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1

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aID5044&FilenameAquatic+Habitat+Protection+Permit+Application.pdf&lEnglish Summary The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) provides for the protection of...

2

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Saskatchewan Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Saskatchewan Ministry of the Environment The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) provides for the protection of aquatic habitat and states that a permit is required: to

3

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats September 27, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis This aerial photo shows open water and floating ice on ponds, lakes and river channels in the Sagavanirktok River Delta in Alaska’s North Slope. PNNL scientists employed satellite technology to understand the impacts of oil development activities on the environment. Using satellite radar to “see” through the ice, scientists detected critical fish overwintering habitats by identifying where ice was grounded and where it was floating. Utilizing this information on critical habitats, fishery managers can suggest locations for energy development activities that increase the sustainability of fishery resources and minimize environmental impacts. Research was funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior. | Photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

5

Willamette River Habitat Protection and Restoration Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................................6 a. The Challenge of Restoration in a Large River/Flood Plain System.............6 b. The Need Goals: Anchor Habitats as Stepping Stones....................20 f. Measuring Results-purpose dams and reservoirs as part of the Federal Columbia River Power System, as well as 42 miles of bank

6

Habitat selection and thermal biology of a large aquatic ectotherm, the alligator snapping turtle (Macroclemys temminckii)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microhabitat selection, physiology, and body size all at-fed thermal biology of ectotherms. In this study, I determined the influence of these variables on the thermal biology of a large aquatic ectotherm, Macroclemys temminckii. I tested the hypothesis that M. temminckii selected microhabitats from those available using radio telemetry and by comparing occupied microhabitats to available microhabitats. Results indicated M. temminckii selected relatively warm and structurally complex microhabitats close to shore. Body size and physiology also affected thermal biology of M. temminckii. Using miniature temperature data loggers, I procured continuous records of ambient and body temperatures for four turtles. I found, in the field, M. temminckii heated faster than they cooled but equilibrated to ambient temperature when inactive. Cooling trials performed in the laboratory indicated larger turtles equilibrated more slowly to ambient temperatures than smaller turtles. These results indicated physiology and size of aquatic ectotherms affected body temperature transiently and prolonged periods when turtles' body temperatures remained different from ambient temperature. However, inactive turtles eventually equilibrated to ambient temperatures. I concluded that selection of appropriate microhabitats was the only method for aquatic turtles to control body temperature for longer time periods, and physiology and body size interacted to influence the amount of time body temperature dithered from ambient temperature.

Nelson, Ryan Edward

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Habitat Conservation Plans: Protecting Species, Enhancing Democratic Legitimacy and Promoting Stewardship are Not Mutually Exclusive Goals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE HCP HANDBOOK .. I.HABITAT CONSERVATION PLANNING HANDBOOK, http://www.fws.gov/bounda- ries. " 46 The HCP handbook does provide that the

Hulick, Anne B.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

Golder Associates, Inc.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

11

Aquatic Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an assessment of the natural area value of eight Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and seven Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties in east Tennessee. It follows a previous study in 2009 that analyzed and evaluated terrestrial natural areas on the Reservation. The purpose of both studies was to evaluate and rank those specially designated areas on the Reservation that contain sensitive species, special habitats, and natural area value. Natural areas receive special protections through established statutes, regulations, and policies. The ORR contains 33,542 acres (13,574 ha) administered by the Department of Energy. The surface waters of the Reservation range from 1st-order to 5th-order streams, but the majority of the streams recognized as ANAs and ARAs are 1st- and 2nd-order streams. East Fork Poplar Creek is a 4th-order stream and the largest watershed that drains Reservation lands. All the waters of the Reservation eventually reach the Clinch River on the southern and western boundaries of the ORR. All available information was collected, synthesized, and evaluated. Field observations were made to support and supplement the available information. Geographic information system mapping techniques were used to develop several quantitative attributes about the study areas. Narrative descriptions of each ANA and ARA and tables of numerical data were prepared. Criteria for assessment and evaluation were developed, and eight categories of factors were devised to produce a ranking system. The evaluation factors used in the ranking system were: (A) size of area, (B) percentage of watershed protected, (C) taxa present with protected status, (D) overall biotic diversity, (E) stream features, (F) water quality and use support ratings, (G) disturbance regime, and (H) other factors. Each factor was evaluated on a 5-point ranking scale (0-4), and each area received a composite score, where 32 was the maximum score possible. A highly ranked ANA or ARA is one that is large in size compared to other areas, includes a greater proportion of the watershed within Reservation boundaries, contains a number of status taxa at high densities, exhibits a high overall biodiversity, has very good or excellent habitat and water quality, is well protected and isolated from disturbances, and shows several other characteristics that contribute to natural area value. In this report, the term 'natural area' is loosely defined as a terrestrial or aquatic system that exhibits, or is thought to exhibit, high natural integrity and other significant natural values. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate and rank the currently recognized Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for their natural area value. A previous study (Baranski 2009) analyzed, evaluated, and ranked terrestrial areas (Natural Areas [NAs], Reference Areas [RAs], and Cooperative Management Areas [CMAs]) on the ORR for natural area value, and a precise methodology for natural area evaluation was developed. The present study is intended to be a complement and companion to the terrestrial area study and attempts to employ a similar methodology for aquatic areas so that aquatic and terrestrial areas can be compared on a similar scale. This study specifically develops criteria for assessing the ecological, biodiversity, and natural area importance and significance of aquatic systems on the Reservation in a relevant and consistent manner. The information can be integrated into the Tennessee Natural Heritage Program (http://tn.gov/environment/na/nhp.shtml) system and applied to potential new aquatic areas. Further, the information will be useful in planning, management, and protection efforts on the ORR.

Baranski, Dr. Michael J. [Catawba College

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Aquatic Turtles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aquatic Turtles Aquatic Turtles Nature Bulletin No 632 march 11, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist AQUATIC TURTLES Turtles are old and conservative. All other living reptiles -- crocodiles, lizards and snakes -- came along much later So did birds and mammals. The group was already ancient when the giant dinosaurs made their appearance, ruled the animal kingdom during the Age of Reptiles, then became extinct. The turtles merely smiled their toothless smile and slowly went their way. With a shell that is both a house and a suit of armor, they have survived 200 million years with very few changes. Five species of aquatic turtles are more or less common in the Chicago region and three others are rare. One or more kinds can be found in each of over a hundred bodies of water in the forest preserves.

13

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; Skookumchuck Creek Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Skookumchuck Creek juvenile bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat-monitoring program is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. This project was commissioned in planning for fish habitat protection and forest development within the Skookumchuck Creek watershed and was intended to expand upon similar studies initiated within the Wigwam River from 2000 to 2002. The broad intent is to develop a better understanding of juvenile bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout recruitment and the ongoing hydrologic and morphologic processes, especially as they relate to spawning and rearing habitat quality. The 2002 project year represents the first year of a long-term bull trout-monitoring program with current studies focused on collecting baseline information. This report provides a summary of results obtained to date. Bull trout represented 72.4% of the catch. Fry dominated the catch because site selection was biased towards electrofishing sample sites which favored high bull trout fry capture success. The mean density of all juvenile bull trout was estimated to be 6.6 fish/100m{sup 2}. This represents one-half the densities reported for the 2002 Wigwam River enumeration program, even though enumeration of bull trout redds was an order of magnitude higher for the Wigwam River. Typically, areas with combined fry and juvenile densities greater than 1.5 fish per 100 m{sup 2} are cited as critical rearing areas. Trends in abundance appeared to be related to proximity to spawning areas, bed material size, and water depth. Cover components utilized by juvenile and adult bull trout and cutthroat trout were interstices, boulder, depth, overhead vegetation and LWD. The range of morphological stream types encompass the stable and resilient spectrum (C3(1), C3 and B3c). The Skookumchuck can be generalized as a slightly entrenched, meandering, riffle-pool, cobble dominated channel with a well-developed floodplain. The presence of an undisturbed riparian ecosystem dominated by mature, coniferous forest, combined with a high percentage of coarse particles in the stream bank, result in stable stream banks with low sediment supply. The results of the habitat assessment concur with the stable stream channel type and channel disturbance features noted were infrequent and minor in nature. Detailed summaries of channel profile, pattern, dimension and materials are provided in Appendices. It was recommended that a fourth index site representing tributary spawning and rearing habitat be established in lower Sandown Creek and included for baseline data collection in year two.

Cope, R.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Use of a 600?kHz ADCP to characterize submerged aquatic vegetation in a very shallow estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) serves as a key habitat for the larval forms of many commercially important marine organisms. In coastal waters

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

16

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial and Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Fire Island National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial and Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Fire Island National Seashore Satellite Remote Sensing Data in FIIS Vegetation Mapping The vegetation communities and spatial patterns necessary. #12;Hyperspectral Remote Sensing in Seagrass Habitat Mapping Recent development of hyperspectral

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

18

An assessment of fish community structure and seasonal habitat use of headwater confined channels and headwater wetlands in the lower Flint River Basin, Southwest Georgia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Headwater wetland streams comprise a significant proportion of aquatic habitats in the Southeast. Nonetheless, little is known about their fish communities. I examined seasonal fish (more)

McPherson, Rodger Dale, Jr.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

Childs, Allen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Bird Habitats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bird Habitats Bird Habitats Bird Habitats The avian nest box monitoring network is located in northern New Mexico to investigate the health and condition of bird populations that nest in bird houses on the Pajarito plateau. April 12, 2012 Avian nest box on LANL land Boxes are placed in the open ponderosa pine forest of the canyons and piñon-juniper woodland on the Pajarito plateau mesas. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The monitoring data are used in a population viability analysis that can determine the status of the population and potential impacts of contaminants. Who nests in our network? More than two dozen North American bird species prefer to nest in bird houses. At LANL, we provide nestboxes for the following native bird

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21

Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

Florida Aquatic Preserve Act (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aquatic Preserve Act (Florida) Aquatic Preserve Act (Florida) Florida Aquatic Preserve Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Water Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection This Act provides for state-owned submerged lands in areas which have

23

Aquatic Habitat Institute An Assessment of The Loading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with gravel and some asphalt pavement and used to store bulk materials. About 0.012 km2 in the central PSNS, rubble, spent abrasive grit ("blaster sand" and copper slag), and dredged sediment. In 1998, this area

24

Aquate Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Aquate Solar Place Tzur Igal, Israel Zip 44862 Product Developing a water-integrated PV (WIPV) platform. References Aquate Solar1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

25

Catalog of Assessment Methods for Evaluating the Effects of Power Plant Operations on Aquatic Communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the current state of knowledge on methods for assessing the effects of stressors on the health, function, integrity and quality of aquatic populations and ecosystems. This information will be valuable to industry, resource agencies, non-governmental environmental organizations, and universities involved in research, management and protection of aquatic resources.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

during the nation's production of plutonium are stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state. These wastes naturally create unusual...

27

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM TECHNICAL REPORT A-S3-1 AERIAL SURVEY TECHNIQUES TO MAP NUMBER rGOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. Technical Report A-83-l 4. TI T L E (""d Subtitle) 5. AERIAL SURVEY···..,." -.d Identity by block numb,,,) Aerial surveys Computer applications Aquatic plant control Mapping

US Army Corps of Engineers

28

Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HABITAT EVALUATION: HABITAT EVALUATION: GUIDANCE FOR THE REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT DOCUMENTS EPA Contract No. 68-C0-0070 work Assignments B-21, 1-12 January 1993 Submitted to: Jim Serfis U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Federal Activities 401 M Street, SW Washington, DC 20460 Submitted by: Mark Southerland Dynamac Corporation The Dynamac Building 2275 Research Boulevard Rockville, MD 20850 CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION ... ...... .... ... ................................................. 1 Habitat Conservation .......................................... 2 Habitat Evaluation Methodology ................................... 2 Habitats of Concern ........................................... 3 Definition of Habitat ..................................... 4

29

Gravity Currents in Aquatic Canopies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lock exchange experiment is used to investigate the propagation of gravity currents through a random array of rigid, emergent cylinders which represents a canopy of aquatic plants. As canopy drag increases, the propagating ...

Tanino, Yukie

30

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

Coty, J

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Beaver Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Gamblin Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 12, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Gamblin Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Gamblin Lake Project provides a total of 273.28 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 127.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 21.06 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow provides 78.05 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetland habitat provides 46.25 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the Gamblin Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Impact of power plants on aquatic systems: a social perspective  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed are: aquatic effects of thermal electric power stations; legal aspects of water pollution; EPA provisions for levels of thermal discharges to assure protection and propagation of a balanced, indigenous population of shellfish, fish, and wildlife in a body of water; cost benefit analysis of steam electric power effluents; cooling systems and siting of power plants; simulation modeling of population dynamics; and sociological aspects of water pollution. (HLW)

Coutant, C.C.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Tritium in the aquatic environment  

SciTech Connect

Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products.

Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Frank, M.L.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Protection of Biota on Nonpark Public Lands: Examples from DOE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

urban development destroyed many wetland habitats. In recent years, a "no net loss of wetlandsn policy on the ORR has effectively protected these species, even in areas...

37

Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage, headgates and fishways. These designs were used to submit for project implementation funding through the WA Salmon Recovery Funding Board. (4) Complete 6 early action projects on Ahtanum Creek--One gravity diversion was replaced with a pump and pump end screen and 5 pump end screens were installed. (5) Conduct two topographic surveys--For the City of Yakima on the Fruitvale diversion for the North Yakima Conservation District to support the installation of a pumping plant which would eliminate the need to divert directly from the Naches River and build the gravel berm each year during low flows. For the Taylor Ditch system for the North Yakima Conservation District to support as feasibility of opening the ditch for habitat and at the same time maintaining irrigation deliveries. (6) Procure materials for use in future YTAHP projects, including siphon pipe, delivery pipe, rock, screens, and water meters. These materials will act as match and support the completion of these subsequent YTAHP projects. Overall, with broad agency support and Action Plan funding through BPA, the YTAHP has achieved substantial enhancements that support aquatic species and which will leverage subsequent work through engineering designs and materials. The program was also able to establish the personnel and equipment support for beginning the stream assessment process on tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas Counties. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat.

Myra, David (South Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council, Ellensburg, WA); Ready, Carol A. (Kittitas County Water Purveyors, Ellensburg, WA)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crystal springs 4 Crystal Sp WD bypass reach to overflow? ? 4 dog river 3 City of TD none 3 no infoAppendix B Aquatic Supplement Contents Hood River Subbasin Tables and Figures: Table 1. Current estimated peak summer withdrawals from the Hood River Table 2. Historic lake stocking and fish introductions

39

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) Saskatchewan Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial InstallerContractor Institutional Investor-Owned...

40

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Carey Creek, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In August 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Carey Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Carey Creek Project provides a total of 172.95 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 4.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetlands provide 52.68 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 2.82 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow and grassland meadow provide 98.13 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Emergent wetlands provide 11.53 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Open water provides 2.88 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Carey Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evaluating the Effects of Power Plant Operations on Aquatic Communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of impingement survival studies conducted at steam-electric power plants since 1970, along with guidance for their interpretation and use. This information will be of value to permit applicants, risk assessors, and risk managers in estimating impingement effects, designing future impingement survival studies, and evaluating potential fish protection benefits of technologies, operational measures, and habitat restorations and enhancements. The report is a companion to EPRI r...

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

42

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Biology Team of ESH-20 (the Ecology Group) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies measure water quality parameters and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from sampling sites within the upper canyon stream. Reports by Bennett and Cross discuss previous aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands the previous findings. The Biology Team collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates monthly at three sampling stations within Sandia Canyon in 1995. The two upstream stations occur near a cattail (Typha latifolia) dominated marsh downstream from outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. The third station is approximately 1.5 miles downstream from the outfalls within a mixed conifer forest. All water chemistry parameters measured in Sandia Canyon during 1995 fell within acceptable State limits and scored in the {open_quotes}good{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} ranges when compared to an Environmental Quality Index. However, aquatic macroinvertebrates habitats have been degraded by widespread erosion, channelization, loss of wetlands due to deposition and stream lowering, scour, limited acceptable substrates, LANL releases and spills, and other stressors. Macroinvertebrate communities at all the stations had low diversities, low densities, and erratic numbers of individuals. These results indicate that although the stream possesses acceptable water chemistry, it has reduced biotic potential. The best developed aquatic community occurs at the sampling station with the best habitat and whose downstream location partially mitigates the effects of upstream impairments.

Cross, S.; Nottelman, H.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : West Beaver Lake, 2004-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 103.08 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 7.17 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Conifer forest habitat provides 95.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary. The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as Salmonid Benefits, was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Bald eagle habitat suitability on Melton Hill Reservoir and the Clinch River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area around Melton Hill Reservoir and sections of the Clinch River along the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide suitable habitat for bald eagles for both breeding and wintering activities. Primary limitations on habitat suitability appear to be human activity in aquatic habitats and along shoreline areas, and human development along shoreline areas. ORR provides the majority of the suitable habitat because shoreline development is very limited. Four eagle management strategies discussed for ORR include planning development away from high-quality habitats, allowing forest stands near water to mature, conducting timber stand improvement to foster growth and development in pines and hardwoods, and using introductions to foster the development of a breeding population. The primary objective of this project was to make a qualitative assessment of bald eagle habitat suitability along Melton Hill Reservoir and the Clinch River and in adjacent areas on the ORR, including the proposed Advanced Neutron Source site. This survey`s aim was to provide ORR managers with an indication of whether suitable habitat exists and, if so, where it occurs on ORR. This information should provide the basis for incorporating eagle management into the overall ORR land management plan.

Buehler, D.A. [Univ., of Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Washington Joint Aquatic Resources Permit Application (JARPA...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington Joint Aquatic Resources Permit Application (JARPA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Washington Joint...

47

FINAL REPORT ON THE AQUATIC MERCURY ASSESSMENT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

In February 2000, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 issued a proposed Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for total mercury in the middle and lower Savannah River. The initial TMDL, which would have imposed a 1 ng/l mercury limit for discharges to the middle/lower Savannah River, was revised to 2.8 ng/l in the final TMDL released in February 2001. The TMDL was intended to protect people from the consumption of contaminated fish, which is the major route of mercury exposure to humans. The most bioaccumulative form of mercury is methylmercury, which is produced in aquatic environments by the action of microorganisms on inorganic mercury. Because of the environmental and economic significance of the mercury discharge limits that would have been imposed by the TMDL, the Savannah River Site (SRS) initiated several studies concerning: (1) mercury in SRS discharges, SRS streams and the Savannah River, (2) mercury bioaccumulation factors for Savannah River fish, (3) the use of clams to monitor the influence of mercury from tributary streams on biota in the Savannah River, and (4) mercury in rainwater falling on the SRS. The results of these studies are presented in detail in this report. The first study documented the occurrence, distribution and variation of total and methylmercury at SRS industrial outfalls, principal SRS streams and the Savannah River where it forms the border with the SRS. All of the analyses were performed using the EPA Method 1630/31 ultra low-level and contaminant-free techniques for measuring total and methylmercury. Total mercury at National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) outfalls ranged from 0.31-604 ng/l with a mean of 8.71 ng/l. Mercury-contaminated groundwater was the source for outfalls with significantly elevated mercury concentrations. Total mercury in SRS streams ranged from 0.95-15.7 ng/l. Mean total mercury levels in the streams varied from 2.39 ng/l in Pen Branch to 5.26 ng/l in Tims Branch. Methylmercury ranged from 0.002 ng/l in Upper Three Runs to 2.60 ng/l in Tims Branch. Total mercury in the Savannah River ranged from 0.62 ng/l to 43.9 ng/l, and methylmercury ranged from 0.036 ng/l to 7.54 ng/l. Both total and methylmercury concentrations were consistently high in the river near the mouth of Steel Creek. Total mercury was positively correlated with methylmercury (r = 0.88). Total mercury bound to particulates ranged from 41% to 57% in the river and from 28% to 90% in the streams. Particulate methylmercury varied from 9% to 37% in the river and from 6% to 79% in the streams. Small temporary pools in the Savannah River swamp area near and around Fourmile Branch had the highest concentrations observed in the Savannah River watershed, reaching 1,890 ng/l for total mercury and 34.0 ng/l for methylmercury. The second study developed a mercury bioaccumulation factor (BAF) for the Savannah River near SRS. A BAF is the ratio of the concentration of mercury in fish flesh to the concentration of mercury in the water. BAFs are important in the TMDL process because target concentrations for mercury in water are computed from BAFs. Mercury BAFs are known to differ substantially among fish species, water bodies, and possibly seasons. Knowledge of such variation is needed to determine a BAF that accurately represents average and extreme conditions in the water body under study. Analysis of fish tissue and aqueous methylmercury samples collected at a number of locations and over several seasons in a 110 km (68 mile) reach of the Savannah River demonstrated that BAFs for each species under study varied by factors of three to eight. Influences on BAF variability were location, habitat and season-related differences in fish mercury levels and seasonal differences in methylmercury levels in the water. Overall (all locations, habitats, and seasons) average BAFs were 3.7 x 10{sup 6} for largemouth bass, 1.4 x 10{sup 6} for sunfishes, and 2.5 x 10{sup 6} for white catfish. This study showed that determination of representative BAFs for large rivers requires the collect

Halverson, N

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Calispell Creek Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Calispell Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in February 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Calispell Creek Project provides a total of 138.17 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 5.16 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Grassland provides 132.02 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 0.99 HUs for yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Calispell Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, November 1993--October 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Studies Team (EST) of ESH-20 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies gather water quality measurements and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from permanent sampling sites. Reports by Bennett (1994) and Cross (1994) discuss previous EST aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands those findings. EST collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates at five permanent stations within the canyon from November 1993 through October 1994. The two upstream stations are located below outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. Some water quality parameters are different at the first three stations from those expected of natural streams in the area, indicating degraded water quality due to effluent discharges. The aquatic habitat at the upper stations has also been degraded by sedimentation and channelization. The macroinvertebrate communities at these stations are characterized by low diversities and unstable communities. In contrast, the two downstream stations appear to be in a zone of recovery, where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams of the area. The two lower stations have increased macroinvertebrate diversity and stable communities, further indications of downstream water quality improvement.

Cross, S.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Habitat Management -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Habitat Management Some of the documents on this page are in Portable Document Format (PDF) and can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is covered with mostly contiguous native eastern deciduous hardwood forest. Within that framework are found many ecological communities (e.g., cedar barrens, river bluffs, wetlands) with unique biota, often including rare species. Many research park habitats are managed to protect their ecosystem values, furnish food and shelter for wildlife, and provide sites for research and monitoring. Habitats that receive special attention include prairies, forests, and wetlands and riparian areas.

51

Earth & Aquatic Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth and Aquatic Sciences Earth and Aquatic Sciences SHARE Earth and Aquatic Sciences Create and apply new knowledge across multiple scales to aid decision makers on the stewardship of air, water and land resources. Many factors affect the fate, transport and transformation of metal and radionuclide contaminants found on DOE lands. A fundamental understanding of environmental inorganic and biological interactions is needed for deriving practical solutions to management of DOE lands. ORNL applies molecular to field-scale chemistry, hydrology and microbiology expertise, together with neutron scattering, nano-materials sciences facilities, computing resources and comprehensive models in environmental remediation sciences research. Multiple research projects are carried out with aims of

52

Geopressured habitat: A literature review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature review of the geopressured-geothermal habitat is summarized. Findings are presented and discussed with respect to the principal topics: Casual agents are both geological and geochemical; they include disequilibrium compaction of sediments, clay diagenesis, aquathermal pressuring, hydrocarbon generation, and lateral tectonic compression. The overall physical and chemical characteristics of the habitats are dictated by varying combinations of sedimentation rates, alteration mineralogy, permeability, porosity and pressure, temperature, fluid content and chemistry, and hydrodynamic flow. Habitat pressure seals are considered in terms of their formation processes, geologic characteristics, and physical behavior, including pressure release and reservoir pressure recharge on a geologic time scale. World-wide occurrence of geopressured-geothermal habitats is noted. The main thrust of this topic concerns the U.S.A. and Canada; in addition, reference is made to occurrences in China and indications from deep-sea vents, as well as the contribution of paleo-overpressure to habitat initiation and maintenance. Identification and assessment of the habitat is addressed in relation to use of hydrogeologic, geophysical, geochemical, and geothermic techniques, as well as well-logging and drill-stem-test data. Conclusions concerning the adequacy of the current state of knowledge and its applicability to resource exploration and development are set forth, together with recommendations for the thrust of future work.

Negus-de Wys, Jane

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

Presentation on lessons learned from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Aquatic Species Program 1978-1996 microalgae R&D activities, presented at the 2008 AFOSR Workshop in Washington, D.C.

Jarvis, E. E.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Priest River Project, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; North Eaton Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2005, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the North Eaton Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The North Eaton Lake Project provides a total of 235.05 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 9.38 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Emergent wetland habitat provides 11.36 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Forested wetland provides 10.97 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 203.34 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the North Eaton Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

EPRI Workshop on EMF and Aquatic Life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A workshop on Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) and Aquatic Life was organized by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and held on November 15, 2012, at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) in Moss Landing, California. The purpose of the workshop was to help EPRI identify research needs regarding the potential impact of EMF from offshore energy generation and/or underwater transmission cables on various forms of aquatic life. The workshop participants reviewed the current ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian enclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2000 included: (1) Implementing 2 new projects in the Grande Ronde drainage, and retrofitting one old project that will protect an additional 1.3 miles of stream and 298.3 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Improving fish passage in Bear Creek to restore tributary and mainstem access; (4) Planting and seeding 6.7 stream miles with 7,100 plants and 365 lbs. of seed; (5) Establishing 18 new photopoints and retaking 229 existing photopoint pictures; (6) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (7) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 98.7 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 62 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,910 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.; Stennfeld, Scott P.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Delta Subsidence Reversal, Levee Failure, and Aquatic HabitatA Cautionary Tale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recent, and future subsidence, SacramentoSan Joaquin Delta,SJ, Rojstaczer S. 1996. Subsidence of agricultural lands invertical accretion, and subsidence at three Louisiana

Bates, Matthew E.; Lund, Jay R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Delta Subsidence Reversal, Levee Failure, and Aquatic HabitatA Cautionary Tale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for subsidence- reversal projections, and illustrate some1. Together, these projections estimate the probabilityDISCUSSION Delta Flooding Projections and Simulations The

Bates, Matthew E.; Lund, Jay R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

3 Environmental Conditions 3.1 Characterization of Aquatic Habitat Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on either side. Coordination between these two State agencies, including an understanding of the migratory the insolation and water sto capacity of Bruneau Subbasin Assessment 152 #12;frequency of unstable banks

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Childs, Allen B.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1997. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project provides a total of 313.91 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 16.08 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Shoreline and island habitat provide 7.36 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Wet meadow provides 117.62 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 9.78 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 140.47 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest provides 22.60 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; West Beaver Lake Project, Technical Report 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 82.69 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 8.80 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Conifer forest habitat provides 70.33 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Open water provides 3.30 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Wildlife Supplement Table 1. Land protection status by habitat type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-skinned Newt Yes Yes Dunn's Salamander Larch Mountain Salamander Western Red-backed Salamander Ensatina Clouded Pacific Chorus (Tree) Frog Yes Yes Red-legged Frog Yes Yes Cascades Frog Columbia Spotted Frog Yes Yes Yes Pied-billed Grebe Yes Yes Horned Grebe Yes Yes Red-necked Grebe Yes Yes Eared Grebe Yes Western

65

Grand Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing the opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project originally provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented under revisions of the Fish and Wild Program as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources, is the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No. 199202601). Work undertaken during 2008 included: (1) completing 1 new fencing project in the North Fork John Day subbasin that protects 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat, and 1 fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that protects an additional 0.59 miles of stream and 42.5 acres of habitat; (2) constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa river to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) planting 10,084 plants along 0.5 miles of the Wallowa Riverproject; (4) establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; and (7) completed a comprehensive project summary report to the Independent Scientific Review panel (ISRP) that provided our conclusions regarding benefits to focal species, along with management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 57 individual projects have been implemented, monitoring and maintained along 84.9 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams, that protect and enhance 3,564 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

67

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma Creek South Project, Technical Report 2003-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Tacoma Creek South property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in June 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Tacoma Creek South Project provides a total of 190.79 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetlands provide 20.51 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Grassland provides 1.65 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 11.76 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 139.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forest also provides 19.15 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Tacoma Creek South Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Upper Trimble Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Upper Trimble property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in March 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Upper Trimble Project provides a total of 250.67 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Wet meadow provides 136.92 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Mixed forest habitat provides 111.88 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 1.87 HUs for yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Upper Trimble Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Characterization of Habitat for Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) in Los Roques Archipelago National Park, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information on the locations for feeding, reproductions, and resting, are essential to effectively protect sea turtle populations and implement conservation efforts. This type of ecological information is critically important for hawksbill turtle conservation in Los Roques Archipelago National Park (LRANP) where turtles have been declining in spite of habitat protection efforts. The goal of this research was to produce a benthic habitat map of LRANP employing in situ visual surveys, remote sensing and geographic information system techniques, and to spatially characterize sea turtle occupancy and patterns of usage by habitat type. Between June and August of 2008, turtle behavior and habitat use were recorded during 159 h of observation, comprising 46 sighting events (n = 20 juveniles, n = 26 female adults). Observed activities were grouped into 4 categories: foraging, resting, swimming, and reproductive behavior. The benthic habitat at each turtle sighting was recorded as one of three categories: coral reef, sand or marine vegetation. Results suggest that the population of turtles within LRANP is comprised primarily of female adults and juvenile individuals and that coral reef is the most important habitat for this species. The most important foraging area in the atoll is a coral patch reef that connects Dos Mosquises Sur and Dos Mosquises Norte. The data in this thesis have been made available in digital and map form to the managers of LRANP for management purposes.

Hunt, Luciana E.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the protection of aquatic habitat and states that a permit is required: to alter the bed, bank or boundary of any water... http:energy.govsavingsaquatic-habitat-protection-perm...

71

Evaluation of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Arsenic Ambient Water Quality Criteria: Speciation and Bioaccumulation Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers the topic of arsenic bioaccumulation and speciation in aquatic organisms as this information pertains to the development of aquatic life criteria for arsenic to protect human health. It presents a summary of laboratory efforts conducted over the last year at the freshwater and marine laboratories involved in this ongoing research project.

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

72

Evaluation of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Arsenic Ambient Water Quality Criteria: Speciation and Bioaccumulation Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers the topic of arsenic bioaccumulation and speciation in aquatic organisms as this information pertains to the development of aquatic life criteria for arsenic to protect human health. It presents a synopsis of the current state of the science, which is drawn from a review of the published, peer-reviewed scientific research on the subject.

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

73

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources are the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No.199202601). Work undertaken during 2007 included: (1) Starting 1 new fencing project in the NFJD subbasin that will protect an additional 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat; (2) Constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa River to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) Planting 22,100 plants along 3 streams totaling 3.6 stream miles; (4) Establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; (7) Initiated writing of a comprehensive project summary report that will present a summary of conclusions of the benefits to focal species and management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 56 individual projects have been implemented, monitored and maintained along 84.8 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams that protect and enhance 3,501 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H.

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2000, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of these efforts is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. Six projects, two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and one property on the mainstem Walla Walla River were part of the exercise. Several thousand native plants as bare-root stock and cuttings were reintroduced to the sites and 18 acres of floodplain corridor was seeded with native grass seed. Pre and post-project monitoring efforts were included for all projects, incorporating methodologies from CTUIR's Draft Monitoring Plan.

Volkman, Jed; Sexton, Amy D. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation : Fish Passage and Habitat Improvement in the Upper Flathead River Basin, 1991-1996 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past 50 years, dramatic changes have occurred in the Flathead Lake and River system. Degradation of fishery resources has been evident, in part due to deterioration of aquatic habitat and introduction of non-endemic fish and invertebrate species. Habitat loss has been attributed to many factors including the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam, unsound land use practices, urban development, and other anthropogenic and natural disturbances. Fish migration has also been limited by barriers such as dams and impassible culverts. Cumulatively, these factors have contributed to declines in the distribution and abundance of native fish populations. Recovery of fish populations requires that a watershed approach be developed that incorporates long-term aquatic habitat needs and promotes sound land use practices and cooperation among natural resource management agencies. In this document, the authors (1) describe completed and ongoing habitat improvement and fish passage activities under the Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program, (2) describe recently identified projects that are in the planning stage, and (3) develop a framework for identifying prioritizing, implementing, and evaluating future fish habitat improvement and passage projects.

Knotek, W.Ladd; Deleray, Mark; Marotz, Brian L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aquatic Species Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned AFOSR Workshop Washington, D.C. February 19-21, 2008 Sponsored by Air Force Office of Science Eric E. Jarvis, Ph.D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Bioenergy Center eric_jarvis@nrel.gov NREL/PR-510-43232 The ASP Didn't Invent the Concept of Fuels from Algae...  Algae for methane (via anaerobic digestion) * Meier (1955); UC Berkeley 1957-59 (Oswald and Golueke) * Wastewater use, recycling of CO 2 and nutrients  Revival during Energy Crisis of 1970's * Uziel et al. (1975); Benemann et al. (1976-80) * Still focused on methane and hydrogen * Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) * Later DOE (SERI founded in 1977) ...But the ASP Took the Concept to the Next Level  Supported work at SERI/NREL and through

77

Habitat for Humanity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Habitat for Humanity Habitat for Humanity Jump to: navigation, search Name Habitat for Humanity Place Americus, GA Website http://www.habitat.org/ References NREL Technical Report: Zero Energy Home[1] Fact Sheet: Zero Energy Demonstration Home[2] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration Partnership Year 2005 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Habitat for Humanity is a company located in Americus, GA. References ↑ "NREL Technical Report: Zero Energy Home" ↑ "Fact Sheet: Zero Energy Demonstration Home" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Habitat_for_Humanity&oldid=38172

78

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 164-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Appendix 2). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 436-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Attachment A). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

Whitney, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 2008 Annual Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.

Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Observing SQL queries in their natural habitat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe Habitat, a declarative observational debugger for SQL. Habitat facilitates true language-level (not: plan-level) debugging of, probably flawed, SQL queries that yield unexpected results. Users mark SQL subexpressions ... Keywords: Declarative debugging, SQL, query languages, relational databases

Torsten Grust; Jan Rittinger

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Wireless sensor networks for habitat monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We provide an in-depth study of applying wireless sensor networks to real-world habitat monitoring. A set of system design requirements are developed that cover the hardware design of the nodes, the design of the sensor network, and the capabilities ... Keywords: environmental monitoring, habitat monitoring, low power systems, sensor network architecture, wireless sensor networks

Alan Mainwaring; David Culler; Joseph Polastre; Robert Szewczyk; John Anderson

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Protective Relays: Numerical Protective Relays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protective relays are decision-making elements in the protection scheme for electrical power systems. Numerical relays offer many advantages over the traditional electromechanical types of devices. This guide provides an overview of numerical relays and discusses maintenance and testing.

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

Review of Toxicology of PAHs in Invertebrate Aquatic Organisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the toxicity of sediment-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to aquatic biota and suggests approaches that can be used to assess such toxicity.

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

87

Aquatic species project report: FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project, which is managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The project is focused on applying genetic engineering techniques to enhance the lipid, or oil, production of microalgae. Those lipids can be extracted and processed into high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. Because microalgae require carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse'' gas, as a nutrient, project researchers also study the role that microalgae could play in a possible global climate change mitigation strategy.

Brown, L.M. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Sprague, S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Habitat Quality and Anadromous Fish Production on the Warm Springs Reservation. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The number of anadromous fish returning to the Columbia River and its tributaries has declined sharply in recent years. Changes in their freshwater, estuarine, and ocean environments and harvest have all contributed to declining runs of anadromous fish. Restoration of aquatic resources is of paramount importance to the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs (CTWS) Reservation of Oregon. Watersheds on the Warm Springs Reservation provide spawning and rearing habitat for several indigenous species of resident and anadromous fish. These streams are the only ones in the Deschutes River basin that still sustain runs of wild spring chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus, tshawytscha. Historically, reservation streams supplied over 169 km of anadromous fish habitat. Because of changes in flows, there are now only 128 km of habitat that can be used on the reservation. In 1981, the CTWS began a long-range, 3-phase study of existing and potential fish resources on the reservation. The project, consistent with the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program, was designed to increase the natural production of anadromous salmonids on the reservation.

Fritsch, Mark A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife I Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1992. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project provides a total of 936.76 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 71.92 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Shoreline and island habitat provide 12.77 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Cattail hemi-marsh provides 308.42 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Wet meadow provides 208.95 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 14.43 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 148.62 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 3.38 HUs for Canada goose. Conifer forest provides 160.44 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Insider protection  

SciTech Connect

The government community is broadly addressing the insider threat. The first section of this paper defines protection approaches and the latter sections present various applicable technology developments. The bulk of the paper discusses technology developments applied to (1) personnel and material tracking and inventory, (2) classified document protection, and (3) protecting security systems. The personnel and material tracking system uses a PC based-host to (1) collect information from proximity tags and material movement sensors, (2) apply rules to this input to assure that the ongoing activity meets the site selectable rules and, (3) forward the results to either an automated inventory system or an alarm system. The document protection system uses a PC network to efficiently and securely control classified material which is stored on write-once-read-mostly optical media. The protection of sensor to multiplexer communications in a security system is emphasized in the discussion of protecting security systems.

Waddoups, I.G.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

Konopacky, Richard C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Aquatic weed automatic classification using machine learning techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aquatic weed control through chemical products has attracted much attention in the last years, mainly because of the ecological disorder caused by such plants, and also the consequences to the economical activities. However, this kind of control has ... Keywords: Aquatic weed, Artificial neural networks, Nave Bayes, Optimum-path forest, Shape analysis, Support vector machines

LuS A. M. Pereira; Rodrigo Y. M. Nakamura; Guilherme F. S. De Souza; Dagoberto Martins; JoO P. Papa

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Proceedings of the Subcontractors' Review Meeting: Aquatic Species Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Hnt'k'wipn 2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure Report.  

SciTech Connect

The construction of Albeni Falls Dam was completed in 1955. Prior to construction, the dam was expected to alter approximately 6,300 acres. However, the loss assessment addressed the losses in terms of Habitat Units (HUs) (Martin et al. 1988). HUs are derived by multiplying the Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) by the number of acres in question. The HSI, in turn, is an index to the habitat carrying capacity for a specific species or guild of species based on a set of habitat performance measures and can be used to assess changes, both positive and negative, in habitat quantity and quality (USFWS 1980, 1980a). The HSI is derived though a HEP that is completed according to species or guild specific models. Variables defined in the models are measured on the landscape; and those measured values are rated according to the model to produce an index to the habitat's suitability. The HSI index ranges from 0.0 to 1.0. An HSI of 0.3 indicates that habitat quality/carrying capacity is marginal while an HSI of 0.7 suggests that habitat quality/carrying capacity is relatively good. Thus an acre of optimum habitat (HSI = 1.0) results in 1 HU. The construction and inundation of Albeni Falls Dam resulted in a loss of 28,587 HUs. This HU ledger was the sum of the losses for each of the chosen target species, which were 5,985 mallard HUs, 4,699 Canada goose HUs, 3,379 redhead HUs, 4,508 breeding bald eagle HUs, 4,365 wintering bald eagle HUs, 2,286 black-capped chickadee HUs, 1,680 white tailed deer HUs, and 1,756 muskrat HUs. The PACIFIC NORTHWEST ELECTRIC POWER PLANNING AND CONSERVATION ACT (1980) made mitigating against the HU ledger associated with the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS), of which Albeni Falls is a part, the responsibility of BPA. The Act also established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), which is responsible for, among other things, establishing the Fish and Wildlife Program to direct the mitigation process. The Bonneville Power Administration funded the acquisition of the mitigation properties covered in this baseline HU assessment in accordance with the NPCC's Fish and Wildlife Program and is due the appropriate HU crediting for both protecting and enhancing that area. The mitigation property is composed of three separate property acquisitions completed in the southern portion of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Figure 1). These acreages are contiguous (Figure 2) and were targeted because of their potential instream, wetland and riparian habitats. The 909 acre Hanson Property was purchased fee title in December of 2004 and includes the northern and southern most parcels. The 159.7 acre Allotment 331 was purchased in February of 2005 and lies along Hangman Creek and includes the majority of the forested land. Allotments 1021, 333A and 333B, which were acquired in September of 2005, lie along Hangman Creek upstream of Allotment 331 and are 160 acres, 80 acres and 75 acres respectively. The Allotments remain in Trust but are now held by the Department of Interior for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe rather than for individual Tribal members. Approximately 174.8 acres (acreage determined by Coeur d'Alene Tribal GIS) of the Hanson Property lies south and west of U.S. Highway 95. These 174.8 acres encompass uplands along with a farmstead that includes a dwelling, several shops, storage sheds and a loft barn. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe decided at the time of purchase not to retain those uplands in the mitigation program since uplands and residential areas are not suitable to the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. This baseline HU assessment encompasses only the contiguous acreages that lie north and east of U.S. Highway 95. This report is a summary of the 2005 baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) conducted on the 1,195.2 acres (as determined from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's GIS database) of hnt'k'wipn surrounding the confluence of Sheep Creek and Hangman Creeks on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The Bonneville Power Administration was guaranteed a minimum of 364 protection HUs for th

Green, Gerald I.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Cattail Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cattail Protection Cattail Protection Name: Julie Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is a piece of land protected by cattails protected? (Meaning you can not touch, cover up or build on.) Replies: Hi Julie, It's quite possible that a piece of land with cattails is protected as a wetland. There are some federal (and probably state) statutes on wetland protection, in general you have to file environmental impact statements and such. I've heard of cases where some large projects were allowed to encroach on wetlands when the builders signed contracts requiring they construct a wetland of equivalent size on another parcel of land. Donald Yee Ph.D. I assume you are referring to wetlands protections. Cattails are wetland plants, and there are regulations governing - but not necessarily preventing - the development of wetlands, but cattails are also aggressive and somewhat weedy, so I doubt the presence of cattails alone would be sufficient to call an area a wetland. This is a technical question which all too often lands in legal dispute. Check with the Corps of Engineers, the EPA, and other experts in wetlands delineation and regulation.

99

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

DOE-STD-1153-2002; A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 METHODS DERIVATION MODULE 3: METHODS DERIVATION DOE-STD-1153-2002 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1153-2002 M3-1 1 Introduction and Basis for the Approach The Department of Energy (DOE) currently has in place a radiation dose limit of 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for the protection of aquatic organisms (DOE Order 5400.5), and has proposed dose limits for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms. These limits are: 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for aquatic animals; 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for terrestrial plants; and 0.1 rad/d (1 mGy/d) for terrestrial animals. Because the biota protection limits are dose-based, a calculational method is needed to demonstrate compliance. In theory, derived radionuclide concentration limits for environmental media (e.g., Biota Concentration Guides, BCGs, for water, sediment, or soil) provide a relatively straightforward and simple means to do so. However, because of the

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101

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Application of Oxygen Eddy Correlation in Aquatic Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eddy correlation technique is rapidly becoming an established method for resolving dissolved oxygen fluxes in natural aquatic systems. This direct and noninvasive determination of oxygen fluxes close to the sediment by simultaneously ...

Claudia Lorrai; Daniel F. McGinnis; Peter Berg; Andreas Brand; Alfred West

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Interactions between currents and the spatial structure of aquatic vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vegetation is present in nearly all aquatic environments, ranging from meandering streams to constructed channels and rivers, as well as in lakes and coastal zones. This vegetation grows in a wide range of flow environments ...

Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project focuses on the lower Klickitat River and its tributaries that provide or affect salmonid habitat. The overall goal is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of watersheds supporting anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss) which are listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU. Restoration activities are aimed at restoring stream processes by removing or mitigating watershed perturbances and improving habitat conditions and water quality. In addition to steelhead, habitat improvements benefit Chinook (O. tshawytscha) and coho (O. kisutch) salmon, resident rainbow trout, and enhance habitat for many terrestrial and amphibian wildlife species. Protection activities compliment restoration efforts within the subbasin by securing refugia and preventing degradation. Since 90% of the project area is in private ownership, maximum effectiveness will be accomplished via cooperation with state, federal, tribal, and private entities. The project addresses goals and objectives presented in the Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the 1994 NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. Feedback from the 2000 Provincial Review process indicated a need for better information management to aid development of geographic priorities. Thus, an emphasis has been placed on database development and a review of existing information prior to pursuing more extensive implementation. Planning and design was initiated on several restoration projects. These priorities will be refined in future reports as the additional data is collected and analyzed. Tasks listed are for the April 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 contract cycle, for which work was delayed during the summer of 2001 because the contract was not finalized until mid-August 2001. Accomplishments are provided for the September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 reporting period. During this reporting period, significant progress was made on acquisition and development of spatial data, monitoring of steelhead spawning, riparian revegetation, streamflow monitoring, completion of maintenance and repair work, completion of a working version of a habitat database, and completion of the Swale Creek assessment.

Conley, Will

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Fire Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1066-2012 December 2012 _______________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1066-99 DOE STANDARD FIRE PROTECTION U.S. Department of Energy AREA FIRP Washington, DC 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1066-2012 FOREWORD This Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD) supersedes DOE-STD-1066-99 1 and is approved for use by DOE and its contractors. The following fire protection standard is canceled with the issuance of this Standard and appropriate technical content was incorporated into this Standard:  DOE-STD-1088-95, Fire Protection for Relocatable Structures

106

FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the 1995 - 96 project period, four new habitat enhancement projects were implemented under the Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the upper Umatilla River Basin. A total of 38,644 feet of high tensile smooth wire fencing was constructed along 3.6 miles of riparian corridor in the Meacham Creek, Wildhorse Creek, Greasewood Creek, West Fork of Greasewood Creek and Mission Creek watersheds. Additional enhancements on Wildhorse Creek and the lower Greasewood Creek System included: (1) installation of 0.43 miles of smooth wire between river mile (RM) 10.25 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek (fence posts and structures had been previously placed on this property during the 1994 - 95 project period), (2) construction of 46 sediment retention structures in stream channels and maintenance to 18 existing sediment retention structures between RM 9.5 and RM 10.25 Wildhorse Creek, and (3) revegetation of stream corridor areas and adjacent terraces with 500 pounds of native grass seed or close species equivalents and 5,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funds were cost shared with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, provided under this project, to accomplish habitat enhancements. Water quality monitoring continued and was expanded for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Physical habitat surveys were conducted on the lower 13 river miles of Wildhorse Creek and within the Greasewood Creek Project Area to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area.

Shaw, R.Todd

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

An Analysis of Potential Stream Fish and Fish Habitat Monitoring Procedures for the Inland Northwest: Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect

Recent concerns over the rapid declines of native stream-fish populations in the inland Northwest have prompted the USDA Forest Service to institute interim land management practices intended to stop further declines in fish habitat quality and protect existing high quality habitat. Natural resource managers in the Inland Northwest need tools for assessing the success or failure of conservation policies and the impacts of management actions on fish and fish habitats. Effectiveness monitoring is one such potential tool, but there are currently no established monitoring protocols. Since 1991, US Forest Service biologists have used the standardized R1/R4 inventory procedures to measure fish and fish habitats on agency lands throughout the Intermountain West. The widespread use and acceptance of these standardized procedures and the large amount of data collected suggest that the R1/R4 procedures might provide the basis for an effectiveness monitoring protocol. Using fish and fish habitat data collected by Forest Service biologists, the authors assessed the efficiency of the R1/R4 procedures for monitoring stream fish and fish habitats.

Peterson, James T.; Wollrab, Sherry P.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The use of geographic information systems technology for salmon habitat analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although Geographic Information Systems (GISs) have traditionally been used to analyze terrestrial animal habitats, identify migration patterns, and monitor ecosystems, they have rarely been used to understand aquatic species. The US Army Corps of Engineers is working with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and other government agencies to exploit GIS technology for improving the survival of threatened and endangered salmon in the Snake River in the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The customized GIS will be used to map the physical environment of the river, to map the current biological environment, and to analyze potential impacts to both of these environments from several mitigation options. Data in both digital and textual formats have been obtained from scientists across the Pacific Northwest who are analyzing the habitats, limnology, and hydrology of the Snake River. The mitigation options focus on studying the effects of lowering the reservoirs of the Snake River in an effort to speed juvenile salmon towards the ocean. The hypothesis being examined is that faster juvenile salmon travel to the ocean may result in higher juvenile survival and greater smolt-to-adult return ratios. Lowering the Snake River reservoirs is expected to have a variety of impacts to the physical environment, including changes to water velocity, temperature, dissolved gasses, and turbidity. Each of these potential changes is being examined to assess their effects on the surrounding terrestrial wildlife and on both the anadromous and resident fish of the Snake River.

Evans, B.J.; Gordon, J.V.; Mavros, W.V.; Perry, E.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Pinney, C. [US Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla, WA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

DOE-STD-1153-2002; A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATION MODULE 1: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATION DOE-STD-1153-2002 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1153-2002 M1-1 1 Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is accountable to Congress and the public for the safe conduct of its activities, including facility operation, waste management and disposal activities, and remediation of environmental contamination. These routine activities may result in releases of radionuclides to the air and water, accumulation of radionuclides in soil and sediment, and the potential for plants, animals, and members of the public to be exposed to radiation. DOE Order 5400.5, "Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment" (1990a), lists the environmental radiation protection requirements that DOE and DOE- contractor employees must meet to protect aquatic animals. In addition, dose limits below

111

Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2008 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2008. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting wetlands plugs at sites on Spring Creek (Head-waters). Many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). Physical sampling during 2008 included sediment and depth measurements (SADMS) in Spring Creek at the Car Removal site. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for 5 strata on Spring Creek. Water temperature and chemistry were monitored monthly on Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Diggie Creek, and Portneuf (Jimmy Drinks) and Blackfoot rivers. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in five reservation streams which included nine sites. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Spring Creek series remained relatively low, however, there was an increase of biomass overall since 1993. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were similar to 2006, and 2007, however, as in years past, high densities of macrophytes make it very difficult to see fry in addition to lack of field technicians. Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams stayed the same as 2007 at 1.5/hr. Numbers of fish larger than 18-inches caught by anglers increased from 2007 at .20 to .26/hr.

Osborne, Hunter [Shoshone Bannock Tribes

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

Berger, Matthew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, Part 1, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains reports on subprojects involving the determining of alternatives to enhance salmonid habitat on patented land in Bear Valley Creek, Idaho, coordination activities for habitat projects occurring on streams within fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribes, and habitat and fish inventories in the Salmon River. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports. (ACR)

Konopacky, Richard C.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

An Ecosystem-Based Approach to Habitat Restoration Projects with Emphasis on Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary, 2003 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat restoration in the Columbia River estuary (CRE) is an important off-site mitigation action in the 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), an operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The CRE, defined as the tidally influenced stretch of river from the mouth to Bonneville Dam 146 miles upstream, is part of the migration pathway for anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin, including salmon listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Salmon in various stages of life, from fry to adults, use tidal channels and wetlands in the CRE to feed, find refuge from predators, and transition physiologically from freshwater to saltwater. Over the last 100 years, however, the area of some wetland habitats has decreased by as much as 70% because of dike and levee building, flow regulation, and other activities. In response to the decline in available habitat, the BiOp's Reasonable and Prudent Alternative (RPA) included mandates to 'develop a plan addressing the habitat needs of juvenile salmon and steelhead in the estuary' (RPA Action 159) and 'develop and implement an estuary restoration program with a goal of protecting and enhancing 10,000 acres of tidal wetlands and other key habitats' (RPA Action 160). To meet Action 159 and support Action 160, this document develops a science-based approach designed to improve ecosystem functions through habitat restoration activities in the CRE. The CRE habitat restoration program's goal and principles focus on habitat restoration projects in an ecosystem context. Since restoration of an entire ecosystem is not generally practical, individual habitat restoration projects have the greatest likelihood of success when they are implemented with an ecosystem perspective. The program's goal is: Implementation of well-coordinated, scientifically sound projects designed to enhance, protect, conserve, restore, and create 10,000 acres of tidal wetlands and other key habitats to aid rebuilding of ESA-listed salmon populations and native species using the CRE. The program's underlying principles are: (1) projects are founded on the best available ecological restoration science, implemented in an ecosystem context, and developed with the intent to restore relevant ecological processes; (2) projects incorporate adaptive management practices with testable hypotheses to track ecological responses to a given restoration effort; and (3) projects are implemented in a coordinated, open process and scientific results from monitoring and evaluation are communicated widely and readily accessible. With this goal and these principles in mind, we developed an approach for CRE habitat restoration. The intent of this document is to provide a scientific basis and implementation guidelines for a habitat restoration program designed to improve ecosystem functions and enhance juvenile salmonid survival in the CRE. The stepwise approach to CRE habitat restoration outlined is somewhat general and broad because the available scientific information is incomplete, e.g., juvenile salmon usage of various CRE wetland habitats. As new data become available, a more specific, detailed plan than was possible here can be produced as an outgrowth of this document. In conclusion, this document provides a scientific basis and implementation guidelines for a habitat restoration program designed to improve ecosystem functions and enhance juvenile salmonid survival in the CRE. As more experience is gained with CRE habitat restoration and scientific uncertainties are resolved, this document should be used as a basis for a detailed habitat restoration plan that specifically addresses (1) which habitat types offer the greatest ecological benefit to salmon, (2) the location of potential sites that if restored would likely provide these habitat types, and (3) how and when the restoration work should be done. This document supports the use of adaptive management so that all elements of salmonid habitat restoration actions in the CRE are under continual evaluation and revision at both the project and program levels. Lessons learned from curre

Johnson, G.; Thom, R.; Whiting, A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project continued to identify impacted stream reaches throughout the Umatilla River Basin for habitat improvements during the 2001 project period. Public outreach efforts, biological and physical monitoring, and continued development of a Umatilla Subbasin Watershed Assessment assisted the project in fostering public cooperation, targeting habitat deficiencies and determining habitat recovery measures. Projects continued to be maintained on 49 private properties, one 25-year Non-Exclusive Bureau of Indian Affairs' Easement was secured, six new projects implemented and two existing project areas improved to enhance anadromous fish habitat. New project locations included sites on the mid Umatilla River, upper Umatilla River, Mission Creek, Cottonwood Creek and Buckaroo Creek. New enhancements included: (1) construction of 11,264 feet of fencing between River Mile 43.0 and 46.5 on the Umatilla River, (2) a stream bank stabilization project implemented at approximately River Mile 63.5 Umatilla River to stabilize 330 feet of eroding stream bank and improve instream habitat diversity, included construction of eight root wad revetments and three boulder J-vanes, (3) drilling a 358-foot well for off-stream livestock watering at approximately River Mile 46.0 Umatilla River, (4) installing a 50-foot bottomless arch replacement culvert at approximately River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek, (5) installing a Geoweb stream ford crossing on Mission Creek (6) installing a 22-foot bottomless arch culvert at approximately River Mile 0.5 Cottonwood Creek, and (7) providing fence materials for construction of 21,300 feet of livestock exclusion fencing in the Buckaroo Creek Drainage. An approximate total of 3,800 native willow cuttings and 350 pounds of native grass seed was planted at new upper Umatilla River, Mission Creek and Cottonwood Creek project sites. Habitat improvements implemented at existing project sites included development of a 105-foot well for off-stream livestock watering at approximately River Mile 12.0 Wildhorse Creek and construction of an engineered stream ford at approximately River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek. A total of $277,848 in financial cost share assistance was provided by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Workforce Investment Act, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Umatilla County and Pheasants Forever for planning efforts and habitat enhancements. Monitoring continued to quantify baseline conditions and the effects of habitat enhancements in the upper basin. Daily stream temperatures were collected from June through September at 22 sites. Suspended sediment samples were obtained at three gage stations to arrive at daily sediment load estimates. Photographs were taken at 96 existing and three newly established photo points to document habitat recovery and pre-project conditions. Transects were measured at three stream channel cross sections to assist with engineering and design and to obtain baseline data regarding channel morphology. Biological inventories were conducted at River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek to determine pre-project fish utilization above and below the passage barrier. Post-project inventories were also conducted at River Mile 85.0 of the Umatilla River at a project site completed in 1999. Umatilla Subbasin Watershed Assessment efforts were continued under a subcontract with Eco-Pacific. This watershed assessment document and working databases will be completed in fiscal year 2002 and made available to assist project personnel with sub-watershed prioritization of habitat needs. Water Works Consulting, Duck Creek Associates and Ed Salminen Consulting were subcontracted for watershed assessment and restoration planning in the Meacham Creek Subwatershed. A document detailing current conditions in the Meacham Creek Subwatershed and necessary restoration actions will be availa

Shaw, R. Todd; Sexton, Amy D.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Resource Assessment for Microalgal/Emergent Aquatic Biomass Systems in the Arid Southwest: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research project has been designed to facilitate the eventual selection of biomass production systems using aquatic species (microalgal and emergent aquatic plant species (MEAP) which effectively exploit the potentially available resources of the Southwest.

Vigon, B. W.; Arthur, M. F.; Taft, L. G.; Wagner, C. K.; Lipinsky, E. S.; Litchfield, J. H.; McCandlish, C. D.; Clark, R.

1982-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Site : Five-Year Habitat Management Plan, 2001-2005, 2000-2001 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins were ecologically rich in both the habitat types and the species diversity they supported. This was due in part to the pattern of floods and periodic inundation of bottomlands that occurred, which was an important factor in creating and maintaining a complex system of wetland, meadow, and riparian habitats. This landscape has been greatly altered in the past 150 years, primarily due to human development and agricultural activities including cattle grazing, logging and the building of hydroelectric facilities for hydropower, navigation, flood control and irrigation in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. The Burlington Bottoms (BB) wetlands contains some of the last remaining bottomlands in the area, supporting a diverse array of native plant and wildlife species. Located approximately twelve miles northwest of Portland and situated between the Tualatin Mountains to the west and Multnomah Channel and Sauvie Island to the east, the current habitats are remnant of what was once common throughout the region. In order to preserve and enhance this important site, a five-year habitat management plan has been written that proposes a set of actions that will carry out the goals and objectives developed for the site, which includes protecting, maintaining and enhancing wildlife habitat for perpetuity.

Beilke, Susan G.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

MHK Technologies/Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Vortex Hydro Energy LLC Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Michigan Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Reciprocating Device Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy) device is based on the extensively studied phenomenon of Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed five-hundred years ago by Leonardo DaVinci in the form of 'Aeolian Tones.' VIV results from vortices forming and shedding on the downstream side of a bluff body in a current. Vortex shedding alternates from one side to the other, thereby creating a vibration or oscillation. The VIV phenomenon is non-linear, which means it can produce useful energy at high efficiency over a wide range of current speeds and directions.This converter is unlike any existing technology, as it does not use turbines, propellers, or dams. VIVACE converts the horizontal hydrokinetic energy of currents into cylinder mechanical energy. The latter is then converted to electricity through electric power generators.

122

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Projects, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mitigation projects for wildlife species impacted by the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge hydroelectric projects are recommended. First priority projects encompass the development of long-term wildlife management plans for WWP lands adjacent to the two reservoirs. General objectives for all WWP lands include alternatives designed to protect or enhance existing wildlife habitat. It is also suggested that WWP evaluate the current status of beaver and river otter populations occupying the reservoirs and implement indicated management. Second priority projects include the protection/enhancement of wildlife habitat on state owned or privately owned lands. Long-term wildlife management agreements would be developed with Montana School Trust lands and may involve reimbursement of revenues lost to the state. Third priority projects include the enhancement of big game winter ranges located on Kootenai National Forest lands. 1 ref., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Toxicity of coal gasifier solid waste to the aquatic plants Selenastrum capricornutum and Spirodela oligorhiza  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classical assessment of aquatic toxicity has focused on fish and invertebrates primarily due to their economic importance. However, increased awareness of the role of aquatic vegetation as primary producers in aquatic systems has stimulated their use in aquatic hazards evaluations. This paper presents the results of solid waste leaching tests using a procedure which was designed to mimic landfilling of solid waste. Results are reported for leachate analysis of the ash agglomerate and the relative toxicity of this leachate to Selenastrum capricornutum (a unicellular green alga) and Spirodela oligorhiza (a floating aquatic vascular plant).

Klaine, S.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Relationship between juvenile steelhead survival and winter habitat availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ugedal. 2007. Shelter availability affects behaviour, size-and winter habitat availability Eric Huber, Sammy Kayed, andThe establishment and availability of interstitial spaces

Huber, Eric; Kayed, Sammy; Post, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Patterns of fish habitat use in Mediterranean streams-type.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this study is to contribute to the understanding of the Mediterranean freshwater fish ecology, emphasising the habitat use patterns. Extreme seasonal variations (more)

Ilhu, Maria

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Landscape Characteristics Of Upland Sandpiper Habitat In Michigan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Grassland bird populations have declined across North America due to habitat loss but at a disproportionately higher rate in the midwestern United States, where extensive (more)

Korte, Jacob Lawrence

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Garfield County Habitat for Fall Chinook and Steelhead, Annual Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives and tasks outlined in detail in this project report were implemented during calendar year 2006 in all the watersheds of Garfield County. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). In the years since 1993, other watersheds in Garfield County have been designated as salmon bearing streams and have received numerous practices formerly just designated for the Pataha Creek Watershed. The following sections show the individual practices, quantity of practices implemented, total costs, BPA costs and tons of soil saved for all the BPA funds used to protect and enhance the natural resources in the salmon bearing watersheds of Garfield County. In the year 2006, 55% of the funding received from BPA went into cost share practices. Of all the cost share received in the county, 22% came from BPA. This is largely due to other funding programs becoming available to address livestock influenced water quality problems and riparian health improvement. Over 95% of the sediment entering the streams can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek, Deadman Creek, and Alpowa Creek have had steelhead runs in the past. The Pataha Creek has native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow, and shiners inhabit the lower portion of Pataha Creek because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat through the CREP, CCRP, and DOE grants has improved habitat for all the fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek is slowly developing into spawning and rearing habitat for Chinook salmon. With the future removal of some migration barriers on the lower portion of the Deadman and Pataha, more stream miles will become useful spawning and rearing habitat. The upland projects completed during 2006 were practices that significantly reduce the erosion and resulting sedimentation from these croplands. Runoff studies conducted by WSU have shown a direct impact on reducing soil erosion by the implementation of these practices. The tree planting projects conducted under the CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) and CRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) programs have helped reduce sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone in desired locations inside the Pataha, Deadman, and Alpowa Creek watersheds. The CREP and the CCRP programs continue with enrollment in the watersheds and are protecting the riparian areas along these three streams at an increasing level every year. Currently, over 1,100 acres of riparian habitat have been enrolled in the CREP program within these three watersheds.

Bartels, Duane

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

PROTECTED AREAS AMENDMENTS AND.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Ministry of Environment #12;#12;Changes in Habitat Capability & High Value Forage -Hydroelectric projects? Research Questions: #12; Stable Isotope Analysis (SIA) #12;Bear location site investigations #12;Possible

129

Microsoft Word - Aquatic_Invasive_Mussels_Monitoring_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovations - ST-3 Innovations - ST-3 Matt DeLong Contract Specialist for Technology Innovation Projects - NSSP-4 Proposed Action: Aquatic Invasive Mussels Monitoring Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B3.1 - Site characterization and environmental monitoring Location: Columbia River Basin Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to partially fund the expansion of ongoing research and monitoring efforts on the potential spread and impact of aquatic invasive mussels in the Columbia River Basin through BPA's Fiscal Year 2013 Technology Innovation Portfolio. Washington State University Vancouver would conduct the enhanced research and monitoring efforts with co-sponsorship from the U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research

130

DOE Advanced Protection Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Task 3 - Advanced Protection - Evaluate measures - 2009 - Design, model Irvine Smart Grid Demo protection system - 2010 6 Copyright 2010, Southern California Edison Task 1 -...

131

An analysis of underwater habitats a development of the outline for aquatectural graphic standards.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In addition to many forms of land-based architecture in this world, there are several instances of underwater habitats. These habitats have implications for space exploration (more)

Riggin, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2001. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting willows at sites on Diggie Creek, Clear Creek and Spring Creek. In addition, many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). In 2001, exclosure fences were erected on Diggie Creek (250 m barbed wire; (70 m jack), Wood Creek (500 m jack), Clear Creek (20 m jack), Ross Fork Creek (200 m jack), West Fork Creek (200 m jack)) and the Portneuf River (1 km barbed wire; 100 m jack). Jack and rail exclosure fences that had deteriorated over the past ten years were repaired at numerous areas throughout the Reservation. Physical sampling during 2001 included sediment and depth surveys (SADMS) in Big Jimmy Creek and Diggie Creek. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for eight and nine strata in the Big Jimmy and Diggie Creek, respectively. Baseline SADM data was collected in Diggie Creek to monitor the effects of bank sloping and revegetation on channel morphology and sediment levels through time. Water temperature was monitored (hourly) in Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Ross Fork Creek and Big Jimmy Creek. Biotic sampling included invertebrate sampling in the 200 and 300 series of Clear Creek. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in Clear Creek 200 and 300 series. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Clear Creek 300 series remained similar to 2000 while numbers of fish in Clear Creek 200 series dropped to near pre project levels. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were significantly higher than 2000. A mark-recapture study was initiated in spring 2001 to estimate numbers of spawning adults using the Head End of Spring Creek Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams increased from 0.55 in 2000 to 0.77 fish per hour in 2001. Numbers of fish 18 inches caught by anglers decreased from 0.41 in 2000 to 0.19 in 2001.

Moser, David C.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Modern generator protection systems  

SciTech Connect

The special problems of the protection of generating stations with large machines connected to large integrated networks are presented. The coordination between the protective relays and tripping functions and the reliability of the protection scheme are important considerations in modern plants. Primary and backup protective functions, the applications, and their divisions into fault detection and ''fault prevention'' categories are considered. Testing and maintenance of the generator protection system including automatic calibration testing equipment is also discussed. The concept of the generator protection as a completely coordinated system and its realization with solid state protective relays is also presented. 9 refs.

Pencinger, C.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The effects of the invasive exotic Chinese tallow tree (Triadica sebifera) on amphibians and aquatic invertebrates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation addresses the question of how leaf litter from trees affects animals that live in aquatic environments, with an emphasis on the effect of (more)

Leonard, Norman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Aquatic Species Program review: proceedings of principal investigators meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Aquatic Species Program is to improve the productivity, conversion to fuels, and cost efficiency of aquatic plant culture technologies. The emphasis of the program is on developing a mass culture technology for cultivating oil-yielding microalgae in the American southwest. A technical and economic analysis indicated that such a concept would be feasible if (1) lipid yields from microalgae are improved, (2) there is sufficient saline water for large-scale development, and (3) microalgal lipids can be economically converted to conventional fuels. It was determined that fuels from microalgal lipids presented better options than converting the microalgal biomass to either alcohols or methane. All lipids can potentially be catalytically converted to gasoline, or the fatty acids can be converted to substitute diesel fuels. The Southwest has the necessary low, flat, underutilized lands, and carbon dioxide is available from either natural deposits or flue gas from industrial plants. The amount of saline water available will probably determine how much fuel can be produced from aquatic species, and this question should be answered during 1985. The largest constraint of this technology is the economical production of an oil-rich microalgal feedstock. The agenda for the review was divided into four sections: species selection and characterization, applied physiological studies, outdoor mass cultivation, and systems design and analysis. Papers from these presentations are included in these proceedings. Program advances were reported in the areas of species collection and selection, modulated light physiology, mass culture yields, harvesting of microalgae, mass culture facility design and analysis, and assessments on fuel options from microalgae. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

137

On agricultural protection and exotic species introductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marine and aquatic systems are good examples of this: invading mollusks foul water intake systems at power

Costello, Christopher; McAusland, Carol

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Reuse » Habitat Restoration at Property Reuse » Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site The 1,470-acre Salmon, Mississippi, Site is located in Lamar County, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, in southwestern Mississippi. It is roughly square in shape, and each side is approximately 1.52 miles long. The site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Defense for underground nuclear testing in the 1960s. The site was decontaminated, remediated, and decommissioned in 1972, and all buildings and equipment were removed at that time. Two small, shallow pockets of contamination were left for remediation by natural attenuation. A subsequent remedial investigation was completed in 1999. Final site

139

Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity Posted By Office of Public Affairs Guy painter Girl painter A number of Pantexans volunteered Friday, March 30, to help renovate two

140

Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 30, to help renovate two Habitat for Humanity homes in Amarillo, Texas. B&W Pantex provided breakfast and lunch for the volunteers, who were encouraged to bring family...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Graves Property - Yakama Nation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Graves property (140 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also documented the general ecological condition of the property. The Graves property was significantly damaged from past/present livestock grazing practices. Baseline HEP surveys generated 284.28 habitat units (HUs) or 2.03 HUs per acre. Of these, 275.50 HUs were associated with the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type while 8.78 HUs were tied to the riparian shrub cover type.

Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement Volume I -Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 PROJECT COSTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 LITERATURE CITED Fork John Day River Habitat Improvement Annual Report Prepared by John Andrews, Project Leader and Earl Fishburn, Brent Frazier, and Rod Johnson, Project Coordinators Umatilla National Forest 2517 S. W. Hailey

143

Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver Zero Energy Demonstration Home  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure describes the 2005 demonstration home designed by NREL and the Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver. The completed home produced 24% more energy than it consumed over 12 months.

Not Available

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Carl Property - Yakama Nation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A baseline habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Carl property (160 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also helped assess the general ecological condition of the property. The Carl property appeared damaged from livestock grazing and exhibited a high percentage of invasive forbs. Exotic grasses, while present, did not comprise a large percentage of the available cover in most areas. Cover types were primarily grassland/shrubsteppe with a limited emergent vegetation component. Baseline HEP surveys generated 356.11 HUs or 2.2 HUs per acre. Habitat units were associated with the following HEP models: California quail (47.69 HUs), western meadowlark (114.78 HUs), mallard (131.93 HUs), Canada goose (60.34 HUs), and mink (1.38 HUs).

Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

AQUATIC ASSESSMENT OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AND ITS REMEDIATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This modeling study evaluated aquatic environment affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident and the effectiveness of remediation efforts. Study results indicate that radionuclide concentrations in the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers were well above the drinking water limits immediately after the Chernobyl accident, but have decreased significantly in subsequent years due to flashing, burying, and decay. Because high concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs, the major radionuclides affecting human health through aquatic pathways, are associated with flooding, an earthen dike was constructed along the Pripyat River in its most contaminated floodplain. The dike was successful in reducing the 90Sr influx to the river by half. A 100-m-high movable dome called the New Safe Confinement is planned to cover the Chernobyl Shelter (formally called the sarcophagus) that was erected shortly after the accident. The NSC will reduce radionuclide contamination further in these rivers and nearby groundwater; however, even if the Chernobyl Shelter collapses before the NSC is built, the resulting peak concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs in the Dnieper River would still be below the drinking water limits.

Onishi, Yasuo; Kivva, Sergey L.; Zheleznyak, Mark J.; Voitsekhovitch, Oleg V.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Aquatic biomass as a source of fuels and chemicals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the development of technologies that produce and utilize plant biomass species which naturally inhabit wetlands or submerged areas. Processes being developed through this program take advantage of the rapid growth rates, high yields, and extraordinary chemical compositions inherently associated with aquatic species. Emphasis is placed on salt tolerant species for cultivation on poorly utilized, low-value lands, where conventional agriculture is not economic. Candidate species are identified from: (1) microalgae-unicellular plants that are natural factories for converting sunlight into high quality oils; (2) macroalgae-large, chemically unique plants that can be easily fermented to methane gas or alcohols; and (3) emergents-plants that grow rooted in waterways and bogs, but are partially exposed above water. Within the next five years, the conditions and resources necessary for sustained systems operations are to be defined, design parameters examined, and experimental facilities developed. Succeeding years are planned to focus on resolving major technical hurdles in systems operations, integration, and component performance. This paper updates the technical progress in this program, describes several aspects of evolving systems concepts, and attempts to provide some perspectives based on potential economics. 16 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

Raymond, L.P.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam, 1989-1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 1989 through March 1990 on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Study objectives addressed by each agency are to describe the life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults between Bonneville and McNary dams and evaluate the need and identify potential methods for protecting, mitigating and enhancing populations downstream from McNary Dam, to describe the white sturgeon recreational fishery between Bonneville and McNary dams, describe reproductive and early life history characteristics downstream from Bonneville Dam and describe life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults downstream from Bonneville Dam, to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available between Bonneville and McNary dams, and to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available downstream from Bonneville Dam. Our approach is to work concurrently downstream and upstream from Bonneville Dam. Upstream from Bonneville Dam we began work in the Dalles Reservoir in 1987 and expanded efforts to Bonneville Reservoir in 1988 and John Day Reservoir in 1989. Highlights from this work is also included. 47 refs., 33 figs., 66 tabs.

Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

DIALOG: Fostering Early Career Development Across the Aquatic Sciences  

SciTech Connect

A total of 447 dissertation abstracts were received for the DIALOG V Program, with 146 individuals applying for the DIALOG V Symposium; 47 were invited and 45 have accepted. This represents a significant increase compared to the DIALOG IV Program in which 221 abstracts were registered and 124 applied for the symposium. The importance of the dissertation registration service is indicated by the increasing number of individuals who take time to register their dissertation even when they are not interested in applying to the symposium. The number of visits to the webpage has also increased significantly over the years. This also reflects graduate interest in being part of the on-line Dissertation Registry and receiving the weekly electronic DIALOG Newsletter. See http://aslo.org/phd.html for details. The DIALOG symposium reaches approximately 40 new PI's at a pivotal point in their research careers. Based on their comments, the symposium changes the way participants think, communicate, and approach their research. The science community and the general population will benefit from the perspectives these new PI's bring back to their home institutions and share with their students and colleagues. This group should act as a catalyst to move the entire field in exciting new, interdisciplinary directions. To reach more graduates, plans are underway to establish the symposium on an annual basis. By facilitating the development of close collegial ties, symposium participants come away with a network of colleagues from around the globe with interests in aquatic science research and education. Past participants are collaborating on research proposals, and all have noted that participation has enabled them to develop a more interdisciplinary view of their field, influencing the way they interpret, communicate, and approacli their research. The dissertation registry provides a unique introduction to the work of this most recent generation of aquatic scientists. Each year increasing numbers of graduates take advantage of the opportunity to be part of this international collection, and more scientists, employers and administrators use this resource to identify recent graduates and get an overview of their work. Dissertation abstracts are submitted on line and immediately posted on the ASLO web site in a format that can be searched by year, name, and key words (www.aslo.org/phd.html). In addition to the recognition, program participants receive a compilation of abstracts, a directory, and a demographic profile of their cohort. An electronic distribution list keeps recent grads informed about job opportunities, resources, recent advances across the aquatic sciences, and-other research and professional news. Finally, the interdisciplinary symposium offers a unique opportunity for grads to get to know each other and share common experiences, and address the challenges and opportunities facing new professionals. The DIALOG Program is a long-term investment in human resources and science infrastructure. The most interesting and important questions in aquatic and other sciences are increasingly interdisciplinary and this program brings together scientists from across the full spectrum of biologically relevant aquatic science. The DIALOG database will become increasingly useful as more graduates participate. While the full impact of the program will probably not be realized for many years, there have already been many tangible results. Several interdisciplinary (including some international) research collaborations have been started; an international student exchange program has been set up at two institutions; several workshops and meeting sessions have been organized; and the entire group continues to communicate about research, education, and science policy issues via an electronic distribution list. The goal of the DIALOG symposium is to foster cross-disciplinary and international understanding and interactions at an early career stage, so that interdisciplinary perspectives and collegial relationships can build over a full profess

Caroline Susan Weiler, PhD

2004-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

149

Proceedings of the Subcontractors' Review Meeting: Aquatic Species Program  

SciTech Connect

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Aquatic Species Program Review: Proceedings of the March 1983 Principal Investigators Meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Design and Analysis on Energy Recovery System of Aquatic Product Comprehensive Process Factory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To reduce energy consumption and carbon emission, this paper designs energy recovery technology of aquatic products processing plant, including refrigeration heat recovery and ice-making cooling recovery. Three heat recovery plans are compared and analyzed, ... Keywords: aquatic products, sensible heat recovery, heat recovery efficiency, cooling recovery

Min Li; Zhan Li; Xiaoqiang Jiang; Zhongjin Zhang; Lijin Zheng

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities in the Hood River basin that occurred over the October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003 period (FY 03). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 03. A description of the progress during FY 03 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are provided. OBJECTIVE 1 - Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administrative oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts, personnel, implementation, and monitoring was provided. OBJECTIVE 2 - Continue to coordinate, implement, and revise, as needed, the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document was utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan (Coccoli, 2002), ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document has been reviewed by many, including stakeholders, agencies, and interested parties. The Hood River Watershed Group Coordinator and author of the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan, Holly Coccoli, has updated and revised the plan. Changes will be reflected in the Hood River Subbasin Plan, and after submission of the Subbasin Plan, a formally revised version of the Monitoring Plan will be put out for review. This will more specifically address changes in the Hood River subbasin since 2000, and reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River subbasin regarding monitoring. OBJECTIVE 3 - Evaluate and monitor the habitat, accessibility, and presence of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout upstream of the Middle Fork Irrigation District water sources on Evans Creek. Through this project, BPA funded the Middle Fork Irrigation District (MFID) a total of $194,000 in FY 03 for the Glacier Ditch- Evans Creek project. BPA funds accounted for approximately 30% of the project while the remaining 70% was cost-shared by the MFID, the US Forest Service, and the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. The MFID operated irrigation diversions on Evans Creek (Hutson pond RM 4.0 and the Evans Creek diversion RM 5.5), a tributary to the East Fork Hood River. Both diversions had inadequate upstream fish passage, and utilized Evans Creek to transport Eliot Branch water to distribute irrigation water lower in the basin. This project consisted of: piping a portion of the Glacier ditch to create a pressurized irrigation pipeline system, piping the Hutson extension, removing the culvert on Evans Creek near the Glacier ditch, removing the culvert above the Hutson pond, revegetating the disturbed areas, and providing adequate and approved fish passage on Evans Creek. Prior to any work, Brian Connors with MFID completed a NEPA checklist. Some of the key regulatory points of this project included wetland delineations, a cultural resources survey, and consultations with NOAA Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This project will eliminate the overflow of silty water into Evans Creek and West Fork Evans Creek. Upon completion of this project, access to 2.5 miles of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout habitat will be restored. Elimination of the interbasin transfer of water will discontinue the conveyance of silty Eliot Branch water into clear East Fork tributaries. Additionally, less water taken from Coe Branch, Eliot Branch, and Laurance Lake which will benefit listed steelhead and bull trout. The Glacier Ditch provided irrigation water from the Eliot Branch to upper valley orchards and agriculture for more than 100 years. The Glacier Ditch served approximately 1,438 acres with 18 cfs of water. The Glacier Ditch portion of this project

Vaivoda, Alexis

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Corium protection assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corium protection assembly includes a perforated base grid disposed below a pressure vessel containing a nuclear reactor core and spaced vertically above a containment vessel floor to define a sump therebetween. A plurality of layers of protective blocks are disposed on the grid for protecting the containment vessel floor from the corium.

Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Sirtori, IT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Thompson Falls Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents a preliminary mitigation and enhancement plan for the Thompson Falls hydroelectric project. It discusses options available to provide wildlife protection, mitigation and enhancement in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501). The options focus on mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat losses attributable to the construction of the hydroelectric project. These losses were previously estimated from the best available information concerning the degree of negative and positive impacts to target wildlife species (Wood and Olsen 1984). Criteria by which the mitigation alternatives were evaluated were the same as those used to assess the impacts identified in the Phase I document (Wood and Olsen 1984). They were also evaluated according to feasibility and cost effectiveness. This document specifically focuses on mitigation for target species which were identified during Phase I (Wood and Olsen 1984). It was assumed mitigation and enhancement for the many other target wildlife species impacted by the hydroelectric developments will occur as secondary benefits. The recommended mitigation plan includes two recommended mitigation projects: (1) development of wildlife protection and enhancement plans for MPC lands and (2) strategies to protect several large islands upstream of the Thompson Falls reservoir. If implemented, these projects would provide satisfactory mitigation for wildlife losses associated with the Thompson Falls hydroelectric project. The intent of the mitigation plan is to recommend wildlife management objectives and guidelines. The specific techniques, plans, methods and agreements would be developed is part of the implementation phase.

Bissell, Gael; Wood, Marilyn

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

NeSmith, Frank (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Long, Mack (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Paks, Kalispell, MT); Matthews, Dayne (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

ORISE: Human Subjects Protection Resource Protection Book  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Subjects Protection Resource Book Human Subjects Protection Resource Book The Human Subjects Protection Resource Book synthesizes information currently available on the protection of human subjects in research, the continuing application of such information to new areas of endeavor, and ever-changing rules, regulations, and guidance. This resource, to which the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contributed, is for investigators, institutional review boards, research organizations, research subjects and others. The book contains chapters that provide background information on the history and development of federal regulations; chapters that discuss procedural and substantive issues regarding the review and conduct of human subjects research; and chapters that are specific to one type of research

157

Fire Protection Program Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

Sharry, J A

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

158

Microbial Characteristics of Native Aquatic Species of Savannah River Wetlands  

SciTech Connect

In 1974 the Savannah River Site (SRS) was established as a National Environmental Research Park (NERP) in the United States. NERP provided locations for long-term ecological research investigation. Many of the ecological studies that have been conducted in the past mainly focused on the macroscopic view. The Savannah River Site contains wetlands that are home to many diverse organisms. We conducted a preliminary survey of microbial habitats in order to explore the biodiversity of species-specific symbionts. Bacterial surveys included viable counts, direct counts, isolation, identification, and metabolic profiles.

McKinsey, P.C.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

159

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisor Paul Hoover Special Assistant and Issues Management Coordinator Elinor Gwynn Radiation Protection Radiation Protection The Radiation Protection Division supports the...

160

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) 17MTBMontanaStreamProtectionActSPA124Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 87-5-501 et seq Montana Stream Protection Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17MTBMontanaStreamProtectionActSPA124Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Montana has a policy to preserve fish and wildlife habitat as well as

162

Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

Myra, D.; Ready, C.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Marine Resources Commission The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches, and other shores. A permit from the Commission is required to dredge, fill, or otherwise disturb these

164

National Infrastructure Protection Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrastructure Infrastructure Protection Plan 2006 Preface Preface i The ability to protect the critical infrastructure and key resources (CI/KR) of the United States is vital to our national security, public health and safety, economic vitality, and way of life. U.S. policy focuses on the importance of enhancing CI/KR protection to ensure that essential governmental missions, public services, and economic functions are maintained in the event of a

165

ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subjects Protecting Human Subjects The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Human Subjects Research Program exists to ensure that all research conducted at DOE institutions, whether...

166

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING STANDARDS  

SciTech Connect

Hanford Atomic Production Operation specification guides for protective clothing are presented. Details of this manual are given in TID-4100(Suppl.). (N.W.R.)

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

168

Generator backup overcurrent protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concern that the characteristics and correct application of the generator backup relay are misunderstood is addressed in this report to the Power Systems Protection Committee. It is inherently a secure device, and rarely has the opportunity to operate in its intended capacity. So the question was asked, ''Do generator backup overcurrent relays really protect anything.'' In response a description of the function and operating characteristics of the backup relays, a discussion of generator fault current behavior, examples of relay settings for a typical application, and methods and criteria for determining that the relay both protects the generator and operates selectively with other protective devices are included.

Baker, D.S.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Surge Protection Anthology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Three annexes include unpublished contributions to working groups, US patents front pages, and ... Lightning protection of roof-mounted solar cells ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fire Protection Program Guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidelines Principal Orders Related Orders Technical Standards Guidance Current fire protection requirements of the Department reside in: DOE O 420.1C, "Facility Safety", 10 CFR...

171

A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

Marmorek, David

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

H&T Aquatics Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

H&T Aquatics Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility H&T Aquatics Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name H&T Aquatics Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility H&T Aquatics Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Mecca, California Coordinates 33.571692°, -116.0772244° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

173

Aquatic Toxicology 85 (2007) 1927 Estrogen-receptor independent effects of two ubiquitous environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Szamrej (2003) identified enhanced chl-a production in Wolffia arrhiza, an aquatic vascular plant, cul cell of Melosira varians C.A. Agardh. J. Phycol. 9, 50­61. Czerpak, R., Szamrej, I.K., 2003. The effect

Julius, Matthew L.

174

Flow and solute transport in random cylinder arrays : a model for emergent aquatic plant canopies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With wetlands constituting about 6% of earth's land surface, aquatic vegetation plays a significant role in defining mean flow patterns and in the transport of dissolved and particulate material in the environment. However, ...

Tanino, Yukie, 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Evaluating the Effects of Power Plants on Aquatic Communities: Guidelines for Selection of Assessment Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidelines for selecting methods to estimate effects of cooling water withdrawals on aquatic populations and communities. The report is a companion to the EPRI 1999 report TR-112013, "Catalog of Assessment Methods for Evaluating Effects of Power Plant Operations on Aquatic Communities." These two documents describe approaches for estimating the magnitude of cooling water intake structure effects as part of assessing the potential for adverse environmental impact (AEI) under Section 3...

2002-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

176

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan serves as an aid to management and staff to implement new environmental programs in a timely manner.

Brekke, D.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25 Federal Register 25 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 209 / Friday, October 28, 2011 / Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9484-2] Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee (CHPAC); Notice of Charter Renewal AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Charter Renewal. Notice is hereby given that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that, in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), 5 U.S.C. App.2. The Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee (CHPAC) is a necessary committee which is in the public interest. Accordingly, CHPAC will be renewed for an additional two- year period. The purpose of CHPAC is to provide advice and recommendations to the Administrator of EPA on issues

178

ORISE: Human Subjects Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Subjects Protection Human Subjects Protection The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs technical assessments to assist U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories involved in human subjects research projects. Under DOE Order and Policy 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, and 10 CFR 745, DOE employees and contractors are expected to protect the rights and welfare of human research subjects. In support of the DOE Office of Science and the Human Subjects Protection Program (HSPP), ORISE has most recently assisted with the development and distribution of tools to address classified research and to track potential human social cultural behavior systems (HSCB) research conducted by DOE laboratories. Examples of products that ORISE has developed in support of the HSPP

179

Middle East: stratigraphic evolution and oil habitat: discussion  

SciTech Connect

The paper, Middle East: Stratigraphic Evolution and Oil Habitat, by R.J. Murris (AAPG Bull. v. 64, p. 597-618) is discussed. Problems with the time-stratigraphic units used in the article are pointed out, along with the source rocks of the petroleum deposits, the depositional cyclicity, subsidence and sea level fluctuation, and the Middle East geosyncline. (JMT)

Ibrahim, M.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Salmon Basin Habitat Site Visits May 20-23, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

meeting at the Idaho Council Office Detailed Itinerary TBD #12;13 Projects included in this tour: 2007-268-00 Idaho Watershed Habitat Restoration-Custer District Custer Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) 1994-015-00 Idaho Fish Screening Improvement Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) 2007-399-00 Upper

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M. [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project report, FY 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project is to develop the technology for growing microalgae as a renewable biomass feedstock for the production of a diesel fuel substitute (biodiesel), thereby reducing the need for imported petroleum. Microalgae are of interest as a feedstock because of their high growth rates and tolerance to varying environmental conditions, and because the oils (lipids) they produce can be extracted and converted to substitute petroleum fuels such as biodiesel. Microalgae can be grown in arid and semi-arid regions with poor soil quality, and saline water from aquifers or the ocean can be used for growing microalgae. Biodiesel is an extremely attractive candidate to fulfill the need for a diesel fuel substitute. Biodiesel is a cleaner fuel than petroleum diesel; it is virtually free of sulfur, and emissions of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and particulates during combustion are significantly reduced in comparison to emissions from petroleum diesel. Biodiesel provides essentially the same energy content and power output as petroleum-based diesel fuel.

Brown, L.; Jarvis, E.; Dunahay, T.; Roessler, P.; Zeiler, K. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Sprague, S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Use-Exposure Relationships of Pesticides for Aquatic Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field-scale environmental models have been widely used in aquatic exposure assessments of pesticides. Those models usually require a large set of input parameters and separate simulations for each pesticide in evaluation. In this study, a simple use-exposure relationship is developed based on regression analysis of stochastic simulation results generated from the Pesticide Root-Zone Model (PRZM). The developed mathematical relationship estimates edge-of-field peak concentrations of pesticides from aerobic soil metabolism half-life (AERO), organic carbon-normalized soil sorption coefficient (KOC), and application rate (RATE). In a case study of California crop scenarios, the relationships explained 90 95 % of the variances in the peak concentrations of dissolved pesticides as predicted by PRZM simulations for a 30-year period. KOC was identified as the governing parameter in determining the relative magnitudes of pesticide exposures in a given crop scenario. The results of model application also indicated that the effects of chemical fate processes such as partitioning and degradation on pesticide exposure were similar among crop scenarios, while the cross-scenario variations were mainly associated with the landscape characteristics, such as organic carbon contents and curve numbers. With a minimum set of input data, the use-exposure relationships proposed in this study could be used in screening procedures for potential water quality impacts from the off-site movement of pesticides.

Yuzhou Luo; Frank Spurlock; Xin Deng; Sheryl Gill; Kean Goh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Biodiesel from aquatic species. Project report: FY 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers in the Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project focus on the use of microalgae as a feedstock for producing renewable, high-energy liquid fuels. The program`s basic premise is that microalgae, which have been called the most productive biochemical factories in the world, can produce up to 30 times more oil per unit of growth area than land plants. It is estimated that 150 to 400 barrels of oil per acre per year (0.06 to 0.16 million liters/hectar) could be produced with microalgal oil technology. Initial commercialization of this technology is envisioned for the desert Southwest because this area provides high solar radiation and offers flat land that has few competing uses (hence low land costs). Similarly, there are large saline aquifers with few competing uses in the region. This water source could provide a suitable, low-cost medium for the growth of many microalgae. The primary area of research during FY 1993 was the effort to genetically improve microalgae in order to control the timing and magnitude of lipid accumulation. Increased lipid content will have a direct effect on fuel price, and the control of lipid content is a major project goal. The paper describes progress on the following: culture collection; molecular biology of lipid biosynthesis; microalgal transformation; and environmental, safety, and health and quality assurance.

Brown, L.M.; Sprague, S.; Jarvis, E.E.; Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Zeiler, K.G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Status of Wildlife in Protected Areas Compared to Non-Protected Areas of Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compile over 270 wildlife counts of Kenyas wildlife populations conducted over the last 30 years to compare trends in national parks and reserves with adjacent ecosystems and country-wide trends. The study shows the importance of discriminating human-induced changes from natural population oscillations related to rainfall and ecological factors. National park and reserve populations have declined sharply over the last 30 years, at a rate similar to non-protected areas and country-wide trends. The protected area losses reflect in part their poor coverage of seasonal ungulate migrations. The losses vary among parks. The largest parks, Tsavo East, Tsavo West and Meru, account for a disproportionate share of the losses due to habitat change and the difficulty of protecting large remote parks. The losses in Kenyas parks add to growing evidence for wildlife declines inside as well as outside African parks. The losses point to the need to quantify the performance of conservation policies and promote integrated landscape practices that combine parks with private and community-based measures.

David Western; Samantha Russell; Innes Cuthill

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project; Klickitat Watershed Enhancement, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of the Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of stream reaches and watersheds supporting native anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss; ESA- listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU) and spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha). Habitat restoration activities in the Klickitat subbasin augment goals and objectives of the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the NMFS Biological Opinion (All-H paper). Work is conducted to enhance instream and contributing upland habitat to facilitate increased natural production potential for native salmonid stocks. Efforts in the Klickitat Subbasin fall into two main categories: (1) identification and prioritization of sites for protection and restoration activities, (2) implementation of protection and restoration measures. KWEP personnel also assist monitoring efforts of the YKFP Monitoring & Evaluation Project. During the September 2002-August 2003 reporting period, KWEP personnel continued efforts to address feedback from the August 2000 Provincial Review that indicated a need for better information management and development of geographic priorities by: (1) Assisting development of the Strategic Habitat Plan for the Klickitat Lead Entity (Task A3.1) and Klickitat steelhead EDT model (Task A4.1); (2) Improving the functionality of reference point, habitat unit, and large woody debris modules of the habitat database as well as addition of a temperature module (Tasks A1.1-1.2); (3) Continuing development and acquisition of GIS data (Task A1.3); (4) Ongoing data collection efforts to fill information gaps including streamflow, habitat, and temperature (Objectives C1 and C2); and (5) Completion of planning, field work, and hydrologic modeling associated with roads assessment in the White Creek watershed (Task A4.2). Significant milestones associated with restoration projects during the reporting period included: (1) Completion of the Surveyors Fish Creek Passage Enhancement project (Task B2.3); (2) Completion of interagency agreements for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat Mill (Task B2.10) projects; (3) Completion of topographic surveys for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4), Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5), Trout Creek and Bear Creek culvert replacements (Task B2.7), and Snyder Swale II (Task B2.13) projects; (4) Completion of the Snyder Swale II - Phase 1 project (Task B2.13); (5) Completion of design, planning, and permitting for the Klickitat Mill project (Task B2.10) and initiation of construction; (6) Design for the Trout and Bear Creek culverts (B2.7) were brought to the 60% level; and (7) Completion of design work for the for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5) projects.

Conley, Will

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Field Evaluation of Wedgewire Screens for Protecting Early Life Stages of Fish at Cooling Water Intake Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wedgewire screens are designed to minimize entrainment and impingement of aquatic organisms at power plant cooling water intake structures (CWIS). This report presents the results of a field study evaluating the effectiveness of cylindrical wedgewire screens for protecting the early life stages (eggs and larvae) of fish at cooling water intakes. The study examines multiple screen design parameters and hydraulic conditions in the Chesapeake Bay with a variety of estuarine species. Information in this repo...

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

190

Investigation of the Utility of United States Environmental Protection Agency's Recalculation Procedure for Deriving Site-specific Criteria for Ammonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report explores the utility of the United States Environmental Protection Agencys (USEPAs) Recalculation Procedure for deriving site-specific criteria for ammonia in fresh water. It represents a comprehensive evaluation of the application of the deletion process for select sites geographically distributed across the conterminous United States (U.S.).BackgroundThe Agency is currently in the process of updating its National aquatic life ...

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project The Mission of the Office of River Protection is to safely retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Office of River Protection Consent Order, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - NCO-2011-01

192

Coordinating overcurrent protection devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distribution, substation, and plant engineers can benefit from using an overcurrent protection program in commercial, industrial, and utility applications to aid in clearing temporary faults and isolating permanent faults. In the time it normally takes to check one coordination scheme manually, dozens of alternatives can be evaluated using a graphics-oriented program, because the engineer receives immediate feedback for quick decision-making. It is well known that accurately coordinating overcurrent protection devices can minimize or prevent equipment damage, and electrical power service to customers can be greatly improved. In addition to assisting experienced engineers, an overcurrent protection program is an excellent training tool for new engineers.

St. John, M.; Borgnino, A.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Fire Protection Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Fire Protection Overview The Department of Energy (DOE) Fire Protection Program is multi-faceted. It includes published fire safety directives (Orders, standards, and guidance documents), a range of oversight activities, an annual fire protection program summary, and a directory of fire safety professionals. DOE also sponsors fire safety conferences, various training initiatives, and a spectrum of technical assistance activities. This Home Page is intended to bring together in one location as much of the Program's resources as possible to facilitate greater understanding, communication, and efficiency of operations. Guidelines -- NFPA Codes and standards, CFRs, and DOE Directives (policy statements, Orders, Standards, and Guidance Documents)

194

Bird Protection in Illinois  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection in Illinois Protection in Illinois Nature Bulletin No. 550-A January 18, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BIRD PROTECTION IN ILLINOIS Very few people are indifferent about birds. Almost every bird is the feathered friend of somebody or some organization ready to do battle in its behalf. At present, in Illinois, songbirds and most other wild birds, together with their nests and eggs, are completely protected by law at all times. A few kinds, called game birds, may be shot by hunters -- pheasants and quail, also migratory ducks, geese, coots, jacksnipes, woodcocks, and doves. Such hunting must be done with shotguns in certain places in certain open seasons with many other detailed restrictions. Now, even crow hunters are licensed. The only unprotected birds are those three immigrants or exotics: the English sparrow, the European starling and the "domestic " pigeon. These, too, have their friends .

195

Potline Open Circuit Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It results in a high power arc, which feeds oneself as the DC current is not cut. ... To reduce the risk, the potline and the substation must be protected against the...

196

Mondriaan memory protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability and security are quickly becoming users' biggest concern due to the increasing reliance on computers in all areas of society. Hardware-enforced, fine-grained memory protection can increase the reliability and ...

Witchel, Emmett Jethro, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Environmental protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California's commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities.

R. C. Holland

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fish Protection Technology Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an updated review of the state of knowledge on fish protection technologies for use at power plant cooling water intake structures (CWISs) to meet requirements of 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA). While it is not possible to know with certainty how the 316(b) Final Rule will look (it is scheduled to be issued on or before June 27, 2013), it is anticipated that power generating facilities will have some flexibility in selecting fish protection technologies. The ...

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

199

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Washington Department of fish and Wildlife subsequently purchased numerous properties to mitigate for the identified Snake River losses. These projects, however, were not sufficient to mitigate for all the HU's lost. The Northwest Power Planning Council amended the remaining 26,774 HU's into their 1994-1995 Fish and Wildlife Program as being unmitigated (NPPC 2000), which allowed the Nez Perce Tribe to contract with BPA to provide HU's through the Precious Lands Project. The Precious Lands project contains a different composition of cover types than those assessed during the lower Snake loss assessment. For example, no mallard or Canada goose habitat exists on Precious Lands but the area does contain conifer forest, which was not present on the area inundated by dam construction. These cover type differences have resulted in a slightly different suite of species for the current HEP assessment. Target species for Precious Lands are downy woodpecker, yellow warbler, song sparrow, California Quail, mule deer, sharp-tailed grouse (brood rearing), west em meadowlark, beaver, and black-capped chickadee. This list is a reflection of the available cover types and the management objectives of the Nez Perce Tribe. For example, chukar was not used in the present assessment because it is an introduced Eurasian game bird that does not provide an accurate representation of the ecological health of the native grasslands it was supposed to represent. Initial model runs using the chukar confirmed this suspicion so the brood-rearing section of the sharp-tailed grouse model was used instead. Additionally, the beaver model was used in place of the river otter model because the otter model used in the loss assessment was not a published model, was overly simplistic, and did not provide an accurate assessment of riparian condition. The beaver model, however, provides a detailed evaluation of overstory class structure that the NPT felt was a good compliment to the yellow warbler and song sparrow models that evaluated understory shrub layers. Overall, such substituti

Kozusko, Shana

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Habitat choice of juvenile coastal cod : the role of macroalgae habitats for juvenile coastal cod (Gadus morhua L.) in Porsangerfjorden and Ullsfjorden in Northern Norway .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Habitat choice of small juvenile coastal cod (Gadus morhua L. 1758) was investigated in a field study in Porsangerfjorden and Ullsfjorden in Northern Norway. A (more)

Michaelsen, Christer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microbially derived crop protection products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Project: Microbially derived crop protection productstransferred into major crop plants. Following greenhouseMicrobial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products " A

Torok, Tamas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Project, 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the Funding source For the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. The major activities undertaken during this report period were: procurement of 6 cooperative lease agreements and one lease addendum with private landowners, design and layout of 4.4 miles of riparian exclosure fence and 1.75 miles of instream structures, development of three fencing contracts and three instream work contracts. Results include implementation of 3 miles of fencing and 3.7 miles of instream work. Other activities undertaken during this report period are: weekly inspection and maintenance of fencing projects, collection and summarization of temperature data, photopoint establishment, coordination with numerous agencies and tribes and education of high school students on habitat improvement and preservation.

Bailey, Timothy D.; Rimbach, Gregory P.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project; 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the Funding source For the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. The major activities undertaken during this report period were: procurement of 6 cooperative lease agreements and one lease addendum with private landowners, design and layout of 4.4 miles of riparian exclosure fence and 1.75 miles of instream structures, development of three fencing contracts and three instream work contracts. Results include implementation OF 3 miles of fencing and 3.7 miles of instream work. Other activities undertaken during this report period are: weekly inspection and maintenance of fencing projects, collection and summarization of temperature data, photopoint establishment, coordination with numerous agencies and tribes and education of high school students on habitat improvement and preservation.

Bailey, Timothy D.; Rimbach, Gregory P. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: (1) Flood damage assessment of project leases after the May 1995 and November 1995 floods, (2) reconstruction of 0.75 miles of riparian fence, (3) inspection and routine maintenance of 14.8 miles of fence, (4) collection of approximately 55,000 native willow and cottonwood cuttings and installation of approximately 21,600 of these material, (5) implementation of two bioengineering projects and initiation of a third project, (6) installation of approximately 30 tree/rootwads for fish habitat enhancement, (7) removal of an abandoned flood irrigation dam/fish barrier, (8) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, and (9) extensive interagency coordination.

Laws, Troy S. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: 1) Flood damage assessment of project leases after the May 1994 flood, 2) reconstruction of 1.25 miles of high tensile steel fence, 3) inspection and routine maintenance of 14.8 miles of fence, 4) collection of approximately 6,600 cottonwood and willow cuttings for transplanting in spring of 1995, 5) establishment of three bioengineered habitat restoration demonstration projects, 6) Implementation of a streambank stabilization workshop (bioengineering techniques) for Umatilla Basin residents and resource agency personnel, 7) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, and 8) extensive interagency coordination.

Laws, Troy S. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

AVIAN AND BAT SCREENING ANALYSIS AND HABITAT CHARACTERIZATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AVIAN AND BAT SCREENING ANALYSIS AVIAN AND BAT SCREENING ANALYSIS AND HABITAT CHARACTERIZATION Barr Engineering Company UMore Park Research Wind Turbine Dakota County, Minnesota June 2010 Prepared For: Barr Engineering Company 4700 West 77 th St. Minneapolis, MN 55435 Prepared By: 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 200 Denver, Colorado 80202 Phone: (720) 330-7280 Fax: (303) 458-5701 www.nrcdifference.com NRC Project # 0010-0110-01

207

South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Nez Perce National Forest.  

SciTech Connect

In 1984, the Nez Perce National forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement which provided for improvement of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout habitat in south Fork Clearwater River tributaries. Project work was completed in seven main locations: Crooked River, Red River, Meadow Creek Haysfork Gloryhole, Cal-Idaho Gloryhole, Fisher Placer and Leggett Placer. This report describes restoration activities at each of these sites.

Siddall, Phoebe

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. The major activities undertaken during this report period were: (1) procurement of one cooperative lease agreement and one access easement with private landowners, (2) design and layout of 1.3 miles of riparian exclosure fence and 1.4 miles of instream structure maintenance, and (3) development of one fencing contract and three instream work contracts. Results include implementation of 1.9 miles of fencing, 1.4 miles of instream maintenance work, reconstruction of 0.75 miles of flood damaged fence, inspection and routine maintenance of 13.5 miles of fence, and planting of grasses, legumes and shrubs along 4.6 miles of stream. Other activities undertaken during this report period are: collection and summarization of temperature data, establishment and data collection from habitat monitoring transects, electrofishing surveys and spawning ground counts, photopoint establishment, coordination with numerous agencies and tribes and education of high school students on habitat improvement and preservation.

Bailey, Timothy D.; Rimbach, Gregory P. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring : Annual Report 1989.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project 83-7 was established under the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) habitat improvement projects, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two subprojects: general and intensive monitoring. Primary objectives of the general monitoring subproject (Part 1) are to determine natural production increases due to habitat improvement projects in terms of parr production and to determine natural production status and trends in Idaho. The second objective is accomplished by combining parr density data from monitoring and evaluation of BPA habitat projects and from other Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) management and research activities. Primary objectives of the intensive monitoring subproject (Part 2) are to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production and to develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Field work began in 1987 in the upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). 22 refs., 10 figs., 17 tabs.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Toxicological benchmark for screening of potential contaminants of concern for effects on aquatic biota on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the initial stages in ecological risk assessment of hazardous waste sites is the screening of contaminants to determine which of them are worthy of further consideration. This report presents potential screening benchmarks for protection of aquatic life from contaminants in water. Because there is no guidance for screening benchmarks, a set of alternative benchmarks is presented here. The alternative benchmarks are based on different conceptual approaches to estimating concentrations causing significant effects. To the extent that toxicity data are available, this report presents the alternative benchmarks for chemicals that have been detected on the Oak Ridge Reservation. It also presents the data used to calculate the benchmarks, and the sources of the data. It compares the benchmarks and discusses their relative conservatism and utility.

Suter, G.W. II; Futrell, M.A.; Kerchner, G.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities that occurred over Fiscal Year 2002 (FY 02). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 02. A description of the progress during FY 02 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are given. OBJECTIVE 1--Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administration oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts and personnel was provided. OBJECTIVE 2--Develop, coordinate, and implement the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document is utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan, ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document was updated and revised to reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River basin based upon other documents and actions taken in the basin. OBJECTIVE 3--Assist Middle Fork Irrigation District in developing an alternative irrigation water source on Evans Creek (Hutson pond and Evans Creek diversion), eliminating the need for irrigation diversion dams which happen to be partial fish barriers. Upon completion, this project will restore 2.5 miles of access for winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout habitat. This objective was revised and included in the FY 03 Statement of Work for Project No. 1998-021-00. During FY 02 the final engineering was completed on this project. However, due to a lengthy permitting process and NMFS consultation, this project was inadvertently delayed. Project completion is expected in July 2003. OBJECTIVE 4--Assist the Farmers Irrigation District (FID) in construction and installation of a new fish screen and bypass system on the mainstem Hood River (Farmers Canal). Final engineering and design for the horizontal screen was completed during the winter of 2001. In December 2001 and January 2002, the concrete work was completed and the head gates were mounted. During the spring the secondary head level control gates were installed. In September 2002, the jersey barriers and vortex tubes were installed. These are located upstream of the old drum screen, and are the primary means of dealing with bedload and suspended load from the diversion. The screen surface was also installed in September 2002 and the system accommodated water soon after. Monitoring of these structures in regards to efficiency and possible effects to fish migration is scheduled to occur in spring 2003. The transition from the old canal to the new screen is smooth and currently does not present any problems. The old drum screen is going to remain in place until all the biological and hydrological monitoring is complete to ensure compliance and satisfaction of all agencies involved. OBJECTIVE 5--Assist the East Fork Irrigation District (EFID) in final engineering design and construction of the Central Lateral Canal upgrade and invert siphon. This objective was revised and included in the FY 03 Statement of Work for Project No. 1998-021-00. During FY 02, a significant portion of the engineering and design work was completed on the EFID Central Lateral Canal upgrade and invert siphon. There were some changes in canal alignment that required further design work and easement acquisition. Time was also spent looking for matching funds and securing a loan by the EFID. Construction initiation is now scheduled for summer 2003. OBJECTIVE 6--Modify and/or eliminate five culverts, three on Baldwin Creek, one on Graham Creek, and one on Evans Creek, which function as barriers to upstream and downstream fish migration. This objective was revised and included in the FY 03 Statement of Work for Project No. 1998-021-00. There are only two culverts on Baldwin Creek that will be eliminated

Vaivoda, Alexis

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Rack Protection Monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

Orr, Stanley G.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

213

Rack protection monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Habitat reclamation plan to mitigate for the loss of habitat due to oil and gas production activities under maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities associated with oil and gas development under the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) from 1975 to 2025 will disturb approximately 3,354 acres. Based on 1976 aerial photographs and using a dot grid methodology, the amount of land disturbed prior to MER is estimated to be 3,603 acres. Disturbances on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) were mapped using 1988 aerial photography and a geographical information system. A total of 6,079 acres were classified as disturbed as of June, 1988. The overall objective of this document is to provide specific information relating to the on-site habitat restoration program at NPRC. The specific objectives, which relate to the terms and conditions that must be met by DOE as a means of protecting the San Joaquin kit fox from incidental take are to: (1) determine the amount and location of disturbed lands on NPR-1 and the number of acres disturbed as a result of MER activities, (2) develop a long term (10 year) program to restore an equivalent on-site acres to that lost from prior project-related actions, and (3) examine alternative means to offset kit fox habitat loss.

Anderson, D.C.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

076 Federal Register 076 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 250 / Monday, December 31, 2012 / Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [ER-FRL-9006-8] Notice of Intent: Designation of an Expanded Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS) off Charleston, South Carolina AGENCY: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4. ACTION: Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the designation of an expanded ODMDS off Charleston, South Carolina. Purpose: EPA has the authority to designate ODMDSs under Section 102 of the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (33 U.S.C. 1401 et seq.). It is EPA's policy to prepare a National Environmental Policy Document for all ODMDS designations (63 FR 58045, October 1998). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, TO

216

Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22 Federal Register 22 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 103 / Friday, May 28, 2010 / Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9156-1] Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of one new equivalent method for monitoring ambient air quality. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated, in accordance with 40 CFR Part 53, one new equivalent method for measuring concentrations of lead (Pb) in total suspended particulate matter (TSP) in the ambient air. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surender Kaushik, Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (MD-D205-03), National Exposure

217

River Protection.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cc: cc: DOE/IG-0506 I N S P E C T I O N R E P O R T U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF INSPECTIONS I N S P E C T I O N O F SELECTED ASPECTS OF THE OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION PERFORMANCE-BASED INCENTIVE PROGRAM JUNE 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 June 14, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman /s/ Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Inspection of Selected Aspects of the Office of River Protection Performance-Based Incentive Program" BACKGROUND The Office of River Protection (ORP), which reports to the Office of Environmental Management, is responsible for remediation of the radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Hanford Site in the State of Washington. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2000, ORP established 26 performance-based contract

218

Microscope collision protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

DeNure, Charles R. (Pocatello, ID)

2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

219

Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. CRITICAL FOUNDATIONS PROTECTING AMERICA'S INFRASTRUCTURES The Report of the President's Commission ...

220

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : January 2000-December 2002 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports were implemented from calendar year 2000 through 2002 in the Pataha Creek Watershed. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by NPPC. In previous years, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and were the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices were the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. Prior to 2000, several bank stabilization projects were installed but the installation costs became prohibitive and these types of projects were reduced in numbers over the following years. The years 2000 through 2002 were years where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek has steelhead in the upper reaches and native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow and shiners inhabit the lower portion because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat will improve habitat for the desired fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek could eventually develop into spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon if some migration barriers are removed and habitat is restored. The upland projects completed during 2000 through 2002 were practices that reduce erosion from the cropland. Three-year continuous no-till projects were finishing up and the monitoring of this particular practice is ongoing. Its direct impact on soil erosion along with the economical aspects is being studied. Other practices such as terrace, waterway, sediment basin construction and the installation of strip systems are also taking place. The years 2000 through 2002 were productive years for the Pataha Creek Model Watershed but due to the fact that most of the cooperators in the watershed have reached their limitation allowed for no-till and direct seed/ two pass of 3 years with each practice, the cost share for these practices is lower than the years of the late 90's. All the upland practices that were implemented have helped to further reduce erosion from the cropland. This has resulted in a reduction of sedimentation into the spawning and rearing area of the fall chinook salmon located in the lower portion of the Tucannon River. The tree planting projects have helped in reducing sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone of desired locations inside the Pataha Creek Watershed. The CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) along with the CCRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) are becoming more prevalent in the watershed and are protecting the riparian areas along the Pataha Creek at an increasing level every year. Currently roughly 197 acres of riparian has been enrolled along the Pataha Creek in the CREP program.

Bartels, Duane G.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Environmental Protection Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Details Site Details EPD Home Staff List (pdf) Org Chart (pdf) Compliance / Permits Programs Other Information Land Use & Institutional Controls Mapping Site Environmental Reports Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) Spill Response BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Developing Environmental Products and Services for Brookhaven Stakeholders The Environmental Protection Division (EPD) develops and delivers environmental products and services for all Brookhaven stakeholders. We manage environmental programs such as pollution prevention, groundwater protection, and natural resource management; provide technical assistance on environmental requirements; maintain the Laboratory's IS0 14001-registered Environmental Management System; prepare environmental permit applications; conduct environmental monitoring; manage data

222

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. This report focuses on the following: notification of environmental occurrences; general planning and reporting; special programs and plans; environmental monitoring program; and quality assurance and data verification.

Brekke, D.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Environmental protection implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. SNL is committed to operating in full compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental laws, regulations, and standards. Furthermore, SNL/California strives to go beyond compliance with legal requirements by making every effort practical to reduce impacts to the environment to levels as low as reasonably achievable.

Holland, R.C.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection December 4, 2013 - 7:00am Addthis DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection DOE and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that will enhance collaboration in promoting the conservation of migratory birds. DOE manages land that includes wetlands, shrub-steppe, shortgrass prairie, desert, and forested areas that provide habitat for migratory birds. In the MOU, DOE recognizes that some of its activities have the potential to affect migratory birds (e.g., transmission lines, power poles, invasive weed control, and various construction activities), and agrees that it is important to conserve

225

West Foster Creek 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the West Foster Creek (Smith acquisition) wildlife mitigation site in May 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance and maintain the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The West Foster Creek 2007 follow-up HEP survey generated 2,981.96 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for a 34% increase (+751.34 HUs) above baseline HU credit (the 1999 baseline HEP survey generated 2,230.62 habitat units or 1.13 HUs per acre). The 2007 follow-up HEP analysis yielded 1,380.26 sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) habitat units, 879.40 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) HUs, and 722.29 western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) habitat units. Mule deer and sharp-tailed grouse habitat units increased by 346.42 HUs and 470.62 HUs respectively over baseline (1999) survey results due largely to cessation of livestock grazing and subsequent passive restoration. In contrast, the western meadowlark generated slightly fewer habitat units in 2007 (-67.31) than in 1999, because of increased shrub cover, which lowers habitat suitability for that species.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Uranium in the Near-shore Aquatic Food Chain: Studies on Periphyton and Asian Clams  

SciTech Connect

The benthic aquatic organisms in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River are the first biological receptors that can be exposed to groundwater contaminants coming from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The primary contaminant of concern in the former nuclear fuels processing area at the Site, known as the 300 Area, is uranium. Currently, there are no national clean up criteria for uranium and ecological receptors. This report summarizes efforts to characterize biological uptake of uranium in the food chain of the benthic aquatic organisms and provide information to be used in future assessments of uranium and the ecosystem.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Miley, Terri B.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Brandt, Charles A.; Napier, Bruce A.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Design and performance of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center photovoltaic system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A building-integrated DC PV array has been constructed on the Georgia Tech campus. The array is mounted on the roof of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center (GTAC), site of the aquatic events during the 1996 Paralympic and Olympic Games in Atlanta. At the time of its construction, it was the world`s largest roof-mounted photovoltaic array, comprised of 2,856 modules and rates at 342 kW. This section describes the electrical and physical layout of the PV system, and the associated data acquisition system (DAS) which monitors the performance of the system and collects measurements of several important meteorological parameters.

Rohatgi, A.; Begovic, M.; Long, R.; Ropp, M.; Pregelj, A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Armored garment for protecting  

SciTech Connect

A lightweight, armored protective garment for protecting an arm or leg from blast superheated gases, blast overpressure shock, shrapnel, and spall from a explosive device, such as a Rocket Propelled Grenade (RPG) or a roadside Improvised Explosive Device (IED). The garment has a ballistic sleeve made of a ballistic fabric, such as an aramid fiber (e.g., KEVLAR.RTM.) cloth, that prevents thermal burns from the blast superheated gases, while providing some protection from fragments. Additionally, the garment has two or more rigid armor inserts that cover the upper and lower arm and protect against high-velocity projectiles, shrapnel and spall. The rigid inserts can be made of multiple plies of a carbon/epoxy composite laminate. The combination of 6 layers of KEVLAR.RTM. fabric and 28 plies of carbon/epoxy laminate inserts (with the inserts being sandwiched in-between the KEVLAR.RTM. layers), can meet the level IIIA fragmentation minimum V.sub.50 requirements for the US Interceptor Outer Tactical Vest.

Purvis, James W. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, II, Jack F. (Albuquerque, NM); Whinery, Larry D. (Albuquerque, NM); Brazfield, Richard (Albuquerque, NM); Lawrie, Catherine (Tijeras, NM); Lawrie, David (Tijeras, NM); Preece, Dale S. (Watkins, CO)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

National Infrastructure Protection Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this context, our critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) may be directly exposed to the event themselves or indirectly exposed as a result of the dependencies and interde- pendencies among CIKR. Within the CIKR protection mission area, national priorities must include preventing catastrophic loss of life

Sen, Pradeep

230

Fish passage and protection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report consists of reprints on fish passage and protection topics from: American Fisheries Society; American Society of Civil Engineers; Harza Engineering Company; Hydro Review Magazine; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Independent Energy Magazine; National Hydropower Association; Northwest Hydroelectric Association; United States Army Corps of Engineers; United States Committee on large dams; and the United States Department of the Interior.

Rinehart, B.N.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A Surface Protective System  

SciTech Connect

Part of the design and development work connected with the erection of the chemistry "cave" in the "GP" Building entailed an investigation of various protective measures for materials of construction. This work was based on the observations and recommendations of personnel engaged in work at a similar installation at Argonne National Laboratory.

Brown, W. T.

1950-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

Conceptual Spawning Habitat Model to Aid in ESA Recovery Plans for Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a spawning habitat model that can be used to determine the physical habitat factors that are necessary to define the production potential for fall chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Columbia River's Hanford Reach and Snake River. This project addresses RPA 155 in the NMFS 2000 Biological Opinion: Action 155: BPA, working with BOR, the Corps, EPA, and USGS, shall develop a program to: (1) Identify mainstem habitat sampling reaches, survey conditions, describe cause-and-effect relationships, and identify research needs; (2) Develop improvement plans for all mainstem reaches; and (3) Initiate improvements in three mainstem reaches. During FY 2003 we continued to collect and analyze information on fall chinook salmon spawning habitat characteristics in the Hanford Reach that will be used to address RPA 155, i.e., items 1-3 above. For example, in FY 2003: (1) We continued to survey spawning habitat in the Hanford Reach and develop a 2-dimensional hydraulic and habitat model that will be capable of predicting suitability of fall chinook salmon habitat in the Hanford Reach; (2) Monitor how hydro operations altered the physical and chemical characteristics of the river and the hyporheic zone within fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach; (3) Published a paper on the impacts of the Columbia River hydroelectric system on main-stem habitats of fall chinook salmon (Dauble et al. 2003). This paper was made possible with data collected on this project; (4) Continued to analyze data collected in previous years that will ultimately be used to identify cause-and-effect relationships and identify research needs that will assist managers in the improvement of fall chinook habitat quality in main-stem reaches. During FY 2004 we plan to: (1) Complete preliminary reporting and submit papers based on the results of the project through FY 2004. Although we have proposed additional analysis of data be conducted in FY 2005, we anticipate a significant number of key papers being prepared and submitted in FY 2004 which will go toward identifying the data gaps this RPA is intended to address; (2) Make available data from this project for use on Project 2003-038-00 ('Evaluate restoration potential of Snake River fall chinook salmon') which is a BPA-funded project that will start in FY 2004; and (3) Present results of our work at regional and national meetings in order to facilitate technology transfer and information sharing. The objective of this project is to define the production potential of fall chinook salmon that spawn in the Hanford Reach. We will provide fisheries and resource managers with the information they need to determine if the Hanford Reach fall chinook salmon population is indeed healthy, and whether this population will be capable of seeding other satellite populations in the future. We will accomplish this purpose by continuing our on-going research at determining the carrying capacity of the Hanford Reach for producing fall chinook salmon under current operational scenarios, and then begin an assessment of whether the Reach is functioning as a model of a normative river as is widely believed. The product of our research will be a better understanding of the key habitat features for mainstem populations of anadromous salmonids, as well as a better understanding of the measures that must be taken to ensure long-term protection of the Hanford Reach fall chinook population. Although the project was originally funded in FY 1994, it was significantly redefined in FY 2000. At that time five tasks were proposed to accomplish the project objective. The purpose of this progress report is to briefly describe the activities that have been completed on each of the five tasks from FY 2000 through FY 2003.

Geist, David (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Estuarine and Tidal Freshwater Habitat Cover Types Along the Lower Columbia River Estuary Determined from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Developing an understanding of the distribution and changes in estuarine and tidal floodplain ecosystems is critical to the management of biological resources in the lower Columbia River. Columbia River plants, fish, and wildlife require specific physicochemical and ecological conditions to sustain their populations. As habitats are degraded or lost, this capability is altered, often irretrievably; those species that cannot adapt are lost from the ecosystem. The Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) completed a comprehensive ecosystem protection and enhancement plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary in 1999 (Jerrick, 1999). The plan identified habitat loss and modification as a critical threat to the integrity of the lower Columbia River ecosystem and called for a habitat inventory as a key first step in its long term restoration efforts. In 2000, the Estuary Partnership initiated a multiphase project to produce a spatial data set describing the current location and distribution of estuarine and tidal freshwater habitat cover types along the lower Columbia River from the river mouth to the Bonneville Dam using a consistent methodology and data sources (Fig. 1). The first phase of the project was the development of a broadbrush description of the estuarine and tidal freshwater habitat cover classes for the entire study area ({approx}146 river miles) using Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite imagery. Phase II of the project entailed analysis of the classified satellite imagery from Phase I. Analysis of change in landcover and a summary of the spatial relationships between cover types are part of Phase II. Phase III of the project included the classification of the high resolution hyperspectral imagery collected in 2000 and 2001 for key focal areas within the larger study area. Finally, Phase IV consists of this final report that presents results from refining the Landsat ETM+ classification and provides recommendations for future actions. Previous studies (Thomas, 1980; Thomas, 1983; Graves et al., 1995; NOAA, 1997; Allen, 1999) produced similar landcover data sets; however, most of these studies used multiple and varied data sources and differed from one another in methodologies. Currently, no single data set has been produced using a consistent methodology and uniform scale data, which describes current estuarine and tidal freshwater floodplain cover types from the Columbia's mouth to the Bonneville Dam (Fig. 1). Results from this study will be used by the Estuary Partnership and its cooperators to: (1) develop indicators of 'habitat health' for target species and populations, and biological integrity at the community and ecosystem scales; (2) develop definitions of 'important salmonid habitat'; (3) identify and evaluate potential wetland conservation and restoration sites; (4) track non-indigenous and invasive species; and (5) develop an understanding of how estuarine and floodplain habitats have changed over the past 200 years. This study focused on estuarine and tidal freshwater floodplain habitat cover types, which are important to native species, particularly juvenile salmonids. Results from this study are meant to provide support for the multiple efforts currently underway to recover 12 species of Columbia River salmonids identified as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Spatial scale was an important consideration in this study. Our goal was to create a geographic information system (GIS) coverage depicting habitat cover types for the entire 146 river miles of the study area and the associated floodplain, at a spatial resolution sufficient to resolve important estuarine and floodplain features, wherever possible. Thus, in addition to the small scale (30 m pixel size) satellite imagery covering the study area described in this report, we also acquired high spatial resolution imagery ({approx}1.5 m pixel size) for key portions of the study area using a Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). Compared to the rather coarse, low spectral resolution of the satellite ima

Garono, Ralph; Robinson, Rob

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the 2010 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) project EST-P-09-1, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, and known as the 'Salmon Benefits' study. The primary goal of the study is to establish scientific methods to quantify habitat restoration benefits to listed salmon and trout in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) in three required areas: habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival (Figure ES.1). The general study approach was to first evaluate the state of the science regarding the ability to quantify benefits to listed salmon and trout from habitat restoration actions in the LCRE in the 2009 project year, and then, if feasible, in subsequent project years to develop quantitative indices of habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival. Based on the 2009 literature review, the following definitions are used in this study. Habitat connectivity is defined as a landscape descriptor concerning the ability of organisms to move among habitat patches, including the spatial arrangement of habitats (structural connectivity) and how the perception and behavior of salmon affect the potential for movement among habitats (functional connectivity). Life history is defined as the combination of traits exhibited by an organism throughout its life cycle, and for the purposes of this investigation, a life history strategy refers to the body size and temporal patterns of estuarine usage exhibited by migrating juvenile salmon. Survival is defined as the probability of fish remaining alive over a defined amount of space and/or time. The objectives of the 4-year study are as follows: (1) develop and test a quantitative index of juvenile salmon habitat connectivity in the LCRE incorporating structural, functional, and hydrologic components; (2) develop and test a quantitative index of the early life history diversity of juvenile salmon in the LCRE; (3) assess and, if feasible, develop and test a quantitative index of the survival benefits of tidal wetland habitat restoration (hydrologic reconnection) in the LCRE; and (4) synthesize the results of investigations into the indices for habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival benefits.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, J. R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ostrand, Kenneth G.; Hanson, Kyle C.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Donley, Erin E.; Ke, Yinghai; Buenau, Kate E.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Townsend, Richard L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, Part 1 of 2, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Idaho, that will be used in conjunction with 1984 and 1985 fish and habitat pre-treatment (baseline) data to evaluate effects of habitat enhancement on the habitat and fish community in Bear Valley Creek overtime. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur in the upper-Salmon River basin. Subproject III involved fish inventories (pre-treatment) in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River, and habitat problem identification on Fivemile and Ramey Creek. Subproject IV involved baseline habitat and fish inventories on the East Fork of the Salmon River, Herd Creek and Big-Boulder Creek. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the four subproject reports. 20 refs., 37 figs., 22 tabs.

Richards, Carl

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Priest River, 2004-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 105.41 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 26.95 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland habitat provides 23.78 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scmb-shrub vegetation provides 54.68 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: (1) procurement of one access easement with a private landowner, (2) design, layout, and implementation of 3.36 miles of instream structure maintenance, (3) inspection and routine maintenance of 15.1 miles of fence, (4) revegetation along 3.36 miles of stream, (5) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, (6) extensive interagency coordination, and (7) environmental education activities with local high school students.

Bailey, Timothy D.; Laws, Troy S. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Effect of Group-Selection Opening Size on Breeding Bird Habitat Use in a Bottomland Forest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on the effects of creating group-selection openings of various sizes on breeding birds habitat use in a bottomland hardwood forest of the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Creation of 0.5-ha group selection openings in southern bottomland forests should provide breeding habitat for some field-edge species in gaps and habitat for forest-interior species and canopy-dwelling forest-edge species between gaps provided that enough mature forest is made available.

Moorman, C.E.; D.C. Guynn, Jr.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Aquatic Mammals 2003, 29.1, 3752 Stereotypical sound patterns in humpback whale songs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

within these themes. Sounds that had a low PRR (typically had much less total energy than of low-energy sounds within dominant patterns suggests either Figure 8. Comparison of sound pattern usageAquatic Mammals 2003, 29.1, 37­52 Stereotypical sound patterns in humpback whale songs: Usage

Mercado III, Eduardo

244

Abstracts of Presentation: Aquatic Species Program Annual Review Meeting, Golden, Colorado, 24-25 September 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the aquatic species program is to produce gasoline and diesel fuels from microalgae grown in saline waters of the desert southwest. Microalgae are known to accumulate lipids in large quantities and can thrive in high salinity water which currently has no other use.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Physics of Aquatic Systems II Werner Aeschbach-Hertig 1.1 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but also other branches of Earth sciences, leading to the related fields of isotope geology and isotopePhysics of Aquatic Systems II Werner Aeschbach-Hertig 1.1 2006 1 1. Introduction to Isotopes and Hydrology 1.1 Introduction to Isotope Hydrology "Isotope Hydrology" is a relatively young scientific

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

246

Environmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climatically important trace gas fluxes on regional and global scales, yet the magnitude of the transfer-generated turbulence in a shallow tidal sea, Nature, 400, 251­254. Raymond, P. A., and J. J. Cole (2001), Gas exchangeEnvironmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems

Ho, David

247

Temporal and spatial stability of Anopheles gambiae larval habitat distribution in western Kenya highlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distribution in Western Kenya highlands Li Li* 1 , Ling Biandata collected in western Kenya highlands during both drylarval habitats in western Kenya. The precipitation data of

Li, Li; Bian, Ling; Yakob, Laith; Zhou, Guofa; Yan, Guiyun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Availability, usage and expected contribution of potential nursery habitats for the California halibut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a damsel?sh re?ect availability of suitable habitat.locate/ecss Availability, usage and expected contribution ofthe spatial coverage (availability) of all potential nursery

Fodrie, Fredrick Joel; Mendoza, Guillermo F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The effects of background adaptation and food availability on habitat preference of Corythoichthys flavofasciatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADAPTATION AND FOOD AVAILABILITY ON HABITAT PREFERENCE OFchoice is related to the availability of food, presence ofbackground adaptation, food availability, or a combination

Iyer, Neetha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

GRR/Section 12-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservation Plan (HCP) The Developer meets with the DOFAW and the United States Fish and Wildlife Services to discuss the Habitat Conservation Plan. 12-HI-a.2 -...

251

Spatial Characterization of Puerto Rican Commercial Fisheries: Gear Usage Across Habitat Classes and Bathymetry Ranges.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The spatial characterization of Puerto Rican commercial fisheries describing fishing gear use in relation to habitat classes and bathymetry ranges was achieved through the collection (more)

Koeneke, Roberto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been assigned specific terms related to extreme habitatsstudy based on free text terms for environmental metadatato- use (small) set of terms (Habitat-Lite) that captures

Hirschman, Lynette

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Superconducting coil protection  

SciTech Connect

The protection system is based on a two-phase construction program. Phase I is the development of a reliable hardwired relay control system with a digital loop utilizing firmware and a microprocessor controller. Phase II is an expansion of the digital loop to include many heretofore unmonitored coil variables. These new monitored variables will be utilized to establish early quench detection and to formulate confirmation techniques of the quench detection mechanism. Established quench detection methods are discussed and a new approach to quench detection is presented. The new circuit is insensitive to external pulsed magnetic fields and the associated induced voltages. Reliability aspects of the coil protection system are discussed with respect to shutdowns of superconducting coil systems. Redundance and digital system methods are presented as related topics. (auth)

Woods, E.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Protective Coatings Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that fireside corrosion of waterwall panels in coal-fired boilers increased with the introduction of low NOx combustion systems since the early 1980s. This report describes ongoing work to evaluate protective coating solutions used to mitigate the wastage due to corrosion, and to determine which provide the greatest resistance to the circumferential cracking phenomena. It includes recent laboratory corrosion assisted thermal fatigue tests and analyses of field-exposed samples of ...

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

255

Radiation protection at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Protective Coatings Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes assessments of ceramic and thermal spray coatings that have advanced significantly or recently been marketed for use in the utility boiler industry to reduce slagging, mitigate fireside corrosion and potentially, circumferential cracking due to cyclic temperature variations. These innovations promise to enhance coating quality as well as reduce time and labor required to protect large areas of the boiler waterwalls. Coatings may also enable plants to improve production rates; thereb...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

257

Fire Protection Program: Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary Summary Since May 1950, an Annual Fire Protection Program Summary has been submitted by DOE's fire protection community. Currently, this report is required by section 5a.(8) of DOE Order 231.1. "Environment, Safety and Health Reporting." In 1999, an automation initiative was undertaken to streamline data collection and provide a more through review of DOE Reporting Element activities. This action resulted in the delayed publications of the CY 1999 and 2000 reports until 2002. It is now possible however to view all Annual Summary Reporting Element responses since 1991 at the Site, Operations, Lead Program Secretarial Office and Headquarters levels. Additionally, a build-in reference to other DOE reporting activities (CAIRS and ORPS) is available that allows Reporting Elements and managers the opportunity to review all fire protection events along previously mentioned categories. Reports listed below were generated from this application. To obtain a copy of the Annual Summary Application please contact Jim Bisker in the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy (EH-53) at (301)903-6542 or Jim Bisker.

258

Optical Delineation of Benthic Habitat Using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle  

SciTech Connect

To improve understanding and characterization of coastal regions, there has been an increasing emphasis on autonomous systems that can sample the ocean on relevant scales. Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) with active propulsion are especially well suited for studies of the coastal ocean because they are able to provide systematic and near-synoptic spatial observations. With this capability, science users are beginning to integrate sensor suits for a broad range of specific and often novel applications. Here, the relatively mature Remote Environmental Monitoring Units (REMUS) AUV system is configured with multi-spectral radiometers to delineate benthic habitat in Sequim Bay, WA. The vehicle was deployed in a grid pattern along 5 km of coastline in depths from 30 to less than 2 meters. Similar to satellite and/or aerial remote sensing, the bandwidth ratios from the downward looking radiance sensor and upward looking irradiance sensor were used to identify beds of eelgrass on sub-meter scales. Strong correlations were found between the optical reflectance signals and the geo-referenced in situ data collected with underwater video within the grid. Results demonstrate the ability of AUVs to map littoral habitats at high resolution and highlight the overall utility of the REMUS vehicle for nearshore oceanography.

Moline, Mark A.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Evans, Nathan R.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Network protection with service guarantees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increasing importance of communication networks comes an increasing need to protect against network failures. Traditional network protection has been an "all-or-nothing" approach: after any failure, all network ...

Kuperman, Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Managed Programs, Environmental Protection Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

training and supporting subject matter expertise. Environmental Information Management System: storing, managing, verifying, protecting, retrieving and archiving BNL's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Kootenai River Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project : Long-term Bighorn Sheep/Mule Deer Winter and Spring Habitat Improvement Project : Wildlife Mitigation Project, Libby Dam, Montana : Management Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Libby hydroelectric project, located on the Kootenai River in northwestern Montana, resulted in several impacts to the wildlife communities which occupied the habitats inundated by Lake Koocanusa. Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, in cooperation with the other management agencies, developed an impact assessment and a wildlife and wildlife habitat mitigation plan for the Libby hydroelectric facility. In response to the mitigation plan, Bonneville Power Administration funded a cooperative project between the Kootenai National Forest and Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks to develop a long-term habitat enhancement plan for the bighorn sheep and mule deer winter and spring ranges adjacent to Lake Koocanusa. The project goal is to rehabilitate 3372 acres of bighorn sheep and 16,321 acres of mule deer winter and spring ranges on Kootenai National Forest lands adjacent to Lake Koocanusa and to monitor and evaluate the effects of implementing this habitat enhancement work. 2 refs.

Yde, Chis

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Laundered protective clothing survey  

SciTech Connect

It is considered appropriate occasionally to make independent checks on the effectiveness of the plant laundry in removing radioactive contamination from plant-issue protective clothing. Previous surveys have offered constructive criticism resulting in improved handling of high level and soft beta contaminated clothing and incorporation in new designs of ventilating and air sampling recommendations. Recurrently the adequacy of laundry reject limits is questioned, and only recently an accurate, special study resulted in relaxed limits for Metal Preparation area clothing. A current question concerns the advisability of determining the reject level on the beta-gamma monitor more frequently than once a day. 2 tabs.

Clukey, H.V.

1952-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Protective measures for personnel  

SciTech Connect

This document addresses radiation protection concerns for workers in the experimental laboratories and production plants where nuclear fission piles are being used. A broad in-depth discussion is provided based with the experiences gained in the Manhattan Project and being applied to contemporary activities. Discussion is thorough and encompasses control of external irradiations including alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron radiations; and control of radioactivity within the body by control of inhalation, ingestion, and entrance through skin or wounds. General measures for the control of radiation hazards is addressed by provision of clothing and waste disposal. An Appendix 1 is entitled General Rules and Procedures Concerning Activity Hazards.

Nickson, J.J.

1946-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

264

Hearing protection for miners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A NIOSH analysis showed that at age 50 approximately 90% of coal miners have a hearing impairment, yet noise included hearing loss is 100% preventable. The article discusses requirements of the MSHA regulations, 30 CFR Part 62 - occupational noise exposure (2000) and a 2008-MSHA document describing technologically achievable and promising controls for several types of mining machinery. Hearing protection is still required for exposure to greater than 90 dBA. These are now commercially available ways to determine how much attenuation an individual gets from a given hearing protector, known as 'fit testing'. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 photo.

Schulz, T. [Sperian Hearing Protection (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Potential Impacts of OTEC Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HI  

SciTech Connect

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a marine renewable energy technology with the potential to contribute significantly to the baseload power needs of tropical island communities and remote U.S. military installations. As with other renewable energy technologies, however, there are potential challenges to its commercialization: technological, financial, social, and environmental. Given the large volumes of seawater required to drive the electricity-producing cycle, there is potential for the intakes to negatively impact the marine resources of the source waterbody through the impingement and entrainment of marine organisms. The goal of this project was to identify feasible warm water intake designs for a land-based OTEC facility proposed for development in Port Allen, Kauai and to characterize the populations of ichthyoplankton near the proposed warm water intake location that could be at risk of entrainment. The specific objectives of this project were to: Complete a site-specific assessment of available and feasible warm water intake technologies to determine the best intake designs for minimizing impacts to aquatic organisms at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Complete a field sampling program to collect biological data to characterize the baseline populations of ichthyoplankton near the sites being considered for the warm water intake at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Various intake design options are presented with the focus on providing adequate environmental protection to the local ichthyoplankton population while providing an economically viable intake option to the OTEC developer. Further definition by NOAA and other environmental regulators is required to further refine the designs presented to meet all US regulations for future OTEC development.

Oney, Stephen K. [OTE Corporation; Hogan, Timothy [Alden Research Laboratory; Steinbeck, John [Tenera Environmental

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

DIETARY OVERLAP IN FRUGIVOROUSAND INSECTIVOROUS BATS FROM EDAPHIC CERRADO HABITATS OF BRAZIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIETARY OVERLAP IN FRUGIVOROUSAND INSECTIVOROUS BATS FROM EDAPHIC CERRADO HABITATS OF BRAZIL north- eastern Brazil suggest significant ecologicalseparation of species. Nonetheless, recent sim edaphic Cerrado habitats on the Chapada do Araripe in northeastern Brazil. For each of the 11 most common

Willig, Michael

267

Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata  

SciTech Connect

There is an urgent need to capture metadata on the rapidly growing number of genomic, metagenomic and related sequences, such as 16S ribosomal genes. This need is a major focus within the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), and Habitat is a key metadata descriptor in the proposed 'Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) specification. The goal of the work described here is to provide a light-weight, easy-to-use (small) set of terms ('Habitat-Lite') that captures high-level information about habitat while preserving a mapping to the recently launched Environment Ontology (EnvO). Our motivation for building Habitat-Lite is to meet the needs of multiple users, such as annotators curating these data, database providers hosting the data, and biologists and bioinformaticians alike who need to search and employ such data in comparative analyses. Here, we report a case study based on semi-automated identification of terms from GenBank and GOLD. We estimate that the terms in the initial version of Habitat-Lite would provide useful labels for over 60% of the kinds of information found in the GenBank isolation-source field, and around 85% of the terms in the GOLD habitat field. We present a revised version of Habitat-Lite and invite the community's feedback on its further development in order to provide a minimum list of terms to capture high-level habitat information and to provide classification bins needed for future studies.

Kyrpides, Nikos; Hirschman, Lynette; Clark, Cheryl; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Mardis, Scott; Luciano, Joanne; Kottmann, Renzo; Cole, James; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Field, Dawn

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Predicting the potential habitat of oaks with data mining models and the R system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak forests are essential for the ecosystems of many countries, particularly when they are used in vegetal restoration. Therefore, models for predicting the potential habitat of oaks can be a valuable tool for work in the environment. In accordance with ... Keywords: Classification trees, Data mining models, Ensemble models, Habitat modelling, Neural networks, Oaks, R system, Supervised classification, Support vector machines

Rafael Pino-Mejas; Mara Dolores Cubiles-de-la-Vega; Mara Anaya-Romero; Antonio Pascual-Acosta; Antonio Jordn-Lpez; Nicols Bellinfante-Crocci

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

GRR/Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies [[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife]] Regulations & Policies Oregon Administrative Rules 635-415-0025 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the procedures required when a project will

270

ADVANCED WORKER PROTECTION SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From 1993 to 2000, OSS worked under a cost share contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS is a protective ensemble that provides the user with both breathing air and cooling for a NIOSH-rated duration of two hours. The ensemble consists of a liquid air based backpack, a Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG), and an outer protective garment. The AWPS project was divided into two phases. During Phase 1, OSS developed and tested a full-scale prototype AWPS. The testing showed that workers using the AWPS could work twice as long as workers using a standard SCBA. The testing also provided performance data on the AWPS in different environments that was used during Phase 2 to optimize the design. During Phase 1, OSS also performed a life-cycle cost analysis on a representative clean up effort. The analysis indicated that the AWPS could save the DOE millions of dollars on D and D activities and improve the health and safety of their workers. During Phase 2, OSS worked to optimize the AWPS design to increase system reliability, to improve system performance and comfort, and to reduce the backpack weight and manufacturing costs. To support this design effort, OSS developed and tested several different generations of prototype units. Two separate successful evaluations of the ensemble were performed by the International Union of Operation Engineers (IUOE). The results of these evaluations were used to drive the design. During Phase 2, OSS also pursued certifying the AWPS with the applicable government agencies. The initial intent during Phase 2 was to finalize the design and then to certify the system. OSS and Scott Health and Safety Products teamed to optimize the AWPS design and then certify the system with the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH). Unfortunately, technical and programmatic difficulties prevented us from obtaining NIOSH certification. Despite the inability of NIOSH to certify the design, OSS was able to develop and successfully test, in both the lab and in the field, a prototype AWPS. They clearly demonstrated that a system which provides cooling can significantly increase worker productivity by extending the time they can function in a protective garment. They were also able to develop mature outer garment and LCG designs that provide considerable benefits over current protective equipment, such as self donning and doffing, better visibility, and machine washable. A thorough discussion of the activities performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 is presented in the AWPS Final Report. The report also describes the current system design, outlines the steps needed to certify the AWPS, discusses the technical and programmatic issues that prevented the system from being certified, and presents conclusions and recommendations based upon the seven year effort.

Judson Hedgehock

2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Impacts of Delayed Drawdown on Aquatic Biota and Water Quality in Seasonally Managed Wetlands of the Grasslands Ecological Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fowl Ass. , 1995. Vymazal, Jan. Algae and Element Cycling inN and P content in the algae biomass. Likewise, inorganic Cof delayed wetland drawdown on algae and other aquatic biota

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil-fuel processing technologies on aquatic systems  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported for the second year of this project to evaluate the effects of aqueous effluents from in-situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic biota. The project objectives for Year 2 were pursued through five tasks: literature reviews on process water constituents, possible environmental impacts and potential control technologies; toxicity bioassays on the effects of coal gasification and oil shale retorting process waters and six process water constituents on aquatic biota; biodegradation studies on process water constituents; bioaccumulation factor estimation for the compounds tested in the toxicity bioassays; and recommendations on maximum exposure concentrations for process water constituents based on data from the project and from the literature. Results in each of the five areas of research are reported.

Bergman, H.L.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Hyperspectral Aquatic Radiative Transfer Modeling Using a High-Performance Cluster Computing Based Approach  

SciTech Connect

For aquatic studies, radiative transfer (RT) modeling can be used to compute hyperspectral above-surface remote sensing reflectance that can be utilized for inverse model development. Inverse models can provide bathymetry and inherent- and bottom-optical property estimation. Because measured oceanic field/organic datasets are often spatio-temporally sparse, synthetic data generation is useful in yielding sufficiently large datasets for inversion model development; however, these forward-modeled data are computationally expensive and time-consuming to generate. This study establishes the magnitude of wall-clock-time savings achieved for performing large, aquatic RT batch-runs using parallel computing versus a sequential approach. Given 2,600 simulations and identical compute-node characteristics, sequential architecture required {approx}100 hours until termination, whereas a parallel approach required only {approx}2.5 hours (42 compute nodes) - a 40x speed-up. Tools developed for this parallel execution are discussed.

Fillippi, Anthony [Texas A& M University; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; King, Amy L [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Guneralp, Inci [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Hyperspectral Aquatic Radiative Transfer Modeling Using a High-Performance Cluster Computing-Based Approach  

SciTech Connect

Abstract For aquatic studies, radiative transfer (RT) modeling can be used to compute hyperspectral above-surface remote sensing reflectance that can be utilized for inverse model development. Inverse models can provide bathymetry and inherent-and bottom-optical property estimation. Because measured oceanic field/organic datasets are often spatio-temporally sparse, synthetic data generation is useful in yielding sufficiently large datasets for inversion model development; however, these forward-modeled data are computationally expensive and time-consuming to generate. This study establishes the magnitude of wall-clock-time savings achieved for performing large, aquatic RT batch-runs using parallel computing versus a sequential approach. Given 2,600 simulations and identical compute-node characteristics, sequential architecture required ~100 hours until termination, whereas a parallel approach required only ~2.5 hours (42 compute nodes) a 40x speed-up. Tools developed for this parallel execution are discussed.

Filippi, Anthony M [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; King, Amy L [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Guneralp, Inci [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Utilization of emergent aquatic plants for biomass-energy-systems development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review was conducted of the available literature pertaining to the following aspects of emergent aquatic biomass: identification of prospective emergent plant species for management; evaluation of prospects for genetic manipulation; evaluation of biological and environmental tolerances; examination of current production technologies; determination of availability of seeds and/or other propagules, and projections for probable end-uses and products. Species identified as potential candidates for production in biomass systems include Arundo donax, Cyperus papyrus, Phragmites communis, Saccharum spontaneum, Spartina alterniflora, and Typha latifolia. If these species are to be viable candidates in biomass systems, a number of research areas must be further investigated. Points such as development of baseline yield data for managed systems, harvesting conceptualization, genetic (crop) improvement, and identification of secondary plant products require refinement. However, the potential pay-off for developing emergent aquatic systems will be significant if development is successful.

Kresovich, S.; Wagner, C.K.; Scantland, D.A.; Groet, S.S.; Lawhon, W.T.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Look back at the U. S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae Close-Out Report NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program-Biodiesel from Algae July 1998 By John Sheehan Terri Dunahay John Benemann Paul Roessler Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuels Development

277

Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program was a relatively small research effort intended to look at the use of aquatic plants as sources of energy. Its history dates back to 1978, but much of the research from 1978 to 1982 focused on using algae to produce hydrogen. The program switched emphasis to other transportation fuels, particularly biodiesel, beginning in the early 1980's. This report summarizes the research activities carried out from 1980 to 1996, with an emphasis on algae for biodiesel production.

Sheehan, J.; Dunahay, T.; Benemann, J.; Roessler, P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Review of Bioaccumulation Models of Mercury and Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Aquatic Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed description of several nonproprietary, process-based modeling tools that are useful for the assessment of food web bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury in aquatic systems. These models are either readily available or can be obtained through relevant contacts. The information contained in this report will be of value to users by serving as a guide in the selection of an appropriate bioaccumulation model framework best suited for a specific ...

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

279

Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

94 Federal Register 94 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 209 / Friday, October 30, 2009 / Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [ER-FRL-8798-8] Environmental Impact Statements and Regulations; Availability of EPA Comments Availability of EPA comments prepared pursuant to the Environmental Review Process (ERP), under section 309 of the Clean Air Act and Section 102(2)(c) of the National Environmental Policy Act as amended. Requests for copies of EPA comments can be directed to the Office of Federal Activities at 202-564-7146 or http://www.epa.gov/ compliance/nepa/. An explanation of the ratings assigned to draft environmental impact statements (EISs) was published in FR dated July 17, 2009 (74 FR 34754). Draft EISs EIS No. 20090290, ERP No. D-FTA- F54014-WI, Kenosha-Racine-Milwaukee

280

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for thermally protecting heat sensitive components of tools. The apparatus comprises a Dewar holding the heat sensitive components. The Dewar has spaced-apart inside walls, an open top end and a bottom end. A plug is located in the top end. The inside wall has portions defining an inside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar and the outside wall has portions defining an outside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar. A bottom connector has inside and outside components. The inside component sealably engages the inside wall aperture and the outside component sealably engages the outside wall aperture. The inside component is operatively connected to the heat sensitive components and to the outside component. The connections can be made with optical fibers or with electrically conducting wires.

Bennett, G.A.; Moore, T.K.

1986-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Topical report on sources and systems for aquatic plant biomass as an energy resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is documented on the mass cultivation of aquatic plants and systems design that is available from the literature and through consultation with active research scientists and engineers. The biology of microalgae, macroalgae, and aquatic angiosperms is discussed in terms of morphology, life history, mode of existence, and ecological significance, as they relate to cultivation. The requirements for growth of these plants, which are outlined in the test, suggest that productivity rates are dependent primarily on the availability of light and nutrients. It is concluded that the systems should be run with an excess of nutrients and with light as the limiting factor. A historical review of the mass cultivation of aquatic plants describes the techniques used in commercial large-scale operations throughout the world and recent small-scale research efforts. This review presents information on the biomass yields that have been attained to date in various geographical locations with different plant species and culture conditions, emphasizing the contrast between high yields in small-scale operations and lower yields in large-scale operations.

Goldman, J.C.; Ryther, J.H.; Waaland, R.; Wilson, E.H.

1977-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Environmental Protection Agency  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Protection Agency Protection Agency . . Book, 4 Project Rulison Off-Site Surveillance Operation for the Flaring Period - October 26 - November 3, 1970 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. P r e l i m i n a r y Report March 1 0 , 1 9 7 1 PROJECT RULISON OFF-SITE ' SURVEILLANCE FOR THE E'LARING OPERATION OF OCTOBER 26 - November 3, 1970 S o u t h w e s t e r n R a d i o l o g i c a l H e a l t h Laboratqry ~ u g i n g . . . t h e p e r i o d of O c t o b e r 26' through November 3 , ,1970, n a t u r a l g a s f r o m -.._. -- . . t h e P r o j e c t R u l i s o n t e s t w e l l was f l a r e d f o r t h e h i g h - r a t e p r o d u c t i o n f l a r i n g t e s t . . The' f l a r i n g o p e r a t i o n was s t a r t e d , a t 1430 M!5T on October 2 6 , 1970. The g a s flow r a t e w a s i n c r e a s e d o v e r a six-hour p

283

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment This document describes a customized...

284

Cavern Protection (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Cavern Protection (Texas) Cavern Protection (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial...

285

Office of Environmental Protection, Sustainability Support &...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection, Sustainability Support & Corporate Safety Analysis Office of Environmental Protection, Sustainability Support & Corporate Safety Analysis Organizational...

286

Canadian Environmental Protection Act 2012 (Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canadian Environmental Protection Act 2012 (Canada) Canadian Environmental Protection Act 2012 (Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government...

287

Protected Planet | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Protected Planet Protected Planet Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Protected Planet Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), International Union for Conservation of Nature Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: protectedplanet.net/about Cost: Free Protected Planet Screenshot References: Protected Planet[1] "Be inspired by the most beautiful places on the planet. Explore the worlds national parks, wilderness areas and world heritage sites. Help us find and improve information on every protected area in the world. Protectedplanet.net lets you discover these incredible places through elegant mapping and intuitive searching. Protectedplanet.net wants you to

288

Protective Force Firearms Qualification Courses  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROTECTIVE FORCE PROTECTIVE FORCE FIREARMS QUALIFICATION COURSES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://www.hss.energy.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security Protective Force Firearms Qualification Courses July 2011 i TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION A - APPROVED FIREARMS QUALIFICATION COURSES .......................... I-1 CHAPTER I . INTRODUCTION ................................................................................... I-1 1. Scope .................................................................................................................. I-1 2. Content ............................................................................................................... I-1

289

Mapping Floating and Emergent Aquatic Vegetation in Coastal Wetlands of Eastern Georgian Bay,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), marine systems (Wang et al. 2004), upland coastal habitats (Grenier et al. 2007; Rokitnicki- Wojcik 2009 using Ikonos imagery. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 34(2):143­158 Fournier RA, Grenier M, Lavoie A Creek, Michigan. U.S. Geological Survey, Scientific Investigations Report 2006­5051, 8 p Grenier M

McMaster University

290

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

291

Fire Protection Program: Related Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science Brookhaven National Laboratory Hanford Fire Department CPSC OSHA NRC EPA FEMA National Fire Academy Fire Protection Association Australia National Fire...

292

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Burlington Bottoms, Technical Report 1993-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Burlington Bottoms, consisting of approximately 417 acres of riparian and wetland habitat, was purchased by the Bonneville Power Administration in November 1991. The site is located approximately 1/2 mile north of the Sauvie Island Bridge (T2N R1W Sections 20, 21), and is bound on the east side by Multnomah Channel and on the west side by the Burlington Northern Railroad right-of-way and U.S. Highway 30 (Figures 1 and 2). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Columbia and Willamette River Basin's Fish and Wildlife Program and Amendments. Under this Program, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. In 1993, an interdisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement quantitative Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) to document the value of various habitats at Burlington Bottoms. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. HEP participants included; Charlie Craig, BPA; Pat Wright, Larry Rasmussen, and Ron Garst, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service; John Christy, The Nature Conservancy; and Doug Cottam, Sue Beilke, and Brad Rawls, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Beilke, Susan

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1987.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead (Salmo gairdneri) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages over the last four years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production at full seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded attainment of full benefit of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration. According to the BPA Work Plan, project implementors have the primary responsibility for measuring physical habitat and estimating habitat change. To date, Idaho habitat projects have been implemented primarily by the US Forest Service (USFS). The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) have sponsored three projects (Bear Valley Mine, Yankee Fork, and the proposed East Fork Salmon River projects). IDFG implemented two barrier-removal projects (Johnson Creek and Boulder Creek) that the USFS was unable to sponsor at that time. The role of IDFG in physical habitat monitoring is primarily to link habitat quality and habitat change to changes in actual, or potential, fish production. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B. (Idaho Dept. of Fish and Game, Boise, ID (USA)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oxbow Conservation Area, 2002-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the Oxbow Conservation Area in Grant County, Oregon. The evaluation is a required part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) relating to the acquisition and management of the Oxbow Conservation Area. The HEP team was comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. The survey was conducted using the following HEP evaluation models for key species: black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types used in this survey were conifer forest, irrigated meadow, riparian meadow, upland meadow, riparian shrub, upland shrub, and mine tailings. The project generated 701.3 habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. Results for each HEP species are: (1) Black-capped chickadee habitat was good, with only isolated areas lacking snags or having low tree canopy cover. (2) Mallard habitat was poor in upland meadows and marginal elsewhere due to a lack of herbaceous/shrub cover and low herbaceous height. (3) Mink habitat was good, limited only by the lack of the shrub component. (4) Western meadowlark habitat was marginal in upland meadow and mine tailing cover types and good in irrigated meadow. Percent cover of grass and height of herbaceous variables were limiting factors. (5) White-tailed deer habitat was marginal due to relatively low tree canopy cover, reduced shrub cover, and limited browse diversity. (6) Yellow Warbler habitat was marginal due to less than optimum shrub height and the lack of hydrophytic shrubs. General ratings (poor, marginal, etc.) are described in the introduction section.

Cochran, Brian

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Program, 1988 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Collawash Falls Fish Passage Project began in August of 1987, and resulted in completion of Phase I of the construction of the fish passage facility. A core team of Forest Service personnel. led by fish passage specialists from R-10, Alaska, excavated a trench in the bedrock face of the falls that is approximately 95 feet long, 8 feet deep and 10 feet wide. Implementation of Phase II of the project was put on hold in July of 1988. when 50 yards of rock from the adjacent headwall sloughed into the trench. During September and October of 1988 the larger rocks were reduced in size by blasting. High water flows in November moved the blasted rock from the trench. The project is being done by the Mt. Hood National Forest with funds supplied by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 703(c). Action Item 4.2, in consultation with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODF&W). Successful modification of the Collawash Falls will allow anadromous fish full access to over 10 miles of acknowledged high quality spawning and rearing habitat. The total anadromous fish production benefits gained from utilization of this habitat, assuming a 10 year project life with a 4% discount factor is $1,690,019.00. In 1974, several partial barriers to anadromous fish in the form of small falls and cataracts located immediately above the trench, were modified for full passage by blasting. This work conducted by the Forest Service was fully successful in allowing fish passage through all but the main barrier in Collawash Falls. Other Collawash River fisheries projects include the 1984 construction of a fish liberation access site above the falls for the PGE/ODFW spring chinook trap and haul program. Funding for the project came from revenues generated by an adjacent Forest Service timber sale. In summer of 1985, 30,000 spring chinook presmolts were stocked at this liberation site. In spring of 1987. 10,000 coho pre-smolts were stocked above the falls in the first of a three-year program to increase the runs of native winter run coho to the Collawash River system.

Bettin, Scott (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information/Protected  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information/Protected Health Information Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information/Protected Health Information The confidentiality and privacy rights of former workers are not only a legal requirement, they are crucial to establishing and maintaining credibility with the former worker community. All medical information that is collected as part of this program is treated as confidential and is used only as allowed by the Privacy Act of 1974. All FWP activities are conducted with the approval of the Institutional Review Boards, or Human Subjects Committees, of DOE and involved universities. All individuals sign an informed consent and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

297

Determination of the toxicity, water-quality interactions, and biomagnification of selenium in aquatic food chains. Technical report for 15 August 1987-14 August 1989 (Final)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecological degradation of aquatic ecosystems associated with the presence of elevated concentrations of the trace element selenium has been of considerable scientific, governmental, and public concern. The increased flux of selenium into several aquatic ecosystems, due to anthropogenic activities, has resulted in death, teratogenesis, reproductive impairment and decreased populations in fish and waterfowl communities in the systems. Research is continuing on several investigations into the toxicity, bioaccumulation, transfer, and biotransformation of selenium in aquatic organisms and laboratory food chains. Initial studies were primarily concerned with the comparative acute and chronic toxicity, water-quality interactions, and toxicological interactions of several chemical species of selenium to a variety of aquatic organisms. Further research was directed towards the biotransformation, transfer, and subsequent bioaccumulation of selenium in simplified laboratory aquatic food chains. Studies on the transfer, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of selenium from dietary sources to consumers were conducted. The development of methodology for determining and quantifying the biochemical speciation of selenium in aquatic organisms was initiated.

Maier, K.J.; Ogle, R.S.; Maier, K.A.R.; Williams, M.J.; Malchow, D.

1989-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Umatilla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement : FY 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summer of 1991, construction continued on the Bonneville Power Administration funded anadromous fish habitat enhancement project in the Umatilla River sub-basin, Umatilla County, State of Oregon. 1991 was the final year of this five year project. Work started in May 1 and ended on November 31. Preconstruction activity consisted of final layout and design of the project, movement of approximately 600 cubic yards of large boulders and 12 log trucks loads of woody material to the construction site. A total of five rock weirs, five rock deflectors, 20 woody debris placements and 79 individual boulder placements were constructed in the South Fork and the main stem of the Umatilla River. A total of twelve log weirs, four rock weirs, two rock deflectors, and ten woody debris placements were placed in Meacham Creek. In addition, 47 weirs in Thomas Creek and the upper portion of the South Fork of the Umatilla River were repaired. Project monitoring consisted of sediment sampling above and below the Umatilla River construction project area, and mapping and photographing all structures.

Northrop, Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Umatilla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement : FY 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summer of 1990, construction continued on the Bonneville Power Administration funded anadromous fish habitat enhancement project in the Umatilla River sub-basin, Umatilla County, State of Oregon. Work started on 5/1/90 and ended 10/30/90. A total of five large log weirs, eight large rock weirs, 17 associated weir structures, 19 small to medium rock deflectors, four bank and island reinforcements, three rock flow controls, 19 woody debris placements, and 85 individual boulders were constructed in the South Fork of the Umatilla River. In addition, one large rock weir was constructed at the confluence of the North and South Forks of the Umatilla River, and repair work was completed on 33 structures in Thomas Creek. Also, 300 cubic yards of rock and some logs and woody material were moved on site for use in 1991. Preconstruction activity consisted of moving approximately 1,500 cubic yards of large boulders, and dive log truck loads of woody material to the construction site. Project monitoring consisted of sediment sampling above and below the project area and, mapping and photographing and structures. 7 figs.

Northrop, Michael

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Adaptive protection algorithm and system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adaptive protection algorithm and system for protecting electrical distribution systems traces the flow of power through a distribution system, assigns a value (or rank) to each circuit breaker in the system and then determines the appropriate trip set points based on the assigned rank.

Hedrick, Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Toms, Helen L. (Irwin, PA); Miller, Roger M. (Mars, PA)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Corrosion protection for silver reflectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of protecting silver reflectors from damage caused by contact with gaseous substances which are often present in the atmosphere and a silver reflector which is so protected. The inventive method comprises at least partially coating a reflector with a metal oxide such as aluminum oxide to a thickness of 15 {angstrom} or less. 6 figs.

Arendt, P.N., Scott, M.L.

1989-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

302

Corrosion protection for silver reflectors  

SciTech Connect

A method of protecting silver reflectors from damage caused by contact with gaseous substances which are often present in the atmosphere and a silver reflector which is so protected. The inventive method comprises at least partially coating a reflector with a metal oxide such as aluminum oxide to a thickness of 15 .ANG. or less.

Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Scott, Marion L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Data Protection Office October 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Protection Office October 2010 AUTHORISATION FORM FOR DATA PROCESSING BY STUDENTS This form should be completed where students are processing personal data for research or study purposes. In order to meet the requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998 and ensure the personal data is being processed

Mottram, Nigel

304

Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Substation control and protection project  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of EPRI-sponsored Project RP1359-7, dealing with digital protection and control of transmission class substations. Earlier work involved a study of the feasibility of an integrated protection and control system, specification of functional requirements and selection of the optimum architecture for the system. An integrated system including line, bus and transformer protection was designed, built and laboratory tested. It was subsequently installed at the Deans substation of Public Service Electric and Gas (New Jersey). A standalone, digital transmission line system was built and installed at the Branchburg substation of PSE G, for coordinated line protection with the integrated system. The system is called WESPAC, an acronym for Westinghouse Substation Protection and Control. 52 refs., 174 figs.

Cassel, R.L.; Deliyannides, J.S.; Dzieduszko, J.W.; Harvey, J.H.; Hertz, L.H.; Klancher, F.; Mays, L.M.; McGarry, M.J.; Pettis, L.G.; Pistolese, L.F.; Reuther, J.F.; Sackin, M.; Szarmach, D.J.; Udren, E.A. (Westinghouse ABB Power T and D Co., Coral Springs, FL (USA). Relay and Telecommunications Div.)

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Land UseIron Pollution in Mangrove Habitat of Karachi, Indus Delta  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coastal area of Karachi, Pakistan, which lies at the northwestern part of the Indus delta, is heavily polluted particularly in the mangrove habitat. The present study traces the pathway of trace metal iron from the source to the different ...

S. M. Saifullah; Sarwat Ismail; S. H. Khan; M. Saleem

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Long-Term Trends in Summertime Habitat Suitability for Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SA, Schoellhamer DH. 2004. Trends in the sediment yield ofKevin Fleming. 2008. Long-term Trends in Summertime HabitatTR. 2007. Multi- decadal trends for three declining fish

Nobriga, Matthew L.; Sommer, Ted R.; Feyrer, Frederick; Fleming, Kevin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 1, Oregon, 1986 Final and Annual Reports.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes activities implemented for fisheries habitat improvement work on priority drainages in the Clackamas and Hood River sub-basins. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the reports on individual projects. (ACR)

Stuart, Amy

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains reports on habitat improvement and fisheries enhancement projects conducted in the following subbasins: (1) Clackamas River; (2) Hood River; :(3) Deschutes River; (4) John Day River; (5) Umatilla River; and (6) Grande Ronde River. (ACR)

Miller, Rod

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Characterization and Monitoring Data for Evaluating Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat in the Missouri River Mainstem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergent sandbar habitat (ESH) in the Missouri River Mainstem System is a critical habitat element for several federally listed bird species: the endangered interior least tern (Sterna antillarum) and the threatened Northern Great Plains piping plover (Charadrius melodus). The Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) provides the primary operational management of the Missouri River and is responsible under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to take actions within its authorities to conserve listed species. To comply with the 2000 USFWS BiOp and the 2003 amended USFWS BiOp, the Corps has created habitats below Gavins Point Dam using mechanical means. Initial monitoring indicates that constructed sandbars provide suitable habitat features for nesting and foraging least terns and piping plovers. Terns and plovers are using constructed sandbars and successfully reproducing at or above levels stipulated in the BiOp. However, whether such positive impacts will persist cannot yet be adequately assessed at this time.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Downs, Janelle L.

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

311

A geographic footprint of boaters entering & departing Lake Powell| Aquatic nuisance species management| Potential distribution of the invasive zebra/quagga mussel into south western United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Currently, transoceanic and intercontinental dispersal of the Zebra/Quagga mussel (and many other Aquatic Invasive Species) has already occurred. While there may be countless vectors (more)

Wenzel, Jamie M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 1, Oregon, 1985 Annual and Final Reports.  

SciTech Connect

The Hot Springs Fork of the Collawash River is a major sub-drainage in the Clackamas River drainage. Emphasis species for natural production are spring chinook, coho salmon, and winter steelhead. Increased natural production appears limited by a lack of quality rearing habitat. Habitat complexity over approximately 70% of accessible area to anadromous fish has been reduced over the last 40 years by numerous factors. Natural passage barriers limit anadromous fish access to over 7 miles of high quality habitat. In the first year of a multi-year effort to improve fish habitat in the Hot Springs Fork drainage, passage enhancement on two tributaries and channel rehabilitation on one of those tributaries was completed. Three waterfalls on Nohorn Creek were evaluated and passage improved on the uppermost waterfall to provide steelhead full access to 2.4 miles of good quality habitat. The work was completed in October 1985 and involved blasting three jump pools and two holding pools into the waterfall. On Pansy Creek, four potential passage barriers were evaluated and passage improvement work conducted on two logjams and one waterfall. Minor modifications were made to a waterfall to increase flow into a side channel which allows passage around the waterfall. Channel rehabilitation efforts on Pansy Creek (RM 0.0 to 0.3) to increase low flow pool rearing habitat and spawning habitat including blasting five pools into areas of bedrock substrate and using a track-mounted backhoe to construct instream structures. On site materials were used to construct three log sills, three boulder berms, a boulder flow deflector, and five log and boulder structures. Also, an alcove was excavated to provide overwinter rearing habitat. Pre-project monitoring consisting of physical and biological data collection was completed in the project area.

McDonald, Ken

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Habitat Metro Denver -- Perfecting Award-Winning Affordable Homes Using Building America's Integrated Design Approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat for Humanity's goal is to supply quality housing to poor families while reducing their energy cost burden, especially in light of ever-increasing energy prices. Habitat Metro Denver partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Project and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to improve their construction and design process to create an affordable home that is not only cost-effective and volunteer friendly to build but highly energy efficient and a comfortable place to live.

Not Available

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. In May of this year a thirty year flood event occurred in the Umatilla Basin that resulted in major changes to the year`s statement of work and to the future direction of the program. All projects in the Birch Creek drainage sustained damage to either fencing or instream work, with severe damages on about 1/3 of the project areas. As a result of flooding, and subsequent maintenance demands, all new project implementation in the Birch Creek drainage was cancelled; the entire implementation season was spent repairing flood damages in the Birch Creek drainage. The major activities undertaken during this report period were: (a) construction of O.5 miles of riparian corridor fence on Meacham Creek, (b) performing intensive instream maintenance on 7.25 miles of Mainstem Birch and East Birch creeks, (c) performing major fence maintenance on 1.8 miles of flood damaged riparian corridor fence, (d) rebuilding of O.5 miles of flood destroyed fence, and 54 stream crossing fences, (e) retrofitting of three miles of high tensile fence with an extended electric wire, and (f) spending considerable time working with landowners to resolve flood related problems and come to agreement on project maintenance activities. Other activities undertaken during this report period were: weekly inspection and maintenance of fencing projects, collection and summarization of temperature data, photopoint picture taking, procurement of instream work permits, and coordination with numerous agencies and tribes.

Bailey, Timothy D.; Rimbach, Gregory P. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site  

SciTech Connect

Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fire Protection Account Request Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection System Account Request Form Fire Protection System Account Request Form To obtain a user id and password to access the Fire Protection system, please complete the form, save the file and email it to hssUserSupport@hq.doe.gov or print and fax it to 301-903-9823. We will provide a username and password to new account holders. Please allow several business days to process your account request. When your request is approved, you will be contacted with your

318

Physical protection of power reactors  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Laboratories has applied a systematic approach to designing physical protection systems for nuclear facilities to commercial light-water reactor power plants. A number of candidate physical protection systems were developed and evaluated. Focus is placed on the design of access control subsystems at each of three plant layers: the protected area perimeter, building surfaces, and vital areas. Access control refers to barriers, detectors, and entry control devices and procedures used to keep unauthorized personnel and contraband out of the plant, and to control authorized entry into vital areas within the plant.

Darby, J.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Attraction to and Avoidance of instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of hydrokinetic (HK) energy projects is under consideration at over 150 sites in large rivers in the United States, including the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee, and Atchafalaya Rivers. These waterbodies support numerous fish species that might interact with the HK projects in a variety of ways, e.g., by attraction to or avoidance of project structures. Although many fish species inhabit these rivers (about 172 species in the Mississippi River alone), not all of them will encounter the HK projects. Some species prefer low-velocity, backwater habitats rather than the high-velocity, main channel areas that would be the best sites for HK. Other, riverbank-oriented species are weak swimmers or too small to inhabit the main channel for significant periods of time. Some larger, main channel fish species are not known to be attracted to structures. Based on a consideration of habitat preferences, size/swim speed, and behavior, fish species that are most likely to be attracted to HK structures in the main channel include carps, suckers, catfish, white bass, striped bass, smallmouth bass, spotted bass, and sauger. Proper siting of the project in order to avoid sensitive fish populations, backwater and fish nursery habitat areas, and fish migration corridors will likely minimize concerns about fish attraction to or avoidance of HK structures.

Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Assessing Habitat for Avian Species in Assessing Habitat for Avian Species in an Integrated Forage/Biofuels an Integrated Forage/Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an Integrated Forage/Biofuels an Integrated Forage/Biofuels Management System Management System in the Midin NWSG mixes beneficial to forage, biofuels production, and wildlife habitatp , 3. identify wildlife habitat benefits associated with varying forage and biofuels management strategies 4. identify optimum

Gray, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The impacts of mining on the habitat ecology of raccoons in east-central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Habitat alterations associated with strip-mining and reclamation may reduce the suitability of an area for wildlife by redistributing requirements for survival and reproduction. I evaluated several predictions regarding the impacts of habitat alterations on wildlife by comparing patterns of landscape use and behavior of raccoons (Procyon rotor) in unmined and reclaimed habitats on the Big Brown Mine in Freestone County, Texas. I hypothesized that changes in vegetation composition and structure and the spatial distribution of habitat types would influence diel activity and movements, habitat use, resting site use, home range size, and ultimately the demography of raccoons. I captured and radio-collared 12 and 4 adult raccoons in unmined and reclaimed areas, respectively, and observed patterns of habitat use, and annual and seasonal home range sizes. During each season, I monitored continuous 24-hr activity and movement patterns of 4 radio-collared raccoons in unmined and reclaimed areas. I relocated inactive radio-collared raccoons to evaluate resting site use in unmined and reclaimed areas. Estimates of population demographics were based on live-trapped raccoons. Raccoons inhabiting reclaimed areas had larger annual home ranges and their movement patterns within and across the reclaimed landscape suggested those areas offered less abundant and/or more isolated resources for raccoons. Raccoons in unmined habitats used trees more often as resting sites than did raccoons in reclaimed areas; brushpiles were used more often than trees by raccoons in reclaimed areas. Improved pasture was the most abundant habitat type in reclaimed areas and was underutilized by raccoons. Analyses of trapping success and population sex-age structure suggest that reclaimed areas may be incapable of supporting population densities found in unmined habitats. Collectively, these findings support the conclusion that reclaimed habitats may not be mitigating the loss of unmined woodlands. Although it was not possible to test the validity of all aspects of the conceptual model, results from this study provided support for the processes it identified and its predictions regarding the potential impacts of strip-mining on raccoons. Based on these results, I discussed 5 recommendations to improve reclamation efforts.

Beucler, Michele

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

FAQS Reference Guide Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the December 2003 edition of DOE-STD-1174-2003, Radiation Protection Functional Area Qualification Standard.

323

Vintage Capital and Creditor Protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide novel evidence linking the level of creditor protection provided by law to the degree of usage of technologically older, vintage capital in the airline industry. Using a panel of aircraft-level data around the ...

Benmelech, Efraim

324

LBNL/ Adopt Fall Protection Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the Company Letter Certification Template to address if your company has decided to work under LBNL fall protection program. See attached Chapter 30 of our program of PUB...

325

The costs of environmental protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, some have argued that tougher environmental policies can create jobs, stimulate innovation, and enhance competitiveness. On this view, economic side effects make environmental protection a sort of green free ...

Schmalensee, Richard

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection Ecosystem Standards and Planning Biodiversity BranchThis page has been intentionally left blank ii Preface Preface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

British Columbia is recognized globally for its exceptional wildlife, diversity of ecosystems, and rich natural resources. The Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection (WLAP) works to maintain these valuable natural assets, which lie at the heart of many recreational and economic activities enjoyed by British Columbians in all regions of the province. The Ministry has responsibility for the protection and stewardship of British Columbias environment. To fulfil this responsibility, it develops policy and legislation, regulations, codes of practice, environmental contracts and covenants (legal agreements). It also monitors and reports on selected species and habitats, as well as acquires information on habitat and species health. It sets science- and results-based objectives and standards and provides best practices for activities that affect our environment. Together, clear goals and objectives, meaningful performance measures and science-based tools guide Ministry actions in improving environmental management. Regulatory frameworks allow headquarters and regional staff to

Instream Works

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Look back at the U. S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae Close-Out Report NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program-Biodiesel from Algae July 1998 By John Sheehan Terri Dunahay John Benemann Paul Roessler Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuels Development Prepared by: the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 A national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Operated by Midwest Research Institute Under Contract No. DE-AC36-83CH10093 Executive Summary From 1978 to 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuels Development funded a program to develop renewable transportation fuels from algae. The main focus of the program, know as the Aquatic

328

Office of Ecosystem Protection Enclosure cc:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thank you for your submittal of the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) To Address Biological Impairment in Potash Brook. This waterbody is included on Vermonts 2004 303(d) list and was prioritized for TMDL development. The purpose of the TMDL is to address an aquatic life use impairment caused by stormwater runoff.

Jeffrey Wennberg Commissioner; Wally Mclean; Vt Dec; Tim Clear; Vt Dec

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Evaluate the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Habitat, Status Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Project 2003-038-00, Evaluate the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, began in FY04 (15 December 2003) and continues into FY06. This status report is intended to summarize accomplishments during FY04 and FY05. Accomplishments are summarized by Work Elements, as detailed in the Statement of Work (see BPA's project management database PISCES). This project evaluates the restoration potential of mainstem habitats for fall Chinook salmon. The studies address two research questions: 'Are there sections not currently used by spawning fall Chinook salmon within the impounded lower Snake River that possess the physical characteristics for potentially suitable fall Chinook spawning habitat?' and 'Can hydrosystem operations affecting these sections be adjusted such that the sections closely resemble the physical characteristics of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in similar physical settings?' Efforts are focused at two study sites: (1) the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Columbia River confluence, and (2) the Lower Granite Dam tailrace. Our previous studies indicated that these two areas have the highest potential for restoring Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The study sites will be evaluated under existing structural configurations at the dams (i.e., without partial removal of a dam structure), and alternative operational scenarios (e.g., varying forebay/tailwater elevations). The areas studied represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We are using a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats is the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Escapement estimates for fall of 2000 indicate more than 9000 adult fall Chinook salmon returned to this area, accounting for more than 2100 redds within a 5 km section of river.

Hanrahan, T.P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

Energy Department and Environmental Protection Agency Release...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection Agency Release Fuel Economy Tool for Used Vehicles Energy Department and Environmental Protection Agency Release Fuel Economy Tool for Used Vehicles...

331

Protecting Intelligent Distributed Power Grids Against Cyber...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protecting Intelligent Distributed Power Grids Against Cyber Attacks - May 2008 Protecting Intelligent Distributed Power Grids Against Cyber Attacks - May 2008 Development of a...

332

Changes related to "Environmentally Protective Power Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Environmentally Protective Power Generation EPPG" Environmentally Protective Power Generation EPPG Jump to:...

333

10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

334

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

335

Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

336

Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2010 (Saskatchewan)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Environmental Management and Protection Act of 2010 protects air, land, water resources and ecosystems of the province by managing and regulating potentially harmful activities and substances....

337

Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Habitat for Humanity Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach, Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011, Building America assisted Habitat for Humanity of Palm 2011, Building America assisted Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County (HabitatPBC) in completing three high-performance prototype houses that achieved HERS index scores of less than 60, which is about 30% better than typical HabitatPBC construction, at a payback of less than 4 years. The HabitatPBC is planning to implement these strategies in future homes they build. This has the potential for significant and affordable energy savings as HabitatPBC has built more than 111 affordable houses and served an additional 125 families worldwide through their affiliation with HFH International (today serving >20 families a year). Building America (through the Florida Solar Energy Center, a member of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory team) achieved

338

Networks, deregulation, and risk : the politics of critical infrastructure protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Docket RMStandards for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Docket RM2- 13; GAO. ?Critical Infrastructure Protection: Multiple

Ellis, Ryan Nelson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Proceedings of the SERI Biomass Program Principal Investigators' Review Meeting: Aquatic Species Program Reports; 23-25 June 1982, Washington, DC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) is concerned with how plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas is utilized. Processes are being developed in this program to make use of those aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as on their extraordinary chemical compositions.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Characterization and Monitoring Data for Evaluating Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat in the Missouri River Mainstem 2004-2009  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) provides the primary operational management of the Missouri River Main Stem Reservoir System. Management of the Missouri River has generally reduced peak river flows that form and maintain emergent sandbar habitat. Emergent sandbars provide non-vegetated nesting habitat for the endangered interior least tern (Sternula antillarum athalassos) and the threatened Northern Great Plains piping plover (Charadrius melodus). Since 2000, piping plover nesting habitat within the Gavins Point Reach, Garrison Reach, Lake Oahe, and Lake Sakakawea has fledged the majority of piping plovers produced along the Missouri River system. Habitats within Lewis and Clark Lake have also recently become important plover production areas. Mechanical construction of emergent sandbar habitat (ESH) within some of these reaches within the Missouri River began in 2004. Through 2009, 11 sandbar complexes had been constructed (10 in Gavins Point Reach, 1 in Lewis and Clarke Lake) totaling about 543 ac of piping plover and interior least tern nesting habitat. ESH Construction has resulted in a net gain of tern and plover nesting habitat. Both terns and plovers successfully nest and fledge young on constructed sandbars, and constructed habitats were preferred over natural habitats. Natural processes may limit the viability of constructed sandbars as nesting habitat. Continued research is needed to identify if changes in constructed sandbar engineering and management increase the length of time constructed habitats effectively function as nesting habitat. However, the transfer of information from researchers to planners through technical research reports may not be timely enough to effectively foster the feedback mechanisms of an adaptive management strategy.

Duberstein, Corey A.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 2, Idaho, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1984, and under the auspices of the Northwest Power Planning Council, the Clear-water National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement to improve anadromous fish habitat in Lolo Creek. This was to be the second and final year of instream enhancement work in Lolo Creek, a major tributary to the Clearwater River. The project was again entitled Lolo Creek Habitat Improvement (No.84-6) which was scheduled from April 1, 1984, through March 31, 1985. Project costs were not to exceed $39,109. The following report is a description of the project objectives, methodology, results, and conclusions of this year's work, based on the knowledge and experience gained through 2 years of enhancement work. The primary objective was to partially mitigate the juvenile and adult anadromous fish losses accrued through hydroelectric development in the Columbia and Snake River systems by enhancing the spawning and rearing habitats of selected Clearwater River tributaries for spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout. The enhancement was designed to ameliorate the ''limiting production factors'' by the in-stream placement of habitat structures that would positively alter the pool-riffle structure and increase the quality of over-winter habitat.

Hair, Don

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

Ashley, Paul

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

Rasmussen, Lynn (Nez Perce Soil and Conservation District, Lewiston, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Forrest Conservation Area, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the 4,232-acre Forrest Conservation Area managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribe) in Grant County, Oregon. The habitat evaluation is required as part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration. Representatives from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Tribes conducted the field surveys for the HEP. The survey collected data for habitat variables contained in habitat suitability index (HIS) models for wildlife species; the key species were black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), California Quail (Callipepla californica), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types surveyed were grassland, meadow grassland, conifer forest, riparian tree shrub, shrub steppe, juniper forest, and juniper steppe. Other cover types mapped, but not used in the models were open water, roads, gravel pits, corrals, and residential.

Smith, Brent

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Data Protection The Data Protection Act 1984 has now been replaced by the Data Protection Act 1998,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Protection The Data Protection Act 1984 has now been replaced by the Data Protection Act 1998, which is based on the European Data Protection Directive. The 1998 Act applies to both manual for privacy and access by individuals. Information on how to make a request for access to personal data under

Priestley, Hilary

346

Surface Protection for Enhanced Materials Performance: Science ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Surface Protection for Enhanced Materials Performance: Science,...

347

Protecting users of the cyber commons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Establish a global cyber "neighborhood watch" enabling users to take defensive action to protect their operations.

Stephen J. Lukasik

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

GRR/Section 12-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental Take License  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental Take License 2-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental Take License < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental Take License 12HIAHabitatConservationPlanAndIncidentalTakeLicense (3).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife Regulations & Policies Hawaii Revised Statutes 195D-21 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12HIAHabitatConservationPlanAndIncidentalTakeLicense (3).pdf 12HIAHabitatConservationPlanAndIncidentalTakeLicense (3).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

349

Habitat requirements and burrowing depths of rodents in relation to shallow waste burial sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the literature and summarize information on factors affecting habitat selection and maximum recorded burrowing depths for representative small mammals that we consider most likely to inhibit waste burial sites in arid and semi-arid regions of the West. The information is intended for waste management designers who need to know what to expect from small mammals that may be present at a particular site. Waste repositories oculd be designed to exclude the deep burrowing rodents of a region by creating an unattractive habitat over the waste. Summaries are given for habitat requirements of each group along with generalized modifications that could be employed to deter habitation. Representatives from the major groups considered to be deep burrowers are discussed. Further, detailed information about a particular species can be obtained from the references cited.

Gano, K.A.; States, J.B.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Watershed Evaluation and Habitat Response to Recent Storms : Annual Report for 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large and powerful storm systems moved through the Pacific Northwest during the wet season of 1995--96, triggering flooding, mass erosion, and, alteration of salmon habitats in affected watersheds. This project study was initiated to assess whether watershed conditions are causing damage, triggered by storm events, to salmon habitat on public lands in the Snake River basin. The storms and flooding in 1995--96 provide a prime opportunity to examine whether habitat conditions are improving, because the effects of land management activities on streams and salmon habitat are often not fully expressed until triggered by storms and floods. To address these issues, they are studying the recent storm responses of watersheds and salmon habitat in systematically selected subbasins and watersheds within the Snake River system. The study watersheds include several in the Wenaha and Tucannon subbasins in Washington and Oregon, and the watersheds of Squaw Creek (roaded) and Weir Creek (unroaded) in the Lochsa River subbasin, Idaho. The study was designed to examine possible differences in the effects of the storms in broadly comparable watersheds with differing magnitudes or types of disturbance. Watershed response is examined by comparing storm response mechanisms, such as rates of mass failure, among watersheds with similar attributes, but different levels of land management. The response of salmon habitat conditions is being examined by comparing habitat conditions before and after the storms in a stream and among streams in watersheds with similar attributes but different levels of land management. If appropriate to the results, the study will identify priority measures for reducing the severity of storm responses in watersheds within the Snake River Basin with habitat for at-risk salmon. This annual report describes the attributes of the study watersheds and the criteria and methods used to select them. The report also describes the watershed and fish habitat attributes evaluated and the methods used to evaluate them. Watershed responses and attributes evaluated include mass failures, historic soil loss, the integration of roads with the drainage network, estimated flood recurrence intervals, and headwater channel morphology. Habitat attributes evaluated include large woody debris, pool frequency and depth, substrate conditions, and bank stability. Multiple analyses of habitat data in the Tucannon and Wenaha subbasins remain to be completed due to difficulties stemming from data characteristics that indicated that some of the pre-existing data may have be of questionable accuracy. Diagnostic attributes of the questionable data included a change in monitoring protocols during the pre- to post-flood analysis period, physically implausible temporal trends in some habitat attributes at some sites, and conflicting results for the same attribute at the same locations from different data sources. Since unreliable data can lead to spurious results, criteria were developed to screen the data for analysis, as described in this report. It is anticipated that while the data screening will prevent spurious results, it will also truncate some of the planned analysis in the Tucannon and Wenaha systems.

Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Huntington, Charles W.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

An Evaluation of the Effects of Geothermal Energy Development on Aquatic Biota in the Gysers Area of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i n geothermal steam and condensates can also enter the l oon the aquatic community. Steam-condensates from geothermalC u r r e n t l y a l l steam condensate f l u i d s at the

Resh, Vincent H.; Flynn, Thomas S.; Lamberti, Gary A; McElravy, Eric

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, December 30, 1992--December 29, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and by the year 2000. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. These research and education projects are particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s programs aimed at addressing aquatic pollution problems associated with DOE National Laboratories. First year funding supported seven collaborative cluster projects and twelve initiation projects. This report summarizes research results for period December 1992--December 1993.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

BUILDING UNDERWATER AD-HOC NETWORKS AND SENSOR NETWORKS FOR LARGE SCALE REAL-TIME AQUATIC APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BUILDING UNDERWATER AD-HOC NETWORKS AND SENSOR NETWORKS FOR LARGE SCALE REAL-TIME AQUATIC, CT 06269 Gainesville, FL 32611 Abstract-- Large-scale Underwater Ad-hoc Networks (UANET) and Underwater Sensor Networks (UWSN) are novel networking paradigms to explore the uninhabited oceans. How- ever

Cui, Jun-Hong

354

1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington River Protection Solutions Washington River Protection Solutions - September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions - September 2010 September 2010 Participation in the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Integrated Safety Management System Annual Review The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), participated in the review of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Integrated Safety Management System Annual Review for 2010. The review was conducted during the period of August 23 to September 2, 2010, and focused on six functional areas: corrective action management, work planning and control, radiological protection, environmental protection, emergency preparedness, and

356

Federal Energy Management Program: Environmental Protection Agency -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Environmental Protection Agency - Edison, New Jersey to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Environmental Protection Agency - Edison, New Jersey on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Environmental Protection Agency - Edison, New Jersey on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Environmental Protection Agency - Edison, New Jersey on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Environmental Protection Agency - Edison, New Jersey on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Environmental Protection Agency - Edison, New Jersey on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Environmental Protection Agency - Edison, New Jersey on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products

357

Acute toxicity screening of Hanford Site waste grouts using aquatic invertebrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste grouts prepared by mixing a simulated nonradioactive liquid waste with a dry solids blend consisting of cement, fly ash, and clay were screened for their acute toxicity using aquatic invertebrates (D. magna, D. pulex, and C. dubia) as test organisms and a fluorogenic substrate (4-methylumbelliferyl b-d galactoside) as the toxic stress indicator. After one hour of exposing juvenile daphnids to grout extracts of varying concentrations, followed by a 15-minute reaction with the fluorogenic substrate, the degree of in vivo enzymatic inhibition was measured by the number of resulting fluorescent daphnids. The effective concentration at which 50% of the daphnids were adversely affected (EC50) values calculated by probit analysis were 2,877 mg/L, 2,983 mg/L, and 3,174 mg/L for D. pulex, D. magna, and C. dubia, respectively. The results indicated that the grout extracts studied are nonhazardous and not dangerous to daphnids.

Rebagay, T.V.; Dodd, D.A.; Lockrem, L.L.; Powell, W.J.; Voogd, J.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Session: Non-fatality and habitat impacts on birds from wind energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was consisted of one paper presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session focused on discussion of non-collision impacts of wind energy projects on birds, primarily impacts to habitat. The presentation included information about the impacts of habitat fragmentation, disturbance, and site avoidance from wind turbines, as well as from roads, transmission facilities, and other related construction at wind project sites. Whether birds habituate to the presence of turbines and the influence of regional factors were also addressed. The paper given by Dale Strickland was titled ''Overview of Non-Collision Related Impacts from Wind Projects''.

Strickland, Dale

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla habitat improvement program targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning,and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall Chinook and coho salmon. This report covers work accomplished by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation from April 1991 through May 1992. This program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Measure 704 (d)(1) 34.02) as partial mitigation for construction of hydroelectric dams and the subsequent losses of anadromous fish throughout the Columbia River system.

Scheeler, Carl A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma/Trimble Area Management Plan, Technical Report 2001-2003.  

SciTech Connect

In 2000 and 2001, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to mitigate the wildlife habitat losses as part of the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project. Utilizing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Tribe) purchased three projects totaling nearly 1,200 acres. The Tacoma/Trimble Wildlife Management Area is a conglomeration of properties now estimated at 1,700 acres. It is the Tribe's intent to manage these properties in cooperation and collaboration with the Pend Oreille County Public Utility District (PUD) No. 1 and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to benefit wildlife habitats and associated species, populations, and guilds.

Entz, Ray; Lockwood, Jr., Neil; Holmes, Darren

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Kaniksu Unit Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge is proposing to acquire a 706-acre property located in Stevens County, Washington. The new acquisition would be called the Kaniksu Unit. A habitat evaluation was conducted on the property using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1980). Evaluation species were black-capped chickadee, mallard, ruffed grouse and white-tailed deer. Life requisites evaluated were food and reproduction for black-capped chickadee, food, cover, and reproduction for mallard, available winter browse for white-tailed deer and fall-to-spring cover for ruffed grouse.

US Fish and Wildlife Service Staff

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma/Trimble Area Management Plan, Technical Report 2001-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2000 and 2001, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to mitigate the wildlife habitat losses as part of the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project. Utilizing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Tribe) purchased three projects totaling nearly 1,200 acres. The Tacoma/Trimble Wildlife Management Area is a conglomeration of properties now estimated at 1,700 acres. It is the Tribe's intent to manage these properties in cooperation and collaboration with the Pend Oreille County Public Utility District (PUD) No. 1 and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to benefit wildlife habitats and associated species, populations, and guilds.

Entz, Ray; Lockwood, Jr., Neil; Holmes, Darren

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), over 50 radionuclides have been released to the atmosphere and to onsite streams and seepage basins. Now, many of these radionuclides are available to aquatic and/or terrestrial organisms for uptake and cycling through the food chain. Knowledge about the uptake and cycling of these radionuclides is now crucial in evaluating waste management and clean-up alternatives for the site. Numerous studies have been conducted at the SRS over the past forty years to study the uptake and distribution of radionuclides in the Savannah River Site environment. In many instances, bioconcentration factors have been calculated to quantify the uptake of a radionuclide by an organism from the surrounding medium (i.e., soil or water). In the past, it has been common practice to use bioconcentration factors from the literature because site-specific data were not readily available. However, because of the variability of bioconcentration factors due to experimental or environmental conditions, site-specific data should be used when available. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive literature search yielded site-specific bioconcentration factors for cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium, americium, curium, and tritium. These eight radionuclides have been the primary radionuclides studied at SRS because of their long half lives or because they are major contributors to radiological dose from exposure. For most radionuclides, it was determined that the site-specific bioconcentration factors were higher than those reported in literature. This report also summarizes some conditions that affect radionuclide bioavailability to and bioconcentration by aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

Cummins, C.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1999 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a summary of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. Up until last year, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and was the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices are the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. However, the watershed stream evaluation team used in the watershed analysis determined that there were problems along the Pataha Creek that needed to be addressed that would add further protection to the banks and therefore a further reduction of sedimentation into the stream. 1999 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. In stream work was not addressed this year because of the costs associated with these projects and the low impact of the sediment issue concerning Pataha Creeks impact on Chinook Salmon in the Tucannon River.

Bartels, Duane G.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

DARRP -Protecting and restoring natural resources nationwide Protecting and Restoring Natural Resources in Hawaii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Kalaeloa) - see case highlights. Coral reef habitat obliter- ated by the M/V Cape Flattery Ship Grounding removed from reefs in Hawaii. Emergency restoration at Kalaeloa (Barbers Point) recementing 2800 dislodged

366

Transforming Parks and Protected Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

areas Lisa M. Campbell, Noella J. Gray; and Zoe A. Meletis In many countries, parks and protected areas construction of nature, conservation and development narratives, and alternative consumption - and what World' or 'developing' countries. One feature of political ecology has been an overriding emphasis

Bolch, Tobias

367

Cathodic protection diagnostic expert system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A knowledge-based diagnostic system has been developed for troubleshooting cathodic protection systems. The expert system is designed to work in conjunction with a database that stores inventory and field measurement information and flags problem areas. The system is described, and examples of troubleshooting using the system are presented.

Van Blaricum, V.L.; Kumar, A. (Army Construction Engineering Research Labs., Champaign, IL (United States)); Park, Y.T. (Soong Sil Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Computer Science)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Protect Your Heart Against Diabetes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protect Your Heart Against Diabetes Healthy Hearts, Healthy Homes #12;Read other booklets in the Healthy Hearts, Healthy Homes series: Are You at Risk for Heart Disease? Do You Need To Lose Weight? Do Free Web site: www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/other/sp_package.htm For More Information

Bandettini, Peter A.

369

StreamNet; Northwest Aquatic Resource Information Network - Status of Salmon and Steelhead in the Columbia River Basin, 1995 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information on fish populations, fisheries, and fish habitat is crucial to the success of ongoing program to protect, recover, enhance, and manage fish resources in the Columbia River Basin. However, pertinent data are often difficult to locate because it is scattered among many agencies and is often unpublished. The goal of this annual report is to bring many diverse data types and sources into a single comprehensive report on the status of anadromous fish runs in the Columbia River Basin and the environmental conditions that may affect that status. Brief summaries are provided to identify the type and scope of available information. This synopsis is intended to complement other more detailed reports to which readers are referred for comprehensive treatment of specific subjects. This first report focuses mainly on anadromous salmon and steelhead (primarily through 1994) but the authors intend to expand the scope of future issues to include resident species. This is the first of what the authors intend to be an annual report. They welcome constructive suggestions for improvements. This report is a product of the StreamNet (formerly Coordinated Information System and Northwest Environmental Data Base) project which is a part of the Bonneville Power Administration`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The project is called for in the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The project`s objective is to promote exchange and dissemination of information in a standardized electronic format throughout the basin. This project is administered by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission with active participation by tribal, state, and federal fish and wildlife agencies.

Anderson, Duane A.; Beamesderfer, Raymond C. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Enterprise, OR (United States); Woodard, Bob [Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Predicting the effects of climate change on bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) spawning habitat in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting the effects of climate change on bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) spawning habitat tuna (Thunnus thynnus) spawning habitat in the Gulf of Mexico. ­ ICES Journal of Marine Science, doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsr008. Received 1 July 2010; accepted 6 January 2011. Atlantic bluefin tuna (BFT) is a highly

371

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … High-Performance Affordable Housing with Habitat for Humanity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

provide compelling benefits provide compelling benefits for all homeowners, but no sector is better served than affordable housing. These are the homeowners that most need the reduced costs of ownership, maintenance, and health associated with these homes. Building America research projects have paved the way for affordable housing providers such as Habitat for Humanity to effectively address this need. Habitat for Humanity (Habitat) has a clear goal: Enable low-income people to become owners of affordable, durable homes. Building America shares this goal, so a partnership was natural. Since the first days of the Building America program, the U.S. Department of Energy and its research partners have provided technical assistance to Habitat. Researchers have helped local Habitat affiliates

372

NOAA Essential Fish Habitat Research Implementation Plan for Alaska for FY 2007 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, proposals must meet the EFH research priorities listed above and involve habitat for species managed under deadline By November 30 Proposal review By December 15 Prioritized list of proposals released When amount feeding area for proposed-endangered beluga whales. Possible site for LNG facility. Lower Cook Inlet

373

Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Habitat and behaviour of yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares in the Gulf of Mexico determined using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Habitat and behaviour of yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares in the Gulf of Mexico determined using and behaviour for yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares in the Atlantic Basin. Six individuals were tracked maccoyii tunas. These results are consistent with the results of earlier studies conducted on T. albacares

Luther, Douglas S.

375

Potential for enhancing nongame bird habitat values on abandoned mine lands of western North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Throughout western North Dakota the number of unreclaimed surface coal and coal-uranium mines might total over 1100. We examined the potential for enhancing the nongame bird habitat values of unreclaimed mine lands in the arid, western region of North Dakota. Generally, the greatest variety of birds occurred in natural and planted woodlands, while fewer birds occurred in unreclaimed mine lands, grasslands, shrublands and croplands. Deciduous woodland types supported more species of birds than coniferous types. Planted woodlands supported about the same number of bird species as some natural deciduous woodland types and more species than coniferous woods. Unreclaimed mine lands supported more species than grasslands and croplands, and about the same number of species as native shrublands. The highest bird densities were in planted woodlands. Bird diversity varied positively with habitat diversity. The bird fauna of unreclaimed mine lands can be enhanced by creating more diverse habitats. Seventeen guidelines to enhance unreclaimed mine lands for nongame birds are presented. These guidelines can be used in preserving habitats threatened by surface mining and reclaiming previously mined lands.

Burley, J.B.; Hopkins, R.B.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Biodiversity and Habitat Changes Modelling Experiences in Ukraine and Eastern Europe Countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is updated study on biodiversity and its conditions in Ukraine and seven surrounding countries. It includes four different methods: the indicative-index approach, the Mean Species Abundance MSA and two species based approaches, one using habitat ... Keywords: Biodiversity, Birds, DIVA, Eastern Europe, GLOBIO, Generalized Linear Model GLM, Insects, Mammals, Mean Species Abundance MSA, Modelling, Plants, Ukraine

Vasyl Prydatko, Grygoriy Kolomytsev

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Data Mining on Large Data Set for Predicting Salmon Spawning Habitat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydraulic properties related to river flow affect salmon spawning habitat. Accurate prediction of salmon spawning habitat and understanding the influential properties on the spawning behavior are of great interest for hydroelectric dam management. Previous research predicted salmon spawning habitat through deriving river specific spawning suitability indices and employing a function estimate method like logistic regression on several static river flow related properties and had some success. The objective of this study was two-fold. First dynamic river flow properties associated with upstream dam operation were successfully derived from a huge set of time series of both water velocity and water depth for about one fifth of a million habitat cells through principal component analysis (PCA) using nonlinear iterative partial least squares (NIPLAS). The inclusion of dynamic variables in the models greatly improved the model prediction. Secondly, nine machine learning methods were applied to the data and it was found that decision tree and rule induction methods were generally outperformed usually used logistic regression. Specifically random forest, an advanced decision tree algorithm, provided unanimous better results. Over-prediction problem in previous studies were greatly alleviated.

Xie, YuLong; Murray, Christopher J.; Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Habitat: awareness of daily routines and rhythms over a distance using networked furniture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distant partners in just such a situation. The project particularly focuses on conveying the patterns explores the potential of addressing these issues by using household furniture as a network of distributed - London/Berlin 2003). 1 #12;Figure 1: Habitat being used to link two distant partners. 3 Technology

Haddadi, Hamed

379

Protocols for Monitoring Habitat Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary  

SciTech Connect

Protocols for monitoring salmon habitat restoration projects are essential for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' environmental efforts in the Columbia River estuary. This manual provides state-of-the science data collection and analysis methods for landscape features, water quality, and fish species composition, among others.

Roegner, G. Curtis; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Johnson, Gary E.

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

Comparing GIS-based habitat models for applications in EIA and SEA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use changes, urbanisation and infrastructure developments in particular, cause fragmentation of natural habitats and threaten biodiversity. Tools and measures must be adapted to assess and remedy the potential effects on biodiversity caused by human activities and developments. Within physical planning, environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environmental assessment (SEA) play important roles in the prediction and assessment of biodiversity-related impacts from planned developments. However, adapted prediction tools to forecast and quantify potential impacts on biodiversity components are lacking. This study tested and compared four different GIS-based habitat models and assessed their relevance for applications in environmental assessment. The models were implemented in the Stockholm region in central Sweden and applied to data on the crested tit (Parus cristatus), a sedentary bird species of coniferous forest. All four models performed well and allowed the distribution of suitable habitats for the crested tit in the Stockholm region to be predicted. The models were also used to predict and quantify habitat loss for two regional development scenarios. The study highlighted the importance of model selection in impact prediction. Criteria that are relevant for the choice of model for predicting impacts on biodiversity were identified and discussed. Finally, the importance of environmental assessment for the preservation of biodiversity within the general frame of biodiversity conservation is emphasised.

Gontier, Mikael, E-mail: gontier@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Moertberg, Ulla, E-mail: mortberg@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Balfors, Berit, E-mail: balfors@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1988.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead and chinook in the Clearwater and Salmon subbasins since 1984. Projects included in the monitoring are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. This monitoring project is also funded under the same authority. A mitigation record is being developed to use actual and potential increases in smolt production as the best measures of benefit from a habitat improvement project. This project is divided into two subprojects: general and intensive monitoring. Primary objectives of the general monitoring subproject are to determine natural production increases due to habitat improvement projects in terms of parr production and to determine natural production status and trends in Idaho. The second objective is accomplished by combining parr density from monitoring and evaluation of BPA habitat projects and from other IDFG management and research activities. The primary objective of the intensive monitoring subproject is to determine the relationships between spawning escapement, parr production, and smolt production in two Idaho streams; the upper Salmon River and Crooked River. Results of the intensive monitoring will be used to estimate mitigation benefits in terms of smolt production and to interpret natural production monitoring in Idaho. 30 refs., 19 figs., 34 tabs.

Idaho. Dept. of Fish and Game.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Home Range, habitat use and survival of coyotes in Western South Carolina.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT.Home range size, habitat use and survival of coyotes are variable throughout their range. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their spatial distribution, habitat use and mortality on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina, USA. Annual survival for adult coyotes on the SRS was 0.658. Off-site trapping and shooting accounted for 60% of mortality. Home ranges averaged 30.5 km2 and 31.85 km2 by the 95% minimum convex polygon and 95% fixed kernel methods, respectively. We detected no difference in home ranges size between males and females. Intraspecific home range overlap averaged 22.4%, excluding mated pair interactions, with 87.5% of coyotes sharing their home range with one or more individuals. Coyotes selected home ranges containing higher proportions of early successional habitat than was available on the landscape. Core areas likewise contained a greater proportion of early successional habitat than available in the animals home range.

Schrecengost, Joshua, D.; Kilgo, John, C.; Ray, H., Scott; Miller, Karl, V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Comparison among three approaches to evaluate winter habitat selection by white-tailed deer on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Anticosti Island using occurrences from an aerial survey and forest vegetation maps François Potvin, Barry. Telemetry locations or animal occurrences (e.g., from aerial surveys) can provide information on habitat circles) on data from a systematic aerial survey on Anticosti Island, where 260 groups of white

Laval, Université

384

Fisheries Habitat Evaluation in Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : Annual Report 1992.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1987 the Northwest Power Planning Council amended the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, directing the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund, ``a baseline stream survey of tributaries located on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation to compile information on improving spawning habitat, rearing habitat, and access to spawning tributaries for bull trout, cutthroat trout, and to evaluate the existing fish stocks. ff justified by the results of the survey, fund the design, construction and operation of a cutthroat and bull trout hatchery on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation; necessary habitat improvement projects; and a three year monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the hatchery and habitat improvement projects. If the baseline survey indicates a better alternative than construction of a fish hatchery, the Coeur d`Alene Tribe will submit an alternative plan for consideration in program amendment proceeding.`` This report contains the results of the third year of the study and the Coeur d`Alene Indian Tribes` preliminary recommendations for enhancing the cutthroat and bull trout fishery on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation. These recommendations are based on study results from year three data and information obtained in the first two years of the study.

Woodward-Lillengreen, Kelly L.; Skillingstad, Tami; Scholz, Allan T.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Shore Protection Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shore Protection Act (Georgia) Shore Protection Act (Georgia) Shore Protection Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Transportation Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Shore Protection Act is the primary legal authority for protection and management of Georgia's shoreline features including sand dunes, beaches, sandbars, and shoals, collectively known as the sand-sharing system. The value of the sand-sharing system is recognized as vitally important in protecting the coastal marshes and uplands from Atlantic storm activity, as well as providing valuable recreational opportunities.

386

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Big Island - The McKenzie River, Technical Report 1998-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Big Island site is located in the McKenzie River flood plain, containing remnant habitats of what was once more common in this area. A diverse array of flora and fauna, representing significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Stands of undisturbed forested wetlands, along with riparian shrub habitats and numerous streams and ponds, support a diversity of wildlife species, including neotropical migratory songbirds, raptors, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians (including two State-listed Sensitive Critical species). The project is located in eastern Springfield, Oregon (Figure 1). The project area encompasses 187 acres under several ownerships in Section 27 of Township 17S, Range 2W. Despite some invasion of non-native species, the site contains large areas of relatively undisturbed wildlife habitat. Over several site visits, a variety of wildlife and signs of wildlife were observed, including an active great blue heron rookery, red-Legged frog egg masses, signs of beaver, and a bald eagle, Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals and objectives were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) will be used to: (1) determine the current habitat status of the study area and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area.

Sieglitz, Greg

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Umatilla River Basin Anadromus Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Section 7.6-7.8 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The project focused on implementing cooperative instream and riparian habitat improvements on private lands on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (hereafter referred to as Reservation) from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1992. These efforts resulted in enhancement of the lower l/4 mile of Boston Canyon Creek, the lower 4 river miles of Meacham Creek and 3.2 river miles of the Umatilla River in the vicinity of Gibbon, Oregon. In 1993, the project shifted emphasis to a comprehensive watershed approach, consistent with other basin efforts, and began to identify upland and riparian watershed-wide causative factors impacting fisheries habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities throughout the Umatilla River Watershed. During the 1994-95 project period, a one river mile demonstration project was implemented on two privately owned properties on Wildhorse Creek. This was the first watershed improvement project to be implemented by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) off of the Reservation. Four 15 year riparian easements and two right-of-way agreements were secured for enhancement of one river mile on Wildhorse Creek and l/2 river mile on Meacham Creek. Enhancements implemented between river mile (RM) 9.5 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek included: (1) installation of 1.43 miles of smooth wire high tensile fence line and placement of 0.43 miles of fence posts and structures to restrict livestock from the riparian corridor, (2) construction of eighteen sediment retention structures in the stream channel to speed riparian recovery by elevating the stream grade, slowing water velocities and depositing sediments onto streambanks to provide substrate for revegetation, and (3) revegetation of the stream corridor, terraces and adjacent pasture areas with 644 pounds of native grass seed (when commercially available) or close species equivalents and 4,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. Three hundred pounds of native grass/legume seed (including other grasses/legumes exhibiting native species characteristics) were broadcast in existing Boston Canyon Creek, Meacham Creek and Umatilla River project areas. The addition of two properties into the project area between RM 4.25 and RM 4.75 Meacham Creek during the 1995-96 work period will provide nearly complete project coverage of lower Meacham Creek corridor areas on the Reservation. Water quality monitoring continued for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Survey of cross sections and photo documentation of riparian recovery within the project areas provided additional baseline data. Physical habitat surveys continued to be conducted to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area. This information will be utilized to assist in identification of habitat deficient areas within the watershed in which to focus habitat restoration efforts. These efforts were coordinated with the CTUIR Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation (UBNPME) Project. Poor land use practices, which have altered natural floodplain dynamics and significantly reduced or eliminated fisheries habitat, continued to be identified in the Mission Creek Subbasin. Complied data is currently being incorporated into a data layer for a Geographic Information System (GIS) data base. This effort is being coordinated with the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). Community outreach efforts and public education opportunities continued during the reporting period. CTUIR cooperatively sponsored a bioengineering workshop on February 23, 1995 with the Oregon De

Shaw, R. Todd

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Groundwater Protection, Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Groundwater Groundwater placeholder DOE, BNL, elected officials, and community leaders mark the opening of the first off-site groundwater treatment system. From the outset, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) considered the protection of human health to be the most important goal of the cleanup program. Because exposure to groundwater contamination had the greatest potential to impact human health, the focus was to ensure that local drinking water supplies were clean and safe. Early efforts concentrated on determining the locations of the contamination, installing treatment systems to clean up the groundwater, and remediating sources of contamination like landfills and underground tanks. DOE and the Lab are committed to protecting Long Island's sole-source aquifer, a vital natural resource.

389

Flash drying protects standby plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes how special fast-drying technique provides effective corrosion protection for units that will be in standby for a short time. The Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA) has developed a technique for rapidly drying out its boilers as an effective corrosion prevention measure, even for units which will be out of service for a short time. The JEA has several steam generating units that are not in continual service. These units, whether on standby or in extended cold storage, must be maintained if they are to operate reliably when they are needed. JEA uses dehumidification as the primary method to reduce corrosion in these standby units. Engineers at JEA believe it is better to reduce the amount of water retained in standby boilers than to add inhibiting chemicals to retained water for corrosion protection.

Mallard, R.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

EO 11990: Protection Of Wetlands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

90-Protection Of Wetlands 90-Protection Of Wetlands SOURCE: The provisions of Executive Order 11990 of May 24, 1977, appear at 42 FR 26961, 3 CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 121, unless otherwise noted. By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and statutes of the United States of America, and as President of the United States of America, in furtherance of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et s eq.), in order to avoid to the extent possible the long and short term adverse impacts associated with the destruction or modification of wetlands and to avoid direct or indirect support of new construction in wetlands wherever there is a practicable alternative, it is hereby ordered as follows: SECTION 1. (a) Each agency shall provide leadership and shall take action to minimize the

391

Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1985.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluation approaches to document a record of credit for mitigation were developed in 1984-1985 for most of the habitat projects. Restoration of upriver anadromous fish runs through increased passage survival at main stem Columbia and Snake River dams is essential to the establishment of an off-site mitigation record, as well as to the success of the entire Fish and Wildlife program. The mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production (i.e., yield) at full-seeding as the basic measure of benefit from a habitat project. The IDFG evaluation approach consists of three basic, integrated levels: general monitoring, standing crop evaluations, and intensive studies. Annual general monitoring of anadromous fish densities in a small number of sections for each project will be used to follow population trends and define full-seeding levels. For most projects, smolt production will be estimated indirectly from standing crop estimates by factoring appropriate survival rates from parr to smolt stages. Intensive studies in a few key production streams will be initiated to determine these appropriate survival rates and provide other basic biological information that is needed for evaluation of the Fish and Wildlife program. A common physical habitat and fish population data base is being developed for every BPA habitat project in Idaho to be integrated at each level of evaluation. Compatibility of data is also needed between Idaho and other agencies and tribes in the Columbia River basin. No final determination of mitigation credit for any Idaho habitat enhancement project has been attainable to date.

Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report Wanaket Wildlife Area, Techical Report 2005-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Wildlife Program staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Wanaket Wildlife Management Area in June 2005. The 2005 HEP investigation generated 3,084.48 habitat units (HUs) for a net increase of 752.18 HUs above 1990/1995 baseline survey results. The HU to acre ratio also increased from 0.84:1.0 to 1.16:1.0. The largest increase in habitat units occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type (California quail and western meadowlark models), which increased from 1,544 HUs to 2,777 HUs (+43%), while agriculture cover type HUs were eliminated because agricultural lands (managed pasture) were converted to shrubsteppe/grassland. In addition to the agriculture cover type, major changes in habitat structure occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type due to the 2001 wildfire which removed the shrub component from well over 95% of its former range. The number of acres of all other cover types remained relatively stable; however, habitat quality improved in the riparian herb and riparian shrub cover types. The number and type of HEP species models used during the 2005 HEP analysis were identical to those used in the 1990/1995 baseline HEP surveys. The number of species models employed to evaluate the shrubsteppe/grassland, sand/gravel/mud/cobble, and riparian herb cover types, however, were fewer than reported in the McNary Dam Loss Assessment (Rassmussen and Wright 1989) for the same cover types.

Ashley, Paul

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Cathodic Protection of Offshore Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Design criteria for cathodic protection systems...Africa 20??30 5??21 Low Low 130 (12) 90 (8) 90 (8) Indonesia 19 24 Moderate Moderate 110 (10) 75 (7) 75 (7) South China Sea 18 30 Low Low 100 (9) 35 (3) 35 (3) Sea mud 100 Same as water N/A N/A 21.5 (2) 10.8 (1) 10.8 (1) (a) Typical values and ratings

394

Temperature and Water Depth Monitoring Within Chum Salmon Spawning Habitat Below Bonneville Dam : Annual Report October 2007-September 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project described in this report is to provide a sound scientific basis for operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in ways that will effectively protect and enhance chum salmon populations - a species listed in March 1999 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The study objective during fiscal year 2008 was to provide real-time data on Ives Island area water temperature and water surface elevations from the onset of chum salmon spawning through the end of chum salmon emergence. Sampling locations included areas where riverbed temperatures were elevated, potentially influencing alevin development and emergence timing. In these locations, hydrosystem operation caused large, frequent changes in river discharge that affected salmon habitat by dewatering redds and altering egg pocket temperatures. The 2008 objective was accomplished using temperature and water-level sensors deployed inside piezometers. Sensors were integrated with a radio telemetry system such that real-time data could be downloaded remotely and posted hourly on the Internet. During our overall monitoring period (October 2007 through June 2008), mean temperature in chum spawning areas was nearly 2 C warmer within the riverbed than in the overlying river. During chum salmon spawning (mid-November 2007 through December2007), mean riverbed temperature in the Ives Island area was 14.5 C, more than 5 C higher than in the river, where mean temperature was 9.4 C. During the incubation period (January 2008 through mid-May 2008), riverbed temperature was approximately 3 C greater than in the overlying river (10.5 C and 7.2 C, respectively). Chum salmon preferentially select spawning locations where riverbed temperatures are elevated; consequently the incubation time of alevin is shortened before they emerge in the spring.

Arntzen, E.V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fire Protection Engineering Qualification Standard Reference Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection Fire Protection Engineering Qualification Standard Reference Guide SEPTEMBER 2009 This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................. ii PURPOSE.......................................................................................................................................1 SCOPE ............................................................................................................................................1 PREFACE.......................................................................................................................................1 TECHNICAL COMPETENCIES................................................................................................3

396

Registration, Force Protection Equipment Demonstration - May 2009 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration, Force Protection Equipment Demonstration - May 2009 Registration, Force Protection Equipment Demonstration - May 2009 Registration, Force Protection Equipment Demonstration - May 2009 May 2009 Demonstrating commercially availale physical security/force protection soultions around the world The bombing of Khobar Towers in Saudi Arabia on 25 June 1996 revealed the need for continal vigilance and protection againist terrorist forces intent on harming US personnel and interests. The Chairman if the Joint Chiefs of Staff directed the Services to investigate COTS equipments solutions for physical security/force protection needs. The Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquistion, Technology, and Logistics (OUSD {at&l}) tasked the Office of the US Army Product Manager, force Protection Systems (PM-FPS), to coordiante and facilitate a Force Protection Equipment

397

Help:Protected pages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Protected pages Protected pages Jump to: navigation, search A protected page is a page where normal users are prevented from editing and/or moving at all. Only a user with sysop permissions can edit or move a protected page. Likewise only sysop users can protect a page in the first place, or unprotect the page to lift the restriction. There are several reasons why a particular page might be protected: On public wikis, pages may be protected because they have been repeatedly targeted with vandalism or moved to bad titles, or where it is believed that vandalism or page moves would have a unusually severe impact. On corporate wikis, pages may be protected when they contain statements which have been approved by management, and policy dictates that those statements can't be changed without following a certain approval

398

IEDWorking Paper 1 Environmental Protection, Energy Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEDWorking Paper 1 April 2007 Environmental Protection, Energy Policy and Poverty Reduction Protection, Energy Policy and Poverty Reduction ­ Synergies of an Integrated Approach Renate Schubert, Julia.................................................................................................................4 3 Reducing poverty through climate and energy policy

Fischlin, Andreas

399

Secure application partitioning for intellectual property protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intellectual property protection is a major concern for both hardware and software architects today. Recently secure platforms have been proposed to protect the privacy of application code and enforce that an application ...

O'Donnell, Charles W., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Optimization of radiation protection: a bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a bibliography of radiation protection optimization documents. Abstracts, an author index, and a subject index are provided.

Tang, G.R.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Google Earth Tour: Waters LANL Protects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Grand Challenges Vision & Mission Contacts | Information Environment at LANL Clean the Past Introduction Tour: Environmental Cleanup Protections: Cleanup ...

402

Alkali metal protective garment and composite material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

Ballif, III, John L. (Salt Lake City, UT); Yuan, Wei W. (Seattle, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994  

SciTech Connect

Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

Abdelghani, A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Review of Pacific Northwest Laboratory research on aquatic effects of hydroelectric generation and assessment of research needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an overview of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) research on how hydroelectric generation affects aquatic biota and environments. The major accomplishments of this research are described, and additional work needed to permit optimal use of available data is identified. The research goals are to: (1) identify impacts of hydroelectric generation, (2) provide guidance in allocating scarce water resources, and (3) develop techniques to avoid or reduce the impacts on aquatic communities or to compensate for unavoidable impacts. Through laboratory and field experiments, an understanding is being developed of the generic impacts of hydrogeneration. Because PNL is located near the Columbia River, which is extensively developed for hydroelectric generation, it is used as a natural laboratory for studying a large-scale operating system. Although the impacts studied result from a particular system of dams and operating procedures and occur within a specific ecosystem, the results of these studies have application at hydroelectric generating facilities throughout the United States.

Fickeisen, D.H.; Becker, C.D.; Neitzel, D.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Protective Relay Maintenance and Application Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protective relays are decision-making elements in the protection scheme for electrical power systems. A strong test and maintenance program will keep protective relays in a high state of readiness and help utilities avoid equipment damage and prolonged downtime. This guide provides recommended practices for maintenance and testing of these relays.

1993-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

406

Self-Protecting Session Initiation Protocol Stack  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the Self-Protecting Session Initiation Protocol Stack capable of recognizing malicious SIP messages and protecting itself in high-load conditions. The stack model is based on the two-step processing and uses hash lookup tables and cellular ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Denial of Service, SIP, Self-protecting

Zoran Rusinovic; Nikola Bogunovic

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Executive Summary: Treated Wood Ted Poston, Battelle As part of the process outlined in Washington's Statewide Strategy to Recover Salmon:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation were charged to develop Aquatic Habitat Guidelines employing an integrated approach to marine, freshwater, and riparian habitat protection and restoration. Guidelines will be issued, as funding allows, in a series of manuals addressing many aspects of aquatic and riparian habitat protection and restoration. This document is one of a series of white papers developed to provide a legitimate scientific and technical basis for developing Aquatic Habitat Guidelines. The white papers address the current understanding of impacts of development and land management activities on aquatic habitat, and potential mitigation for these impacts. Individual white papers will not necessarily result in a corresponding guidance document. Instead, guidance document development, addressing management and technical assistance needs, may incorporate information synthesized from one or more of the white papers. The scope of work for each white paper requested a comprehensive but not exhaustive review of the peer-reviewed scientific literature, symposia literature, and technical (gray) literature, with an emphasis on the peer-reviewed literature. The reader of this report can therefore expect a broad review of the literature, which is current through late 2000. Several of the white papers

Extinction Not; Option Washington; Departments Fish

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z