aquifer efficiency. ATES-delivered energy costs are compared with the costs of hot water heated by using electric power or fuel-oils. ATES costs are shown as a function of purchased thermal energy. Both the potentially low delivered energy costs available from an ATES system and its strong cost dependence on the cost of purchased thermal energy are shown. Cost components for point demand and multi-district city ATES systems are shown. Capital and thermal energy costs dominate. Capital costs, as a percentage of total costs, increase for the multi-district city due to the addition of a large distribution system. The proportion of total cost attributable to thermal energy would change dramatically if the cost of purchased thermal energy were varied. It is concluded that ATES-delivered energy can be cost competitive with conventional energy sources under a number of economic and technical conditions. This investigation reports the cost of ATES under a wide range of assumptions concerning parameters important to ATES economics. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.; Brown, D.R.; Huber, H.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect

Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO{sub 2} and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO{sub 2}. The basic problem of CO{sub 2} injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO{sub 2} injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO{sub 2} injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factor of 15. Because of the lower viscosity, the CO{sub 2} displacement front will have a tendency towards instability. Preliminary simulation results show good agreement between classical instability solutions and numerical predictions of finger growth and spacing obtained using different gas/liquid viscosity ratios, relative permeability and capillary pressure models. Further studies are recommended to validate these results over a broader range of conditions.

Garcia, Julio Enrique

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fundamental quantitative analysis of microbial activity in aquifer bioreclamation  

SciTech Connect

In situ bioremediation of hazardous organic chemicals that contaminate aquifer solids and ground water is a highly promising technique for many sites at DOE facilities. Its potential stems from having agents for destruction of the contaminants (bacteria) close to the separate-phase liquid or sorbed contaminants. This project was designed to advance knowledge in several of the microbiological fundamentals most important to in situ bioremediation: biodegradation of poorly soluable organic contaminants; dual limitation kinetics of electron donors and acceptors; kinetics of sequential degradation involving oxygenase reaction; biologically induced clogging in porous media, and two dimensional modeling of biofilm reactions in non homogeneous porous media.

Rittman, B.E.; Valocchi, A.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Baveye, P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Agronomy

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Storage capacity and injection rate estimates for CO? sequestration in deep saline aquifers in the conterminous United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A promising method to mitigate global warming is injecting CO? into deep saline aquifers. In order to ensure the safety of this method, it is necessary to understand how much CO? can be injected into an aquifer and at what ...

Szulczewski, Michael Lawrence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Technology Demonstrations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demonstrations Demonstrations Technology Demonstrations Efficient new building technologies can help meet our country's energy goals, stimulate U.S. manufacturing, create jobs, and improve the environment. However, many high-performing technologies are not readily adopted in the marketplace due to lack of information about their real-world performance. To address this gap in information, the DOE frequently supports demonstrations to assess technologies' energy performance, installation procedures, operations, and maintenance characteristics. The information from these demonstrations helps consumers make more informed decisions and helps U.S. manufacturers validate the performance of their products. Frequently Asked Questions How does DOE prioritize demonstration projects?

364

NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE Cooperative Agreement is to conduct a cost-shared clean coal technology project to demonstrate the feasibility of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology and to evaluate economic, environmental, and operational benefits of CFB steam generators on a utility scale. At the conclusion of the Phase 2 program, testing related to satisfying these objectives was completed. Data analysis and reporting are scheduled for completion by October 1991. (VC)

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weather Service NYISO New York Independent System Operator OAT Otherwise Applicable Tariff PG&E Pacific Gas and Electric Company PIER Public Interest Energy Research program...

366

Column Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on CT transformations in Hanford soil. This work assessed the potential for in situ CT biotransColumn Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material a column reactor system containing Hanford Aquifer material in order to assess the potential of in situ

Semprini, Lewis

367

Aquifer Vulnerability Assessment to Petroleum Contaminants Based on Fuzzy Variable Set Theory and Geographic Information System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a common environmental and hydro-geological problem that groundwater system is contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. An important step of pollution control and treatment is aquifer vulnerability assessment. In this paper, a karst fissure groundwater ... Keywords: fuzzy variable set, GIS, aquifer, petroleum contamination, vulnerability, assessment

Li Qingguo; Ma Zhenmin; Fang Yunzhi; Chen Shouyu

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Vulnerability assessment of groundwater resources: A modelling-based approach to the Mancha Occidental aquifer, Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The semiarid Mancha Occidental aquifer represents a paradigmatic case of intensive groundwater use for agriculture. Irrigation has proven a catalyst for welfare in the area over the last three decades, if at a significant environmental cost and while ... Keywords: Aquifer, Groundwater, Mancha Occidental, Participatory modelling, Vulnerability, Water Framework Directive

Pedro Martínez-Santos; M. Ramón Llamas; Pedro E. Martínez-Alfaro

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 3. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains two appendices to the main report. The first lists the aquifers in the 12 geographic regions of the USA and characterizes each as containing sands and gravels or limestones or volcanic rock. The second appendix tabulates the hydrologic characteristics of each aquifer. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Advanced Application Development Program Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary of the Tranmission Reliability program's Advanced Applications Research and Development activity area. This program develops and demonstrates tools to monitor and control the grid with...

373

Precision Dual-Aquifer Dewatering at a Low Level Radiological Cleanup in New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

Cleanup of low-level radioactive wastes at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), Wayne, New Jersey during the period October, 2000 through November, 2001 required the design, installation and operation of a dual-aquifer dewatering system to support excavation of contaminated soils. Waste disposal pits from a former rare-earth processing facility at the WISS had been in contact with the water table aquifer, resulting in moderate levels of radionuclides being present in the upper aquifer groundwater. An uncontaminated artesian aquifer underlies the water table aquifer, and is a localized drinking water supply source. The lower aquifer, confined by a silty clay unit, is flowing artesian and exhibits potentiometric heads of up to 4.5 meters above grade. This high potentiometric head presented a strong possibility that unloading due to excavation would result in a ''blowout'', particularly in areas where the confining unit was < 1 meter thick. Excavation of contaminated materials w as required down to the surface of the confining unit, potentially resulting in an artesian aquifer head of greater than 8 meters above the excavation surface. Consequently, it was determined that a dual-aquifer dewatering system would be required to permit excavation of contaminated material, with the water table aquifer dewatered to facilitate excavation, and the deep aquifer depressurized to prevent a ''blowout''. An additional concern was the potential for vertical migration of contamination present in the water table aquifer that could result from a vertical gradient reversal caused by excessive pumping in the confined system. With these considerations in mind, a conceptual dewatering plan was developed with three major goals: (1) dewater the water table aquifer to control radionuclide migration and allow excavation to proceed; (2) depressurize the lower, artesian aquifer to reduce the potential for a ''blowout''; and (3) develop a precise dewatering level control mechanism to insure a vertical gradient reversal did not result in cross-contamination. The plan was executed through a hydrogeologic investigation culminating with the design and implementation of a complex, multi-phased dual-aquifer dewatering system equipped with a state of the art monitoring network.

Gosnell, A. S.; Langman, J. W. Jr.; Zahl, H. A.; Miller, D. M.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

374

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

375

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

376

Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Description Program Description Discover E (Engineering) is an evening of interesting, interactive and fun engineering, science, math, and technology demonstrations for K-12 students and their parents or guardians. It is held in conjunction with National Engineers Week which is celebrated at the time of George Washington's birthday, our nation's first President, who was a military engineer and land surveyor. Activities include 30-50 interactive demonstrations of basic engineering, science, technology and math principles that may include robots, reverse engineering, casting, crystal structures, forensic science, the effects of liquid nitrogen, slide rule, sound waves, electrostatics, mechanics, materials properties and materials

377

Analysis of Cameron Parish geopressured aquifer. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal prospect is located in northern Cameron Parish, Louisiana in T.12 S., R. 7 W. and T. 12 S., R. 8 W. approximately 10 to 15 miles south of Lake Charles. The region is characterized by Cenozoic sand and clay deposits of geosynclinal thickness and differentially uplifted salt structures. The primary geopressured-geothermal aquifer is the Miogyp sand of the Camerina zone (Upper Frio formation of Oligocene-Miocene age). The main prospect is located in a basin on the north flank of the Hackberry-Big Lake-Sweet Lake salt ridge. Interpretation of 27 miles of seismic lines and 17 deep well logs localizes the prospect in a basin with northwesterly dip in a graben between east--west faults converging eastward. Aquifer depth ranges from 14,000 to 18,000 feet. Net sand thickness exceeds 400 feet with 22% porosity. Temperatures range from 280/sup 0/F. (corrected) at 14,000 feet to 350/sup 0/F. at 18,000 feet. Geopressures occur below 9,000 feet with mud weight equivalents in the sand from 12 to 13 pounds per gallon. Net sand volume of one cubic mile is estimated in the area mapped.

Durham, C.O. Jr.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Ortigas Greenways: Demonstrating Innovation in Walkable Districts | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ortigas Greenways: Demonstrating Innovation in Walkable Districts Ortigas Greenways: Demonstrating Innovation in Walkable Districts Jump to: navigation, search Name Ortigas Greenways: Demonstrating Innovation in Walkable Districts Agency/Company /Organization Clean Air Asia, Asian Development Bank (ADB), Ortigas Greenways Project Team, Paulo G. Alcazaren & Associates (PGAA) Partner Asian Development Bank (ADB), Ministry of Planning Sector Land Focus Area People and Policy, Transportation Topics Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Website http://cleanairinitiative.org/ Program Start 2011 Program End 2012 Country Philippines South-Eastern Asia References Ortigas Greenways[1] Terms of Reference[2] Overview

379

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Progam: Four Rivers Energy Modernization Project (June 1994) -- Not Available PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS Four...

380

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Advanced Combustion Systems Healy Clean Coal Project - Project Brief PDF-226KB Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority, Healy,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tangentially-Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of NOx Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers - Project Brief PDF-280KB Southern Company Services, Inc., Lynn Haven,...

382

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Reduction Technology for the Control of NOx Emissions from High-Sulfur Coal-Fired Boilers - Project Brief PDF-247KB Southern Company Services, Pensacola, FL...

383

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Sept 2002) Advanced Technologies for the Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers, Topical Report No.12 PDF-1.28MB ((June 1999) Design Reports The Final...

384

Geothermal project summaries. Geothermal energy research, development, and demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

The Division of Geothermal Energy ''Geothermal Project Summaries'' provides pertinent information on each active ERDA Geothermal project, includes a listing of all contractors and a compilation of completed projects. New project summaries and necessary revisions to current project data will be prepared on a quarterly basis.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Integrated GasificationCombined Cycle Tampa Electric Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Project - Project Brief PDF-241KB Tampa...

386

Geothermal project summaries. Geothermal energy research, development and demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summaries of all Division of Geothermal Energy supported projects for which contracts have been executed are compiled. Each summary includes pertinent statistical data for that project and an abstract summarizing the project plans and accomplishments. The projects summarized fall into six categories: engineering research and development, resource exploration and assessment, hydrothermal technology applications, advanced technology applications, utilization experiments, and environmental control and institutional studies. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Gas turbines engines and transmissions for bus demonstration programs  

SciTech Connect

The technical status report fulfills the contractual requirements of Contract EM-78-C-02-4867. The report covers the period from 31 January 1979 through 30 April 1979 and is a summary of DDA activities for the effort performed on the procurement of eleven (11) Allison GT 404-4 gas turbine engines and five (5) HT740CT and siz (6) V730CT Allison automatic transmissions and the required associated software. (TFD)

Nigro, D.N.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Coal Processing for Clean Fuels - Coal Preparation Technologies Self-Scrubbing Coal(tm): An Integrated Approach to Clean Air - Project Brief PDF-483KB Custom Coals...

389

Market-Based Programs: Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY Demonstrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photo of a post-top outdoor light along a walkway through a wooded park. Museums Put LED Lighting on Display Museums rank among the most exacting of all lighting applications....

390

Connecticut Fuel Cell Programs -From Demonstration to Deployment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCEF Goals 6 #12;Clean Energy Technologies Fuel Cells Solar Biomass Hydro Landfill Gas Wave Wind 7 #12

391

Results from the Microminiature Thermionic Converter Demonstration Testing Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

large current densities (up to tens of Amps/cmz) at relatively high conversion efficiencies ( 15-25%).

King, D.B.; Luke, J.R.; Wyant, F.J.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

392

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Technologies - NOx Control Technologies Integrated Dry NOxSO2 Emissions Control System - Project Brief PDF-267KB Public Service Company of Colorado, Denver, CO...

393

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1992) Metal Producing 33, p. 26. PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS Review of the U.S. Coke Making Industry and the Innovative By-Product Modifications at Bethlehem Steel, Sparrows Point...

394

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boiler (June 1993) J.J. Catasus-Servia, et al., Third International Joint ISAPOWID EPRI Controls and Instrumentation Conference Reducing Stack Emissions by Gas Firing in...

395

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy report DOEMC26308-3646 (Available from NTIS as DE94004066) Controls and Instrumentation, Topical Report (Dec 1993) U.S. Department of Energy report...

396

Geothermal project summaries. Geothermal energy research, development, and demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Division of Geothermal Energy ''Geothermal Project Summaries'' provides pertinent information on each active ERDA Geothermal project, includes a listing of all contractors and a compilation of completed projects. New project summaries and necessary revisions to current project data will be prepared on a quarterly basis.

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

CAES Demonstration Newsletter, October 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whether the number of customers on the distribution feedera function of the number of customers participating in thesufficient numbers of customers for the demonstration so

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

BWR Radiation Control: In-Plant Demonstration at Vermont Yankee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A five-year program has demonstrated several techniques for reducing radiation fields in BWRs. Improved chemistry control, replacement of valves and control blades containing cobalt, and electropolishing and prefilming of replacement piping proved particularly beneficial.

1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Portfolio evaluation of advanced coal technology : research, development, and demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the advanced coal technology research, development and demonstration programs at the U.S. Department of Energy since the 1970s. The evaluation is conducted from a portfolio point of view and derives ...

Naga-Jones, Ayaka

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Department of Energy's $700 Million Smart Grid Demonstration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

700 Million Smart Grid Demonstration Program Funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 OAS-RA-13-08 January 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585...

403

The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) field test facility -- system description, aquifer characterization, and results of short-term test cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase 1 of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Project at the University of Minnesota was to test the feasibility, and model, the ATES concept at temperatures above 100{degrees}C using a confined aquifer for the storage and recovery of hot water. Phase 1 included design, construction, and operation of a 5-MW thermal input/output field test facility (FTF) for four short-term ATES cycles (8 days each of heat injection, storage, and heat recover). Phase 1 was conducted from May 1980 to December 1983. This report describes the FTF, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville (FIG) aquifer used for the test, and the four short-term ATES cycles. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are all included. The FTF consists of monitoring wells and the source and storage well doublet completed in the FIG aquifer with heat exchangers and a fixed-bed precipitator between the wells of the doublet. The FIG aquifer is highly layered and a really anisotropic. The upper Franconia and Ironton-Galesville parts of the aquifer, those parts screened, have hydraulic conductivities of {approximately}0.6 and {approximately}1.0 m/d, respectively. Primary ions in the ambient ground water are calcium and magnesium bicarbonate. Ambient temperature FIG ground water is saturated with respect to calcium/magnesium bicarbonate. Heating the ground water caused most of the dissolved calcium to precipitate out as calcium carbonate in the heat exchanger and precipitator. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water, suggesting dissolution of some constituents of the aquifer during the cycles. Further work on the ground water chemistry is required to understand water-rock interactions.

Walton, M.; Hoyer, M.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Holm, N.L.; Holm, T.R.; Kanivetsky, R.; Jirsa, M.A.; Lee, H.C.; Lauer, J.L.; Miller, R.T.; Norton, J.L.; Runke, H. (Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

NETL: PPII - Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Project Documents - Industrial Applications Demonstration Project Documents - Industrial Applications Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash - Project Brief [PDF-72KB] Universal Aggregates, LLC, King George County, VA PROJECT FACT SHEET Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash [PDF-412KB] (Feb 2008) PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Report Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Absorber Ash [PDF-4.5MB] (Nov 2007) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash: A DOE Assessment [PDF-170KB] (Mar 2008)

405

Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009 is to provide an updated status of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCT). These demonstrations have been performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2009 provides: (1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation’s energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation’s most abundant energy resource—coal; (2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and (3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, along with fact sheets for projects that are active, recently completed, or recently discontinued.

None

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Major Demonstrations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Demonstrations Major Demonstrations Major Demonstrations A state-of-the-art integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant, Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station produces enough electricity to serve 75,000 homes. A state-of-the-art integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant, Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station produces enough electricity to serve 75,000 homes. The Office of Fossil Energy is co-funding large-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies to hasten their adoption into the commercial marketplace. Through the year 2030, electricity consumption in the United States is expected to grow by about 1 percent per year. The ability of coal-fired generation to help meet this demand could be limited by concerns over greenhouse gas emissions. While the Major Demonstrations performed to date

407

Intern Programs | Target  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

school sophomores and juniors who have strong interest and demonstrated aptitude for mathematics and the sciences, physics, in particular. The program's goals are to encourage high...

408

Blade Manufacturing Improvement: Remote Blade Manufacturing Demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to investigate manufacturing improvements for wind turbine blades. The program included a series of test activities to evaluate the strength, deflection, performance, and loading characteristics of the prototype blades. The original contract was extended in order to continue development of several key blade technologies identified in the project. The objective of the remote build task was to demonstrate the concept of manufacturing wind turbine blades at a temporary manufacturing facility in a rural environment. TPI Composites successfully completed a remote manufacturing demonstration in which four blades were fabricated. The remote demonstration used a manufacturing approach which relied upon material ''kits'' that were organized in the factory and shipped to the site. Manufacturing blades at the wind plant site presents serious logistics difficulties and does not appear to be the best approach. A better method appears to be regional manufacturing facilities, which will eliminate most of the transportation cost, without incurring the logistical problems associated with fabrication directly onsite. With this approach the remote facilities would use commonly available industrial infrastructure such as enclosed workbays, overhead cranes, and paved staging areas. Additional fatigue testing of the M20 root stud design was completed with good results. This design provides adhesive bond strength under fatigue loading that exceeds that of the fastener. A new thru-stud bonding concept was developed for the M30 stud design. This approach offers several manufacturing advantages; however, the test results were inconclusive.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant operation and testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant, located in Brilliant, Ohio, is in its third year of operation and testing. The plant has achieved many of its original performance goals and test objectives; however, current emissions standards and the projected performance of competing technologies have caused a reassessment of the program goals. This paper provides a review of PFBC technology and discusses project goals and milestones achieved. Emphasis is placed on environmental performance and on projected modifications to be undertaken to improve sulfur capture and reduce calcium/sulfur molar ratio. A large-scale hot gas clean up demonstration is also in progress at Tidd. The demonstration has been providing information on ceramic barrier filter technology since its commissioning in October 1992. The Tidd Plant has met both its performance guarantees for emissions and its environmental permit limits. However, the tightening of government environmental standards and the projected performance of competing technologies have required a reassessment of the goals of AEP`s PFBC program. Efforts are focusing on achieving better environmental performance, particularly with respect to sulfur capture and sorbent utilization.

Marrocco, M.; Hafer, D.R.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant operation and testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant, located in Brilliant, Ohio, is in its third year of operation and testing. The plant has achieved many of its original performance goals and test objectives; however, current emissions standards and the projected performance of competing technologies have caused a reassessment of the program goals. This paper provides a review of PFBC technology and discusses project goals and milestones achieved. Emphasis is placed on environmental performance and on projected modifications to be undertaken to improve sulfur capture and reduce calcium/sulfur molar ratio. A large-scale hot gas clean up demonstration is also in progress at Tidd. The demonstration has been providing information on ceramic barrier filter technology since its commissioning in October 1992. The Tidd Plant has met both its performance guarantees for emissions and its environmental permit limits. However, the tightening of government environmental standards and the projected performance of competing technologies have required a reassessment of the goals of AEP's PFBC program. Efforts are focusing on achieving better environmental performance, particularly with respect to sulfur capture and sorbent utilization.

Marrocco, M.; Hafer, D.R.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Blade Manufacturing Improvement: Remote Blade Manufacturing Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to investigate manufacturing improvements for wind turbine blades. The program included a series of test activities to evaluate the strength, deflection, performance, and loading characteristics of the prototype blades. The original contract was extended in order to continue development of several key blade technologies identified in the project. The objective of the remote build task was to demonstrate the concept of manufacturing wind turbine blades at a temporary manufacturing facility in a rural environment. TPI Composites successfully completed a remote manufacturing demonstration in which four blades were fabricated. The remote demonstration used a manufacturing approach which relied upon material ''kits'' that were organized in the factory and shipped to the site. Manufacturing blades at the wind plant site presents serious logistics difficulties and does not appear to be the best approach. A better method appears to be regional manufacturing facilities, which will eliminate most of the transportation cost, without incurring the logistical problems associated with fabrication directly onsite. With this approach the remote facilities would use commonly available industrial infrastructure such as enclosed workbays, overhead cranes, and paved staging areas. Additional fatigue testing of the M20 root stud design was completed with good results. This design provides adhesive bond strength under fatigue loading that exceeds that of the fastener. A new thru-stud bonding concept was developed for the M30 stud design. This approach offers several manufacturing advantages; however, the test results were inconclusive.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Investigation of groundwater recirculation for the removal of RDX from the Pantex Plant perched aquifer  

SciTech Connect

The Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas, is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility that has been in operation since 1942. Past and present operations at Pantex include the creation of chemical high explosives components for nuclear weapons and assembly and disassembly of nuclear weapons. The Pantex Plant is underlain by the Ogallala aquifer, which in this area, consists of the main water-bearing unit and a perched water zone. These are separated by a fine-grained zone of low permeability. Multiple contaminant plumes containing high explosive (HE) compounds have been detected in the perched aquifer beneath the plant. The occurrence of these contaminants is the result of past waste disposal practices at the facility. RDX is an HE compound, which has been detected in the groundwater of the perched aquifer at significant concentrations. A pilot-scale, dual-phase extraction treatment system has been installed at one location at the plant, east of Zone 12, to test the effectiveness of such a system on the removal of these contaminants from the subsurface. A tracer test using a conservative tracer, bromide (Br), was conducted at the treatment site in 1996. In addition to the bromide, RDX and water elevations in the aquifer were monitored. Using data from the tracer test and other relevant data from the investigations at Pantex, flow and contaminant transport in the perched aquifer were simulated with groundwater models. The flow was modeled using MODFLOW and the transport of contaminants in the aqueous phase was modeled using MT3D. Modeling the perched aquifer had been conducted to characterize the flow in the perched aquifer; estimate RDX retardation in the perched aquifer; and evaluate the use of groundwater re-circulation to enhance the extraction of RDX from the perched aquifer.

Woods, A.L. [ed.; Barnes, D.L. [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Boles, K.M.; Charbeneau, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Black, S.; Rainwater, K. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Water Resources Center

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Nondestructive Evaluation: EPRI NDE Performance Demonstration Workshop Meeting Notes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nondestructive Evaluation: EPRI NDE Performance Demonstration Workshop Meeting Notes contains all of the presentations and technical information presented during the PD Workshop held July 2426, 2006 at Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The purpose of the workshop was to describe the approaches to NDE Performance Demonstration (PD) taken by each of the major materials Issue Programs (IP), and the status of each programMRP, PDI, SGMP, and BWRVIP and to present various stakeholder perspectives on the topic ...

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

414

Site-specific investigations of aquifer thermal energy storage for space and process cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has completed three preliminary site-specific feasibility studies that investigated using aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) to reduce space and process cooling costs. Chilled water stored in an ATES system could be used to meet all or part of the process and/or space cooling loads at the three facilities investigated. The work was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Management. The ultimate goal of DOE's Thermal Energy Storage Program is to successfully transfer ATES technology to industrial and commercial sectors. The primary objective of this study was to identify prospective sites and determine the technical and economic feasibility of implementing chill ATES technology. A secondary objective was to identify site-specific factors promoting or inhibiting the application of chill ATES technology so that other potentially attractive sites could be more easily identified and evaluated. A preliminary investigation of the feasibility of commercializing chill ATES in automotive assembly facilities was completed. The results suggested that automotive assembly facilities was completed. The results suggested that automotive assembly facilities represent a good entry market for chill ATES, if the system is cost-effective. As a result, this study was undertaken to identify and evaluate prospective chill ATES applications in the automotive industry. The balance of the report contains two main sections. Section 2.0 describes the site identification process. Site feasibility is addressed in Section 3.0. Overall study conclusions and recommendations are than presented in Section 4.0.

Brown, D R; Hattrup, M P; Watts, R L

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Purely functional lazy nondeterministic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Functional logic programming and probabilistic programming have demonstrated the broad benefits of combining laziness (nonstrict evaluation with sharing of the results) with nondeterminism. Yet these benefits are seldom enjoyed in functional programming ...

Sebastian Fischer; Oleg Kiselyov; Chung-chieh Shan

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer Matthew Ginder-Vogel1, Wei-Min Wu1, Jack Carley2, Phillip Jardine2, Scott Fendorf1 and Craig Criddle1 1Stanford University, Stanford, CA 2Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Microbial Respiration Figure 1. Uranium(VI) reduction is driven by microbial respiration resulting in the precipitation of uraninite. Uranium contamination of ground and surface waters has been detected at numerous sites throughout the world, including agricultural evaporation ponds (1), U.S. Department of Energy nuclear weapons manufacturing areas, and mine tailings sites (2). In oxygen-containing groundwater, uranium is generally found in the hexavalent oxidation state (3,4), which is a relatively soluble chemical form. As U(VI) is transported through

417

Methane entrained in geopressured aquifers, Texas Gulf Coast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six tests of geopressured aquifers have yielded between 3.6 to 4.5 m/sup 3//m/sup 3/ (20 to 25 scf/bbl) of gas. These low gas concentrations are attributed to high salinities, that in all tests exceeded 100,000 mg/l, but undersaturated conditions cannot be ruled out completely. Research efforts are designed to delineate the geographic and stratigraphic variations in salinity and to recognize regional and local trends so that zones of lower salinity and higher gas concentration can be identified. Moreover, well logs and seismic data are being used to develop methods of detecting low concentrations of free gas in watered-out gas sands and in thin sands that were considered as noncommercial prior to renewed interest in unconventional gas supplies. (MHR)

Morton, R.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Cost analysis of power plant cooling using aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most utilities in the US experience their peak demand for electric power during periods with high ambient temperature. Unfortunately, the performance of many power plants decreases with high ambient temperature. The use of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for seasonal storage of chill can be an alternative method for heat rejection. Cold water produced during the previous winter is stored in the aquifer and can be used to provide augmented cooling during peak demand periods increasing the output of many Rankine cycle power plants. This report documents an investigation of the technical and economic feasibility of using aquifer thermal energy storage for peak cooling of power plants. 9 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

Zimmerman, P.W.; Drost, M.K.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

LIRR High-Speed Flywheel Demonstration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LIRR High-Speed Flywheel LIRR High-Speed Flywheel Demonstration Guy Sliker Program Manager Research & Technology Development New York Power Authority This project is part of the Joint Energy Storage Initiative between the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE/ESS), and managed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Presentation Layout Introduction Flywheel Description Project Reasoning Project Objective Project Participants Expected Benefits New York Power Authority Highlights A public benefit energy corporation founded 1931 Largest non-federal public electric utility in United States Wholesale power supplier throughout New York State and neighboring states as required by law

420

Review of simulation techniques for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The storage of thermal energy in aquifers has recently received considerable attention as a means to conserve and more efficiently use energy supplies. The analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems will rely on the results from mathematical and geochemical models. Therefore, the state-of-the-art models relevant to ATES was reviewed and evaluated. These models describe important processes active in ATES including ground-water flow, heat transport (heat flow), solute transport (movement of contaminants), and geochemical reactions. In general, available models of the saturated ground-water environment are adequate to address most concerns associated with ATES; that is, design, operation, and environmental assessment. In those cases where models are not adequate, development should be preceded by efforts to identify significant physical phenomena and relate model parameters to measurable quantities. Model development can then proceed with the expectation of an adequate data base existing for the model's eventual use. Review of model applications to ATES shows that the major emphasis has been on generic sensitivity analysis and site characterization. Assuming that models are applied appropriately, the primary limitation on model calculations is the data base used to construct the model. Numerical transport models are limited by the uncertainty of subsurface data and the lack of long-term historical data for calibration. Geochemical models are limited by the lack of thermodynamic data for the temperature ranges applicable to ATES. Model applications undertaken with data collection activities on ATES sites should provide the most important contributions to the understanding and utilization of ATES. Therefore, the primary conclusion of this review is that model application to field sites in conjunction with data collection activities is essential to the development of this technology.

Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.; Miller, W.J.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Offsite demonstrations for MWLID technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the Offsite Demonstration Project for Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID)-developed environmental site characterization and remediation technologies is to facilitate the transfer, use, and commercialization of these technologies to the public and private sector. The meet this goal, the project identified environmental restoration needs of mixed waste and/or hazardous waste landfill owners (Native American, municipal, DOE, and DoD); documenting potential demonstration sites and the contaminants present at each site; assessing the environmental regulations that would effect demonstration activities; and evaluating site suitability for demonstrating MWLID technologies at the tribal and municipal sites identified. Eighteen landfill sites within a 40.2-km radius of Sandia National Laboratories are listed on the CERCLIS Site/Event Listing for the state of New Mexico. Seventeen are not located within DOE or DoD facilities and are potential offsite MWLID technology demonstration sites. Two of the seventeen CERCLIS sites, one on Native American land and one on municipal land, were evaluated and identified as potential candidates for off-site demonstrations of MWLID-developed technologies. Contaminants potentially present on site include chromium waste, household/commercial hazardous waste, volatile organic compounds, and petroleum products. MWLID characterization technologies applicable to these sites include Magnetometer Towed Array, Cross-borehole Electromagnetic Imaging, SitePlanner {trademark}/PLUME, Hybrid Directional Drilling, Seamist{trademark}/Vadose Zone Monitoring, Stripping Analyses, and x-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Heavy Metals.

Williams, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gruebel, R. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

CAES Demonstration Newsletter, October 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

423

CAES Demonstration Newsletter, July 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

424

CAES Demonstration Newsletter, January 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

CAES Demonstration Newsletter, October 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

426

CAES Demonstration Newsletter, August 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

427

CAES Demonstration Newsletter, July 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the fourth quarter of 1990, steady-state performance testing at the Nucla Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) resumed under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. Co-sponsorship of the Demonstration Test Program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was completed on June 15, 1990. From October through December, 1990, Colorado-Ute Electric Association (CUEA) completed a total of 23 steady-state performance tests, 4 dynamic tests, and set operating records during November and December as the result of improved unit operating reliability. Highlight events and achievements during this period of operation are presented.

Not Available

1991-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Annual Report on Colorado-Ute Electric Association's NUCLA Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Demonstration Program covers the period from February 1987 through December 1988. The outline for presentation in this report includes a summary of unit operations along with individual sections covering progress in study plan areas that commenced during this reporting period. These include cold-mode shakedown and calibration, plant commercial performance statistics, unit start-up (cold), coal and limestone preparation and handling, ash handling system performance and operating experience, tubular air heater, baghouse operation and performance, materials monitoring, and reliability monitoring. During this reporting period, the coal-mode shakedown and calibration plan was completed. (VC)

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

NETL: Major Demonstrations Success Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Technology from Clean Coal Demonstration Projects PDF-75KB (June 2006) The Investment Pays Off PDF-3.7MB (Nov 1999) Clean Coal Technology: The Investment Pays Off (July...

431

EGS Demonstration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » EGS Demonstration Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for EGS Demonstration Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

432

Energy Efficiency Demonstration: Executive Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Efficiency Demonstration was a field-performance assessment of emerging, efficient end-use technologies, deployed with extensive measurement instrumentation at multiple sites throughout the United States. EPRI collaborated with fourteen utilities spread throughout the United States. The selected technologies were known to have the potential to significantly reduce energy consumption in residential and commercial applications. The technologies demonstrated were: light emitting diode (LED) ...

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy Efficiency Demonstration Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Efficiency Demonstration was a field-performance assessment of emerging, efficient end-use technologies, deployed with extensive measurement instrumentation at multiple sites throughout the United States. EPRI collaborated with fourteen utilities spread throughout the United States. The selected technologies were known to have the potential to significantly reduce energy consumption in residential and commercial applications. The technologies demonstrated were: light emitting diode (LED) ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

Landfill Gas-to-Electricity Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medium Btu methane gas is a naturally occurring byproduct of anaerobic digestion of landfilled municipal solid waste. The energy potential of landfill gas in New York State is estimated to be 61 trillion Btu's per year or the equivalent of 10% of the natural gas used annually in the state. The 18-month Landfill Gas-to-Electricity Demonstration Project conducted at the Fresh Kills Landfill in Staten Island, New York conclusively demonstrated that landfill gas is an acceptable fuel for producing electricity using an internal combustion engine/generator set. Landfill gas proved to be a reliable and consistent fuel source during a six-month field test program. Engine exhaust emissions were determined to be comparable to that of natural gas and no unusually high corrosion rates on standard pipeline material were found.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant: Design, Construction, and Early Startup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Binary-cycle technology could almost double the electric energy yield from known hydrothermal resources. The 45-MWe Heber geothermal demonstration plant--now in a three-year test and demonstration program--has successfully passed through a series of feasibility studies, design stages, and field experiments that show its promise to tap these resources.

1987-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

436

40 Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 40 Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal energy has been supplying heat to district networks in the Paris Basin for more than 40 years. The most serious difficulties have been corrosion and scaling related problems that occurred in many geothermal loops in the mid-1980s. The main target of all exploration and exploitation projects has been the Dogger aquifer. Most of the operating facilities use the "doublet" technology which consists of a closed loop with one production well and one injection well. Injection of the cooled

437

The hydrogeochemistry of pond and rice field recharge : implications for the arsenic contaminated aquifers in Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shallow aquifers in Bangladesh, which provide drinking water for millions and irrigation water for innumerable rice fields, are severely contaminated with geogenic arsenic. Water mass balance calculations show that ...

Neumann, Rebecca B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Estimation of CO2 injection well requirements into saline aquifers for pre-feasibility CCS economics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sub-surface saline aquifers are candidates as CO2 injection sites because they could have significant storage potential. One of the long-standing issues in assessing such storage… (more)

Bukhteeva, Olga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Seasonal dynamics in costal aquifers : investigation of submarine groundwater discharge through field measurements and numerical models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fresh and saline groundwater flowing from coastal aquifers into the ocean comprise submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). This outflow is an important pathway for the transport of nutrients and contaminants, and has ...

Michael, Holly Anne, 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Molecular analysis of phosphate limitation in Geobacteraceae during the bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Bioremediation of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer A.et al. , 1999) as well as uranium (Anderson et al. , 2003;Geobacter species to remove uranium from the groundwater of

N'Guessan, L.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquifer demonstration program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Saturated-Unsaturated flow in a Compressible Leaky-unconfined Aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical solution is developed for three-dimensional flow towards a partially penetrating large-diameter well in an unconfined aquifer bounded below by an aquitard of finite or semi-infinite extent. The analytical solution is derived using Laplace and Hankel transforms, then inverted numerically. Existing solutions for flow in leaky unconfined aquifers neglect the unsaturated zone following an assumption of instantaneous drainage assumption due to Neuman [1972]. We extend the theory of leakage in unconfined aquifers by (1) including water flow and storage in the unsaturated zone above the water table, and (2) allowing the finite-diameter pumping well to partially penetrate the aquifer. The investigation of model-predicted results shows that leakage from an underlying aquitard leads to significant departure from the unconfined solution without leakage. The investigation of dimensionless time-drawdown relationships shows that the aquitard drawdown also depends on unsaturated zone properties and the pumping-well wellbore storage effects.

Phoolendra K. Mishra; Velimir V. Vessilinov; Kristopher L. Kuhlman

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

Saturated-Unsaturated flow in a Compressible Leaky-unconfined Aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical solution is developed for three-dimensional flow towards a partially penetrating large-diameter well in an unconfined aquifer bounded below by an aquitard of finite or semi-infinite extent. The analytical solution is derived using Laplace and Hankel transforms, then inverted numerically. Existing solutions for flow in leaky unconfined aquifers neglect the unsaturated zone following an assumption of instantaneous drainage assumption due to Neuman [1972]. We extend the theory of leakage in unconfined aquifers by (1) including water flow and storage in the unsaturated zone above the water table, and (2) allowing the finite-diameter pumping well to partially penetrate the aquifer. The investigation of model-predicted results shows that leakage from an underlying aquitard leads to significant departure from the unconfined solution without leakage. The investigation of dimensionless time-drawdown relationships shows that the aquitard drawdown also depends on unsaturated zone properties and the pumping...

Mishra, Phoolendra K; Kuhlman, Kristopher L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Isotopes of helium, hydrogen, and carbon as groundwater tracers in aquifers along the Colorado River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.1. Battle for Colorado River Water. Importance ofthat will be replaced by Colorado River water in Arizona,in Aquifers along the Colorado River A Thesis submitted in

Haber, Samuel Ainsworth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Environmental assessment of the potential effects of aquifer thermal energy storage systems on microorganisms in groundwater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the potential environmental effects (both adverse and beneficials) of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) technology pertaining to microbial communities indigenous to subsurface environments (i.e., aquifers) and the propagation, movement, and potential release of pathogenic microorganisms (specifically, Legionella) within ATES systems. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in aquifers shows great promise to reduce peak demand; reduce electric utility load problems; contribute to establishing favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems; and reduce pollution from extraction, refining, and combustion of fossil fuels. However, concerns that the widespread implementation of this technology may have adverse effects on biological systems indigeneous to aquifers, as well as help to propagate and release pathogenic organisms that enter thee environments need to be resolved. 101 refs., 2 tabs.

Hicks, R.J.; Stewart, D.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Simulating CO2 storage in saline aquifers with improved code RCB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geological storage of CO2 in saline aquifers is believed to be one of the most promising ways to reduce the concentration of the greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Injection of CO2 will, however, lead to dissolution of minerals in regions of lowered ... Keywords: CO2, RCB (retrasocodebright), gas density correction, gas solubility correction, geochemistry, geomechanics, improved Newton-Raphson iteration method, multiphase flow, relaxation factor, saline aquifer, simulation

Shunping Liu; Bjorn Kvamme

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL's NETL's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Program Advances of Multi-pollutant and CO 2 Control Technologies Chicago, IL April 30, 2007 Timothy Fout Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory T. Fout, Apr. 2007 Outline for Presentation * NETL Overview * The Issue * The Solutions * What is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) * DOE's Sequestration Program Structure * CO 2 Capture Research Projects T. Fout, Apr. 2007 National Energy Technology Laboratory * Only DOE national lab dedicated to fossil energy - Fossil fuels provide 85% of U.S. energy supply * One lab, five locations, one management structure * 1,100 Federal and support-contractor employees * Research spans fundamental science to technology demonstrations West Virginia

447

QuickPEP Tool Demonstration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QuickPEP Tool Demonstration QuickPEP Tool Demonstration Riyaz Papar, PE, CEM Director, Energy Assets & Optimization Hudson Technologies Company William Orthwein, CEM US Department of Energy February 26, 2009 Agenda * Introduction * Plant Energy Profiling * QuickPEP Demonstration * New features in Quick 2.0 * Wrap Up * There are different levels of Plant Energy Profiling - 10,000 ft level - Overall Plant * Phone interview * 1-day plant walkthrough * Using QuickPEP - 1,000 ft level - System level * Gap Analysis (Qualitative only) * 1-day plant walkthrough * 3-day plant Energy Savings Assessments (ESA) * Using US DOE BestPractices System Tools Plant Energy Profiling 10,000 ft approach - The Big Picture in your Plant * Looking at the forest first - Understanding your plant from an energy supply & demand perspective

448

Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shallow Carbon SequeStration Shallow Carbon SequeStration DemonStration ProjeCt Background The Shallow Carbon Sequestration Pilot Demonstration Project is a cooperative effort involving City Utilities of Springfield (CU); Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR); Missouri State University (MSU); Missouri University of Science & Technology (MS&T); AmerenUE; Aquila, Inc.; Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc.; Empire District Electric Company; and Kansas City Power & Light. The purpose of this project is to assess the feasibility of carbon sequestration at Missouri power plant sites. The six electric utilities involved in the project account for approximately 90 percent of the electric generating capacity in Missouri. Description The pilot demonstration will evaluate the feasibility of utilizing the Lamotte and

449

MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration Facility | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with MDF Working with MDF Titanium robotic hand holding sphere fabricated using additive manufacturing Home | User Facilities | MDF MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration Facility SHARE As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources for transforming the next generation of scientific discovery into solutions for rebuilding and revitalizing America's manufacturing industries. Manufacturing industries engage ORNL's expertise in materials synthesis, characterization, and process technology to reduce technical risk and validate investment for innovations targeting products of the future. DOE's Manufacturing Demonstration Facility, established at ORNL, helps industry adopt new manufacturing technologies to reduce life-cycle energy

450

MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration Facility | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF HFIR MDF Working with MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Titanium robotic hand holding sphere fabricated using additive manufacturing Home | User Facilities | MDF MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration Facility SHARE As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources for transforming the next generation of scientific discovery into solutions for rebuilding and revitalizing America's manufacturing industries. Manufacturing industries engage ORNL's expertise in materials synthesis, characterization, and process technology to reduce technical risk and validate investment for innovations targeting products of the future. DOE's Manufacturing Demonstration Facility, established at ORNL, helps industry adopt new manufacturing technologies to reduce life-cycle energy

451

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was undertaken in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-PS30-03GO93010, resulting in this Cooperative Agreement with the Ford Motor Company and BP to demonstrate and evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and required fueling infrastructure. Ford initially placed 18 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCV) in three geographic regions of the US (Sacramento, CA; Orlando, FL; and southeast Michigan). Subsequently, 8 advanced technology vehicles were developed and evaluated by the Ford engineering team in Michigan. BP is Ford's principal partner and co-applicant on this project and provided the hydrogen infrastructure to support the fuel cell vehicles. BP ultimately provided three new fueling stations. The Ford-BP program consists of two overlapping phases. The deliverables of this project, combined with those of other industry consortia, are to be used to provide critical input to hydrogen economy commercialization decisions by 2015. The program's goal is to support industry efforts of the US President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative in developing a path to a hydrogen economy. This program was designed to seek complete systems solutions to address hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle development, and possible synergies between hydrogen fuel electricity generation and transportation applications. This project, in support of that national goal, was designed to gain real world experience with Hydrogen powered Fuel Cell Vehicles (H2FCV) 'on the road' used in everyday activities, and further, to begin the development of the required supporting H2 infrastructure. Implementation of a new hydrogen vehicle technology is, as expected, complex because of the need for parallel introduction of a viable, available fuel delivery system and sufficient numbers of vehicles to buy fuel to justify expansion of the fueling infrastructure. Viability of the fuel structure means widespread, affordable hydrogen which can return a reasonable profit to the fuel provider, while viability of the vehicle requires an expected level of cost, comfort, safety and operation, especially driving range, that consumers require. This presents a classic 'chicken and egg' problem, which Ford believes can be solved with thoughtful implementation plans. The eighteen Ford Focus FCV vehicles that were operated for this demonstration project provided the desired real world experience. Some things worked better than expected. Most notable was the robustness and life of the fuel cell. This is thought to be the result of the full hybrid configuration of the drive system where the battery helps to overcome the performance reduction associated with time related fuel cell degradation. In addition, customer satisfaction surveys indicated that people like the cars and the concept and operated them with little hesitation. Although the demonstrated range of the cars was near 200 miles, operators felt constrained because of the lack of a number of conveniently located fueling stations. Overcoming this major concern requires overcoming a key roadblock, fuel storage, in a manner that permits sufficient quantity of fuel without sacrificing passenger or cargo capability. Fueling infrastructure, on the other hand, has been problematic. Only three of a planned seven stations were opened. The difficulty in obtaining public approval and local government support for hydrogen fuel, based largely on the fear of hydrogen that grew from past disasters and atomic weaponry, has inhibited progress and presents a major roadblock to implementation. In addition the cost of hydrogen production, in any of the methodologies used in this program, does not show a rapid reduction to commercially viable rates. On the positive side of this issue was the demonstrated safety of the fueling station, equipment and process. In the Ford program, there were no reported safety incidents.

Dr. Scott Staley

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

This program was undertaken in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-PS30-03GO93010, resulting in this Cooperative Agreement with the Ford Motor Company and BP to demonstrate and evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and required fueling infrastructure. Ford initially placed 18 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCV) in three geographic regions of the US (Sacramento, CA; Orlando, FL; and southeast Michigan). Subsequently, 8 advanced technology vehicles were developed and evaluated by the Ford engineering team in Michigan. BP is Ford's principal partner and co-applicant on this project and provided the hydrogen infrastructure to support the fuel cell vehicles. BP ultimately provided three new fueling stations. The Ford-BP program consists of two overlapping phases. The deliverables of this project, combined with those of other industry consortia, are to be used to provide critical input to hydrogen economy commercialization decisions by 2015. The program's goal is to support industry efforts of the US President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative in developing a path to a hydrogen economy. This program was designed to seek complete systems solutions to address hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle development, and possible synergies between hydrogen fuel electricity generation and transportation applications. This project, in support of that national goal, was designed to gain real world experience with Hydrogen powered Fuel Cell Vehicles (H2FCV) 'on the road' used in everyday activities, and further, to begin the development of the required supporting H2 infrastructure. Implementation of a new hydrogen vehicle technology is, as expected, complex because of the need for parallel introduction of a viable, available fuel delivery system and sufficient numbers of vehicles to buy fuel to justify expansion of the fueling infrastructure. Viability of the fuel structure means widespread, affordable hydrogen which can return a reasonable profit to the fuel provider, while viability of the vehicle requires an expected level of cost, comfort, safety and operation, especially driving range, that consumers require. This presents a classic 'chicken and egg' problem, which Ford believes can be solved with thoughtful implementation plans. The eighteen Ford Focus FCV vehicles that were operated for this demonstration project provided the desired real world experience. Some things worked better than expected. Most notable was the robustness and life of the fuel cell. This is thought to be the result of the full hybrid configuration of the drive system where the battery helps to overcome the performance reduction associated with time related fuel cell degradation. In addition, customer satisfaction surveys indicated that people like the cars and the concept and operated them with little hesitation. Although the demonstrated range of the cars was near 200 miles, operators felt constrained because of the lack of a number of conveniently located fueling stations. Overcoming this major concern requires overcoming a key roadblock, fuel storage, in a manner that permits sufficient quantity of fuel without sacrificing passenger or cargo capability. Fueling infrastructure, on the other hand, has been problematic. Only three of a planned seven stations were opened. The difficulty in obtaining public approval and local government support for hydrogen fuel, based largely on the fear of hydrogen that grew from past disasters and atomic weaponry, has inhibited progress and presents a major roadblock to implementation. In addition the cost of hydrogen production, in any of the methodologies used in this program, does not show a rapid reduction to commercially viable rates. On the positive side of this issue was the demonstrated safety of the fueling station, equipment and process. In the Ford program, there were no reported safety incidents.

Dr. Scott Staley

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Joint demilitarization technology test and demonstration capabilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a review of the two components of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Demilitarization test and demonstration capabilities. Part one is a general discussion of the NTS and the many assets it offers to the Demilitarization community; and more specifically, a discussion of the NTS Open Burn/Open Detonation (OB/OD) test facility. The NTS Joint Demilitarization Technology (JDT) OB/OD Test Chamber is located at the X Tunnel facility which as been designed and constructed to contain and characterize the effluent from demilitarization activities. X Tunnel consists of a large test chamber capable of withstanding a 3,000 pound net explosive weight detonation or up to a static pressure of well over 100 pounds per square inch. The test chamber is fully instrumented to measure and collect gas and particulate samples as well as to monitor shock phenomenology. Part two is a discussion of the NTS Tactical Demilitarization Demonstration (TaDD) program currently planned for the Area 11 Technical Facility. This project will produce