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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Saskatchewan Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Saskatchewan Ministry of the Environment The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) provides for the protection of aquatic habitat and states that a permit is required: to

2

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic aquatic habitats Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aquatic habitats in the Everglades ... Source: Cole, Jonathan J. - Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 5 AQUATIC PLANT...

3

Improving sampling designs for measuring restoration in aquatic habitats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Restoration of degraded habitat is an increasingly important toll for management. Unfortunately, much of the emphasis has been on restoring large structural elements of habitat (e.g. planting vegetation,removi...

M.G. Chapman

4

Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats September 27, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis This aerial photo shows open water and floating ice on ponds, lakes and river channels in the Sagavanirktok River Delta in Alaska’s North Slope. PNNL scientists employed satellite technology to understand the impacts of oil development activities on the environment. Using satellite radar to “see” through the ice, scientists detected critical fish overwintering habitats by identifying where ice was grounded and where it was floating. Utilizing this information on critical habitats, fishery managers can suggest locations for energy development activities that increase the sustainability of fishery resources and minimize environmental impacts. Research was funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior. | Photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

5

Evaluation of the aquatic habitat and fish assemblage in an urban reach of the historic Rideau Canal, Ottawa,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of the aquatic habitat and fish assemblage in an urban reach of the historic Rideau communities, particularly in the urban reach in Ottawa between Hartwell's Lock and the outflow of Dows Lake natural and engineered habitat/substrate types across the period when the canal is at navigational water

Cooke, Steven J.

6

Aquatic biodiversity conservation in wetland and marine protected areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Discussion of integrated management in protected areas has mostly been directed towards considerations of terrestrial ecosystems. Sustainability too has predominantly been directed towards the sustainable use of ...

Mike Walkey

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Zena conservation easement protects habitat in Willamette Valley...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

central Willamette Valley for fi sh and wildlife habitat mitigation. Located in the Eola Hills about eight miles northwest of Salem (see map), this property provides refuge for...

8

Tool use by aquatic animals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sponges up from the seabed and wear them over their beaks for protection...qualify as tool use [66]. Some marine mammals use objects in other...Finally, aquatic and especially marine habitats are much more three-dimensional...animals. Many filter-feeding marine animals are sessile and thus...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Utilization of submerged aquatic vegetation habitats by fishes and decapods in the Galvestion Bay Ecosystem, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . MATERIALS AND METHODS. . . . . . Page tu Site Selection. . Sampling Design. . Sampling Procedures. Statistical Analysis. 4 5 6 7 RESULTS. . Fish and Decapod Abundance and Distribution... the importance of physical, environtnental and other biological variables for each habitat site in relation to faunal density. MATERIALS AND METHODS Site Selection Three areas (six sites) within the Galveston Bay complex (Figure 1) were selected based...

Scott, Elizabeth A.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

10

Aquatic ecosystem protection and restoration: advances in methods for assessment and evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many methods and criteria are available to assess aquatic ecosystems, and this review focuses on a set that demonstrates advancements from community analyses to methods spanning large spatial and temporal scales. Basic methods have been extended by incorporating taxa sensitivity to different forms of stress, adding measures linked to system function, synthesizing multiple faunal groups, integrating biological and physical attributes, spanning large spatial scales, and enabling simulations through time. These tools can be customized to meet the needs of a particular assessment and ecosystem. Two case studies are presented to show how new methods were applied at the ecosystem scale for achieving practical management goals. One case used an assessment of biotic structure to demonstrate how enhanced river flows can improve habitat conditions and restore a diverse fish fauna reflective of a healthy riverine ecosystem. In the second case, multitaxonomic integrity indicators were successful in distinguishing lake ecosystems that were disturbed, healthy, and in the process of restoration. Most methods strive to address the concept of biological integrity and assessment effectiveness often can be impeded by the lack of more specific ecosystem management objectives. Scientific and policy explorations are needed to define new ways for designating a healthy system so as to allow specification of precise quality criteria that will promote further development of ecosystem analysis tools.

Mark B Bain; Amy L Harig; Daniel P Loucks; Reuben R Goforth; Katherine E Mills

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Duck Valley Habitat Enhancement and Protection, 2001-2002 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Duck Valley Indian Reservation's Habitat Enhancement project is an ongoing project designed to enhance and protect critical riparian areas, natural springs, the Owhyee River and its tributaries, and native fish spawning areas on the Reservation. The project commenced in 1997 and addresses the Northwest Power Planning Council's measures 10.8C.2, 10.8C.3, and 10.8C.5 of the 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The performance period covers dates from April 2001 through August 2002.

Allen, Mattie H.; Sellman, Jake (Shoshone-Paiute Nation, Duck Valley Indian Reservation, Owyhee, NV)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophyte lemna Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Science Aquatic macrophytes... functions that contribute to the stability of the ecosystem. Macrophytes provide the basis for the aquatic... food-web and also provide habitat...

14

A Comprehensive Approach to Restoring Habitat Conditions Needed to Protect Threatened Salmon Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The Grande Ronde River occupies the northeastern comer of Oregon (Figure 1) and is a tributary to the Snake) was developed in response to sever al environmental and social issues. Spring chinook populations have declined in salmon populations by reducing the survival and production of salmon in natal habitat. Water temperatures

15

Fire and aquatic ecosystems of the western USA: current knowledge and key questions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding of the effects of wildland fire and fire management on aquatic and riparian ecosystems is an evolving field, with many questions still to be resolved. Limitations of current knowledge, and the certainty that fire management will continue, underscore the need to summarize available information. Integrating fire and fuels management with aquatic ecosystem conservation begins with recognizing that terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are linked and dynamic, and that fire can play a critical role in maintaining aquatic ecological diversity. To protect aquatic ecosystems we argue that it will be important to: (1) accommodate fire-related and other ecological processes that maintain aquatic habitats and biodiversity, and not simply control fires or fuels; (2) prioritize projects according to risks and opportunities for fire control and the protection of aquatic ecosystems; and (3) develop new consistency in the management and regulatory process. Ultimately, all natural resource management is uncertain; the role of science is to apply experimental design and hypothesis testing to management applications that affect fire and aquatic ecosystems. Policy-makers and the public will benefit from an expanded appreciation of fire ecology that enables them to implement watershed management projects as experiments with hypothesized outcomes, adequate controls, and replication.

Peter A. Bisson; Bruce E. Rieman; Charlie Luce; Paul F. Hessburg; Danny C. Lee; Jeffrey L. Kershner; Gordon H. Reeves; Robert E. Gresswell

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Biology and Control of Aquatic Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Gettys, William T. Haller and David G. Petty, editors #12;The Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Foundation for future generations. This responsibility includes protecting, restoring and enhancing aquatic ecosystems and scientifically sound management, conservation and restoration of aquatic ecosystems. One of the ways

Florida, University of

17

Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

Golder Associates, Inc.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic resource management Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

be subject to revisions. Summary: , habitat degradation and climate change threaten the sustainability of our aquatic resources. Responding... : the structure, function and...

20

Aquatic Turtles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aquatic Turtles Aquatic Turtles Nature Bulletin No 632 march 11, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist AQUATIC TURTLES Turtles are old and conservative. All other living reptiles -- crocodiles, lizards and snakes -- came along much later So did birds and mammals. The group was already ancient when the giant dinosaurs made their appearance, ruled the animal kingdom during the Age of Reptiles, then became extinct. The turtles merely smiled their toothless smile and slowly went their way. With a shell that is both a house and a suit of armor, they have survived 200 million years with very few changes. Five species of aquatic turtles are more or less common in the Chicago region and three others are rare. One or more kinds can be found in each of over a hundred bodies of water in the forest preserves.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Chemical environment in the aquatic habitat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

the examples were taken from marine fish studies. The book is not, and does not claim to be, a general handbook on fisheries production or man- agement.

2000-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and implementation. AOC Land Acquisition Project The Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC) Land Acquisition Project, the AOC Land Acquisition Project also targets areas that are high priority for habitat restoration. The Land Acquisition Project provides GLRI funds so that state and local agencies can purchase land in AOCs

23

BIOLOGY AND AQUATIC PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handbook First published in the United States of America in 2009 by Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration plant management. The Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Foundation (AERF) is pleased to bring you Biology for the environmentally and scientifically sound management, conservation and restoration of aquatic ecosystems. One

Jawitz, James W.

24

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Improvement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore reparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Development of A GIS for Integrated Ecosystem Assessments of Great Lakes Aquatic Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of A GIS for Integrated Ecosystem Assessments of Great Lakes Aquatic Resources Primary management and restoration strategies. Development of aquatic habitat databases and maps will eliminate stressors. A priority research area for NOAA's ecosystems observations program is to generate and manage

26

Lessons from Long-Term Monitoring of Aquatic Ecosystems Gordon H. Reeves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons from Long-Term Monitoring of Aquatic Ecosystems Gordon H. Reeves Team Leader Aquatic restoration effort (Fish Creek), the annual variability in the distribution of fish and habitat (Elk River) the effects of restoration work may not necessarily be seen in an increase in the number of fish in or leaving

27

Bird Habitats  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bird Habitats Bird Habitats Bird Habitats The avian nest box monitoring network is located in northern New Mexico to investigate the health and condition of bird populations that nest in bird houses on the Pajarito plateau. April 12, 2012 Avian nest box on LANL land Boxes are placed in the open ponderosa pine forest of the canyons and piñon-juniper woodland on the Pajarito plateau mesas. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The monitoring data are used in a population viability analysis that can determine the status of the population and potential impacts of contaminants. Who nests in our network? More than two dozen North American bird species prefer to nest in bird houses. At LANL, we provide nestboxes for the following native bird

28

Ecological Values of Shallow-Water Habitats: Implications for the Restoration of Disturbed Ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A presumed value of shallow-habitat enhanced pelagic productivity derives from the principle that in nutrient-rich aquatic systems phytoplankton growth rate is controlled by light availability, which varies in...

Cary B. Lopez; James E. Cloern; Tara S. Schraga; Amy J. Little; Lisa V. Lucas

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Associations of watershed and instream environmental factors with aquatic macrofauna in tributaries of the Pedernales River, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in central Texas streams. During summer 2003 and spring 2004, I examined potential effects of juniper cover on aquatic ecology. Fishes, benthic macroinvertebrates, and the physicochemical habitat were investigated in spring-fed headwater tributaries...

Birnbaum, Jenny Sue

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

30

FISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are now increasingly managed to support aquatic ecosystems and fisheries, in addition to traditional humanFISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa * and J. R. LUNDb restoration alternatives for improving fish habitat by evaluating tradeoffs between fish production

Pasternack, Gregory B.

31

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to habitat loss and significant declines in aquatic biodiversity. Often the health of freshwater ecosystems for mediterranean species recovery. Keywords River restoration Á Ecosystem functions model Á GIS Á SacramentoMEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat

Merenlender, Adina

32

Restoration potential of the aquatic ecosystems of the Colorado River Delta, Mexico: Introduction to special issue on Wetlands of the Colorado River Delta  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The delta of the Colorado River in Mexico supports about a million hectares of riparian, marsh and estuarine habitats of international importance. Some of these habitats depend on flows of fresh and brackish water from the U.S. and Mexico. Up to now, these flows were the incidental result of water management actions taken to provide water for agriculture and municipal use, protect against flooding, and dispose of saline agricultural return flows. This paper briefly describes the wetlands and documents recent bi-national efforts to provide environmental flows to the delta, codified in Minutes 306, 316 and 319 of the water treaty between the U.S. and Mexico for the utilization of Colorado River water. Providing water for environmental uses in this watershed will be a daunting task given the many competing uses for water and expected diminished flows due to climate change. The paper serves as an introduction to a special issue of Ecological Engineering, Wetlands of the Colorado River Delta, which contributes 17 new research articles to the science based on these diverse aquatic habitats. We hope these studies will be useful to those developing management strategies to preserve and enhance these habitats for the future.

Edward P. Glenn; Karl W. Flessa; Jennifer Pitt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Asotin Creek Instream Habitat Alteration Projects: 1998 Habitat Evaluation Surveys.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Master Plan was completed 1994. The plan was developed by a landowner steering committee for the Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD), with technical support from the various Federal, State and local entities. Actions identified within the plan to improve the Asotin Creek ecosystem fall into four main categories, (1) Stream and Riparian, (2) Forestland, (3) Rangeland, and (4) Cropland. Specific actions to be carried out within the stream and in the riparian area to improve fish habitat were, (a) create more pools, (b) increase the amount of large organic debris (LOD), (c) increase the riparian buffer zone through tree planting, and (d) increase fencing to limit livestock access; additionally, the actions are intended to stabilize the river channel, reduce sediment input, and protect private property. Fish species of main concern in Asotin Creek are summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). Spring chinook in Asotin Creek are considered extinct (Bumgarner et al. 1998); bull trout and summer steelhead are below historical levels and are currently as ''threatened'' under the ESA. In 1998, 16 instream habitat projects were planned by ACCD along with local landowners. The ACCD identified the need for a more detailed analysis of these instream projects to fully evaluate their effectiveness at improving fish habitat. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) Snake River Lab (SRL) was contracted by the ACCD to take pre-construction measurements of the existing habitat (pools, LOD, width, depth, etc.) within each identified site, and to eventually evaluate fish use within these sites. All pre-construction habitat measurements were completed between 6 and 14 July, 1998. 1998 was the first year that this sort of evaluation has occurred. Post construction measurements of habitat structures installed in 1998, and fish usage evaluation, will be conducted in 1999. As such, this report is confined to 1998 habitat data summaries for each site, with no analytical evaluation.

Bumgarner, Joseph D.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Florida Aquatic Preserve Act (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Aquatic Preserve Act (Florida) Aquatic Preserve Act (Florida) Florida Aquatic Preserve Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Water Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection This Act provides for state-owned submerged lands in areas which have

35

Investigating habitat value to inform contaminant remediation options: Case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Habitat valuation methods were implemented to support remedial decisions for aquatic and terrestrial contaminated sites at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The habitat valuation was undertaken for six contaminated sites: Contractor's Spoil Area, K-901-N Disposal Area, K-770 Scrapyard, K-1007-P1 pond, K-901 pond, and the Mitchell Branch stream. Four of these sites are within the industrial use area of ETTP and two are in the Black Oak Ridge Conservation Easement. These sites represent terrestrial and aquatic habitat for vertebrates, terrestrial habitat for plants, and aquatic habitat for benthic invertebrates. Current and potential future, no-action (no remediation) scenarios were evaluated primarily using existing information. Valuation metrics and scoring criteria were developed in a companion paper, this volume. The habitat valuation consists of extensive narratives, as well as scores for aspects of site use value, site rarity, and use value added from spatial context. Metrics for habitat value were expressed with respect to different spatial scales, depending on data availability. There was significant variation in habitat value among the six sites, among measures for different taxa at a single site, between measures of use and rarity at a single site, and among measures for particular taxa at a single site with respect to different spatial scales. Most sites had aspects of low, medium, and high habitat value. Few high scores for current use value were given. These include: wetland plant communities at all aquatic sites, Lepomid sunfish and waterbirds at 1007-P1 pond, and Lepomid sunfish and amphibians at K-901 pond. Aquatic sites create a high-value ecological corridor for waterbirds, and the Contractor's Spoil Area and possibly the K-901-N Disposal Site have areas that are part of a strong terrestrial ecological corridor. The only example of recent observations of rare species at these sites is the gray bat observed at the K-1007-P1 pond. Some aspects of habitat value are expected to improve under no-action scenarios at a few of the sites. Methods are applicable to other contaminated sites where sufficient ecological data are available for the site and region.

Rebecca A. Efroymson; Mark J. Peterson; Neil R. Giffen; Michael G. Ryon; John G. Smith; William W. Hargrove; W. Kelly Roy; Christopher J. Welsh; Daniel L. Druckenbrod; Harry D. Quarles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System (IBIS) for the Columbia River Basin(IBIS) for the Columbia

37

Restoration of Riparian and Aquatic Systems for Improved Aquatic Habitats in the Upper Columbia River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, I explore linkages among soils, channel morphology, riparian hydrology, and stream-side vegetation to illustrate why, from an ecological perspective, instream structural manipulations to improve fi...

Robert L. Beschta

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

February 2004 / Vol. 54 No. 2 BioScience 155 Natural factors that fundamentally influence aquatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,we describe our The Case for Regime-based Water Quality Standards GEOFFREY C. POOLE, JASON B. DUNHAM regimes that drive dynamics within stream ecosystems (Stanford et al. 1996, Poff et al. 1997, Poole 2002 into management strategies for aquatic habitat conservation (e.g.,Stanford et al.1996,Poff et al. 1997, Fausch et

39

AQUATIC CONSERVATION: MARINE AND FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS Aquatic Conserv: Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst. 19: 274284 (2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Ecohydrologists and stream ecologists frequently focus aquatic ecosystem management and restoration effortsAQUATIC CONSERVATION: MARINE AND FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS Aquatic Conserv: Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst. 19 frequently alter aquatic ecosystems. Manipulations caused by large centralized water projects have been well

Merenlender, Adina

40

Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions between biota and their environment in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The group focuses particularly on the ecological interactions and their underlying ecological processes necessary to sustain ecosystem structure and function in their natural state

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Investigating habitat value to inform contaminant remediation options: Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Habitat valuation methods are most often developed and used to prioritize candidate lands for conservation. In this study the intent of habitat valuation was to inform the decision-making process for remediation of chemical contaminants on specific lands or surface water bodies. Methods were developed to summarize dimensions of habitat value for six representative aquatic and terrestrial contaminated sites at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Several general valuation metrics were developed for three broad categories: site use by groups of organisms, site rarity, and use value added from spatial context. Examples of use value metrics are taxa richness, a direct measure of number of species that inhabit an area, complexity of habitat structure, an indirect measure of potential number of species that may use the area, and land use designation, a measure of the length of time that the area will be available for use. Measures of rarity included presence of rare species or communities. Examples of metrics for habitat use value added from spatial context included similarity or complementarity of neighboring habitat patches and presence of habitat corridors. More specific metrics were developed for groups of organisms in contaminated streams, ponds, and terrestrial ecosystems. For each of these metrics, cutoff values for high, medium, and low habitat value were suggested, based on available information on distributions of organisms and landscape features, as well as habitat use information. A companion paper describes the implementation of these habitat valuation metrics and scoring criteria in the remedial investigation for ETTP.

Rebecca A. Efroymson; Mark J. Peterson; Christopher J. Welsh; Daniel L. Druckenbrod; Michael G. Ryon; John G. Smith; William W. Hargrove; Neil R. Giffen; W. Kelly Roy; Harry D. Quarles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Investigating Habitat Value in Support of Contaminant Remediation Decisions: Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat valuation methods are most often developed and used to prioritize candidate lands for conservation. In this study the intent of habitat valuation was to inform the decision-making process for remediation of chemical contaminants on specific lands or surface water bodies. Methods were developed to summarize dimensions of habitat value for six representative aquatic and terrestrial contaminated sites at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Several general valuation metrics were developed for three broad categories: site use by groups of organisms, site rarity, and use value added from spatial context. Examples of use value metrics are taxa richness, a direct measure of number of species that inhabit an area, complexity of habitat structure, an indirect measure of potential number of species that may use the area, and land use designation, a measure of the length of time that the area will be available for use. Measures of rarity included presence of rare species or communities. Examples of metrics for habitat use value added from spatial context included similarity or complementarity of neighboring habitat patches and presence of habitat corridors. More specific metrics were developed for groups of organisms in contaminated streams, ponds, and terrestrial ecosystems. For each of these metrics, cutoff values for high, medium, and low habitat value were suggested, based on available information on distributions of organisms and landscape features, as well as habitat use information. A companion paper describes the implementation of these habitat valuation metrics and scoring criteria in the remedial investigation for ETTP.

Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Welsh, Christopher John Edward [ORNL; Druckenbrod, Daniel L [ORNL; Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL; Hargrove, William Walter [ORNL; Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Quarles III, Harry Dewitt [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HABITAT EVALUATION: HABITAT EVALUATION: GUIDANCE FOR THE REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT DOCUMENTS EPA Contract No. 68-C0-0070 work Assignments B-21, 1-12 January 1993 Submitted to: Jim Serfis U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Federal Activities 401 M Street, SW Washington, DC 20460 Submitted by: Mark Southerland Dynamac Corporation The Dynamac Building 2275 Research Boulevard Rockville, MD 20850 CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION ... ...... .... ... ................................................. 1 Habitat Conservation .......................................... 2 Habitat Evaluation Methodology ................................... 2 Habitats of Concern ........................................... 3 Definition of Habitat ..................................... 4

44

Landscape connectivity promotes plant biodiversity spillover into non-target habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape connectivity promotes plant biodiversity spillover into non-target habitats Lars A for review September 26, 2008) Conservation efforts typically focus on maximizing biodiversity in protected increasingly consider how management of protected areas can promote biodiversity beyond reserve borders

45

Safeguarding Animal Health AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safeguarding Animal Health AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES & VIRAL HEMORRHAGIC SEPTICEMIA Teresa L. Dudis;Safeguarding Animal Health AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES An aquatic invasive species (AIS) is an aquatic parasite%20White%20Paper% 20%20-%20FINAL%20VERSION.pdf #12;Safeguarding Animal Health AIS ­ Parasites

46

Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

AQUATIC BIOLOGY Vol. 6: 263279, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cases, the impacts of bivalves on aquatic ecosystems have been well documented during the successfulAQUATIC BIOLOGY Aquat Biol Vol. 6: 263­279, 2009 doi: 10.3354/ab00130 Printed August 2009 Published, there is debate about the efficacy of shellfish restoration for improving water quality in estuaries (Newell 1988

Caron, David

48

Habitat classification and wintering duck use of Mission Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benthic and submerged vegetation sampling periods. The data are summarized under Food Groups in the same table. The standing crop of ~Ru i a during sampling period 1 was high for CN and 118P, 288 and 1212 ml/m , respectively. By 2 spring, CM's crop... dropped to 62 ml/m . The crop in 118P was 220 ml/m, 2 2 less than 20K of the fall crop. The PL crop also dropped by more than 5(C. Only PL among the Aquatic Bed habitat locations had more than trace amounts of filamentous algae. Seeds were commonly...

Alldredge, Judy Meuth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM 26-29 NOVEMBER 1984 GALVESTON, TEXAS June 1985 Final report 26-29 NOVEMBER 1984, 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NC:'IBER GALVESTON, TEXAS 7. AU THOR(.) 8 Control Research Program was held in Galveston, Texas, on 26-29 November 1984, to review current research

US Army Corps of Engineers

50

POTENTAIL HABITAT MOUNTAIN PLOVERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) is endemic to the Western Great Plains and Colorado Plateau (Mengel, 1970). The bird has become of greaterPOTENTAIL HABITAT FOR MOUNTAIN PLOVERS ON COLORADO SPRINGS UTILITIES PROPERTY A Report to Colorado Springs Utilities By The Colorado Natural Heritage Program Colorado State University January 2003 Martin

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecological risk Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: aquatic ecological risk Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions Summary: Aquatic Ecology...

52

Asotin Creek Instream Habitat Alteration Projects : Habitat Evaluation, Adult and Juvenile Habitat Utilization and Water Temperature Monitoring : 2001 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Asotin Creek originates from a network of deeply incised streams on the slopes of the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. The watershed drains an area of 322 square miles that provides a mean annual flow of 74 cfs. The geomorphology of the watershed exerts a strong influence on biologic conditions for fish within the stream. Historic and contemporary land-use practices have had a profound impact on the kind, abundance, and distribution of anadromous salmonids in the watershed. Fish habitat in Asotin Creek and other local streams has been affected by agricultural development, grazing, tilling practices, logging, recreational activities and implementation of flood control structures (Neilson 1950). The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Master Plan was completed in 1994. The plan was developed by a landowner steering committee for the Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD), with technical support from various Federal, State and local entities. Actions identified within the plan to improve the Asotin Creek ecosystem fall into four main categories: (1) Stream and Riparian, (2) Forestland, (3) Rangeland, and (4) Cropland. Specific actions to be carried out within the stream and in the riparian area to improve fish habitat were: (1) create more pools, (2) increase the amount of large organic debris (LOD), (3) increase the riparian buffer zone through tree planting, and (4) increase fencing to limit livestock access. All of these actions, in combination with other activities identified in the Plan, are intended to stabilize the river channel, reduce sediment input, increase the amount of available fish habitat (adult and juvenile) and protect private property. Evaluation work described within this report was to document the success or failure of the program regarding the first two items listed (increasing pools and LOD). Beginning in 1996, the ACCD, with cooperation from local landowners and funding from Bonneville Power Administration began constructing instream projects to improve fish habitat. In 1998, the ACCD identified the need for a more detailed analysis of these instream projects to fully evaluate their effectiveness at improving fish habitat. Therefore, ACCD contracted with WDFW's Snake River Lab (SRL) to take pre- and post-construction measurements of the habitat (i.e., pools, LOD, width, depth) at each site, and to evaluate fish use within some of the altered sites. These results have been published annually as progress reports to the ACCD (Bumgarner et al. 1999, Wargo et al. 2000, and Bumgarner and Schuck 2001). The ACCD also contracted with the WDFW SRL to conduct other evaluation and monitoring in the stream such as: (1) conduct snorkel surveys at habitat alteration sites to document fish usage following construction, (2) deploy temperature monitors throughout the basin to document summer water temperatures, and (3) attempt to document adult fish utilization by documenting the number of steelhead redds associated with habitat altered areas. This report provides a summary of pre-construction measurements taken on three proposed Charley Creek habitat sites during 2001, two sites in main Asotin Creek, and one site in George Creek, a tributary that enters in the lower Asotin Creek basin. Further, it provides a comparison of measurements taken pre- and post-construction on three 1999 habitat sites taken two years later, but at similar river flows. It also presents data collected from snorkel surveys, redd counts, and temperature monitoring.

Bumgarner, Joseph D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Tyre track pools and puddles Anthropogenic contributors to aquatic biodiversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Twelve sites of tyre track pools and puddles situated in woodland, heath and pasture in Dorset UK were examined to determine their macroinvertebrate species richness and community changes over the course of one year. 174 taxa were found with Diptera (59) and Coleoptera (48) contributing 61% of the total. The most frequently occurring and ubiquitous groups were nematoceran dipterans, Oligochaeta, Coleoptera, Crustacea and Lamellibranchiata. Species richness varied with season and on average was highest in March and November samples. On average only 26% (range 1640%) of the combined total number of taxa found in spring (March) and autumn (November) samples from a site were also found there in each of these seasons individually, indicating a high species turnover through the year. The tyre track pools contributed to local aquatic biodiversity by adding 29 taxa to previously published taxa lists from aquatic habitats in the area. The relative richness of the tyre track pools is attributed to their successional variation in a heterogeneous landscape. Conservation value of 9 of the 12 sites was rated Very high to High and nine regionally notable or rare taxa were recorded. It is suggested that the important conservation status of the tyre track pools warrants greater recognition and further intensive study.

Patrick D. Armitage; Adrianna Hawczak; John H. Blackburn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Functional assessment of interconnected aquatic ecosystems in the Baiyangdian BasinAn ecological-network-analysis based approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many individual aquatic ecosystems are hydraulically interconnected and form specific network structures that display integral characteristics. The functional assessment of individual aquatic ecosystems is important, yet inadequate, for developing effective protection and restoration policies in basins, in which multiple interconnected aquatic ecosystems are involved. Here, we developed a framework to use ecological network analysis for functional assessment of a large system composed of various aquatic ecosystems in the context of network-based management. Five storage factor-included network indices were used to characterize the system functioning that was defined here as a performance with a certain of system activities and organization. A deviation index (D), combining normalized input, internal and output ascendency, was used to analyze the degree and causes of system functional variation. China's Baiyangdian Lake, a typical aquatic ecosystem, was taken as a case study. The results demonstrated that these storage factor-included network indices could well depict the system attributes and provide integral functional assessment of the aquatic ecosystems network in the Baiyangdian Basin. The functions of the aquatic ecosystems network presented distinct seasonal fluctuations, and there was a continuous decline in system functioning over the period of 19591978. Both natural and human causes contributed to the functional degradation, while the latter one dominated the degradation. Current study provided an example of how the network analysis might improve the understanding of the integral functioning of interconnected aquatic ecosystems.

Xufeng Mao; Zhifeng Yang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary. The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as Salmonid Benefits, was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY Aquatic Invasive Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 3 1. Abstract Ten North Umpqua Hydroelectric Project impoundments were surveyed for aquatic invasive Energy's North Umpqua Hydroelectric Project includes 11 impoundments within the North Umpqua River

57

Earth & Aquatic Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

behaviors in diverse environments, including the atmosphere, subsurface and stream sediment-water interfaces and aquatic ecosystems. Featured Programs and Projects Integrated...

58

Washington Joint Aquatic Resources Permit Application | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Permit Application Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Permit ApplicationPermit Application: Washington Joint Aquatic...

59

Rehabilitating Aquatic Ecosystems in Developed Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to restore watershed and aquatic ecosystem processes in urban areas are constrained by...rehabilitation and enhancement are preferred over restoration when referring to improving environmental conditions ...

Kathleen G. Maas-Hebner

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Giant otter population responses to habitat expansion and degradation induced by a mega hydroelectric dam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Large hydroelectric dams are major drivers of habitat loss and degradation in lowland Amazonia. Hydroelectric reservoirs reduce the habitat available for terrestrial species, but create new open-water and shoreline lake habitat that can potentially boost populations of aquatic and semi-aquatic species, such as the threatened giant otter (Pteronura brasiliensis). To assess the impacts of mega-dams on this apex-predator, we surveyed the giant otter population across the 443,772-hectare Balbina Hydroelectric Reservoir of central Brazilian Amazonia between 14 and 25years after this reservoir creation. We compared changes in habitat area and estimated giant otter population size between the reservoir pre- and post-filling stages. The Balbina dam created ?3525 islands and increased the open-water surface and total reservoir perimeter available to otters by a factor of 62.7 and 8.9, respectively. Some 25years after damming, however, the estimated post-filling giant otter population size was only twice greater than that estimated before filling and 4.5 times smaller than would be predicted given the total available habitat area and density of dens quantified at a neighbouring undisturbed area used as a surrogate of the pre-filling phase. The observed mismatch between the proportional increase in otter population size and the much greater newly available reservoir habitat area is likely due to low habitat quality in terms of low fish prey productivity and scarcity of suitable sites for denning and territory demarcation. This should be considered in strategic environmental impact assessments of planned hydroelectric dams and in managing existing and future hydropower development in lowland tropical forests.

Ana Filipa Palmeirim; Carlos A. Peres; Fernando C.W. Rosas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh, 2001 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the mid-1980s, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) has been participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) efforts to mitigate for the negative impacts to fish and wildlife resulting from the development and operation of the 7 Columbia Basin Federal Hydropower System. BPA's mitigation obligations were formally recognized and mandated by the Northwest Power Act of 1980 and are guided by the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC's) Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA funds fish and wildlife projects throughout the Basin to meet the habitat and population restorative goals and objectives outlined in the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program and to fulfill its mitigation responsibilities under the Power Act. Impacts to wildlife resulting from hydrofacility construction/inundation were estimated using Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) in the mid and late 1980s and are documented in BPA' s Wildlife Loss Assessments (Rasmussen and Wright 1990,a,b,c,d) and in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lower Snake River Wildlife Habitat Compensation Evaluation (ACOE 1991). The loss assessments provided estimates of lost habitat quality and quantity for the target species selected to represent the habitat cover types impacted by hydropower construction/inundation. The NWPPC incorporated these losses into their Fish and Wildlife Program, recognizing them as the unannualized losses attributable to the construction/inundation of the federal hydropower system (NWPPC 1995 and 2000, Table 1 1-4). The HEP methodology is used by wildlife managers within the Columbia Basin to determine habitat values, expressed as Habitat Units, gained through BPA-funded mitigation project work. ODFW and the other Oregon wildlife managers (i.e., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Confederated Tribes of the Warms Springs Reservation of Oregon, Burns Paiute Tribe, and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation [CTUIR]) have been working together since 1991 to coordinate the planning, selection, and implementation of BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. In 1997, the Oregon wildlife managers developed a programmatic project for mitigation planning and implementation within Oregon. The Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area Additions project is one of many habitat acquisition and restoration projects proposed under the Oregon wildlife managers programmatic project that have been approved and recommended for funding by the NWPPC. The Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area Additions mitigation project will protect and restore wetland, riparian and other habitats on newly acquired parcels at ODFW's Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area (LMWA). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the acquisition and enhancement of Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area lands will contribute towards mitigating for habitat lost as a result of the development and operation of the Columbia Basin hydropower system. This report summarizes the HEP survey conducted in June 2001 to document the baseline habitat values on four parcels recently added to the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area: the 309.66-acre Wallender property, the 375.54-acre Simonis property, the 161.07-acre Conley Lake property, and the 74.55-acre Becker property. The 2001 HEP Team was comprised of the following members and agencies: Susan Barnes (ODFW), Allen Childs (CTUIR), Tracy Hames (Yakama Indian Nation), Dave Larson (ODFW), Cathy Nowak (Cat Tracks Wildlife Consulting), and Ken Rutherford (ODFW). Results of the HEP will be used to (1) determine the pre-restoration habitat values of the project sites, (2) the number of Habitat Units to be credited to BPA for protection of habitats within the project area, (3) determine the enhancement potential of the sites, and (4) develop a habitat management plan for the area.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: The Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing SystemThe Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing System Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems: an overviewNetworked Aquatic Microbial Observing Sys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: The Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing SystemThe Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing System Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems Ocean Research Goals · Development of autonomous networks of heterogeneous sensors to monitor and sample

Smith, Ryan N.

63

Attached Bacterial Populations Shared by Four Species of Aquatic Angiosperms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...are attached to aquatic angiosperms...and estuarine ecosystems, and a major...reestablishment of aquatic angiosperm beds...terrestrial plant restoration (20, 65...could be used for aquatic angiosperm restoration efforts. Application...

Byron C. Crump; Evamaria W. Koch

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Protecting aquatic organisms from chemicals: the harsh realities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diffuse sources. Many of these will be agrochemicals, including nutrients (used as fertilizers...few groups of chemicals (such as the agrochemicals) is there both temporal and spatial...mixtures of man-made chemicals whose composition is probably highly variable and continuously...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

FINAL REPORT ON THE AQUATIC MERCURY ASSESSMENT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 2000, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 issued a proposed Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for total mercury in the middle and lower Savannah River. The initial TMDL, which would have imposed a 1 ng/l mercury limit for discharges to the middle/lower Savannah River, was revised to 2.8 ng/l in the final TMDL released in February 2001. The TMDL was intended to protect people from the consumption of contaminated fish, which is the major route of mercury exposure to humans. The most bioaccumulative form of mercury is methylmercury, which is produced in aquatic environments by the action of microorganisms on inorganic mercury. Because of the environmental and economic significance of the mercury discharge limits that would have been imposed by the TMDL, the Savannah River Site (SRS) initiated several studies concerning: (1) mercury in SRS discharges, SRS streams and the Savannah River, (2) mercury bioaccumulation factors for Savannah River fish, (3) the use of clams to monitor the influence of mercury from tributary streams on biota in the Savannah River, and (4) mercury in rainwater falling on the SRS. The results of these studies are presented in detail in this report. The first study documented the occurrence, distribution and variation of total and methylmercury at SRS industrial outfalls, principal SRS streams and the Savannah River where it forms the border with the SRS. All of the analyses were performed using the EPA Method 1630/31 ultra low-level and contaminant-free techniques for measuring total and methylmercury. Total mercury at National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) outfalls ranged from 0.31-604 ng/l with a mean of 8.71 ng/l. Mercury-contaminated groundwater was the source for outfalls with significantly elevated mercury concentrations. Total mercury in SRS streams ranged from 0.95-15.7 ng/l. Mean total mercury levels in the streams varied from 2.39 ng/l in Pen Branch to 5.26 ng/l in Tims Branch. Methylmercury ranged from 0.002 ng/l in Upper Three Runs to 2.60 ng/l in Tims Branch. Total mercury in the Savannah River ranged from 0.62 ng/l to 43.9 ng/l, and methylmercury ranged from 0.036 ng/l to 7.54 ng/l. Both total and methylmercury concentrations were consistently high in the river near the mouth of Steel Creek. Total mercury was positively correlated with methylmercury (r = 0.88). Total mercury bound to particulates ranged from 41% to 57% in the river and from 28% to 90% in the streams. Particulate methylmercury varied from 9% to 37% in the river and from 6% to 79% in the streams. Small temporary pools in the Savannah River swamp area near and around Fourmile Branch had the highest concentrations observed in the Savannah River watershed, reaching 1,890 ng/l for total mercury and 34.0 ng/l for methylmercury. The second study developed a mercury bioaccumulation factor (BAF) for the Savannah River near SRS. A BAF is the ratio of the concentration of mercury in fish flesh to the concentration of mercury in the water. BAFs are important in the TMDL process because target concentrations for mercury in water are computed from BAFs. Mercury BAFs are known to differ substantially among fish species, water bodies, and possibly seasons. Knowledge of such variation is needed to determine a BAF that accurately represents average and extreme conditions in the water body under study. Analysis of fish tissue and aqueous methylmercury samples collected at a number of locations and over several seasons in a 110 km (68 mile) reach of the Savannah River demonstrated that BAFs for each species under study varied by factors of three to eight. Influences on BAF variability were location, habitat and season-related differences in fish mercury levels and seasonal differences in methylmercury levels in the water. Overall (all locations, habitats, and seasons) average BAFs were 3.7 x 10{sup 6} for largemouth bass, 1.4 x 10{sup 6} for sunfishes, and 2.5 x 10{sup 6} for white catfish. This study showed that determination of representative BAFs for large rivers requires the collect

Halverson, N

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (2006(2006--006006--00)00)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP 101HEP 101 Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed byHabitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP

67

Biomechanics and Energetics in Aquatic and Semiaquatic Mammals: Platypus to Whale*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of oscillating hydrofoils of aquatic mammals. Semi- aquatic mammals swim at the water surface and experience

Fish, Frank

68

WATERSHED MANAGEMENT FOR ENDANGERED AQUATIC AND RIPARIAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and endangered (T&E) species that inhabit aquatic and riparian ecosystems. Unfortunately, too many fallacies of variability, and ecosystems can be restored, etc. Watershed management decisions in the 21st century related and endangered (T&E) species that inhabit aquatic and riparian ecosystems. The presence of conflicting

69

The aquatic ecotoxicology of triazine herbicides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Triazine herbicides control plant growth by inhibiting photophosphorylation, but typically do not cause permanent cell damage or death. Effects on aquatic plants are reversible; photosynthesis resumes when the herbicide disappears from the water, and sometimes even while it is still present. Effects on aquatic plant communities are further ameliorated by species replacements, so the communities as a whole are less sensitive than their most sensitive species. Atrazine, a representative triazine herbicide, is toxic to aquatic plants (algae and macrophytes) at concentrations in the range of 20 to 200 {mu}g/L or less. Aquatic invertebrates and fish are much less sensitive than plants, with acute toxicity occurring at 1000 {mu}g/L or higher. Ecologically significant effects in aquatic ecosystems are likely only if plant communities are severely damaged by prolonged exposure to high atrazine concentrations.

Giddings, J.M. [ENSR Consulting & Engineering, Woods Hole, MA (United States)] [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity Harvesting Prepared for considerations for biodiversity and wildlife habitat values during their development of a discussion paper paper. #12;2 A. INTRODUCTION When evaluating the biodiversity and wildlife habitat implications

71

Habitat Management -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Habitat Management Some of the documents on this page are in Portable Document Format (PDF) and can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is covered with mostly contiguous native eastern deciduous hardwood forest. Within that framework are found many ecological communities (e.g., cedar barrens, river bluffs, wetlands) with unique biota, often including rare species. Many research park habitats are managed to protect their ecosystem values, furnish food and shelter for wildlife, and provide sites for research and monitoring. Habitats that receive special attention include prairies, forests, and wetlands and riparian areas.

72

Protection 1 Protection 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protection 1 Protection 1 Butler W. Lampson Xerox Corporation Palo Alto, California Abstract is a malicious act or accident that crashes the system--- this might be considered the ultimate degradation. 1, p 437. It was reprinted in ACM Operating Systems Rev. 8, 1 (Jan. 1974), p 18. This version

Lampson, Butler W.

73

Protection 1 Protection1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protection 1 Protection1 Butler W. Lampson Xerox Corporation Palo Alto, California Abstract is a malicious act or accident that crashes the system-- this might be considered the ultimate degradation. 1, p 437. It was reprinted in ACM Operating Systems Rev. 8, 1 (Jan. 1974), p 18. This version

Lampson, Butler W.

74

Multiplex modeling of physical habitat for endangered freshwater mussels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantification of the potential habitat available for endangered freshwater mussels can be a challenging task, as habitat use criteria are very complex and often only low numbers of species observations are available. To address this problem in a riverine environment, we developed a concept of a multivariate, multi-scale, and multi-model (multiplex) habitat simulation through combining multivariate time-series analysis of complex hydraulics (CART and logistic regression), micro-scale (River2D), and meso-scale (MesoHABSIM) habitat models, to develop macro-scale management criteria. This concept has been applied and tested on the Upper Delaware River (USA) for the protection and enhancement of existing populations of Alasmidonta heterodon, an endangered freshwater mussel. The physical habitat conditions of approximately 125km of the Delaware River were described using digital aerial imagery and ground-based surveys. The temporal and spatial variabilities of complex hydraulics simulated by a River2D model at 1547 locations were statistically analyzed to select ranges of attributes that corresponded to mussel presence. We applied these criteria to the river's meso-scale hydromorphological unit mappings to identify suitable mesohabitats, which then served as a calibration data set for the coarser scale model. The final meso-scale model's predictions were hydraulically validated offering encouraging results. The meso-scale habitat suitability criteria defined moderately deep, slow-flowing, and non-turbulent hydromorphologic units as providing good conditions for A. heterodon. All three of the developed suitability models (descriptive statistics, CART and logistic regression model) indicated the species preference for hydraulically stable habitats.

Piotr Parasiewicz; Elena Castelli; Joseph N. Rogers; Ethan Plunkett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Earth & Aquatic Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Earth and Aquatic Sciences Earth and Aquatic Sciences SHARE Earth and Aquatic Sciences Create and apply new knowledge across multiple scales to aid decision makers on the stewardship of air, water and land resources. Many factors affect the fate, transport and transformation of metal and radionuclide contaminants found on DOE lands. A fundamental understanding of environmental inorganic and biological interactions is needed for deriving practical solutions to management of DOE lands. ORNL applies molecular to field-scale chemistry, hydrology and microbiology expertise, together with neutron scattering, nano-materials sciences facilities, computing resources and comprehensive models in environmental remediation sciences research. Multiple research projects are carried out with aims of

76

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- The Potential Impacts on Aquatic...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The Potential Impacts on Aquatic Ecosystems from the Release of Trace Elements in Geothermal Fluids...

77

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Priest River Project, Technical Report 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Optimal vortex rings and aquatic propulsion mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...vortex rings and aquatic propulsion mechanisms P. F. Linden...fluid mechanics behind these propulsion mechanisms and show that...over the cycle. 4. FISH PROPULSION BY UNDULATORY SWIMMING Most marine organisms have only discrete...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Digital holographic imaging of aquatic species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this thesis is to design, develop and implement a digital holographic imaging (DHI) system, capable of capturing three-dimensional (3D) images of aquatic species. The images produced by this system are used in ...

Domnguez-Caballero, Jos Antonio

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Contaminated Aquatic Ecosystems Restoration: A Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use Decision Analysis methods to rank intervention strategies after contamination by radionuclides of an aquatic ecosystem. We assume certainty since the validation of models used to quantify impacts of cou...

E. Gallego; S. Ros-Insua; A. Mateos; D. Ros Insua

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geopressured habitat: A literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review of the geopressured-geothermal habitat is summarized. Findings are presented and discussed with respect to the principal topics: Casual agents are both geological and geochemical; they include disequilibrium compaction of sediments, clay diagenesis, aquathermal pressuring, hydrocarbon generation, and lateral tectonic compression. The overall physical and chemical characteristics of the habitats are dictated by varying combinations of sedimentation rates, alteration mineralogy, permeability, porosity and pressure, temperature, fluid content and chemistry, and hydrodynamic flow. Habitat pressure seals are considered in terms of their formation processes, geologic characteristics, and physical behavior, including pressure release and reservoir pressure recharge on a geologic time scale. World-wide occurrence of geopressured-geothermal habitats is noted. The main thrust of this topic concerns the U.S.A. and Canada; in addition, reference is made to occurrences in China and indications from deep-sea vents, as well as the contribution of paleo-overpressure to habitat initiation and maintenance. Identification and assessment of the habitat is addressed in relation to use of hydrogeologic, geophysical, geochemical, and geothermic techniques, as well as well-logging and drill-stem-test data. Conclusions concerning the adequacy of the current state of knowledge and its applicability to resource exploration and development are set forth, together with recommendations for the thrust of future work.

Negus-de Wys, Jane

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Evaluating Florida's Coastal Protected Areas: A Model for Coastal Management Plan Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biodiversity and habitat A. Protect depleted, threatened, rare, or endangered species or populations b. Preserve or restore the viability of representative habitats and ecosystems 2. Fishery management A. Control exploitation rates b. Protect...), ecosystem management (Brody, 2003e; Brody, Carrasco, & Highfield, 2003), stakeholder participation (Brody, 2003f; Burby, 2003), sprawl reduction (Brody, Carrasco, & Highfield, 2006), biodiversity (Brody, 2003c), industry participation in environmental...

Bernhardt, Sarah Praeger

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

83

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian enclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2000 included: (1) Implementing 2 new projects in the Grande Ronde drainage, and retrofitting one old project that will protect an additional 1.3 miles of stream and 298.3 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Improving fish passage in Bear Creek to restore tributary and mainstem access; (4) Planting and seeding 6.7 stream miles with 7,100 plants and 365 lbs. of seed; (5) Establishing 18 new photopoints and retaking 229 existing photopoint pictures; (6) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (7) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 98.7 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 62 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,910 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.; Stennfeld, Scott P.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Title 5 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 95 Protection of Fish...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chapter 95 Protection of Fish and Game Habitat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 5 Alaska...

85

Mosquito larval habitat mapping using remote sensing and GIS: Implications of coalbed methane development and West Nile virus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential larval habitats of the mosquito Culex tarsalis (Coquillett), implicated as a primary vector of West Nile virus in Wyoming, were identified using integrated remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) analyses. The study area is in the Powder River Basin of north central Wyoming, an area that has been undergoing a significant increase in coalbed methane gas extractions since the late 1990s. Large volumes of water are discharged, impounded, and released during the extraction of methane gas, creating aquatic habitats that have the potential to support immature mosquito development. Landsat TM and ETM + data were initially classified into spectrally distinct water and vegetation classes, which were in turn used to identify suitable larval habitat sites. This initial habitat classification was refined using knowledge-based GIS techniques requiring spatial data layers for topography, streams, and soils to reduce the potential for overestimation of habitat. Accuracy assessment was carried out using field data and high-resolution aerial photography commensurate with one of the Landsat images. The classifier can identify likely habitat for ponds larger than 0.8 ha (2 acres) with generally satisfactory results (72.1%) with a lower detection limit of approximate to 0.4 ha (1 acre). Results show a 75% increase in potential larval habitats from 1999 to 2004 in the study area, primarily because of the large increase in small coalbed methane water discharge ponds. These results may facilitate mosquito abatement programs in the Powder River Basin with the potential for application throughout the state and region.

Zou, L.; Miller, S.N.; Schmidtmann, E.T. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Renewable Resources

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Behavior of introduced red drum and habitat-use overlap with largemouth bass in a power-plant cooling reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences BEHAVIOR OF INTRODUCED RED DRUM AND HABITAT-USE OVERLAP WITH LARGEMOUTH BASS IN A POWER-P~ COOLING RESERVOIR A Thesis by ROBERT CLAYTON SMITH Approved... Power-Plant Cooling Reservoir (December 1989) Robert Clayton Smith, B. S. , Loyola University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Brian R. Murphy The introduction of a non-native species into an aquatic community is a fisheries management practice...

Smith, Robert Clayton

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic food pathways Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: aquatic food pathways Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Summary: and population control 1994 Jrgens -- Impact of Daphnia...

88

Dragonflies of freshwater pools in lignite spoil heaps: Restoration management, habitat structure and conservation value  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although numerous studies of several terrestrial groups have revealed high conservation potential of post-industrial sites, freshwater habitats in post-mining sites still remain little explored. Here we present a study of dragonflies (Odonata) colonizing 61 freshwater pools newly established at 9 lignite spoil heaps in the north-western Czech Republic, Central Europe. We aimed mainly on effects of the three prevailing pool restoration methods (spontaneously inundated depressions at non-reclaimed sites, at reclaimed sites; and novel technically constructed ponds) along with several factors of the local habitat and surrounding landscape on species richness, conservation values, and species composition of the dragonfly communities. By recording of 32 species of lentic dragonflies (including 8 threatened ones) and 2 additional threatened lotic species, we documented the conservation value of post-industrial habitats also for aquatic arthropods. None of the three restoration methods supported dragonfly communities of distinctly higher conservation value then did the two others, each method generated habitats for different threatened species. Similar patterns were revealed also for vegetation heterogeneity, bottom substrate, water shading, and surrounding terrestrial habitats. We thus conclude that a mosaic-like combination of the restoration methods and creating of heterogeneous water pools will be most effective for restoring of freshwater biodiversity in highly degraded sites.

Filip Harabi; Filip Tichanek; Robert Tropek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Experts Discuss Models Role in Better Protecting U.S. Ports and Waterways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How can scientific models help save lives, property, and aquatic habitat during a terrorist attack on the nation's ports and rivers? Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory posed this question to scientific modeling and emergency response experts from across the country in a workshop held July 12-13, 2006, at Sequim, Wash.

Manke, Kristin L.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; West Beaver Lake Project, Technical Report 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 82.69 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 8.80 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Conifer forest habitat provides 70.33 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Open water provides 3.30 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Ecological Risks of Shale Oil and Gas Development to Wildlife, Aquatic Resources and their Habitats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

injecting water mixed with sand and chemicals into a well under high pressure to open fractures in shale and release gas; use of 1130 million liters of water per well, impoundments or tanks to store water, heavy truck traffic to transport water, sand extraction, trucks to transport sand, trucks with chemicals for fracking, frac control van, lights to enable activity 24 h per day, temporary storage for flowback water ... This will require an understanding of how development will impact ecosystems and a willingness to invest in the research, monitoring and management to reduce negative impacts. ... This case study identifies the need for further research to help understand the nature and the environmental impacts of hydrofracturing fluids to devise optimal, safe disposal strategies. ...

Margaret C. Brittingham; Kelly O. Maloney; Ada M. Farag; David D. Harper; Zachary H. Bowen

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

Delta Subsidence Reversal, Levee Failure, and Aquatic HabitatA Cautionary Tale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. 2005. Subsidence, sea level rise, and seismicity in theaccretion, and sea level rise in South San Francisco Bayisland subsidence and sea level rise, increasing seismic

Bates, Matthew E.; Lund, Jay R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Delta Subsidence Reversal, Levee Failure, and Aquatic HabitatA Cautionary Tale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Associates. 2009c. Section 7, flood risk analysis, summary.BayDelta Program. 1998. Flood control, supplement to theBattling the inland sea: floods, public policy, and the

Bates, Matthew E.; Lund, Jay R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Grand Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing the opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project originally provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented under revisions of the Fish and Wild Program as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources, is the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No. 199202601). Work undertaken during 2008 included: (1) completing 1 new fencing project in the North Fork John Day subbasin that protects 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat, and 1 fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that protects an additional 0.59 miles of stream and 42.5 acres of habitat; (2) constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa river to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) planting 10,084 plants along 0.5 miles of the Wallowa Riverproject; (4) establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; and (7) completed a comprehensive project summary report to the Independent Scientific Review panel (ISRP) that provided our conclusions regarding benefits to focal species, along with management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 57 individual projects have been implemented, monitoring and maintained along 84.9 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams, that protect and enhance 3,564 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife] [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Land Acquisition protects fish habitat in Wahkiakum County -...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(BPA) is proposing to fund the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) through its contract with the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP) to acquire 305 acres of hillside forest,...

96

Acquisition protects fish habitat in Yakima County Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

facilities. The property would be owned and managed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. September 2008 Land to get management plan Once this property has been...

97

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Chapter 11 - Germination Ecology of Plants with Specialized Life Cycles and/or Habitats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The germination ecology of parasitic plants, myco-heterotrophic plants, orchids, carnivorous plants, aquatics, halophytes or psammophytes is approached from a global perspective because these kinds of plants generally occur in more than one vegetation zone. These groups of plants have unusual life cycles and/or unique habitat requirements, and they have long attracted much attention from botanists, ecologists and other scientists. This chapter surveys the kinds of dormancy found in freshly-matured seeds in each of the seven groups of plants, and it considers available data on the environmental conditions required to break dormancy and stimulate germination.

Carol C. Baskin; Jerry M. Baskin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat for Humanity  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

In August 2013, Southeast Volusia County Habitat for Humanity (VolusiaHabitat) completed its first U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero EnergyReady Home in Edgewater, on the Atlantic coast of...

100

HSU Matt Johnson ADVANCED HABITAT ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HSU Matt Johnson ADVANCED HABITAT ECOLOGY BACKGROUND MATERIAL HSU WILDLIFE 531 Dr. Matt Johnson;39 #12;HSU Matt Johnson CHI-SQUARE GOODNESS-OF-FIT TESTS OF WILDLIFE HABITAT SELECTION In a nutshell

Johnson, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Revisiting Odum (1956): A synthesis of aquatic ecosystem metabolism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Few syntheses of aquatic ecosystem metabolism have been completed since. ... Results will be valuable for management, restoration, and carbon budgets,...

102

BJC/OR-2268 Investigating Habitat Value  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.2.1 Previous Habitat Valuations of Land Areas and Water Bodies on the Oak Ridge ReservationBJC/OR-2268 Investigating Habitat Value in Support of Remedial Decisions: A Case Study of Six Sites at the East Tennessee Technology Park #12;BJC/OR-2268 Investigating Habitat Value in Support of Remedial

Hargrove, William W.

103

Historical Food Web Structure and Restoration of Native Aquatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA ABSTRACT Plans for the restoration of aquatic ecosystemsHistorical Food Web Structure and Restoration of Native Aquatic Communities in the Lake Tahoe in structuring aquatic ecosystems, either through trophic cascades or through the strong per capita influences

Vander Zanden, Jake

104

Annual Report 2013 Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the diversity of aquatic organisms following the restoration of the Chriesbach river. (Photo: Aldo Todaro) Eawag and technologies for the sustainable management of water resources and aquatic ecosystems. In co- operationAnnual Report 2013 Eawag � Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology #12;Cover

Wehrli, Bernhard

105

SPRING / PRINTEMPS 2014 AQUATIC & RECREATION PROGRAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPRING / PRINTEMPS 2014 AQUATIC & RECREATION PROGRAMS ACTIVIT?S AQUATIQUES & R?CR?ATIVES ONLINE REGISTRATION FROM APRIL 21 TO 25 www.gaiters.ca/recreation INSCRIPTION EN LIGNE DU 21 AU 25 AVRIL ALL OUR FINANCIERE #12;REGISTRATIONS INSCRIPTIONS #12;INFORMATION For more information on the recreation programs

106

Student Manager, Aquatics Programs Campus Recreation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Manager, Aquatics Programs Campus Recreation Northern Illinois University Campus Recreation: The department of Campus Recreation is located at NIU's Student Recreation Center at the crossroads of Annie Glidden and Lucinda roads. Campus Recreation is a department within Student Affairs & Enrollment

Karonis, Nicholas T.

107

Aquatic insects in Montezuma Well, Arizona, USA: A travertine spring mound with high alkalinity and dissolved carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An annotated list of aquatic insects from the high carbonate system of Montezuma Well, Arizona, USA, is presented for collections taken during 1976-1986. Fifty-seven taxa in 16 families are reported, including new distribution records for Arizona (Anacaena signaticollis, Laccobius ellipticus, and Crenitulus sp. (nr. debilis)) and the USA (Enochrus sharpi). Larval stages for Trichoptera, Lepidoptera, Megaloptera, Neuroptera, Chironomidae, and Anisoptera were absent even though the habitat lacks fish, and water temperature, dissolved oxygen, available food, and substrata appear adequate in Montezuma Well. The potential importance of alkalinity in restricting these insect groups is discussed.

Blinn, D.W.; Sanderson, M.W. (Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff (USA))

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement at Mountaintop Mining Sites Symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Welcome to this symposium which is part of the ongoing effort to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding mountaintop mining and valley fills. The EIS is being prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Surface Mining, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the State of West Virginia. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement (AEE) at mountaintop mining sites is one of fourteen technical areas identified for study by the EIS Interagency Steering Committee. Three goals were identified in the AEE Work Plan: 1. Assess mining and reclamation practices to show how mining operations might be carried out in a way that minimizes adverse impacts to streams and other environmental resources and to local communities. Clarify economic and technical constraints and benefits. 2. Help citizens clarify choices by showing whether there are affordable ways to enhance existing mining, reclamation, mitigation processes and/or procedures. 3. Ide identify data needed to improve environmental evaluation and design of mining projects to protect the environment. Todays symposium was proposed in the AEE Team Work Plans but coordinated planning for the event began September 15, 1999 when representatives from coal industry, environmental groups and government regulators met in Morgantown. The meeting participants worked with a facilitator from the Canaan Valley Institute to outline plans for the symposium. Several teams were formed to carry out the plans we outlined in the meeting.

Black, D. Courtney; Lawson, Peter; Morgan, John; Maggard, Randy; Schor, Horst; Powell, Rocky; Kirk, Ed. J.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

109

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources are the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No.199202601). Work undertaken during 2007 included: (1) Starting 1 new fencing project in the NFJD subbasin that will protect an additional 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat; (2) Constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa River to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) Planting 22,100 plants along 3 streams totaling 3.6 stream miles; (4) Establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; (7) Initiated writing of a comprehensive project summary report that will present a summary of conclusions of the benefits to focal species and management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 56 individual projects have been implemented, monitored and maintained along 84.8 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams that protect and enhance 3,501 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H.

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

warhead protection  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1%2A en Office of Nuclear Warhead Protection http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-0

111

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Impacts of marine-derived nutrients on stream ecosystem functioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...productivity of these aquatic ecosystems and decrease further...standing MDN effects on ecosystem functioning in terms...of salmon-related aquatic and riparian ecosystems, in terms of salmon habitat protection and restoration, and fisheries exploitation...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nonindigenous brook trout and the demise of Pacific salmon: a forgotten threat?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...freshwater ecosystems are among...decline of aquatic and riparian...charged with restoration of the flora...protection and restoration are the centrepieces...that habitat restoration aimed at...fishes in aquatic ecosystems. In Uses...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned (Presentation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aquatic Species Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned AFOSR Workshop Washington, D.C. February 19-21, 2008 Sponsored by Air Force Office of Science Eric E. Jarvis, Ph.D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Bioenergy Center eric_jarvis@nrel.gov NREL/PR-510-43232 The ASP Didn't Invent the Concept of Fuels from Algae...  Algae for methane (via anaerobic digestion) * Meier (1955); UC Berkeley 1957-59 (Oswald and Golueke) * Wastewater use, recycling of CO 2 and nutrients  Revival during Energy Crisis of 1970's * Uziel et al. (1975); Benemann et al. (1976-80) * Still focused on methane and hydrogen * Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) * Later DOE (SERI founded in 1977) ...But the ASP Took the Concept to the Next Level  Supported work at SERI/NREL and through

115

Habitat for Humanity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Habitat for Humanity Habitat for Humanity Jump to: navigation, search Name Habitat for Humanity Place Americus, GA Website http://www.habitat.org/ References NREL Technical Report: Zero Energy Home[1] Fact Sheet: Zero Energy Demonstration Home[2] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration Partnership Year 2005 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Habitat for Humanity is a company located in Americus, GA. References ↑ "NREL Technical Report: Zero Energy Home" ↑ "Fact Sheet: Zero Energy Demonstration Home" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Habitat_for_Humanity&oldid=38172

116

The Great Lakes comprise the largest freshwater ecosystem on Earth. The restoration and protection of the Great Lakes is vital as they contain 95 percent of the surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Great Lakes comprise the largest freshwater ecosystem on Earth. The restoration and protection and Beach Forecasting* · Identifying Land Use Tipping Points that Threaten Great Lakes Ecosystems* Aquatic Invasive Species · Great Lakes Aquatic Nuisance Species Information System Expansion* · Regional Ecosystem

117

John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 2008 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.

Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool Author Western Governors' Association Published...

119

Integrating Deer, Quail and Turkey Habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the proper management strategies, white-tailed deer, bobwhite quail and Rio Grande turkey habitat can be integrated in one wildlife enterprise....

Lyons, Robert K.; Ginnett, Tim F.

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Toxicological benchmarks for screening potential contaminants of concern for effects on aquatic biota: 1996 revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents potential screening benchmarks for protection of aquatic life form contaminants in water. Because there is no guidance for screening for benchmarks, a set of alternative benchmarks is presented herein. This report presents the alternative benchmarks for chemicals that have been detected on the Oak Ridge Reservation. It also presents the data used to calculate the benchmarks and the sources of the data. It compares the benchmarks and discusses their relative conservatism and utility. Also included is the updates of benchmark values where appropriate, new benchmark values, secondary sources are replaced by primary sources, and a more complete documentation of the sources and derivation of all values are presented.

Suter, G.W. II [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tsao, C.L. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). School of the Environment] [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). School of the Environment

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Light and photosynthesis in aquatic ecosystems (J. T. O. Kirk ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light and photosynthesis in aquatic ecosystems. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cam- bridge and New York. 401 p. $82.50. Although they symbiotically appear in...

122

Fire Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Standard was developed to provide acceptable methods and approaches for meeting DOE fire protection program and design requirements and to address special or unique fire protection issues at DOE facilities that are not comprehensively or adequately addressed in national consensus standards or other design criteria.

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

123

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF HEAVY METAL POLLUTION IN NATURAL AQUATIC SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

He who taught the use of the pen, Taught man that which he knew not" The distribution of heavy metals between soil and soil solutions is a key issue in evaluating the environmental impact of long term applications of heavy metals to land. Contamination of soils by heavy metals has been reported by many workers. Metal adsorption is affected by many factors, including soil pH, clay mineralogy, abundance of oxides and organic matter, soil composition and solution ionic strength. The pH is one of the many factors affecting mobility of heavy metals in soils and it is likely to be the most easily managed and the most significant. To provide the appropriate level of protection for aquatic life and other uses of the resource, it is important to be able to predict the environmental distribution of important metals on spatial and temporal scales and to do so with particular emphasis on the water column concentrations. Regulatory levels reflected in water quality criteria or standards are based on

Muhammad Rehan Tayab

124

Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

125

Dispersing brush mice prefer habitat like home  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Dispersing brush mice prefer habitat like home Karen E Mabry * Judy A Stamps * Author...habitat similar to that at our study site, home ranges were 0.11-0.15ha, and no between-sex difference in adult home range size was detected (Kalcounis-Ruppell...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Habitat Quality and Anadromous Fish Production on the Warm Springs Reservation. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The number of anadromous fish returning to the Columbia River and its tributaries has declined sharply in recent years. Changes in their freshwater, estuarine, and ocean environments and harvest have all contributed to declining runs of anadromous fish. Restoration of aquatic resources is of paramount importance to the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs (CTWS) Reservation of Oregon. Watersheds on the Warm Springs Reservation provide spawning and rearing habitat for several indigenous species of resident and anadromous fish. These streams are the only ones in the Deschutes River basin that still sustain runs of wild spring chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus, tshawytscha. Historically, reservation streams supplied over 169 km of anadromous fish habitat. Because of changes in flows, there are now only 128 km of habitat that can be used on the reservation. In 1981, the CTWS began a long-range, 3-phase study of existing and potential fish resources on the reservation. The project, consistent with the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program, was designed to increase the natural production of anadromous salmonids on the reservation.

Fritsch, Mark A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

1 -SUBTIDAL 2 -INTERTIDAL RB ROCK UB UNCONSOLIDATED AB AQUATIC BED RF -REEF OW -OPEN WATER/ AB AQUATIC BED RF REEF RS ROCKY SHORE US -UNCONSOLIDATED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M - MARINE 1 - SUBTIDAL 2 - INTERTIDAL RB ­ ROCK UB ­ UNCONSOLIDATED AB ­ AQUATIC BED RF - REEF OW - OPEN WATER/ AB ­ AQUATIC BED RF­ REEF RS ­ ROCKY SHORE US - UNCONSOLIDATED BOTTOM BOTTOM Unknown Bottom ­ UNCONSOLIDATED AB ­ AQUATIC RF ­ REEF OW - OPEN WATER/ AB ­ AQUATIC RF­ REEF SB ­ STREAMBED RS - ROCKY US

Gray, Matthew

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant species Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 46: 2008. 1 J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 46: 1-7 Summary: % of the fish species listed in the Endangered Spe- cies Act (Lassuy 1994). Invasive aquatic plant...

129

Cattail Protection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cattail Protection Cattail Protection Name: Julie Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is a piece of land protected by cattails protected? (Meaning you can not touch, cover up or build on.) Replies: Hi Julie, It's quite possible that a piece of land with cattails is protected as a wetland. There are some federal (and probably state) statutes on wetland protection, in general you have to file environmental impact statements and such. I've heard of cases where some large projects were allowed to encroach on wetlands when the builders signed contracts requiring they construct a wetland of equivalent size on another parcel of land. Donald Yee Ph.D. I assume you are referring to wetlands protections. Cattails are wetland plants, and there are regulations governing - but not necessarily preventing - the development of wetlands, but cattails are also aggressive and somewhat weedy, so I doubt the presence of cattails alone would be sufficient to call an area a wetland. This is a technical question which all too often lands in legal dispute. Check with the Corps of Engineers, the EPA, and other experts in wetlands delineation and regulation.

130

Alaska Fish Habitat Permit Application | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form: Alaska Fish Habitat Permit Application Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Fish Habitat Permit Organization Alaska Department of Fish and Game Published Publisher Not...

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic effects subgroups Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

underwater is to use oxygen... Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity Aquatic Insect Biodiversity and Conservation J. Reese... on the planet. While most insects live on land,...

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic vegetation stressors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Causal Diagnosis and Prediction Summary: aquatic organisms, ranging from algae to fish, have been mechanistically linked to environmental stressors... examples of aquatic...

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant control Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crafts 1973). Bartley and Gangstad (1974) reported that for aquatic plant control, acrolein... al. 1989). Fluridone is used to control a variety of aquatic plant species in...

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic humic substances Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-accepting capacity than humic substances extracted from aquatic sediments. and sediment humic substances had more... electron-accepting capacity than dissolved aquatic humic...

135

SRO-NERP -7 Studies of Aquatic and Terrestria I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(affiliated with the University of Georgia), the Savannah River Laboratory (operated by E. 1. du Pont deSRO-NERP - 7 Studies of Aquatic and Terrestria I Environments of the Savannah River Plant, South OF THE AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT, SOUTH CAROLINA: A BIBLIOGRAPHY James G

Georgia, University of

136

Evaluation of the Aquatic Ecotoxicology of Fullerenes and Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of the Aquatic Ecotoxicology of Fullerenes and Nanotubes of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes on aquatic organisms. The number of papers published on this topic is not very high and there are differences in the scientific quality. Fullerenes and carbon nanotubes appear

Fischlin, Andreas

137

Postgraduate Overview MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postgraduate Overview MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER) New programme established to strengthen;1. Aims, Outcomes & Assessment 1.1. Overall Aims The MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER) is closely, rather than by formal tuition in the lecture theatre. In essence then, AER melds both UK and European

Chittka, Lars

138

Aquatic Chemistry Course Id: CHEM 605 (3 cr.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Chemistry Fall 2010 Course Id: CHEM 605 (3 cr.) Lecture: TR 3:40-5:20pm, REIC 165 of this course is to introduce students to the concepts and models used in aquatic chemistry while providing-base chemistry, complexation, precipitation-dissolution and reduction-oxidation reactions. Student Learning

Wagner, Diane

139

Protective Force  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes requirements for management and operation of the DOE Protective Force (PF), establishes requirements for firearms operations and defines the firearms courses of fire. Cancels: DOE M 473.2-1A DOE M 473.2-2

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

140

Physical Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B.

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Physical Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Chg 1, dated 3/7/06. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

Protective Force  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual establishes requirements for management and operation of the DOE Protective Force, establishes requirements for firearms operations and defines the firearms courses of fire. Chg 1 dated 3/7/06. DOE M 470.4-3A cancels DOE M 470.4-3, Chg 1, Protective Force, dated 3-7-06, Attachment 2, Contractor Requirement Document (CRD) only (except for Section C). Chg 1, dated 3-7-06, cancels DOE M 470.4-3

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

143

Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

Konopacky, Richard C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contractual obligations with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's (ODFW), Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program (Program). The Program works cooperatively with private landowners to develop long-term restoration, under which, passive and active Habitat Improvement Projects are conducted. Historically, projects have included livestock exclusion fencing (passive restoration) to protect riparian habitats, along with the installation of instream structures (active restoration) to address erosion and improve fish habitat. In recent years, the focus of active restoration has shifted to bioengineering treatments and, more recently, to channel re-design and reconstruction aimed at improving fish habitat, by restoring stable channel function. This report provides a summary of Program activities for the 2004 calendar year (January 1 through December 31, 2004), within each of the four main project phases, including: (1) Implementation--Pre-Work, (2) Implementation--On Site Development, (3) Operation and Maintenance, and (4) Monitoring and Evaluation. This report also summarizes Program Administrative, Interagency Coordination, and Public Education activities.

St. Hilaire, Danny R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

DOE-STD-1153-2002; A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 METHODS DERIVATION MODULE 3: METHODS DERIVATION DOE-STD-1153-2002 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1153-2002 M3-1 1 Introduction and Basis for the Approach The Department of Energy (DOE) currently has in place a radiation dose limit of 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for the protection of aquatic organisms (DOE Order 5400.5), and has proposed dose limits for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms. These limits are: 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for aquatic animals; 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for terrestrial plants; and 0.1 rad/d (1 mGy/d) for terrestrial animals. Because the biota protection limits are dose-based, a calculational method is needed to demonstrate compliance. In theory, derived radionuclide concentration limits for environmental media (e.g., Biota Concentration Guides, BCGs, for water, sediment, or soil) provide a relatively straightforward and simple means to do so. However, because of the

147

USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-152. 1995. 141 Inland Habitat Suitability for the Marbled Murrelet in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was to the Marbled Murrelet population. Following the 1989 Exxon Valdez Oil spill, the protection of habitat surveys were conducted on Afognak Island, north of Kodiak Island (Cody and Gerlach 1993, U.S. Fish included sur- vey date, location relative to the head of a bay, elevation, slope, aspect, percentage

Standiford, Richard B.

148

towards a better knowledge of sparse habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is largely governed by the Habitats Directive, whose objectives are promoting the maintenance of biodiversity landscape units of the National Inventory of the Landscape in Sweden (NILS). To gather sufficient

149

Fish Habitat Regulations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Fish Habitat Regulations Author Alaska Department of Fish & Game Published Alaska Department of Fish &...

150

Using Livestock to Manage Wildlife Habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock grazing can be an effective tool in managing wildlife habitat. This publication explains how grazing affects various wildlife species such as white-tailed deer, bobwhite quail and turkeys, and how to select the type of livestock needed...

Lyons, Robert K.; Wright, Byron D.

2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

151

MODELING NEKTON HABITAT USE IN GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING NEKTON HABITAT USE IN GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS: AN APPROACH TO DEFINE ESSENTIAL FISH HABITAT IN GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS: AN APPROACH TO DEFINE ESSENTIAL FISH HABITAT (EFH) Project Team: Randall D. Clark.A. Matthews. 1999. Modeling nekton habitat selection in Galveston Bay, Texas: An approach to define essential

152

Fire Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1066-2012 December 2012 _______________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1066-99 DOE STANDARD FIRE PROTECTION U.S. Department of Energy AREA FIRP Washington, DC 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1066-2012 FOREWORD This Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD) supersedes DOE-STD-1066-99 1 and is approved for use by DOE and its contractors. The following fire protection standard is canceled with the issuance of this Standard and appropriate technical content was incorporated into this Standard:  DOE-STD-1088-95, Fire Protection for Relocatable Structures

153

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ERDC/ELTR-04-5 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-04-5 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in Cooper Lake/EL TR-04-5 May 2004 Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in Cooper Lake, Texas: A Case Study Gary Owen Dick, R. Michael Smart, JoEtta K. Smith Lewisville Aquatic Ecosystem Research Facility U.S. Army Engineer Research

US Army Corps of Engineers

155

ERDC/ELTR-04-6 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-04-6 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in El Dorado/EL TR-04-6 May 2004 Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in El Dorado Lake, Kansas: A Case Study Gary Owen Dick, R. Michael Smart Lewisville Aquatic Ecosystem Research Facility U.S. Army Engineer Research

US Army Corps of Engineers

156

ERDC/ELTR-04-7 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-04-7 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in Arcadia Research Program ERDC/EL TR-04-7 May 2004 Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in Arcadia Lake, Oklahoma: A Case Study Gary Owen Dick, R. Michael Smart, Eugene R. Gilliland Lewisville Aquatic Ecosystem Research

US Army Corps of Engineers

157

Physical Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of interests under the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) purview ranging from facilities, buildings, Government property, and employees to national security interests such as classified information, special nuclear material (SNM), and nuclear weapons. Cancels Section A of DOE M 470.4-2 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

158

Nowzari et al. Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25 Nowzari et al. · Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD ASS (EQUUS HEMIONUS ONAGER) IN QA- TROUYEH NATIONAL PARK, IRAN HANIYEH NOWZARI, Department of Environment, Abadeh Branch, Islamic Azad University, Abadeh, Iran. Address: No.475, 90 alley, Ghasrodasht Av

Rubenstein, Daniel I.

159

GHG Emissions from Boreal Reservoirs and Natural Aquatic Ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) gross fluxes were measured at the air-water interface of 205 aquatic ecosystems in the Canadian boreal region from 1993 to 2003. Fluxes were obtained wi...

Alain Tremblay; Jean Therrien; Bill Hamlin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

John M. Epifanio -Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

John M. Epifanio - Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology Illinois Natural History Survey 607 AND ACADEMIC INTERESTS Conservation Genetics & Molecular Ecology ­ Examination of structure & function Ecology, Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS). 2000 - 2001 Assistant National Program Leader. Fisheries

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Postgraduate Overview MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postgraduate Overview MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER) Established programme to strengthen in the laboratory or field, rather than by formal tuition in the lecture theatre. In essence then, AER melds both UK

Chittka, Lars

162

Aquatic primary production in a high-CO2 world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic primary production in a high-CO2 world Etienne Low-De´carie, Gregor F. Fussmann, and Graham-Penfield, Montreal, QC, H3A 1B1, Canada Here, we provide a review of the direct effect of increas- ing CO2 on aquatic: the assessment of theories about limitation of productivity and the integration of CO2 into the co

Fussman, Gregor

163

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program, 1996-2003 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contractual obligations with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's (ODFW), Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program (Program). The last Annual Program Report was submitted in 1997, and described projects undertaken in 1995. This report describes Program activities carried out in 2003, along with a summary of projects undertaken during the years 1996 through 2002. The Program works cooperatively with private landowners to develop long-term restoration agreements, under which, passive and active Habitat Improvement Projects are conducted. Historically, projects have included livestock exclusion fencing (passive restoration) to protect riparian habitats, along with the installation of instream structures (active restoration) to address erosion and improve fish habitat. In recent years, the focus of active restoration has shifted to bioengineering treatments and, more recently, to channel re-design and re-construction aimed at improving fish habitat, by restoring stable channel function. This report provides a summary table of past projects (1996-2002), along with a text description of more extensive habitat improvement projects, including: (1) Implementation of a four-phased project on the Lobato property (Birch Creek) beginning in 1996 and involving a demonstration bioengineering site and riparian improvements (fencing, planting), (2) Implementation of stable channel design/instream structure placement on the Houser property, East Birch Creek, beginning in 1998, an (3) Implementation of a joint, US Army Corps of Engineers/ODFW (cost share) project beginning in 2001 on the Brogoitti property, East Birch Creek, which involved implementation of stable channel design/construction and riparian improvement treatments.

St. Hilaire, Danny R.; Montgomery, Michael; Bailey, Timothy D. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

DOE-STD-1153-2002; A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATION MODULE 1: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATION DOE-STD-1153-2002 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1153-2002 M1-1 1 Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is accountable to Congress and the public for the safe conduct of its activities, including facility operation, waste management and disposal activities, and remediation of environmental contamination. These routine activities may result in releases of radionuclides to the air and water, accumulation of radionuclides in soil and sediment, and the potential for plants, animals, and members of the public to be exposed to radiation. DOE Order 5400.5, "Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment" (1990a), lists the environmental radiation protection requirements that DOE and DOE- contractor employees must meet to protect aquatic animals. In addition, dose limits below

165

Submerged aquatic vegetation and bulrush in Lake Okeechobee as indicators of greater Everglades ecosystem restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lake Okeechobee, Florida, located in the middle of the larger Kissimmee River-Lake Okeechobee-Everglades ecosystem in South Florida, serves a variety of ecosystem and water management functions including fish and wildlife habitat, flood control, water supply, and source water for environmental restoration. As a result, the ecological status of Lake Okeechobee plays a significant role in defining the overall success of the greater Everglades ecosystem restoration initiative. One of the major ecological indicators of Lake Okeechobee condition focuses on the near-shore and littoral zone regions as characterized by the distribution and abundance of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and giant bulrush (Scirpus californicus (C.A. Mey.) Steud.). The objective of this study is to present a stoplight restoration report card communication system, common to all 11 indicators noted in this special journal issue, as a means to convey the status of SAV and bulrush in Lake Okeechobee. The report card could be used by managers, policy makers, scientists and the public to effectively evaluate and distill information about the ecological status in South Florida. Our assessment of the areal distribution of SAV in Lake Okeechobee is based on a combination of empirical SAV monitoring and output from a SAV habitat suitability model. Bulrush status in the lake is related to a suitability index linked to adult survival and seedling establishment metrics. Overall, presentation of these performance metrics in a stoplight format enables an evaluation of how the status of two major components of Lake Okeechobee relates to the South Florida restoration program, and how the status of the lake influences restoration efforts in South Florida.

Matthew C. Harwell; Bruce Sharfstein

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fsh Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project continued to identify impacted stream reaches throughout the Umatilla River Basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public outreach efforts, biological and physical monitoring, and continued development of a Umatilla River Basin Watershed Assessment assisted the project in fostering public cooperation, targeting habitat deficiencies and determining habitat recovery measures. Habitat enhancement projects continued to be maintained on 44 private properties, four riparian easements and one in-stream enhancement agreement were secured, two new projects implemented and two existing projects improved to enhance anadromous fish habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities in the Umatilla River Basin. New project locations included sites on the mid Umatilla River and Buckaroo Creek. Improvements were implemented at existing project sites on the upper Umatilla River and Wildhorse Creek. A stream bank stabilization project was implemented at approximately River Mile 37.4 Umatilla River to stabilize 760 feet of eroding stream bank and improve in-stream habitat diversity. Habitat enhancements at this site included construction of six rock barbs with one large conifer root wad incorporated into each barb, stinging approximately 10,000 native willow cuttings, planting 195 tubling willows and 1,800 basin wildrye grass plugs, and seeding 40 pounds of native grass seed. Staff time to assist in development of a subcontract and fence materials were provided to establish eight spring sites for off-stream watering and to protect wetlands within the Buckaroo Creek Watershed. A gravel bar was moved and incorporated into an adjacent point bar to reduce stream energy and stream channel confinement within the existing project area at River Mile 85 Umatilla River. Approximately 10,000 native willow cuttings were stung and trenched into the stream channel margins and stream banks, and 360 basin wildrye grass plugs planted and 190 pounds of native grass seed broadcast on terraces between River Mile 10 and 12.5 within the existing Wildhorse Creek Project Area. Approximately 70 pounds of native grasses were seeded in the existing McKay Creek Project Area at approximately River Mile 21.5. Financial and in-kind cost share assistance was provided by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Fish and Wildlife Federation and the Umatilla National Forest for the enhancements at River Mile 37.4 Umatilla River and within the Buckaroo Creek Watershed. Monitoring continued to quantify effects of habitat enhancements in the upper basin. Maximum, minimum and average daily stream temperatures were collected from June through September at 22 sites. Suspended sediment samples were obtained at three gage stations to arrive at daily sediment load estimates. Photographs were taken at 94 existing and two newly established photo points to document habitat recovery. Umatilla Basin Watershed Assessment efforts were continued under a subcontract with Washington State University. This endeavor involves compiling existing information, identifying data gaps, determining habitat-limiting factors and recommending actions to improve anadromous fisheries habitat. This watershed assessment document and working databases will be completed in fiscal year 2002 and made available to assist project personnel with sub-watershed prioritization of habitat needs.

Shaw, R. Todd

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous species habitat Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

species habitat Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Predicting the distribution of anadromous fish in fresh water using habitat models Steve Lindley Summary: , critical habitat, and...

168

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadronous fish habitat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anadronous fish habitat Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anadronous fish habitat Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Habitat Management:...

169

Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

170

Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2008. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting wetlands plugs at sites on Spring Creek (Head-waters). Many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). Physical sampling during 2008 included sediment and depth measurements (SADMS) in Spring Creek at the Car Removal site. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for 5 strata on Spring Creek. Water temperature and chemistry were monitored monthly on Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Diggie Creek, and Portneuf (Jimmy Drinks) and Blackfoot rivers. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in five reservation streams which included nine sites. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Spring Creek series remained relatively low, however, there was an increase of biomass overall since 1993. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were similar to 2006, and 2007, however, as in years past, high densities of macrophytes make it very difficult to see fry in addition to lack of field technicians. Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams stayed the same as 2007 at 1.5/hr. Numbers of fish larger than 18-inches caught by anglers increased from 2007 at .20 to .26/hr.

Osborne, Hunter [Shoshone Bannock Tribes

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

171

Integrative studies of thermoregulation in ectothermic vertebrates in aquatic habitats. Annual progress report, 1 October 1980-30 September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field experiments are underway to determine the behavioral mechanisms by which largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, respond to rapid temperature changes in their natural environment. Laboratory experiments are clarifying the relationship between basking behavior of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta and its nutritional state. Important progress has been made in the development and miniaturization of a multichannel, temperature sensing, radio transmitter for fish. Theoretical analysis and mathematical modeling have defined the realized and fundamental climate space of P. scripta and allows the prediction of the behavior of this turtle.

Spotila, J R

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Causes of habitat loss in a Neotropical landscape: The Panama Canal corridor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied drivers of habitat conversion in the Panama Canal region, where rich biodiversity in tropical rainforests currently coexists with two major growing cities and a plethora of economic opportunities. We examined existing administrative units (counties) with known biophysical (e.g., rainfall, topography) and socio-economic (e.g., population density, road density) characteristics. To identify associations between those characteristics and likelihood of habitat conversion to agriculture or urbanization, we used canonical correlation analysis. Two axes accounted for most of the variation among administrative units: one for urbanization and the other for agriculture. Rainfall and topography were negatively associated with urbanization, whereas population wealth was positively associated with land conversion to urban. Agriculture was most strongly associated with elevation variability and topographic complexity. To a lesser extent, agriculture was associated with rural population density, mean annual human population growth and poverty level. We hypothesize that most future habitat loss in the Panama Canal region will be from urbanization as Panama City expands and populations grow along the highway system. Decision-makers will need to emphasize preservation of forests on the edge of developments, where risk of loss is highest. These forested lands tend to become more expensive as urbanization approaches, putting them at greater risk of being converted. Nevertheless, they are still important for protection of the Canal watershed and the high levels of biodiversity in watershed forests. Land planners and decision-makers should consider the influence of socio-economic and biophysical factors when selecting forests to protect for conservation.

Ghislain Rompr; W. Douglas Robinson; Andr Desrochers

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

An Analysis of Hybrid Life Support Systems for Sustainable Habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of sustainable habitats on Earth, on other planetary surfaces, and in space, has motivated strategic planning with respect to life support (LS) system technology development and habitat design. Such planning ...

Shaw, Margaret Miller

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

Berger, Matthew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Classification of Seafloor Habitats using Genetic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitats. The initial motivation to use GP for this task came from a work on diesel engine diagnosis [11 for Marine Science and Technology Curtin University of Technology GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia y understand- ing of the acoustic backscatter from marine macro-benthos (MMB), including mainly seagrass, algae

Fernandez, Thomas

176

Glasgow and Clyde Valley Integrated Habitat Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of expert stakeholder workshops. The model outputs are GIS maps that can be used to assess habitats and how & Clyde Valley Green Network Partnership 7th November 2008 All maps reproduced from Ordnance Survey using digital data on a geographic information system (GIS) to identify IHNs in the GCV area

177

Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects in British Columbia By Matthew Justice B of Resource Management (Planning) Title of Project: Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects #12;ABSTRACT This research explores the motivations of volunteers within fish-habitat rehabilitation

178

Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

www.pdx.edu/recreation/aquatics Registration is limited to 5 participants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SWIM CLINICS www.pdx.edu/recreation/aquatics Registration is limited to 5 participants. Register at the Rec Center Member Services counter. AQUATICS www.pdx.edu/recreation/aquaticsw w w . p d x . e d u / r

Bertini, Robert L.

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic management options Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

30 ERDCELTR-05-4 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program Summary: and ponds may have lost their aquatic flora due to chronic disturbance or long-term vegetation management......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophyte ecotoxicology Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aquatic macrophytes. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 41: 497-501. CARPENTER, S. R... . Freshw. Biol. 39: 689-697. PENNAK, R. W. 1973. Some evidence for ... Source: Notre Dame,...

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic organisms submitted Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology ; Physics ; Biology and Medicine 99 1 -SUBTIDAL 2 -INTERTIDAL RB ROCK UB UNCONSOLIDATED AB AQUATIC BED RF -REEF OW -OPEN WATER AB AQUATIC BED RF REEF RS ROCKY SHORE US...

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophytes eicchornia Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aquatic macrophytes eicchornia Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Aquatic Botany, 341--370 341 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.,...

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophyte modeling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aquatic macrophyte modeling Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Aquatic Botany, 341--370 341 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.,...

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophyte detritus Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aquatic macrophyte detritus Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Aquatic Botany, 341--370 341 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.,...

186

Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about these threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77.12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2001 field season (March to November, 2001).

Mendel, Glen Wesley; Trump, Jeremy; Karl, David

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic organisms potential Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

management decisions... . Aquatic plants stabilize shorelines, prevent sediment resuspension, and alter ... Source: Mississippi State University, Center for Advanced Vehicular...

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic contaminants alter Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENHANCEMENT Summary: . Aquatic plants stabilize shorelines, prevent sediment resuspension, and alter the redox potential... ENHANCEMENT PROJECTS Pages in Study: 113...

189

Aquatic Ecology 36: 8595, 2002. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Ecology 36: 85­95, 2002. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 85

190

John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work undertaken in 2005 included: (1) Four new fence projects were completed thereby protecting 7.55 miles of stream with 9.1 miles of new riparian fence (2) Fence removal 1.7 miles of barbed wire. (3) Completed three spring developments (repair work on two BLM springs on Cottonwood Creek (Dayville), 1 solar on Rock Creek/ Collins property). (4) Dredge tail leveling completed on 0.9 miles of the Middle Fork of the John Day River (5) Cut, hauled and placed 30 junipers on Indian Creek/Kuhl property for bank stability. (6) Collected and planted 1500 willow cuttings on Mountain Creek/Jones property. (7) Conducted steelhead redd counts on Lake Cr./Hoover property and Cottonwood Cr./Mascall properties (8) Seeded 200 lbs of native grass seed on projects where the sites were disturbed by fence construction activities. (9) Maintenance of all active project fences (72.74 miles), watergaps (60), spring developments (30) were checked and repairs performed. (10) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Program in 1984 we have installed 156.06 miles of riparian fence on leased property protecting 88.34 miles of anadromous fish bearing stream. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement Projects from 1996-2001, where the landowner received the materials, built and maintained the project we have a total of 230.92 miles of fence protecting 144.7 miles of stream and 3285 acres of riparian habitat.

Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Delano, Kenneth H. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

MHK Technologies/Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy VIVACE.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Vortex Hydro Energy LLC Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Michigan Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Reciprocating Device Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy) device is based on the extensively studied phenomenon of Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed five-hundred years ago by Leonardo DaVinci in the form of 'Aeolian Tones.' VIV results from vortices forming and shedding on the downstream side of a bluff body in a current. Vortex shedding alternates from one side to the other, thereby creating a vibration or oscillation. The VIV phenomenon is non-linear, which means it can produce useful energy at high efficiency over a wide range of current speeds and directions.This converter is unlike any existing technology, as it does not use turbines, propellers, or dams. VIVACE converts the horizontal hydrokinetic energy of currents into cylinder mechanical energy. The latter is then converted to electricity through electric power generators.

192

Student Recreation and Wellness Center Campus Recreational Services -Aquatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 UNLV Student Recreation and Wellness Center Campus Recreational Services - Aquatics Assumption, ___________________________________, understand and agree that the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (hereinafter "UNLV") Student Recreation, earn a living, engage in other business, social and recreational activities and generally to enjoy life

Hemmers, Oliver

193

Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic Ecosystems: The Role of Organic The distribution between sediments and water plays a key role in the food-chain transfer of hydrophobic organic chemicals. Current models and assessment methods of sediment-water distribution predominantly rely

Gobas, Frank

194

Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity Turtle Biodiversity and Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity Turtle Biodiversity and Conservation Joseph C. Mitchell of these are freshwater species, including the well- known box turtles that are primarily terrestrial. Of the remaining species, three are tortoises and five are marine (sea) turtles. Turtles are found worldwide except

Liskiewicz, Maciej

195

Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood Products Using Batch Leaching Tests leaching tests. The wood preservatives included chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quaternary, copper boron azole, copper citrate, and copper dimeth- yldithiocarbamate. An unpreserved wood sample

Florida, University of

196

Protecting Life on Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to thePeter B. Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to theof Protecting Life on Earth is to explain to an intelligent

Anderson, Byron P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

or performed by DOE employees, addresses the protection of human subjects. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) supports DOE in its efforts to protect...

198

Office of Physical Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Physical Protection is comprised of a team of security specialists engaged in providing Headquarters-wide physical protection.

199

FW 400 Conservation of Fish in Aquatic Ecosystems Lectures: TR 10-10:50 am 132 Wagar Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FW 400 Conservation of Fish in Aquatic Ecosystems Fall 2012 Lectures: TR 10-10:50 am 132 Wagar to understanding and restoring global aquatic biodiversity and fishery resources. Island Press, Covello, CA. Course aquatic organisms and the aquatic ecosystems that sustain them, 2) physical and biotic processes

200

Developing conservation plan for the Edwards Aquifer: Stakeholders reach consensus resolution to balance protection of endangered species and water use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fall 2012 tx H2O 17 Story by Courtney Smith ] Comal and San Marcos springs are the only known habitats for eight federally listed threatened or endangered species. Photo courtesy of the Edwards Aquifer Authority. What does it take... Aquifer region of Texas achieved a milestone in a struggle that has lasted nearly six decades. Working together, participants in the Edwards Aquifer Recovery Implementation Program (EARIP) developed a habitat conservation plan that will protect...

Smith, Courtney

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

202

Habitat Variability and Complexity in the Upper San Francisco Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be found in the salinity gradients of Suisun Marsh (diverse habitats and gradients in salinity, depth, and othershowed a strong gradient in salinity and other variables,

Moyle, Peter B; Lund, Jay R.; Bennett, William A; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A habitat-use model to determine essential fish habitat for juvenile brown shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Farfantepenaeus aztecus) in Galveston Bay, Texas Randall D. Clark John D. Christensen Mark E. Monaco Biogeography Fisheries Science Center Laboratory National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA Galveston, Texas 77550- terns of habitat use in Galveston Bay, Texas. Sixteen years of quantitative density data were used

204

Microsoft Word - Aquatic_Invasive_Mussels_Monitoring_CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovations - ST-3 Innovations - ST-3 Matt DeLong Contract Specialist for Technology Innovation Projects - NSSP-4 Proposed Action: Aquatic Invasive Mussels Monitoring Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B3.1 - Site characterization and environmental monitoring Location: Columbia River Basin Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to partially fund the expansion of ongoing research and monitoring efforts on the potential spread and impact of aquatic invasive mussels in the Columbia River Basin through BPA's Fiscal Year 2013 Technology Innovation Portfolio. Washington State University Vancouver would conduct the enhanced research and monitoring efforts with co-sponsorship from the U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research

205

Predators and distance between habitat patches modify gap crossing behaviour of juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, L. 1758)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When habitat refugia is fragmented and limited, movement of potential prey animals between patches of protective habitat may be driven by biotic factors including foraging opportunities, risk of predation mortality, as well as density effects. However, few studies have examined these factors in marine landscapes. We examined gap crossing behaviour of juvenile Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L. 1758, a species with high mortality throughout its juvenile stage. We examined the effect of inter-patch distance, fish length, group size, and the presence of a predator on gap crossing behaviour by juvenile cod in a 12נ3m experimental arena. Habitat patches consisting of artificial eelgrass were positioned within the arena with inter-patch distances of 3.0m and 7.5m. We observed a 37% reduction in frequency of gap crossing movements at larger distances compared to small ones. At the greater inter-patch distance, fish delayed departing a patch, depending on average group size. Juvenile fish released into a patch with a nearby predator moved across gaps 75% less frequently than fish originating in a predator-free patch. We also found that the presence of a predator delayed fish departure from a patch, again depending on group size. Our study demonstrates a suite of complex behavioural mechanisms that juvenile cod may exhibit to reduce predation risk as they navigate a landscape of fragmented habitat patches.

Mary R. Ryan; Shaun S. Killen; Robert S. Gregory; Paul V.R. Snelgrove

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Mathematical analysis of the optimal habitat configurations for species persistence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

susceptible to internal and external extinction factors. These theoretical results are supported that they are of two main types - ball-shaped or stripe-shaped. We formally prove that these optimal shapes depend that the optimal shape of the habitat realises a compromise between reducing the detrimental habitat edge effects

Hamel, François

207

RESEARCH ARTICLE Habitat variables explain Loggerhead Shrike occurrence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are the spatial scales of habitat associations relevant to this species? Our study area was Fort Bliss Army are indicative of habitat quality in the vicinity of Fort Bliss. Local- and intermediate-scale variables best B. A. Locke Á D. Bash DPW, Division of Environment, IMWE-PWD-E, Bldg 624, Pleasanton Rd, Fort Bliss

Radeloff, Volker C.

208

Research Article Nesting Habitat Characteristics of the Marbled Murrelet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Article Nesting Habitat Characteristics of the Marbled Murrelet in Central California 94720, USA Abstract The marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) is a threatened seabird that nests published on murrelet nesting habitat in the coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) region. Here we present

Mladenoff, David

209

HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

31 HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1 Department that the density of animals in a habitat #12;MEASURING HABITAT QUALITY · Johnson Trans. W. Sect. Wildl. Soc. 41

Johnson, Matthew

210

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, Supplement C, White River Habitat Inventory, 1983 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 130 miles of stream fish habitat was inventoried and evaluated on the Mt. Hood National Forest during the first year of this multi-year project. First year tasks included field inventory and evaluation of habitat conditions on the White River and tributary streams thought to have the highest potential for supporting anadromous fish populations. All streams inventoried were located on the Mt. Hood National Forest. The surveyed area appears to contain most of the high quality anadromous fish habitat in the drainage. Habitat conditions appear suitable for steelhead, coho, and chinook salmon, and possibly sockeye. One hundred and twenty-four miles of potential anadromous fish habitat were identifed in the survey. Currently, 32 miles of this habitat would be readily accessible to anadromous fish. An additional 72 miles of habitat could be accessed with only minor passage improvement work. About 20 miles of habitat, however, will require major investment to provide fish passage. Three large lakes (Boulder, 14 acres; Badger, 45 acres; Clear, 550 acres) appear to be well-suited for rearing anadromous fish, although passage enhancement would be needed before self-sustaining runs could be established in any of the lakes.

Heller, David

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Influence of grazing management on population attributes, habitats, and habitat selection of bobwhites in south Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

grazing systems on La Copita Research Area, Jim Wells County, Texas. 51 Pooled within-groups correlations between habitat variables and discriminant scores produced by canonical discriminant analysis for two separate comparisons of available and quail... slapped reality into me and Dr. Folse helped me to comprehend some complex analyses. Ben Koerth, Jim Mutz, Dave McKown, James Tepera, Dave Martin, and Chafer Lite kept my spirits high and my tail in gear while I was doing my field work. Ben's advice...

Wilkins, Robert Neal

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic invertebrate communities Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of aquatic invertebrate communities in subfossil death assemblages sampled along a salinity gradient... are preserved in lake sediments. Several groups of ... Source: Bern,...

213

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC SEDIMENTS. A smaller organic contaminant database indicates sediment PAH levels exceed probable effect level criteria

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic toxicology research Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Toxicology... and toxicology in the assessment and modelling of aquatic ... Source: Saskatchewan, University of - Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Plasma Physics...

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecology monitoring Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a wide variety of research and development efforts supported by many different partners. Broad-based Summary: Vertebrate Ecology Research Interests: aquatic population and...

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic insect assemblages Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Summary: food re- source for both weakly electric fish assemblages (Table1). Aquatic dipteran larvae, primarily... in each assemblage...

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic systems fmas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

streams, springs, estuaries, bays, and Summary: are extreme in the air of terrestrial eco- systems. In aquatic ecosystems, water serves as a buf- fer; that is... environment....

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems endocrine Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Geosciences 3 Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM The purpose of the Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP) was to restore the environmental...

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystem restoration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Ecosystem Prediction- Aquatic... In a world where the demand for fresh surface water increases every ... Source: Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, NOAA...

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ECOSYSTEMS JOINT MODULE WITH UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA Summary: environments Fresh Water Ecosystems Aquatic policies Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Terrestrial... and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic animal health Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accomplishments in Research Species of plants or animals not native to a particular... ecosystem can have harmful effects when they "invade" the new envi- ronment. Aquatic...

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic systems annual Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

system-wide survival Source: Washington at Seattle, University of - School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology...

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic life volume Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

COLUMBIA BASIN ... Source: Washington at Seattle, University of - School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology...

224

Characterization of hydrocarbons found in the arctic aquatic environment near the Ekati diamond mine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the aquatic environment of the Ekati Diamond Mine were evaluated in snow, sediment, air and water (via passive membrane samplers). (more)

Nabess, Stephanie Ann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

MOIRA: A decision support system for decision making on aquatic ecosystems contaminated by radioactive fallout  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interventions to restore radionuclide contaminated aquatic ecosystems may reduce individual and collective radiation doses, but may also result in detrimental ecological, social and economic effects. Decision ...

D. Ros Insua; E. Gallego; A. Mateos; S. Ros-Insua

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Effects of Agrochemicals on Riparian and Aquatic Primary Producers in an Agricultural Watershed .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In agricultural watersheds, streams are intimately connected with croplands and may be inadvertently exposed to agrochemicals such as fertilizers and herbicides. Riparian plants and aquatic (more)

Dalton, Rebecca L.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic utricularia species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: by aquatic plants (Figure 3h). The intro- duced species, common reed (Phragmites australis) and purple... survey. By comparison, there were few changes in the...

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromus fish habitat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anadromus fish habitat Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anadromus fish habitat Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Sierra Nevada Ecosystem...

229

FUSION OF HYPERSPECTRAL AND BATHYMETRY DATA FOR IMPROVED BENTHIC HABITAT MAPPING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUSION OF HYPERSPECTRAL AND BATHYMETRY DATA FOR IMPROVED BENTHIC HABITAT MAPPING Maria C. Torres, coastal remote sensing, underwater unmixing, benthic habitat mapping, data fusion. #12;

Gilbes, Fernando

230

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Habitat for Humanity South...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Home Case Study, Manatee County Habitat for Humanity, Ellenton, FL, Affordable DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat for Humanity, Edgewater, FL...

231

Protection Program Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes requirements for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Protective Forces (FPF), Contractor Protective Forces (CPF), and the Physical Security of property and personnel under the cognizance of DOE.

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

232

Protective Force Program Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, Protective Force Program, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Does not cancel other directives.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Safety & Environmental Protection Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety & Environmental Protection Services Guidance Note --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW Safety & Environmental Protection Services 1 Telephone: 0141-330-5532 Email: safety of others who live near you. It is about fire and the tragic consequences of getting some simple things

Guo, Zaoyang

234

Safety & Environmental Protection Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety & Environmental Protection Services Guidance Note --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW Safety & Environmental Protection Services 1 Telephone: 0141-330-5532 Email: safety FOR THE CURRENT REVISION. Emergency Fire Action Plan Revision 03/10 Listed below are the procedures and other

Guo, Zaoyang

235

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

Colonisation of Introduced Timber by Algae and Invertebrates, and its Potential Role in Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of a habitat restoration experiment wood substrates (red gum) were introduced to two lowland streams of SE Australia in which habitat has been severely degraded by deposition of sand eroded from higher...

Nicholas R. Bond; Sergi Sabater; Alena Glaister; Simon Roberts

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Best Management Practices Deanna Osmond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources, while others are implemented to protect wildlife habitat, both terrestrial and aquatic or utilized to protect land resources from degradation by wind, salt, and toxic levels of metals serving an additional environmental purpose, such as affording wildlife habitat. Riparian buffers, which

238

Fire Protection Related Sites  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fire Protection related sites for Department of Energy, Non-DOE Government and Non-Government information.

239

Life in a patchy world: species-habitat relationships link macroalgal communities to higher trophic levels in temperate rocky reefs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algae creates significant habitat for small, mobile invertebrates that fuelalgae creates significant habitat for small, mobile invertebrates that fuel

Mahoney, Brenna

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPYRIGHT 2002 Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;3 #12;4 #12;5 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 98, No'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

Healy, Kevin Edward

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING FPE College of Engineering California Polytechnic State University San problems and develop fire safety design solutions in a variety of professional settings. Fire Protection Engineering Science � Apply concepts associated with the thermal sciences, to the analysis of fire protection

Sze, Lawrence

242

FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING FPE College of Engineering California Polytechnic State University San and develop fire safety design solutions in a variety of professional settings. Fire Protection Engineering Science · Apply concepts associated with the thermal sciences, to the analysis of fire protection

Sze, Lawrence

243

Coastal Marshlands Protection Act (Georgia  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act provides the Coastal Resources Division with the authority to protect tidal wetlands. The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act limits certain activities and...

244

ORISE: Human Subjects Protection Resource Protection Book  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Subjects Protection Resource Book Human Subjects Protection Resource Book The Human Subjects Protection Resource Book synthesizes information currently available on the protection of human subjects in research, the continuing application of such information to new areas of endeavor, and ever-changing rules, regulations, and guidance. This resource, to which the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contributed, is for investigators, institutional review boards, research organizations, research subjects and others. The book contains chapters that provide background information on the history and development of federal regulations; chapters that discuss procedural and substantive issues regarding the review and conduct of human subjects research; and chapters that are specific to one type of research

245

Ecological Economics 33 (2000) 2943 Forest owner incentives to protect riparian habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management on a larger scale (Amoros et al., 1987; Swallow and Wear, 1993; Sample, 1994; Gottfried et al salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) populations led the Na- tional Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to con

246

Habitat collapse due to overgrazing threatens turtle conservation in marine protected areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Evolutionary Studies (CEES), University of Groningen, , PO Box 11103, 9700 CC Groningen, The Netherlands 5 Marine Spatial Ecology...Ecological and Evolutionary Studies (CEES), Groningen University, Groningen, The Netherlands...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam, 1989-1990 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 1989 through March 1990 on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Study objectives addressed by each agency are to describe the life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults between Bonneville and McNary dams and evaluate the need and identify potential methods for protecting, mitigating and enhancing populations downstream from McNary Dam, to describe the white sturgeon recreational fishery between Bonneville and McNary dams, describe reproductive and early life history characteristics downstream from Bonneville Dam and describe life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults downstream from Bonneville Dam, to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available between Bonneville and McNary dams, and to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available downstream from Bonneville Dam. Our approach is to work concurrently downstream and upstream from Bonneville Dam. Upstream from Bonneville Dam we began work in the Dalles Reservoir in 1987 and expanded efforts to Bonneville Reservoir in 1988 and John Day Reservoir in 1989. Highlights from this work is also included. 47 refs., 33 figs., 66 tabs.

Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) 17MTBMontanaStreamProtectionActSPA124Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 87-5-501 et seq Montana Stream Protection Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17MTBMontanaStreamProtectionActSPA124Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Montana has a policy to preserve fish and wildlife habitat as well as

249

Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

NeSmith, Frank (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Long, Mack (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Paks, Kalispell, MT); Matthews, Dayne (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Comparative Analysis of Acidobacterial Genomic Fragments from Terrestrial and Aquatic Metagenomic Libraries, with Emphasis on Acidobacteria Subdivision 6  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Terrestrial and Aquatic Metagenomic Libraries...drivers of key ecosystem processes in terrestrial...5o45E), where an ecosystem restoration experiment was...Biodiversity and Ecosystem Development (6...recovered from aquatic environments...

Anna M. Kielak; Johannes A. van Veen; George A. Kowalchuk

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Aquatic and terrestrial invertebrate drift in southern Appalachian Mountain streams: implications for trout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the southern Appalachians, ecotrophic coefficients and food conversion efficiencies. 3. Abundance and biomass invertebrate biomass was greater than aquatic larval biomass in the autumn. Drift rates of aquatic larval abundance and biomass were greatest at sunset. Inputs of terrestrial invertebrate biomass were greater than

Hutchens, John

252

Global distribution of N2O emissions from aquatic systems: natural emissions and anthropogenic eects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global distribution of N2O emissions from aquatic systems: natural emissions and anthropogenic, are increasing due to human activities. Our analysis suggests that a third of global anthropogenic N2O emission the remainder. Over 80% of aquatic anthropogenic N2O emissions are from the Northern Hemisphere mid

Seitzinger, Sybil

253

A COMPARISON OF THE AQUATIC IMPACTS OF LARGE HYDRO AND SMALL HYDRO PROJECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON OF THE AQUATIC IMPACTS OF LARGE HYDRO AND SMALL HYDRO PROJECTS by Lara A. Taylor, P Project: A Comparison of the Aquatic Impacts of Large Hydro and Small Hydro Projects Project No.: 501 of small hydro development in British Columbia has raised concerns surrounding the effects

254

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality in Sandia Canyon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1990, field studies of water quality and stream macroinvertebrate communities were initiated in Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The studies were designed to establish baseline data and to determine the effects of routine discharges of industrial and sanitary waste. Water quality measurements were taken and aquatic macroinvertebrates sampled at three permanent stations within the canyon. Two of the three sample stations are located where the stream regularly receives industrial and sanitary waste effluents. These stations exhibited a low diversity of macroinvertebrates and slightly degraded water quality. The last sample station, located approximately 0.4 km (0.25 mi) downstream from the nearest wastewater outfall, appears to be in a zone of recovery where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams in the Los Alamos area. A large increase in macroinvertebrate diversity was also observed at the third station. These results indicate that effluents discharged into Sandia Canyon have a marked effect on water quality and aquatic macroinvertebrate communities.

Bennett, K.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

AQUATIC ASSESSMENT OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AND ITS REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This modeling study evaluated aquatic environment affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident and the effectiveness of remediation efforts. Study results indicate that radionuclide concentrations in the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers were well above the drinking water limits immediately after the Chernobyl accident, but have decreased significantly in subsequent years due to flashing, burying, and decay. Because high concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs, the major radionuclides affecting human health through aquatic pathways, are associated with flooding, an earthen dike was constructed along the Pripyat River in its most contaminated floodplain. The dike was successful in reducing the 90Sr influx to the river by half. A 100-m-high movable dome called the New Safe Confinement is planned to cover the Chernobyl Shelter (formally called the sarcophagus) that was erected shortly after the accident. The NSC will reduce radionuclide contamination further in these rivers and nearby groundwater; however, even if the Chernobyl Shelter collapses before the NSC is built, the resulting peak concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs in the Dnieper River would still be below the drinking water limits.

Onishi, Yasuo; Kivva, Sergey L.; Zheleznyak, Mark J.; Voitsekhovitch, Oleg V.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Property Reuse » Habitat Restoration at Property Reuse » Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site The 1,470-acre Salmon, Mississippi, Site is located in Lamar County, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, in southwestern Mississippi. It is roughly square in shape, and each side is approximately 1.52 miles long. The site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Defense for underground nuclear testing in the 1960s. The site was decontaminated, remediated, and decommissioned in 1972, and all buildings and equipment were removed at that time. Two small, shallow pockets of contamination were left for remediation by natural attenuation. A subsequent remedial investigation was completed in 1999. Final site

257

Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity Posted By Office of Public Affairs Guy painter Girl painter A number of Pantexans volunteered Friday, March 30, to help renovate two

258

Eisenhower Consortium Bulletin 12 September 1982 RIPARIAN HABITATS AND RECREATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eisenhower Consortium Bulletin 12 September 1982 RIPARIAN HABITATS AND RECREATION recreational pressures on these ecotones between water and surrounding uplands are forcing management agencies and Recreational History ............................................... 4 Impacts to Riparian Ecosystems

259

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Manatee County Habitat...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

has R-23 ICF walls, a spray-foamed sealed attic, solar hot water, and a ducted mini-split heat pump. DOEZERHManateeCountyHabitat2013 More Documents & Publications DOE Zero...

260

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

appliances, and ceiling fans, a solar water heater, an ERV, and a high-efficiency heat pump. To keep the ducts in conditioned space, the Habitat affiliate installed a rigid...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Graves Property - Yakama Nation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Graves property (140 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also documented the general ecological condition of the property. The Graves property was significantly damaged from past/present livestock grazing practices. Baseline HEP surveys generated 284.28 habitat units (HUs) or 2.03 HUs per acre. Of these, 275.50 HUs were associated with the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type while 8.78 HUs were tied to the riparian shrub cover type.

Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

COMPLETION REPORT Identifying Habitats for Greater Sage-Grouse Population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,093 km2 Atlantic Rim Project Area (ARPA) of south-central, Wyoming, which is being developed for coalbed methane natural gas (CBNG) resources. To reach our objective we modeled habitat selection, as resource

Beck, Jeffrey L.

263

Hawaii Habitat Conservation Plans Webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plans Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Habitat Conservation Plans Webpage Author State of Hawaii Division of Forestry and...

264

Impacts of habitat fragmentation on neotropical migrants in east Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE December 1996 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences IMPACTS OF HABITAT FRAGMENTATION ON NEOTROPICAL MIGRANTS IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by ALIX DENISE DOWLING Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... and Fisheries Sciences ABSTRACT Impacts of Habitat Fragmentation on Neotropical Migrants in East Texas. (December 1996) Alix Denise Dowling, B. S. , Indiana University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. I&eith Arnold In this study, point counts were used...

Dowling, Alix Denise

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

National Infrastructure Protection Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Infrastructure Infrastructure Protection Plan 2006 Preface Preface i The ability to protect the critical infrastructure and key resources (CI/KR) of the United States is vital to our national security, public health and safety, economic vitality, and way of life. U.S. policy focuses on the importance of enhancing CI/KR protection to ensure that essential governmental missions, public services, and economic functions are maintained in the event of a

266

Respiratory Protection Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page is supported by the Respiratory Protection Program Administrators Group. The Respiratory Protection Program Administrators Group is a volunteer organization co-sponsored by the DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) to provide a forum for DOE and DOE contractor personnel to identify respiratory protection issues of concern to the DOE and pursue solutions to issues identified.

267

Physical Protection Program Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Supplements DOE O 473.1, by establishing requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Cancels: DOE M 5632.1C-1

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

268

Asset Protection Analysis Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Guide provides examples of the application of as set protection analysis to several common problems. Canceled by DOE N 251.80.

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

270

Microscale Nutrient Patches in Planktonic Habitats Shown by Chemotactic Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Reports of different swimming behavior displayed...this, we studied swimming behavior of bacteria...important to chemotactic efficiency in this example...20 individuals, swimming in the estimated...free amino-acid pool in a cell of 10...of nutrients and energy in aquatic ecosystems...

Nicholas Blackburn; Tom Fenchel; Jim Mitchell

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan serves as an aid to management and staff to implement new environmental programs in a timely manner.

Brekke, D.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Protective Force Program Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, PROTECTIVE FORCE PROGRAM, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Change 1 revised pages in Chapters IV and VI on 12/20/2001.

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

Environmental protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California's commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities.

R. C. Holland

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes Department of Energy (DOE) procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects; and in DOE P 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, dated 12-20-07. Cancels DOE O 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B.

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish DOE procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 CFR Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects, ad in DOE P 443.1, Policy on the Protection of Human Subjects. Cancels DOE O 1300.3. Canceled by DOE O 443.1A.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Environmental Protection Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To implement sound stewardship practices that are protective of the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources impacted by the Department of Energy (DOE) operations and by which DOE cost effectively meets or exceeds compliance with applicable environmental; public health; and resource protection laws, regulations, and DOE requirements. Cancels DOE 5400.1 and DOE N 450.4.

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

25 Federal Register 25 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 209 / Friday, October 28, 2011 / Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9484-2] Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee (CHPAC); Notice of Charter Renewal AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Charter Renewal. Notice is hereby given that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that, in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), 5 U.S.C. App.2. The Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee (CHPAC) is a necessary committee which is in the public interest. Accordingly, CHPAC will be renewed for an additional two- year period. The purpose of CHPAC is to provide advice and recommendations to the Administrator of EPA on issues

279

ORISE: Human Subjects Protection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Subjects Protection Human Subjects Protection The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs technical assessments to assist U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories involved in human subjects research projects. Under DOE Order and Policy 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, and 10 CFR 745, DOE employees and contractors are expected to protect the rights and welfare of human research subjects. In support of the DOE Office of Science and the Human Subjects Protection Program (HSPP), ORISE has most recently assisted with the development and distribution of tools to address classified research and to track potential human social cultural behavior systems (HSCB) research conducted by DOE laboratories. Examples of products that ORISE has developed in support of the HSPP

280

8 - Personal Care Products in the Aquatic Environment: A Case Study on the Effects of Triclosan in Fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are widely used by individuals for health or cosmetic reasons, or by industries such as agrifood and business to promote growth or protect the health of production animals. These chemicals include a huge variety of therapeutic drugs for humans, veterinary drugs, fragrances, and cosmetics. Among these and the focus of this chapter are chemicals used for preventing the growth of bacteria and other pathogens. Here, as a case study, we consider triclosan (TCS), a chlorinated phenoxy phenol that is a potent antibacterial and antifungal chemical. TCS is used in many personal care products, including shampoos, toothpaste, deodorants, and liquid soaps, in textiles used for sport clothing, as well as in plastic and polymers for medical uses. It is considered relatively safe to humans, although there are emerging concerns about the development of bacterial resistance and heightened sensitivity to allergens. In this chapter we consider its no-target effects on fishes. Similar to other personal care products, TCS enters municipal waste and, although the majority of the TCS is removed from the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents, some TCS enters surface waters. TCS has the potential to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms and exert adverse physiological effects. Algae are extremely sensitive to TCS, with growth inhibition occurring at concentrations measured in surface waters. Fish are similarly negatively affected by TCS, with notable reproductive and developmental effects, including lower hatchability of eggs, delayed time to hatching, and reduction in swim performance being reported. Some of the TCS effects occur through disruption of the thyroid axis. Even though the effects in fish generally occur at TCS concentrations higher than those measured in the environment, the concern is that the potential for increasing environmental concentrations of TCS is significant because it is still used in many products worldwide. Indeed, the use of TCS is being reevaluated in several OECD countries because of growing evidence concerning its potential to exert adverse effects on fish and other aquatic organisms.

Alice Hontela; Hamid R. Habibi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A model of phosphorus cycling to explore the role of biomass turnover in submerged aquatic vegetation wetlands for Everglades restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Engineered wetlands using submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) are a cornerstone to the Stormwater Treatment Area (STA) project for stripping phosphorus from agricultural stormwater and lake water before entering protected Everglades marshes in south Florida, USA. However, recent efforts have suggested that the apparent lowest achievable outflow P (C*) in SAV systems (?16?g/l) may not be low enough for proposed regulatory criteria. Thus, deepened predictive understanding on the functionality of these systems is of critical importance. Here, we develop a steady-state mass balance model of intermediate complexity to investigate C* in SAV systems. The model focuses on the role of SAV biomass turnover and P release to the water column, drawing upon established principles from shallow lake studies. This study introduces several large and unique datasets collected from a single study site (STA-2 Cell 3) over a 10-year period and demonstrates coherence in these data through the modeling approach. The datasets included inflowoutflow values, P storage in accrued sediment at two intervals, annual surveys of SAV species composition, gradients of SAV tissue-P, and gradients of internal water column P concentration (previously published). The model was implemented and calibrated in an uncertainty framework with Monte Carlo methods, threshold screening, and multi-criteria limits of acceptability. Model calibration and validation appeared successful, resulting distributions of model parameters and accepted model simulations were relatively narrow, and results deepened perspectives on the previously identified C*. Rooted SAV species may be mining substantial P from underlying soils via root uptake and thus contributing internal loads. Steady turnover and decomposition of SAV biomass may be accounting for up to about a third of the background C*. These perspectives are relevant to STA optimization; our unique data, usage, and calibration strategy should be of interest to the aquatic ecosystem modeling community in general.

John M. Juston; Thomas A. DeBusk; Kevin A. Grace; Scott D. Jackson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project The Mission of the Office of River Protection is to safely retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Office of River Protection Consent Order, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - NCO-2011-01

283

Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for DOE Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This order establishes the Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for Department of Energy (DOE) operations. Cancels Interim Management Directive No. 5001, Safety, Health And Environmental Protection dated 9-29-77.

1980-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

Marmorek, David

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Cost-Effective Mapping of Benthic Habitats in Inland Reservoirs through Split-Beam Sonar, Indicator Kriging, and Historical Geologic Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because bottom substrate composition is an important control on the temporal and spatial location of the aquatic community, accurate maps of benthic habitats of inland lakes and reservoirs provide valuable information to managers, recreational users, and scientists. Therefore, we collected vertical, split-beam sonar data (roughness [E1], hardness [E2], and bathymetry) and sediment samples to make such maps. Statistical calibration between sonar parameters and sediment classes was problematic because the E1:E2 ratios for soft (muck and clay) sediments overlapped a lower and narrower range for hard (gravel) substrates. Thus, we used indicator kriging (IK) to map the probability that unsampled locations did not contain coarse sediments. To overcome the calibration issue we tested proxies for the natural processes and anthropogenic history of the reservoir as potential predictive variables. Of these, a geologic map proved to be the most useful. The central alluvial valley and mudflats contained mainly muck and organic-rich clays. The surrounding glacial till and shale bedrock uplands contained mainly poorly sorted gravels. Anomalies in the sonar data suggested that the organic-rich sediments also contained trapped gases, presenting additional interpretive issues for the mapping. We extended the capability of inexpensive split-beam sonar units through the incorporation of historic geologic maps and other records as well as validation with dredge samples. Through the integration of information from multiple data sets, were able to objectively identify bottom substrate and provide reservoir users with an accurate map of available benthic habitat.

Venteris, Erik R.; May, Cassandra

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

286

Fire Protection Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Fire Protection Overview The Department of Energy (DOE) Fire Protection Program is multi-faceted. It includes published fire safety directives (Orders, standards, and guidance documents), a range of oversight activities, an annual fire protection program summary, and a directory of fire safety professionals. DOE also sponsors fire safety conferences, various training initiatives, and a spectrum of technical assistance activities. This Home Page is intended to bring together in one location as much of the Program's resources as possible to facilitate greater understanding, communication, and efficiency of operations. Guidelines -- NFPA Codes and standards, CFRs, and DOE Directives (policy statements, Orders, Standards, and Guidance Documents)

287

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Marine Resources Commission The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches, and other shores. A permit from the Commission is required to dredge, fill, or otherwise disturb these

288

H&T Aquatics Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

H&T Aquatics Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility H&T Aquatics Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name H&T Aquatics Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility H&T Aquatics Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Mecca, California Coordinates 33.571692°, -116.0772244° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic dilution experiment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U... .S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program--Biodiesel from Algae July 1998 By John Sheehan Terri Dunahay... of the program, know as...

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic exposure assessment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of aquatic biota (1 rad d-1 or 10 mGy d... risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed uranium mining ... Source: Yucca Mountain Project, US EPA Collection: Environmental...

291

MICROBIOLOGY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS Salinity and Temperature Effects on Physiological Responses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the entire salinity gradient, whereas isolates from Euprymna were the least uniform at Vibrio populations [2]. Since temper- ature and salinity gradients are known to change overMICROBIOLOGY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS Salinity and Temperature Effects on Physiological Responses

Nishiguchi, Michele

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic biota due Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aquatic biota due Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 COMBINED ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF SEDIMENT AND WATER COLUMN CONTAMINATED BY DIFFUSE POLLUTION Summary: by the authors to assess...

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic insect behaviours Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41 Concentrating samples can lead to seed losses in soil bank estimations Summary: , many fresh water, but no marine, aquatic plants are...

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic weed control Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fisheries 2: 283-320. Cross, D. G. 1969. Aquatic weed control using grass carp. J. Fish Biol., 1: 27- 30... . 1982. Experience with grass carp for the ... Source: Ferreira, Maria...

295

Some notes on the ecology of aquatic plants in the Al-Hammar marsh, Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aquatic plants were collected from different localities in the Al-Hammar marsh, southern Iraq, during late spring 1985. The marsh...Typha angustata, Potamogeton pectinatus and Phragmites australis were the most a...

Hussain A. Al-Saadi; Abdullah H. Al-Mousawi

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic heavy metals Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Principles of Ecotoxicology, SCOPE Report 12, Chapter 11, pp 239-255. Heavy metals, Pollutants, Toxicity... fIJJ US Army Corps of Engineers AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM...

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic environments adjacent Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: aquatic environments adjacent Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Journal of Animal Ecology 2009, 78, 338345 doi: 10.1111j.1365-2656.2008.01498.x 2008 The Authors. Journal...

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic organic fractions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: aquatic organic fractions Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Journal of Animal Ecology 2009, 78, 338345 doi: 10.1111j.1365-2656.2008.01498.x 2008 The Authors. Journal...

299

LETTER Community ecology theory predicts the effects of agrochemical mixtures on aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTER Community ecology theory predicts the effects of agrochemical mixtures on aquatic experiment to examine the effects of pairwise agrochemical mixtures [fertiliser, herbicide (atrazine. As postulated, the responses of biodiversity and ecosystem properties to agrochemicals alone and in mixtures

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

300

Interactions among flow, sediment deposition and aquatic vegetation in a channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic vegetation is commonly present in rivers in many forms. This thesis consists of two studies, which examine the flow structure around a patch of emergent, rigid vegetation in a laboratory channel. The vegetation ...

Zong, Lijun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic natural organic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plants collected Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic organisms Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

304

E-Print Network 3.0 - area aquatic resources Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

305

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis aquatic plants Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

306

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic animal models Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

307

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant lemna Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

308

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plants imported Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophytes cultured Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

310

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic escape response Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic center volume Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

312

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plants Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

313

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic toxicity properties Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

314

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic organisms investigations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

315

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic toxicity classification Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic animals evolution Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

317

Changes in Habitat and Populations of Steelhead Trout, Coho Salmon, and Chinook Salmon in Fish Creek, Oregon; Habitat Improvement, 1983-1987 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction and evaluation of salmonid habitat improvements on Fish Creek, a tributary of the upper Clackamas River, began in 1982 as a cooperative venture between the Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest, and the Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit of the Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW), USDA Forest Service. The project was initially conceived as a 5-year effort (1982-1987) to be financed with Forest Service funds. The habitat improvement program and the evaluation of improvements were both expanded in mid-1983 when the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to cooperatively fund work on Fish Creek. Habitat improvement work in the basin is guided by the Fish Creek Habitat Rehabilitation-Enhancement Framework developed cooperatively by the Estacada Ranger District, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Pacific Northwest Research Station. The framework examines potential factors limiting production of salmonids in the basin, and the appropriate habitat improvement measures needed to address the limiting factors. Habitat improvement work in the basin has been designed to: (1) improve quantity, quality, and distribution of spawning habitat for coho and spring chinook salmon and steelhead trout, (2) increase low flow rearing habitat for steelhead trout and coho salmon, (3) improve overwintering habitat for coho salmon and steelhead trout, (4) rehabilitate riparian vegetation to improve stream shading to benefit all species, and (5) evaluate improvement projects from a drainage wide perspective. The objectives of the evaluation include: (1) Drainage-wide evaluation and quantification of changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat improvements. (2) Evaluation and quantification of changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements. (3) Benefit-cost analysis of habitat improvements.

Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Hohler, David B.; Cain, Thomas C. (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Bird Protection in Illinois  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Protection in Illinois Protection in Illinois Nature Bulletin No. 550-A January 18, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BIRD PROTECTION IN ILLINOIS Very few people are indifferent about birds. Almost every bird is the feathered friend of somebody or some organization ready to do battle in its behalf. At present, in Illinois, songbirds and most other wild birds, together with their nests and eggs, are completely protected by law at all times. A few kinds, called game birds, may be shot by hunters -- pheasants and quail, also migratory ducks, geese, coots, jacksnipes, woodcocks, and doves. Such hunting must be done with shotguns in certain places in certain open seasons with many other detailed restrictions. Now, even crow hunters are licensed. The only unprotected birds are those three immigrants or exotics: the English sparrow, the European starling and the "domestic " pigeon. These, too, have their friends .

319

Protective Force Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To prescribe Department of Energy policy, responsibilities, and requirements for the management and operation of the Protective Force Program. Chg 1 dated 2-13-95. Cancels DOE O 5632.7 and DOE O 5632.8.

1995-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

320

Mondriaan memory protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability and security are quickly becoming users' biggest concern due to the increasing reliance on computers in all areas of society. Hardware-enforced, fine-grained memory protection can increase the reliability and ...

Witchel, Emmett Jethro, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Physical Protection Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes Department of Energy management objectives, requirements and responsibilities for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Cancels DOE 5632.1C. Canceled by DOE O 470.4.

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

322

Voluntary Protection Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

VPP Steering Committee - The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Federal Field Steering Committee is a group of Federal field office staff members from offices where at...

323

Federal Protective Force  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual establishes requirements for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal protective forces (FPFs). Cancels DOE M 470.4-3, Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The purpose of this Policy is to establish DOE-specific policy for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Canceled by DOE P 443.1A.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Policy is to establish DOE-specific principles for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Cancels DOE P 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

326

General Environmental Protection Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities for Department of Energy (DOE) Operations for assuring compliance with applicable Federal, State and local environmental protection laws and regulations, Executive Orders, and internal Department policies. Cancels DOE O 5480.1A. Para. 2b, 4b, and 4c of Chap. II and para. 2d and 3b of Chap. III canceled by DOE O 231.1.

1990-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

Voluntary Protection Program- Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) promotes safety and health excellence through cooperative efforts among labor, management, and government at the Department of Energy (DOE) contractor sites. DOE has also formed partnerships with other Federal agencies and the private sector for both advancing and sharing its Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) experiences and preparing for program challenges in the next century. The safety and health of contractor and federal employees are a high priority for the Department.

328

Environmental Protection Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To implement sound stewardship practices that are protective of the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources impacted by the Department of Energy (DOE) operations and by which DOE cost effectively meets or exceeds compliance with applicable environmental; public health; and resource protection laws, regulations, and DOE requirements. Chg 1, dated 1-24-05; Chg 2, dated 12-7-05; Admin Chg 1, dated 1-3-07. Cancels DOE 5400.1 and DOE N 450.4.

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Towards Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in September 2012. It aims at running a rapid natural habitats assessment of the potential site of Cap des the GIS system. This will allow finalising a rapid natural habitats assessment of the site, along will lead to: · A rapid natural habitat assessment (phytobenthos and zoobenthos) along all the coastal

Escolano, Francisco

330

Protections: Sediment Control = Contaminant Retention  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sediment Control Protections: Sediment Control Contaminant Retention LANL maintains hundreds of wells, stream sampling stations and stormwater control structures to protect...

331

Among- and within-patch components of genetic diversity respond at different rates to habitat fragmentation: an empirical demonstration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Among- and within-patch components of genetic diversity respond...both these responses to decreased habitat patch connectivity (Soule 1972; Hanfling Brandl...effects of habitat fragmentation and habitat patch isolation, this phenomenon has not previously...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Effect of physicochemical form on copper availability to aquatic organisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Copper concentration and speciation were determined in influent and effluent waters collected from eight power stations that used copper alloys in their cooling systems. Quantities of copper associated with particles, colloids, and organic and inorganic ligands differed with the site, season, and mode of operation of the station. Under normal operating conditions, the differences between influent and effluent waters were generally small, and most of the copper was in bound (complexed) species. However, copper was high in concentration and present in labile species during start-up of water circulation through some cooling systems and during changeover from an open- to closed-cycle operation. Copper sensitivity of selected ecologically and economically important aquatic organisms was also evaluted. Our primary emphasis was on acute effects and most of the testing was performed under controlled laboratory conditions. However, sublethal effects of copper on a population of bluegills living in a power station cooling lake containing water of low pH were also assessed. The toxic response to copper differed with the species and life stage of the animal and with the chemical form of copper in the water.

Harrison, F.L.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M. [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Mapping red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) habitat suitability using GIS and remote sensing techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The British red squirrel population has dramatically declined in the last years. The survival of the species in the UK may depend on the careful selection and management of suitable habitats. A deep understanding of its habitat requirements...

de Lamo, Xavier

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

High-Performance Affordable Housing with Habitat for Humanity- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America support of Habitat for Humanity including researchers who wrote Habitat construction guides and teams that have worked with affiliates on numerous field projects.

336

E-Print Network 3.0 - area habitat evaluation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

loss and fragmentation impacts... into populations that are too small to be self-sustaining. I Areas of habitats are so small that the core area... by creating new habitats...

337

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing habitat quality Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

< 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1 Summary: There are 2 basic approaches to conceptualizing how to measure habitat...

338

Data Protection Policy Page 1 DATA PROTECTION POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Protection Policy Page 1 DATA PROTECTION POLICY POLICY STATEMENT The University intends to fully comply with all requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998 (,,Act) in so far as it affects the Universitys activities. SCOPE This Data Protection Policy: Covers the processing of all personal information

Greenlees, John

339

Hybrid fitness across time and habitats Michael L. Arnold1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid fitness across time and habitats Michael L. Arnold1 and Noland H. Martin2 1 Department­San Marcos, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA There has been considerable debate about the role of hybrids in the evolutionary process. One question has involved the relative fitness of hybrid versus non-hybrid genotypes

Aspbury, Andrea S. - Department of Biology, Texas State University

340

SAND AND GRAVEL MINING IN COLORADO RIPARIAN HABITATS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mines, but Western Colorado sand and gravel mining is also discussed. The similarities and differencesSAND AND GRAVEL MINING IN COLORADO RIPARIAN HABITATS Ma rk A. He i fner Supervising Mined Land Reclamation Specialist Colorado Division of Mined Land Reclamation 723 Centennial Building 1313 Sherman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Research Note Summer Habitat Use by Snowshoe Hare and Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Key words habitat, Lepus americanus, New Mexico, subalpine conifer forest, Sylvilagus nuttallii and mostly anecdotal evidence suggests that it is restricted to high-elevation, subalpine conifer forests.) and pin~on pine (Pinus spp.) woodlands and middle-elevation montane conifer forests, which are dominated

342

IBIS Habitat Types Westside Lowlands Conifer-Hardwood Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix C IBIS Habitat Types Westside Lowlands Conifer-Hardwood Forest Christopher B. Chappell elevations is Montane Mixed Conifer Forest. Along the coastline, it often occurs adjacent to Coastal Dunes and Beaches. In southwestern Oregon, it may border Southwest Oregon Mixed Conifer-Hardwood Forest. The primary

343

Biodiversity as spatial insurance: the effects of habitat fragmentation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitat destruction (e.g. strip min- ing or clear cutting of forests), conversion to agri- culture (e.g. conversion of grasslands to croplands or rangelands, or conversion of forests to planta- tions that these effects may be weaker or masked by other covarying factors in the environ- ment (Grace et al. 2007, Hector

Gonzalez, Andrew

344

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Avian Habitat Response to Grazing, Haying, and Biofuels Production in Native Warm-Season Forages in the Mid-South.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Declines in grassland birds have been attributed to loss of habitat, habitat degradation, and changes in land management. In the Mid-South, pasture and hayfield (more)

Birckhead, Jessie Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United influencing total fish biomass in streams, but few studies have evaluated the relative influence of habitat and pH together. We measured total fish biomass, stream habitat, and stream pH in sixteen sites from

Kraft, Clifford E.

347

Draft Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Plan May 28, 2004 Appendix D: Focal Habitat Descriptions D-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix D: Information on Focal Habitats from IBIS No. 5. Interior Mixed Conifer Forest Author: Rex C. Crawford Geographic Distribution: The Eastside Mixed Conifer Forest habitat appears primarily the Blue River Gorge. Physical Setting: The Eastside Mixed Conifer Forest habitat is primarily mid

348

SHORT COMMUNICATION Habitat patch size and isolation as predictors of occupancy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT COMMUNICATION Habitat patch size and isolation as predictors of occupancy and number Abstract How fully a suitable habitat patch is utilized by organisms depends crucially on patch size a "habitat patch", measuring its boarders, and relatively low detection probability of the inhabitants

Agnarsson, Ingi

349

Assessing the distribution, habitat, and population size of the threatened Dupont's lark Chersophilus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

North African range, as well as on its preferred habitat, population density and size. Fieldwork), with important populations believed to be present in the steppe-like habitat of North Africa (Cramp, 1988Assessing the distribution, habitat, and population size of the threatened Dupont's lark

Oñate, Juan J.

350

DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection December 4, 2013 - 7:00am Addthis DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection DOE and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that will enhance collaboration in promoting the conservation of migratory birds. DOE manages land that includes wetlands, shrub-steppe, shortgrass prairie, desert, and forested areas that provide habitat for migratory birds. In the MOU, DOE recognizes that some of its activities have the potential to affect migratory birds (e.g., transmission lines, power poles, invasive weed control, and various construction activities), and agrees that it is important to conserve

351

Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

076 Federal Register 076 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 250 / Monday, December 31, 2012 / Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [ER-FRL-9006-8] Notice of Intent: Designation of an Expanded Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS) off Charleston, South Carolina AGENCY: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4. ACTION: Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the designation of an expanded ODMDS off Charleston, South Carolina. Purpose: EPA has the authority to designate ODMDSs under Section 102 of the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (33 U.S.C. 1401 et seq.). It is EPA's policy to prepare a National Environmental Policy Document for all ODMDS designations (63 FR 58045, October 1998). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, TO

352

Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

22 Federal Register 22 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 103 / Friday, May 28, 2010 / Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9156-1] Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of one new equivalent method for monitoring ambient air quality. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated, in accordance with 40 CFR Part 53, one new equivalent method for measuring concentrations of lead (Pb) in total suspended particulate matter (TSP) in the ambient air. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surender Kaushik, Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (MD-D205-03), National Exposure

353

Microscope collision protection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

DeNure, Charles R. (Pocatello, ID)

2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

354

River Protection.PDF  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

cc: cc: DOE/IG-0506 I N S P E C T I O N R E P O R T U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF INSPECTIONS I N S P E C T I O N O F SELECTED ASPECTS OF THE OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION PERFORMANCE-BASED INCENTIVE PROGRAM JUNE 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 June 14, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman /s/ Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Inspection of Selected Aspects of the Office of River Protection Performance-Based Incentive Program" BACKGROUND The Office of River Protection (ORP), which reports to the Office of Environmental Management, is responsible for remediation of the radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Hanford Site in the State of Washington. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2000, ORP established 26 performance-based contract

355

Environmental Protection Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Site Details Site Details EPD Home Staff List (pdf) Org Chart (pdf) Compliance / Permits Programs Other Information Land Use & Institutional Controls Mapping Site Environmental Reports Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) Spill Response BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Developing Environmental Products and Services for Brookhaven Stakeholders The Environmental Protection Division (EPD) develops and delivers environmental products and services for all Brookhaven stakeholders. We manage environmental programs such as pollution prevention, groundwater protection, and natural resource management; provide technical assistance on environmental requirements; maintain the Laboratory's IS0 14001-registered Environmental Management System; prepare environmental permit applications; conduct environmental monitoring; manage data

356

Protection Program Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements for the management and operation of the DOE Federal Protective Forces (FPF), Contractor Protective Forces (CPF), and the Physical Security of property and personnel under the cognizance of DOE. Cancels DOE M 470.4-2A, DOE M 470.4-3A, and DOE M 470.4-8. Appendix C Safeguards and Security Alarm Management and Control Systems, of DOE M 470.4-2A, is retained and incorporated into this Order as Attachment 3, Annex 1.

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

357

Substation fire protection features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes Commonwealth Edison`s (ComEd) approach to substation fire protection. Substation fires can have a major operational, financial, as well as political impact on a utility. The overall Company philosophy encompasses both active and passive fire protection features to provide prompt detection, notification, and confinement of fire and its by-products. Conservatively designed smoke detection systems and floor and wall penetration seals form the backbone of this strategy. The Company has implemented a program to install these features in new and existing substations. Thus far these measures have been successful in mitigating the consequences of substation fires.

Hausheer, T.G. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Environmental protection implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. SNL is committed to operating in full compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental laws, regulations, and standards. Furthermore, SNL/California strives to go beyond compliance with legal requirements by making every effort practical to reduce impacts to the environment to levels as low as reasonably achievable.

Holland, R.C.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. This report focuses on the following: notification of environmental occurrences; general planning and reporting; special programs and plans; environmental monitoring program; and quality assurance and data verification.

Brekke, D.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Assessing interactions between nutrients and toxicity : influences of nitrogen and phosphorus on triclosan toxicity to the aquatic macrophyte "lemna gibba".  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the present study, influences of nutrient availability on triclosan toxicity to a model aquatic macrophyte Lemna gibba were explored. Triclosan effective concentrations varied by (more)

Fulton, Barry A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Advanced nuclear reactors and tritium impacts. Modeling the aquatic pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effective contribution of nuclear energy will depend on various factors related to economics, safety, public acceptance and sustainability. To assure, however, the nuclear energy development, reactor accident impacts, as Fukushima, must be evaluated in a predictive way. Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of potential releases of radionuclides from nuclear reactors to the environment. It is important to evaluate, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models, by comparing with measured values in the environment or by comparing with the predictions of other models. Tritium has a complex environmental behavior once released into the environment. It is essential to establish reference scenarios to allow the simulation of tritium aquatic pathway subsequent to accidental releases. For this purpose, two scenarios for seawater circulation were analyzed by hydrodynamic modeling. An inverse modeling procedure was successfully applied to estimate tide elevations on the borders, which are based on applying the harmonic constants and using the same overestimation percentage produced by model results to correct the border values. Simulations of validated model for postulated accidental releases of tritium inventory from heavy water reactors, whose doses could be relevant, were presented here. It was observed differences between the two scenarios for the transport modeling that were caused by the removal of large volume of polluted waters from the accident site and its dilution in the discharge area, which has minor tritium concentrations. Moreover, the processes involved in the dynamic transfer of tritium in the environment were analyzed in dependence on the environmental conditions of tropical coastal ecosystem.

Francisco Fernando Lamego Simes Filho; Abner Duarte Soares; Andr da Silva Aguiar; Celso Marcelo Franklin Lapa; Antonio Carlos Ferreira Guimares

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Protecting waters of recreational and ecological significance: an analysis of state practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and other chemicals continue to be dumped into our nation's waters each day (National Geographic, 1993). This fact affects us directly through our utilization of water for recreational purposes. We need to be able to catch and potentially eat fish without... aquatic ecosystem. In a sense, any human activity that would lower the water quality of a designated ONRW for the long-term is not permitted. This protection extends to areas upstream from the ONRW, in a sense if logging, mining, or other human...

Darrow, Jeff T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Development of a Habitat Suitability Index Model for the Sage Sparrow on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mitigation threshold guidelines for the Hanford Site are based on habitat requirements of the sage sparrow (Amphispiza belli) and only apply to areas with a mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) overstory and a native understory. The sage sparrow habitat requirements are based on literature values and are not specific to the Hanford Site. To refine these guidelines for the Site, a multi-year study was undertaken to quantify habitat characteristics of sage sparrow territories. These characteristics were then used to develop a habitat suitability index (HSI) model which can be used to estimate the habitat value of specific locations on the Site.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Simmons, Mary Ann; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Becker, James M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Aquatic Sciences OVERVIEW Ecology of freshwater shore zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Freshwater shore zones are among the most ecologically valuable parts of the planet, but have been heavily damaged by human activities. Because the management and rehabilitation of freshwater shore zones could be improved by better use of ecological knowledge, we summarize here what is known about their ecological functioning. Shore zones are complexes of habitats that support high biodiversity, which is enhanced by high physical complexity and connectivity. Shore zones dissipate large amounts of physical energy, can receive and process extraordinarily high inputs of autochthonous and allochthonous organic matter, and are sites of intensive nutrient cycling. Interactions between organic matter inputs (including wood), physical energy, and the biota are especially important. In general, the ecological character of shore zone ecosystems is set by inputs of physical energy, geologic (or anthropogenic) structure, the hydrologic regime, nutrient inputs, the biota, and climate. Humans have affected freshwater shore zones by laterally compressing and stabilizing the shore zone, changing hydrologic regimes, shortening and simplifying shorelines, hardening shorelines, tidying shore zones, increasing inputs of physical energy that impinge on shore zones, pollution, recreational activities, resource extraction, introducing alien species, changing climate, and intensive development in the shore zone. Systems to guide management and restoration by quantifying ecological services provided by shore zones and balancing multiple (and sometimes conflicting) values are relatively recent and imperfect. We

D. L. Strayer; S. E. G. Findlay

365

Who Protects My Trust?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......they trust to protect their interests? The eBay points model of trust works and users understand that. We need something...behavioural advertising. It is claimed they are able to predict flu outbreaks and even know when a woman is pregnant before she does......

Rick Chandler

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

United States Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Health and Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (40 CFR Part 197)--Final Rule Response to Comments Document #12;Yucca Mountain Standards Response to Comments Standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada 40 CFR Part 197 June, 2001 Office of Radiation and Indoor Air U

367

Armored garment for protecting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight, armored protective garment for protecting an arm or leg from blast superheated gases, blast overpressure shock, shrapnel, and spall from a explosive device, such as a Rocket Propelled Grenade (RPG) or a roadside Improvised Explosive Device (IED). The garment has a ballistic sleeve made of a ballistic fabric, such as an aramid fiber (e.g., KEVLAR.RTM.) cloth, that prevents thermal burns from the blast superheated gases, while providing some protection from fragments. Additionally, the garment has two or more rigid armor inserts that cover the upper and lower arm and protect against high-velocity projectiles, shrapnel and spall. The rigid inserts can be made of multiple plies of a carbon/epoxy composite laminate. The combination of 6 layers of KEVLAR.RTM. fabric and 28 plies of carbon/epoxy laminate inserts (with the inserts being sandwiched in-between the KEVLAR.RTM. layers), can meet the level IIIA fragmentation minimum V.sub.50 requirements for the US Interceptor Outer Tactical Vest.

Purvis, James W. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, II, Jack F. (Albuquerque, NM); Whinery, Larry D. (Albuquerque, NM); Brazfield, Richard (Albuquerque, NM); Lawrie, Catherine (Tijeras, NM); Lawrie, David (Tijeras, NM); Preece, Dale S. (Watkins, CO)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

Protective Force Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes policy, requirements, responsibilities, and authorities, for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Extended until 7-7-06 by DOE N 251.64, dated 7-7-05 Cancels: DOE 5632.7A

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

United States Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites, sediments and ground water; preventionUnited States Environmental Protection Agency Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry/R-02/008 January 2002 Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry, and Assessment of Nitrogen

370

Contractor Protective Force  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual establishes requirements for the management and operation of the U.S. Department of Energy contractor protective forces. Cancels: DOE M 470.4-3 Chg 1, CRD (Attachment 2) only, except for Section C. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

371

Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for DOE Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes the Environmental Protection, Safety. and Health Protection Program for Department of Energy (DOE) operations. Cancels DOE 5480.1, dated 5-5-1980, its chapters are not canceled. Canceled by DOE O 5480.1B

1981-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

372

AVIAN AND BAT SCREENING ANALYSIS AND HABITAT CHARACTERIZATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AVIAN AND BAT SCREENING ANALYSIS AVIAN AND BAT SCREENING ANALYSIS AND HABITAT CHARACTERIZATION Barr Engineering Company UMore Park Research Wind Turbine Dakota County, Minnesota June 2010 Prepared For: Barr Engineering Company 4700 West 77 th St. Minneapolis, MN 55435 Prepared By: 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 200 Denver, Colorado 80202 Phone: (720) 330-7280 Fax: (303) 458-5701 www.nrcdifference.com NRC Project # 0010-0110-01

373

Natural Resources Environmental Protection Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-term Trend in Cs-137 Average On and Near Off-site Sampling Deer Sampling ­ 12 on-site, 5 off-site samplesCi/g, wet weight, from sample just off the south boundary. ­ Ten-year trend for on and near off-site samplesCi/g, dry weight (background) Aquatic Sampling - Surveillance ­ On- and Off-site fish sampling indicated

Homes, Christopher C.

374

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : January 2000-December 2002 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports were implemented from calendar year 2000 through 2002 in the Pataha Creek Watershed. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by NPPC. In previous years, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and were the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices were the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. Prior to 2000, several bank stabilization projects were installed but the installation costs became prohibitive and these types of projects were reduced in numbers over the following years. The years 2000 through 2002 were years where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek has steelhead in the upper reaches and native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow and shiners inhabit the lower portion because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat will improve habitat for the desired fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek could eventually develop into spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon if some migration barriers are removed and habitat is restored. The upland projects completed during 2000 through 2002 were practices that reduce erosion from the cropland. Three-year continuous no-till projects were finishing up and the monitoring of this particular practice is ongoing. Its direct impact on soil erosion along with the economical aspects is being studied. Other practices such as terrace, waterway, sediment basin construction and the installation of strip systems are also taking place. The years 2000 through 2002 were productive years for the Pataha Creek Model Watershed but due to the fact that most of the cooperators in the watershed have reached their limitation allowed for no-till and direct seed/ two pass of 3 years with each practice, the cost share for these practices is lower than the years of the late 90's. All the upland practices that were implemented have helped to further reduce erosion from the cropland. This has resulted in a reduction of sedimentation into the spawning and rearing area of the fall chinook salmon located in the lower portion of the Tucannon River. The tree planting projects have helped in reducing sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone of desired locations inside the Pataha Creek Watershed. The CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) along with the CCRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) are becoming more prevalent in the watershed and are protecting the riparian areas along the Pataha Creek at an increasing level every year. Currently roughly 197 acres of riparian has been enrolled along the Pataha Creek in the CREP program.

Bartels, Duane G.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Protecting Spreadsheets Against Fraud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous research on spreadsheet risks has predominantly focussed on errors inadvertently introduced by spreadsheet writers i.e. it focussed on the end-user aspects of spreadsheet development. When analyzing a faulty spreadsheet, one might not be able to determine whether a particular error (fault) has been made by mistake or with fraudulent intentions. However, the fences protecting against fraudulent errors have to be different from those shielding against inadvertent mistakes. Faults resulting from errors committed inadvertently can be prevented ab initio by tools that notify the spreadsheet writer about potential problems whereas faults that are introduced on purpose have to be discovered by auditors without the cooperation of their originators. Even worse, some spreadsheet writers will do their best to conceal fraudulent parts of their spreadsheets from auditors. In this paper we survey the available means for fraud protection by contrasting approaches suitable for spreadsheets with those known from frau...

Mittermeir, Roland T; Hodnigg, Karin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A Visual Servoing System for an Aquatic Swimming Robot Junaed Sattar, Philippe Giguere, Gregory Dudek and Chris Prahacs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Visual Servoing System for an Aquatic Swimming Robot Junaed Sattar, Philippe Giguere, Gregory. INTRODUCTION We describe the visually-based servo control of a swim- ming aquatic robot. In recent work we have developed and deployed a swimming robot that uses legged motion to swim and navigate underwater and which

377

Ecology and welfare of aquatic animals in wild capture B. K. Diggles S. J. Cooke J. D. Rose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEWS Ecology and welfare of aquatic animals in wild capture fisheries B. K. Diggles · S. J Freedoms'' approach to animal welfare was originally devised for farmed terrestrial animals, and has been within food production systems. There are now moves towards assessing and addressing aquatic animal

Cooke, Steven J.

378

The Ecological Society of America wwwwww..ffrroonnttiieerrssiinneeccoollooggyy..oorrgg Nitrogen (N) is vital to the functioning of aquatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..ffrroonnttiieerrssiinneeccoollooggyy..oorrgg Nitrogen (N) is vital to the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, yet can be extremely detrimental in excess) to aquatic ecosystems, the amount of N in streams and rivers remains high in many watersheds. Stream desired (Howarth et al. 2002). Natural resource managers are now asking how restoration of stream

Palmer, Margaret A.

379

Uranium in the Near-shore Aquatic Food Chain: Studies on Periphyton and Asian Clams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The benthic aquatic organisms in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River are the first biological receptors that can be exposed to groundwater contaminants coming from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The primary contaminant of concern in the former nuclear fuels processing area at the Site, known as the 300 Area, is uranium. Currently, there are no national clean up criteria for uranium and ecological receptors. This report summarizes efforts to characterize biological uptake of uranium in the food chain of the benthic aquatic organisms and provide information to be used in future assessments of uranium and the ecosystem.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Miley, Terri B.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Brandt, Charles A.; Napier, Bruce A.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fire Protection Program: Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary Summary Since May 1950, an Annual Fire Protection Program Summary has been submitted by DOE's fire protection community. Currently, this report is required by section 5a.(8) of DOE Order 231.1. "Environment, Safety and Health Reporting." In 1999, an automation initiative was undertaken to streamline data collection and provide a more through review of DOE Reporting Element activities. This action resulted in the delayed publications of the CY 1999 and 2000 reports until 2002. It is now possible however to view all Annual Summary Reporting Element responses since 1991 at the Site, Operations, Lead Program Secretarial Office and Headquarters levels. Additionally, a build-in reference to other DOE reporting activities (CAIRS and ORPS) is available that allows Reporting Elements and managers the opportunity to review all fire protection events along previously mentioned categories. Reports listed below were generated from this application. To obtain a copy of the Annual Summary Application please contact Jim Bisker in the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy (EH-53) at (301)903-6542 or Jim Bisker.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM The purpose of the Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP) was to restore the environmental health and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iii Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM Executive Summary The purpose in the Fraser Basin's aquatic ecosystem. The program was led by Environment Canada and conducted by scientists's aquatic-based ecosystem between 1992 and 1997. The research program was focused on the main stem Fraser

383

Voluntary Protection Program Manuals | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Voluntary Protection Program Manuals Voluntary Protection Program Manuals Voluntary Protection Program Manual U.S. Department Of Energy Approval Memo Issuing Revised VPP Program...

384

Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the 2010 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) project EST-P-09-1, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, and known as the 'Salmon Benefits' study. The primary goal of the study is to establish scientific methods to quantify habitat restoration benefits to listed salmon and trout in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) in three required areas: habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival (Figure ES.1). The general study approach was to first evaluate the state of the science regarding the ability to quantify benefits to listed salmon and trout from habitat restoration actions in the LCRE in the 2009 project year, and then, if feasible, in subsequent project years to develop quantitative indices of habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival. Based on the 2009 literature review, the following definitions are used in this study. Habitat connectivity is defined as a landscape descriptor concerning the ability of organisms to move among habitat patches, including the spatial arrangement of habitats (structural connectivity) and how the perception and behavior of salmon affect the potential for movement among habitats (functional connectivity). Life history is defined as the combination of traits exhibited by an organism throughout its life cycle, and for the purposes of this investigation, a life history strategy refers to the body size and temporal patterns of estuarine usage exhibited by migrating juvenile salmon. Survival is defined as the probability of fish remaining alive over a defined amount of space and/or time. The objectives of the 4-year study are as follows: (1) develop and test a quantitative index of juvenile salmon habitat connectivity in the LCRE incorporating structural, functional, and hydrologic components; (2) develop and test a quantitative index of the early life history diversity of juvenile salmon in the LCRE; (3) assess and, if feasible, develop and test a quantitative index of the survival benefits of tidal wetland habitat restoration (hydrologic reconnection) in the LCRE; and (4) synthesize the results of investigations into the indices for habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival benefits.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, J. R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ostrand, Kenneth G.; Hanson, Kyle C.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Donley, Erin E.; Ke, Yinghai; Buenau, Kate E.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Townsend, Richard L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Designing radiation protection signs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Entry into hazardous areas without the proper protective equipment is extremely dangerous and must be prevented whenever possible. Current postings of radiological hazards at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) do not incorporate recent findings concerning effective warning presentation. Warning information should be highly visible, quickly, and easily understood. While continuing to comply with industry standards (e.g., Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines), these findings can be incorporated into existing radiological sign design, making them more effective in terms of usability and compliance. Suggestions are provided for designing more effective postings within stated guidelines.

Rodriguez, M.A.; Richey, C.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Income Protection (IP) Insurance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the daily futures market closing prices for the insured crop prior to the sales closing date and during harvest. IP uses the Group Risk Plan?s (GRP) county yield index to adjust IP premium rates. The insurance is provided for an enter- prise unit... equals 27.5 percent of the approved yield times 100 percent of the projected price. An insured?s total guaranteed dollar amount of protection is the net acres of the insured crop (acres times share) in the county multiplied by the IP dollar guaran- tee...

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

388

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology berlandstrasse 133  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Eawag ?berlandstrasse 133 P.O. Box in Sustainable Water Resources Management Pradeep Aggarwal International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna will discuss the IAEA's programme which develops and helps apply isotope techniques for used to build

Wehrli, Bernhard

389

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology berlandstrasse 133  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Eawag ?berlandstrasse 133 P.O. Box, and derive carbon and energy from the plant photosynthate flux, and extract mineral elements from soil agents, driven by the carbon flux from their plant hosts. [1] Taylor L.L., Leake J.R., Quirk J., Hardy K

Wehrli, Bernhard

390

ERDC/ELSR-00-8EnvironmentalLaboratory Aquatic Plant Control Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELSR-00-8EnvironmentalLaboratory Aquatic Plant Control Research Program Sediment Resuspension Sediment Resuspension Dynamics in Canopy- and Meadow-Forming Submersed Macrophyte Communities by William F resuspension dynamics in canopy- and meadow-forming submersed macrophyte communities / by John W. Barko

US Army Corps of Engineers

391

Evolution mediates the effects of apex predation on aquatic food webs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects of apex predation on aquatic food webs Mark C. Urban e-mail: mark.urban...meso-predator to an apex predator alters local food webs. The marbled salamander (Ambystoma opacum...effects from apex predation on local food webs. Community ecologists might often need...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

228 USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-114. 2003 Part 5: Historical Aquatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FrontRangearedammedanddiverted to provide water to the surrounding regions, and they are constricted by roads and railroads, stocked with fish, polluted by mining wastes and urban runoff. Yet many of the people who visit the Front Range trade; and (3) from 1859 to 2002 during which more extensive and complex changes occurred in the aquatic

393

Aquatic Botany 64 (1999) 381398 Controls on soil cellulose decomposition along a salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Botany 64 (1999) 381­398 Controls on soil cellulose decomposition along a salinity gradient gradient, where nutrients, soil moisture, temperature and salinity among other factors also varied. Our placed at seven marsh sites along the salinity gradient, and soil and in- terstitial water samples were

Brix, Hans

394

ERDC/ELTR-01-5 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Flooding............................................ 40 Simulated behavior of a Wildcelery CommunityERDC/ELTR-01-5 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program A Simulation Model for Growth Plant Control Research Program ERDC/EL TR-01-5 March 2001 A Simulation Model for Growth of the Submersed

US Army Corps of Engineers

395

Project 35013 Species-and Site-specific Impacts of Gas Supersaturation on Aquatic Animals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

three species tend to be bottom oriented and deep water species, and most TDG effects are in the upperProject 35013 Species- and Site-specific Impacts of Gas Supersaturation on Aquatic Animals Sponsor in the river?" The proposal was submitted primarily at the request of the state water quality agencies

396

Aquatic Mammals 2003, 29.2, 202213 Acoustic communication ranges for northern elephant seals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Mammals 2003, 29.2, 202­213 Acoustic communication ranges for northern elephant seals communication range estimates for four northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) vocalization types and lower limit of auditory lter widths for the northern elephant seal auditory system. Signal de- tection

Reichmuth, Colleen

397

03/0924 1 st INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON THE USE OF AQUATIC MACROPKYTES FOR WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filters (RBF). "Rustic" and rather simple wastewater treatment systems for such small communities in rural03/0924 1 st INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON THE USE OF AQUATIC MACROPKYTES FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS £-10 CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT : THE FRENCH EXPERIENCE Catherine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

398

Emerging contaminants in wastewater and river water: Risks for human water security and aquatic ecosystem sustainability?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emerging contaminants in wastewater and river water: Risks for human water security and aquatic and Environmental Science (BRGM), Orléans, France ; 2 National Research Institute for Rural Engineering, Water systems. Since degradation rates in conventional sewage treatment plants (STP) are rather low, ECs enter

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

399

Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725) Fall 2006 will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of invasion ecology and will emphasize aspects related will be presented the ecological concepts and debates underlying this developing field; the biology and life history

Watson, Craig A.

400

Effectiveness of Mechanical Aerationin Floating Aquatic Macrophyte-Based Wastewater Treatment Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effectiveness of Mechanical Aerationin Floating Aquatic Macrophyte-Based Wastewater Treatment to evaluate its effect on wastewater treatment effi- ciency andplantgrowth. Light aeration (0.003 and0.021Lnr2 tanks. Heavy aeration (1.03 and 3.53 L nr2 min-1 ) raised wastewater dissolved oxygen(DO) concentrations

Florida, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NREL Fall 2013 Seminar Series "Using Aquatic Ecosystem Science to Inform Freshwater Resource Use and Sustainability"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affected by the combination of physical, biological and chemical transformations within aquatic ecosystems Freshwater Ecosystems" Dec 6 Ted Stets, US Geological Survey Title: "Century of Trends: Historical Perspectives on the Evolution of Water Quality in the US" Dec 13 Brian Bledsoe, CSU's Department of Civil

MacDonald, Lee

402

Sorption of organic matter on clay minerals in aquatic system and influence on sedimentary organic preservation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption of organic matter on clay minerals in aquatic system and influence on sedimentary organic, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2, France (E-mail : Sylvain.Drouin@univ-orleans.fr). Sorption of organic molecules that mineral sorption affects transport of natural organic matter to bottom water and to sediments

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

403

A Beginner's Guide to Water Management--Aquatic Plants in Florida Lakes1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CIR 111 A Beginner's Guide to Water Management--Aquatic Plants in Florida Lakes1 Florida LAKEWATCH2 to familiarizing citizens with the language and techniques used by those involved in water management within and Conservation. LAKEWATCH facilitates public involvement in the management of Florida waters by training citizen

Watson, Craig A.

404

Fuzzy optimal control of reservoir-assisted stormwater treatment areas for aquatic ecosystem restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Attachment of stormwater treatment areas (STAs) or constructed wetlands to stormwater retention reservoirs can achieve substantial reductions in pollutant loadings if properly operated and maintained. Besides water quality improvement, optimally operated ... Keywords: Aquatic ecosystems, Constructed wetlands, Evolutionary algorithm, Fuzzy control, Real-time operations, Stormwater retention basins, Stormwater treatment areas

John W. Labadie; Yongshan Wan

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

SECTION 47 Table of Contents 47 Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin Inventory of Existing Programs Aquatic.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

47-1 SECTION 47 ­ Table of Contents 47 Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin Inventory of Existing Programs #12;47-2 47 Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin Inventory of Existing Programs ­ Aquatic Large portions of Section 47 were contained within the Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin Summary Report (2001) and are summarized

406

Aquatic Botany 69 (2001) 89108 Geographic variation in growth responses in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Botany 69 (2001) 89­108 Geographic variation in growth responses in Phragmites australis of Botany (CAS), Dukelská 145, CZ-37982 Trebon, Czech Republic Abstract Phragmites australis; Flowering time; Morphology; Biomass allocation; Phragmites australis 1. Introduction Along a latitudinal

Brix, Hans

407

Aquatic Botany 64 (1999) 303315 Organic acids in the sediments of wetlands dominated by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of lower organic acids in the sediments of stands of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. were Large-scale decline of the common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud.) in European waterAquatic Botany 64 (1999) 303­315 Organic acids in the sediments of wetlands dominated by Phragmites

Brix, Hans

408

Aquatic Botany 69 (2001) 313324 Are Phragmites-dominated wetlands a net source or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, P.O. Box 8602, Riccarton, Christchurch, New Zealand Abstract Phragmites australis wetlands act.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Carbon cycling; Gas transport; Methane emission; Phragmites australisAquatic Botany 69 (2001) 313­324 Are Phragmites-dominated wetlands a net source or net sink

Brix, Hans

409

MASTER THESIS IN AQUATIC PHOTOCHEMISTRY Sunlight-induced carbon dioxide emissions from lakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MASTER THESIS IN AQUATIC PHOTOCHEMISTRY Sunlight-induced carbon dioxide emissions from lakes The emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from inland waters are substantial on a global scale. Yet, the fundamental question remains open which proportion of these CO2 emissions is induced by sunlight via photochemical

Uppsala Universitet

410

Habitat selection of the Wood Thrush nesting in east Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANAGEMENT IMPLICATIONS. 70 Page LITERATURE CITED 72 VITA 83 ix LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1. Kruskal-Wallis comparisons of vegetation variables at random sites and Wood Thrush nest sites 20 2. Numbers and species of trees selected as nest sites... by Wood Thrushes 24 3. Numbers (percentages) of predated, successful, and abandoned Wood Thrush nests (1993-1994) 29 4. Numbers (percentages) of Wood Thrush nests (1993-1994) by outcome and in relation to nearest type of edge habitat 30 5. Kruskal-Wallis...

Carrie, Neil Ross

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

411

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: (1) procurement of one access easement with a private landowner, (2) design, layout, and implementation of 3.36 miles of instream structure maintenance, (3) inspection and routine maintenance of 15.1 miles of fence, (4) revegetation along 3.36 miles of stream, (5) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, (6) extensive interagency coordination, and (7) environmental education activities with local high school students.

Bailey, Timothy D.; Laws, Troy S. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Hunting, Habitat, and Indigenous Settlement Patterns: A Geographic Analysis of Bugl Wildlife Use in Western Panama  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation analyzes indigenous wildlife use from a geographic perspective, focusing on the relationships between hunting, habitat, and settlement patterns. Fieldwork took place among five neighboring communities in ...

Smith, Derek Anthony

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous fisheries habitat Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Predicting the distribution of anadromous fish in fresh water using habitat models Steve Lindley Summary: 134 Predicting the...

414

Availability, usage and expected contribution of potential nursery habitats for the California halibut  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

locate/ecss Availability, usage and expected contribution ofas well as the distribution (usage) of juvenile ?sh withinof ju- venile ?sh (usage) within those habitats. In this

Fodrie, Fredrick Joel; Mendoza, Guillermo F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Spatial Characterization of Puerto Rican Commercial Fisheries: Gear Usage Across Habitat Classes and Bathymetry Ranges.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The spatial characterization of Puerto Rican commercial fisheries describing fishing gear use in relation to habitat classes and bathymetry ranges was achieved through the collection (more)

Koeneke, Roberto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Habitat Niche Modeling in the Texas Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum): Applications to Planned Translocation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??I studied translocation of Texas horned lizards on Tinker Air Force Base, Midwest City, Oklahoma, using correlative and mechanistic habitat suitability models. My goals were (more)

Bogosian III, Victor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - avian habitat fragmentation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2006. The responses of understorey birds to forest fragmentation, logging and Summary: wildfires, and habitat fragmentation. The different disturbance treatments had distinct...

418

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing avian habitat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Texas A&M University, Spatial Sciences Laboratory Collection: Geosciences 5 Assessing Landscape and Habitat Factors at Multiple Scales: What Drives Avian Abundance and Distribution...

419

Artificial habitats and the restoration of degraded marine ecosystems and fisheries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The challenge to any ecological restoration effort is to define the condition or ... other words, to answer the question: Restoration to what? Examples of aquatic ecosystem restoration from Hong Kong (fisheries...

William Seaman

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Protection Program Operations - DOE Directives, Delegations,...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations by jcronin Functional areas: Physical Protection, Protective Force, Safeguards, Security, and Emergency Management The Order establishes requirements for the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency...

422

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the restoration of the aquatic ecosystems within Northeast Oregon and Southeast Washington so that the habitat-393-00, Protect and Restore Northeast Oregon/Southeast Washington1 . PROPOSED ACTION: The Fish and Wildlife #2007-245-00, Protect & Restore Joseph Creek Watershed, commenting that the budget reduction reflects

423

MANUAL OF PROTECTIVE ACTION GUIDES-AND PROTECTIVE ACTIONS FOR...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory (July 15, 1977). 10. International Commission on Radiological Protection. Report of a Task Group of Committee 2 on Reference Man. Publication 23. p. 360. Pergamon...

424

Protected Planet | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Protected Planet Protected Planet Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Protected Planet Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), International Union for Conservation of Nature Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: protectedplanet.net/about Cost: Free Protected Planet Screenshot References: Protected Planet[1] "Be inspired by the most beautiful places on the planet. Explore the worlds national parks, wilderness areas and world heritage sites. Help us find and improve information on every protected area in the world. Protectedplanet.net lets you discover these incredible places through elegant mapping and intuitive searching. Protectedplanet.net wants you to

425

Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

94 Federal Register 94 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 209 / Friday, October 30, 2009 / Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [ER-FRL-8798-8] Environmental Impact Statements and Regulations; Availability of EPA Comments Availability of EPA comments prepared pursuant to the Environmental Review Process (ERP), under section 309 of the Clean Air Act and Section 102(2)(c) of the National Environmental Policy Act as amended. Requests for copies of EPA comments can be directed to the Office of Federal Activities at 202-564-7146 or http://www.epa.gov/ compliance/nepa/. An explanation of the ratings assigned to draft environmental impact statements (EISs) was published in FR dated July 17, 2009 (74 FR 34754). Draft EISs EIS No. 20090290, ERP No. D-FTA- F54014-WI, Kenosha-Racine-Milwaukee

426

Solar collector overheating protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prismatic structures in a thermal solar collector are used as overheating protection. Such structures reflect incoming light efficiently back whenever less thermal power is extracted from the solar collector. Maximum thermal power is generated when the prismatic structure is surrounded by a switching fluid with an index of refraction comparable to that of the prismatic structure. Thermal heat can be harvested via extra fluid channels in the solar absorber or directly via the switching fluid near the prisms. The light reducing effect of prismatic structures is demonstrated for a typical day and a season cycle of the Earth around the Sun. The switchability and the light reducing effect are also demonstrated in a prototype solar collector.

M. Slaman; R. Griessen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Environmental Protection Agency  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Protection Agency Protection Agency . . Book, 4 Project Rulison Off-Site Surveillance Operation for the Flaring Period - October 26 - November 3, 1970 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. P r e l i m i n a r y Report March 1 0 , 1 9 7 1 PROJECT RULISON OFF-SITE ' SURVEILLANCE FOR THE E'LARING OPERATION OF OCTOBER 26 - November 3, 1970 S o u t h w e s t e r n R a d i o l o g i c a l H e a l t h Laboratqry ~ u g i n g . . . t h e p e r i o d of O c t o b e r 26' through November 3 , ,1970, n a t u r a l g a s f r o m -.._. -- . . t h e P r o j e c t R u l i s o n t e s t w e l l was f l a r e d f o r t h e h i g h - r a t e p r o d u c t i o n f l a r i n g t e s t . . The' f l a r i n g o p e r a t i o n was s t a r t e d , a t 1430 M!5T on October 2 6 , 1970. The g a s flow r a t e w a s i n c r e a s e d o v e r a six-hour p

428

Protective Force Firearms Qualification Courses  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PROTECTIVE FORCE PROTECTIVE FORCE FIREARMS QUALIFICATION COURSES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://www.hss.energy.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security Protective Force Firearms Qualification Courses July 2011 i TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION A - APPROVED FIREARMS QUALIFICATION COURSES .......................... I-1 CHAPTER I . INTRODUCTION ................................................................................... I-1 1. Scope .................................................................................................................. I-1 2. Content ............................................................................................................... I-1

429

CEBAF - environmental protection program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important objective in the successful operation of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is to ensure protection of the public and the environment. To meet this objective, the Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc., (SURA) is committed to working with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop, implement, and manage a sound and workable environmental protection program at CEBAF. This environmental protection plan includes information on environmental monitoring, long-range monitoring, groundwater protection, waste minimization, and pollution prevention awareness program plan.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects Website  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

provide protection with respect to the rights and welfare of research subjects. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) administers the Oak Ridge Sitewide...

431

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

432

Classified Matter Protection and Control  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 471.2, which establishes policy for the protection and control of classified and unclassified information. Does not cancel other directives.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

433

Environmental Protection and Natural Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

moved forward, environmentalists and Mexican stakeholders59 Stat. 1219. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).1992. Integrated Environmental Plan for the Mexican-U.S.

Snchez-Rodrguez, Roberto; Mumme, Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

MIE -H&S -08 -Personal Protection Personal Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type of work. Safety glasses 2. Safety boots are optional, except when heavy parts are to be moved or worked on. Open toe shoes must not worn at the work site or in the laboratories. Safety boots 3. GlovesMIE - H&S - 08 - Personal Protection Personal Protection 1. Safety glasses must be worn when any

435

EPA's Radiation Protection Standards Protecting the Environment from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cancer. EPA does not regulate naturally occurring radiation or the non-ionizing radiation that is emittedEPA's Radiation Protection Standards Protecting the Environment from Radioactive Materials EPA materials. These radioactive materials emit ionizing radiation, which can damage living tissue and cause

436

Guidelines on Storage, Use and Disposal of Wood Residue for the Protection of Fish and Fish Habitat in British  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................... 2 2.0 PROPONENT==S GUIDE TO THE REGULATORY REVIEW PROCESS 2.1 Preproposal Planning being developed by Environment Canada and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. During the review the Fraser River Action Plan through its Fraser Pollution Abatement Office. Environment Canada

437

Golden-cheeked Warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) habitat fragmentation in Travis County, Texas: a remote sensing and geographical information system analysis of habitat extent, pattern and condition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis procedures were assessed for their utility in characterizing fragmentation patterns. Benson (1990) attempted to calculate a fractal dimension of potential GCW habitat "patches" within larger GCW habitat 'sites' and then correlate this parameter... (1987) measured the fractal dimension over a range of length scales to examine the anthropogenic and geomorphic processes which contribute to landscape patterns. He successfully contrasted difFerences in the scale of huinan and natural processes...

Moses, Michael Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

438

Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information/Protected  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information/Protected Health Information Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information/Protected Health Information The confidentiality and privacy rights of former workers are not only a legal requirement, they are crucial to establishing and maintaining credibility with the former worker community. All medical information that is collected as part of this program is treated as confidential and is used only as allowed by the Privacy Act of 1974. All FWP activities are conducted with the approval of the Institutional Review Boards, or Human Subjects Committees, of DOE and involved universities. All individuals sign an informed consent and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

439

Combined group ECC protection and subgroup parity protection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system are disclosed for providing combined error code protection and subgroup parity protection for a given group of n bits. The method comprises the steps of identifying a number, m, of redundant bits for said error protection; and constructing a matrix P, wherein multiplying said given group of n bits with P produces m redundant error correction code (ECC) protection bits, and two columns of P provide parity protection for subgroups of said given group of n bits. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the matrix P is constructed by generating permutations of m bit wide vectors with three or more, but an odd number of, elements with value one and the other elements with value zero; and assigning said vectors to rows of the matrix P.

Gara, Alan G.; Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

440

DIETARY OVERLAP IN FRUGIVOROUSAND INSECTIVOROUS BATS FROM EDAPHIC CERRADO HABITATS OF BRAZIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIETARY OVERLAP IN FRUGIVOROUSAND INSECTIVOROUS BATS FROM EDAPHIC CERRADO HABITATS OF BRAZIL north- eastern Brazil suggest significant ecologicalseparation of species. Nonetheless, recent sim edaphic Cerrado habitats on the Chapada do Araripe in northeastern Brazil. For each of the 11 most common

Willig, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Multiscale Sagebrush Rangeland Habitat Modeling in the Gunnison Basin of Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiscale Sagebrush Rangeland Habitat Modeling in the Gunnison Basin of Colorado Open-File Report" in Gunnison Basin, Colorado, 2007 (photograph by Lorie Brummer, U.S. Geological Survey). #12;Multiscale Sagebrush Rangeland Habitat Modeling in the Gunnison Basin of Colorado By Collin G. Homer, Cameron L

Aldridge, Cameron

442

Camas Creek (Meyers Cove) Anadromous Species Habitat Improvement: Annual Report 1989.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical agricultural practices and natural events contributed to severe degradation of riparian zones and instream fish habitat in the Meyers Cove area of Camas Creek. In 1984, Salmon National Forest personnel began implementing specific management activities in riparian areas and the stream channel to accelerate habitat recovery. In 1987--88, 4.3 miles of fence was constructed establishing a riparian livestock exclosure in the Meyers Cove area of Camas Creek. One end-gap and two water-crossing corridors were constructed in 1989 to complete the fence system. The riparian exclosure has been fertilized with phosphorous-rich fertilizer to promote root growth. A stream crossing ford was stabilized with angular cobble. Streambank stabilization/habitat cover work was completed at three sites and three additional habitat structures were placed. Extensive habitat inventories were completed to identify quality/quantity of habitat available to anadromous fish. The work accomplished was designed to promote natural revegetation of the riparian area to improve rearing habitat cover and streambank stability. Streambank work was limited to extremely unstable sites. Enhancement activities will improve spawning, incubation, and rearing habitat for wild populations of steelhead trout and chinook salmon. Anadromous species population increases resulting from these enhancement activities will provide partial compensation for downstream losses resulting from hydroelectric developments on the Columbia River system. 9 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Hardy, Terry

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Contrasting bee foraging in response to resource scale and local habitat management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mexico, we investigated the influence of coffee floral resource levels and habitat management on native of environmental cues in order to conserve energy and maximize resource acquisition. Because most habitats have is provisioned to offspring and the latter of which is mostly consumed by bees in order to sustain their high

444

Assessing certainty and uncertainty in riparian habitat suitability models by identifying parameters with extreme outputs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to introduce a computationally efficient uncertainty assessment approach using an index-based habitat suitability model. The approach focuses on uncertainty in ecological knowledge regarding parameters of index curves and weights. ... Keywords: Habitat model, Riparian vegetation, Suitability index, Uncertainty

Baihua Fu, Joseph H. A. Guillaume

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is an urgent need to capture metadata on the rapidly growing number of genomic, metagenomic and related sequences, such as 16S ribosomal genes. This need is a major focus within the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), and Habitat is a key metadata descriptor in the proposed 'Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) specification. The goal of the work described here is to provide a light-weight, easy-to-use (small) set of terms ('Habitat-Lite') that captures high-level information about habitat while preserving a mapping to the recently launched Environment Ontology (EnvO). Our motivation for building Habitat-Lite is to meet the needs of multiple users, such as annotators curating these data, database providers hosting the data, and biologists and bioinformaticians alike who need to search and employ such data in comparative analyses. Here, we report a case study based on semi-automated identification of terms from GenBank and GOLD. We estimate that the terms in the initial version of Habitat-Lite would provide useful labels for over 60% of the kinds of information found in the GenBank isolation-source field, and around 85% of the terms in the GOLD habitat field. We present a revised version of Habitat-Lite and invite the community's feedback on its further development in order to provide a minimum list of terms to capture high-level habitat information and to provide classification bins needed for future studies.

Kyrpides, Nikos; Hirschman, Lynette; Clark, Cheryl; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Mardis, Scott; Luciano, Joanne; Kottmann, Renzo; Cole, James; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Field, Dawn

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Sediment Quality Triad Assessment in Kachemak Bay: Characterization of Soft Bottom Benthic Habitats and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment Quality Triad Assessment in Kachemak Bay: Characterization of Soft Bottom Benthic Habitats. Sediment Quality Triad Assessment in Kachemak Bay: Characterization of Soft Bottom Benthic Habitats and Contaminant Bioeffects Assessment. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 104. 170pp. #12;iii Sediment Quality

447

Nekton of New Seagrass Habitats Colonizing a Subsided Salt Marsh in Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nekton of New Seagrass Habitats Colonizing a Subsided Salt Marsh in Galveston Bay, Texas SETH P at Galveston Island State Park, Texas, created new areas of subtidal habitat that were colonized by seagrasses loss of fisheries production (Zimmerman et al. 1991). Galveston Bay is the second largest coastal

448

Stream habitat and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) physiological stress responses to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stream habitat and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) physiological stress responses to streamside and sedimentation, loss of habitat complexity) are potentially stressful to stream-dwelling fish. We examined stream Columbia using 15 streams divided into three categories: old growth (reference), recently logged (clear

Hinch, Scott G.

449

Nest-Site Habitat of Cavity-Nesting Birds at the San Joaquin Experimental Range1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

279 Nest-Site Habitat of Cavity-Nesting Birds at the San Joaquin Experimental Range1 Kathryn L. Purcell2 and Jared Verner2 Abstract Detailed information about the nesting habitats of birds, including those needed for successful nesting, can provide a better understanding of the ecological factors

Standiford, Richard B.

450

Variation in habitat suitability does not always relate to variation in species' plant functional traits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Variation in habitat suitability does not always relate to variation...this positive relationship does not hold for some species...Cornelissen, J. H. C. , 2003 A handbook of protocols for standardised...Variation in habitat suitability does not always relate to variation...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

ELLIS, TIMOTHY ALAN. Assessing Nursery Quality for Southern Flounder, Paralichthys lethostigma, through Fish Energy Content and Habitat Abiotic Conditions. (Under the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitat quality were compared: fish energy content and habitat abiotic conditions. The hypothesis habitat quality. When measured on appropriate temporal and spatial scales, total fish energy contentABSTRACT ELLIS, TIMOTHY ALAN. Assessing Nursery Quality for Southern Flounder, Paralichthys

Buckel, Jeffrey A.

452

1www.aquaticinvaders.org Aquatic Invaders Volume 17 Number 3 Vol.17, No.3, July-September 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; University of Michigan; 401 E. Liberty, Suite 330; Ann Arbor, MI 48104 Introduction The increased spread Clearinghouse, a project of New York Sea Grant. Aquatic Invaders presents information on research, meetings

453

Aquatic Invasive Species Field Biology Technician Employer: Alex Latzka with Jake Vander Zanden, Bill Provencher, and Steve Carpenter.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

participate in field research relating to the ecology of aquatic invasive species in the Vilas and Oneida County region of northern Wisconsin. The students would work closely with graduate students at the Center

454

Productivity of the aquatic macrophyte community of the Holston River: implications to hypolimnetic oxygen depletions of Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were initiated in 1979 to evaluate the extensive aquatic macrophyte beds on the Holston River in upper east Tennessee. The primary aim of these studies was to determine if allochthonous input from drifting aquatic plant debris was a significant factor contributing to low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Cherokee Reservoir located downstream. This report presents the results of studies conducted in 1979-1980 to obtain refined estimate of the impact of allochthonous aquatic macrophyte input on DO levels in Cherokee Reservoir. The report also details phenological aspects of the growth and reproduction of the various species that comprise the submersed aquatic macrophyte community of the Holston River above Cherokee Reservoir and discusses the contribution of each to net primary productivity of the river. 31 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

Young, R.C.; Dennis, W.M.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

An Evaluation of the Effects of Geothermal Energy Development on Aquatic Biota in the Gysers Area of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

28. White, J . 1974. Geothermal energy i s not nonpolluting.required t o develop geothermal energy. American Water WorksOF THE EFFECTS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT ON AQUATIC

Resh, Vincent H.; Flynn, Thomas S.; Lamberti, Gary A; McElravy, Eric

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Aquatic Studies at the Proposed George Parkhouse I Reservoir Site on the South Sulphur River in Northeast Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1997, the Texas Water Development Board identified George Parkhouse I on the South Sulphur River in northeast Texas as a potential reservoir site. This aquatic survey of a future reservoir site is designed to provide information about stream fish...

Gelwick, Frances P.; Burgess, Christine C.

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

GRR/Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies [[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife]] Regulations & Policies Oregon Administrative Rules 635-415-0025 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the procedures required when a project will

458

Data Protection Office October 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Protection Office October 2010 AUTHORISATION FORM FOR DATA PROCESSING BY STUDENTS This form should be completed where students are processing personal data for research or study purposes. In order to meet the requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998 and ensure the personal data is being processed

Mottram, Nigel

459

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

Rissman, Adena

460

Look back at the U. S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae Close-Out Report NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program-Biodiesel from Algae July 1998 By John Sheehan Terri Dunahay John Benemann Paul Roessler Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuels Development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hyperspectral Aquatic Radiative Transfer Modeling Using a High-Performance Cluster Computing-Based Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract For aquatic studies, radiative transfer (RT) modeling can be used to compute hyperspectral above-surface remote sensing reflectance that can be utilized for inverse model development. Inverse models can provide bathymetry and inherent-and bottom-optical property estimation. Because measured oceanic field/organic datasets are often spatio-temporally sparse, synthetic data generation is useful in yielding sufficiently large datasets for inversion model development; however, these forward-modeled data are computationally expensive and time-consuming to generate. This study establishes the magnitude of wall-clock-time savings achieved for performing large, aquatic RT batch-runs using parallel computing versus a sequential approach. Given 2,600 simulations and identical compute-node characteristics, sequential architecture required ~100 hours until termination, whereas a parallel approach required only ~2.5 hours (42 compute nodes) a 40x speed-up. Tools developed for this parallel execution are discussed.

Filippi, Anthony M [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; King, Amy L [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Guneralp, Inci [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hyperspectral Aquatic Radiative Transfer Modeling Using a High-Performance Cluster Computing Based Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For aquatic studies, radiative transfer (RT) modeling can be used to compute hyperspectral above-surface remote sensing reflectance that can be utilized for inverse model development. Inverse models can provide bathymetry and inherent- and bottom-optical property estimation. Because measured oceanic field/organic datasets are often spatio-temporally sparse, synthetic data generation is useful in yielding sufficiently large datasets for inversion model development; however, these forward-modeled data are computationally expensive and time-consuming to generate. This study establishes the magnitude of wall-clock-time savings achieved for performing large, aquatic RT batch-runs using parallel computing versus a sequential approach. Given 2,600 simulations and identical compute-node characteristics, sequential architecture required {approx}100 hours until termination, whereas a parallel approach required only {approx}2.5 hours (42 compute nodes) - a 40x speed-up. Tools developed for this parallel execution are discussed.

Fillippi, Anthony [Texas A& M University; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; King, Amy L [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Guneralp, Inci [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Systematic review of the influence of foraging habitat on red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relationships between foraging habitat and reproductive success provide compelling evidence of the contribution of specific vegetative features to foraging habitat quality, a potentially limiting factor for many animal populations. For example, foraging habitat quality likely will gain importance in the recovery of the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis (RCW) in the USA as immediate nesting constraints are mitigated. Several researchers have characterized resource selection by foraging RCWs, but emerging research linking reproductive success (e.g. clutch size, nestling and fledgling production, and group size) and foraging habitat features has yet to be synthesized. Therefore, we reviewed peer-refereed scientific literature and technical resources (e.g. books, symposia proceedings, and technical reports) that examined RCW foraging ecology, foraging habitat, or demography to evaluate evidence for effects of the key foraging habitat features described in the species recovery plan on group reproductive success. Fitness-based habitat models suggest foraging habitat with low to intermediate pine Pinus spp. densities, presence of large and old pines, minimal midstory development, and herbaceous groundcover support more productive RCW groups. However, the relationships between some foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success are not well supported by empirical data. In addition, few regression models account for > 30% of variation in reproductive success, and unstandardized multiple and simple linear regression coefficient estimates typically range from -0.100 to 0.100, suggesting ancillary variables and perhaps indirect mechanisms influence reproductive success. These findings suggest additional research is needed to address uncertainty in relationships between foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success and in the mechanisms underlying those relationships.

Garabedian, James E. [North Carolina State University

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Wave-like aquatic propulsion of mono-hull marine vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper describes results of the experimental investigation of a small-scale mono-hull model boat propelled by a localised flexural wave propagating along the plate of finite width forming the boat's keel. Forward propulsion of the boat was achieved through flexural wave propagation in the opposite direction, which is similar to the aquatic propulsion used in nature by stingrays. The model boat under consideration underwent a series of tests both in a Perspex water tank and in an experimental pool. In particular, the forward velocity of the boat has been measured for different frequencies and amplitudes of the flexural wave. The highest velocity achieved was 32cm/s. The thrust and propulsive efficiency have been measured as well. The obtained value of the propulsive efficiency in the optimum regime was 51%. This indicates that the efficiency of this type of aquatic propulsion is comparable to that of dolphins and sharks (around 75%) and to that of a traditional propeller (around 70%). In contrast with a propeller though, the wave-like aquatic propulsion has the following advantages: it does not generate underwater noise and it is safe for people and marine animals.

V.V. Krylov; E. Porteous

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

HOME RANGE SIZE, MOVEMENT AND HABITAT USE FOR A POPULATION OF BLANDING'S TURTLES (EMYS BLANDINGII) IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOME RANGE SIZE, MOVEMENT AND HABITAT USE FOR A POPULATION OF BLANDING'S TURTLES (EMYS BLANDINGII TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES iii LIST OF TABLES iv HOME RANGE SIZE, MOVEMENT AND HABITAT USE. HOME RANGE AND HABITAT COMPOSITION MAPS FOR ALL 17 RADIO-TRACKED TURTLES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER

Janzen, Fredric

466

SECTION 7 Table of Contents 7 Coeur d' Alene Subbasin Inventory of Existing Programs Aquatic .................2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Environmental Quality are involved in programs that affect the land or water that provide habitat for fish-Shoshone Soil and Water Conservation District The current management strategies of Kootenai-Shoshone Soil and Water Conservation District (KSSWCD) can be summarized from excerpts of the District's current five

467

Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 56: 17001706 (1999) 1999 NRC Canada PERSPECTIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacifique (Oncorhynchus spp.) de la côte nord-ouest de l'Amérique du Nord ont connu des déclins régionaux et straying from their natal streams during spawning migrations. Management efforts aimed at expediting freshwater habitat in streams w

468

Caves contain unique habitats populated by specialized, endemic invertebrates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pro- duced only 2% of the speci- mens, but 30% of the species identi- fied. Future stud- ies ranked as rare at the state level (i.e., S1­S2). For some species, this ranking may reflect incomplete. Based on the observed diversity and endemicity, we determined that protecting six of the eight caves

Taylor, Steven J.

469

HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hardwood ­ conifer systems. 1.2 Justification Lowland spruce-fir forest covers approximately 10% of New spruce-fir or northern hardwood-conifer forest. Past harvesting in some of these areas have resulted in conversion of former spruce-fir sites to northern hardwood-conifer forest. 2.3 Protection and Regulatory

New Hampshire, University of

470

Fire Protection Account Request Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fire Protection System Account Request Form Fire Protection System Account Request Form To obtain a user id and password to access the Fire Protection system, please complete the form, save the file and email it to hssUserSupport@hq.doe.gov or print and fax it to 301-903-9823. We will provide a username and password to new account holders. Please allow several business days to process your account request. When your request is approved, you will be contacted with your

471

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Burlington Bottoms, Technical Report 1993-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burlington Bottoms, consisting of approximately 417 acres of riparian and wetland habitat, was purchased by the Bonneville Power Administration in November 1991. The site is located approximately 1/2 mile north of the Sauvie Island Bridge (T2N R1W Sections 20, 21), and is bound on the east side by Multnomah Channel and on the west side by the Burlington Northern Railroad right-of-way and U.S. Highway 30 (Figures 1 and 2). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Columbia and Willamette River Basin's Fish and Wildlife Program and Amendments. Under this Program, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. In 1993, an interdisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement quantitative Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) to document the value of various habitats at Burlington Bottoms. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. HEP participants included; Charlie Craig, BPA; Pat Wright, Larry Rasmussen, and Ron Garst, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service; John Christy, The Nature Conservancy; and Doug Cottam, Sue Beilke, and Brad Rawls, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Beilke, Susan

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1987.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead (Salmo gairdneri) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages over the last four years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production at full seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded attainment of full benefit of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration. According to the BPA Work Plan, project implementors have the primary responsibility for measuring physical habitat and estimating habitat change. To date, Idaho habitat projects have been implemented primarily by the US Forest Service (USFS). The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) have sponsored three projects (Bear Valley Mine, Yankee Fork, and the proposed East Fork Salmon River projects). IDFG implemented two barrier-removal projects (Johnson Creek and Boulder Creek) that the USFS was unable to sponsor at that time. The role of IDFG in physical habitat monitoring is primarily to link habitat quality and habitat change to changes in actual, or potential, fish production. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B. (Idaho Dept. of Fish and Game, Boise, ID (USA)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

UC leads effort to protect California forests from catastrophic fire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sierra Nevadas mixed conifer forests burned every 15 to 35These mixed conifer ing forest habitat characteristics

Warnert, Jeannette E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Influence of landscape elements on population densities and habitat use of three small-mammal species.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mabry, K.E., E.A. Dreelin, and G.W. Barrett. 2003. Influence of landscape elements on population densities and habitat use of three small-mammal species. J. Mammology. 84(1):20-25. Corridor effects on population densities and habitat use of 3 small mammal species were assessed in an experimentally fragmented landscape. Corridor presence did not have a statistically significant effect on population densities of cotton rats or cotton mice; however, a significant effect was observed for old-field mice. The results suggest that landscape fragmentation and habitat structure may have varying effects on population densities of different species.

Mabry, Karen, E.; Dreelin, Erin, A.; Barrett, Gary, W.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

FAQS Reference Guide Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the December 2003 edition of DOE-STD-1174-2003, Radiation Protection Functional Area Qualification Standard.

476

Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist) senior subject matter expert for health physics/radiation safety at the sites. You will...

477

Physical Protection of Classified Matter  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes policy and objectives for physical protection of classified matter. This directive does not cancel another directive. Chg 1, 7-30-93. Canceled by 5632.1C.

1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

478

Illinois Groundwater Protection Act (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the State of Illinois to restore, protect, and enhance the groundwaters of the State, as a natural and public resource. The State recognizes the essential and pervasive role of...

479

Model Fire Protection Assessment Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Assessment guide covers the implementation of the DOE's responsibility of assuring that DOE and the DOE Contractors have established Fire Protection Programs that are at the level required for the area being assessed.

480

Transforming Parks and Protected Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforming Parks and Protected Areas Policy and governance in a changing world Edited by Kevin S from the British Library Library of Congress Cataloging In Publication Data Transforming parks

Bolch, Tobias

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Radiological Protection for DOE Activities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes radiological protection program requirements that, combined with 10 CFR 835 and its associated implementation guidance, form the basis for a comprehensive program for protection of individuals from the hazards of ionizing radiation in controlled areas. Extended by DOE N 441.3. Cancels DOE 5480.11, DOE 5480.15, DOE N 5400.13, DOE N 5480.11; please note: the DOE radiological control manual (DOE/EH-0256T)

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

482

Department of Energy - Voluntary Protection Program Contract...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Contract Transition Process Department of Energy - Voluntary Protection Program Contract Transition Process The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE) Voluntary Protection...

483

Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2010 (Saskatchewan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Environmental Management and Protection Act of 2010 protects air, land, water resources and ecosystems of the province by managing and regulating potentially harmful activities and substances....

484

10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

485

Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

486

Voluntary Protection Program - Related Links | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Related Links Voluntary Protection Program - Related Links VPPPA - The Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association, a non- profit organization is leading the way in...

487

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

488

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous fish habitat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anadromous fish habitat Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Evaluating Effects of Climate Change onEvaluating...

489

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 2, Idaho, 1985 Annual and Final Reports.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The individual reports in this volume have been separately abstracted for inclusion in the data base. The reports describe fish habitat enhancement projects on the Lochsa River, Eldorado and Camas Creeks, and the Clearwater River. (ACR)

Hair, Don

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

The Effects of Habitat Complexity on the Cognitive Performance of Two Fish Species and Their Hybrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attributes. In the field, I quantified habitat complexity in populations of two species of swordtail fishes Xiphophorus birchmanni and X. malinche as well as two populations of naturally occurring X. birchmanni/X. malinche hybrids found in the Rio Calnali...

Chance, Heather

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

491

Songbirds as sentinels of mercury in terrestrial habitats of eastern North America  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) is a globally distributed environmental contaminant with a variety of deleterious effects in fish, wildlife, and humans. Breeding songbirds may be useful sentinels for Hg across diverse habitats b...

Allyson K. Jackson; David C. Evers; Evan M. Adams; Daniel A. Cristol

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Oil platforms off California are among the most productive marine fish habitats globally  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Artificial reef effect in relation to offshore renewable energy conversion...The ecology of benthopelagic fishes at offshore wind farms: A synthesis of 4 years of research...Habitat characteristics affecting fish assemblages on a Hawaiian coral...

Jeremy T. Claisse; Daniel J. Pondella II; Milton Love; Laurel A. Zahn; Chelsea M. Williams; Jonathan P. Williams; Ann S. Bull

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Assessment of estuarine habitats for resident and estuarine-dependent species: tools for conservation and management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to other tropical estuarine systems, they appear to provide important habitat for several economically- and ecologically-valued species. In the GOM, I examined the fish and invertebrate communities of adjacent oyster reef (oyster), vegetated marsh edge (VME...

Shervette, Virginia Rhea

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

494

Early View (EV): 1-EV High connectivity among habitats precludes the relationship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early View (EV): 1-EV High connectivity among habitats precludes the relationship between dispersal such as currents and larval behaviors (reviewed in Mora and Sale 2002), the use of PLD as a quantitative measure

Roy, Denis

495

The Coachella Valley Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan: A Decade of Delays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes the history of the Coachella Valley Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (CVMSHCP), ... than a decade to complete, and the long duration of these processes often results in...

Peter S. Alagona; Stephanie Pincetl

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Nekton of new seagrass habitats colonizing a subsided salt marsh in Galveston Bay, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Subsidence and erosion of intertidal salt marsh at Galveston Island State Park, Texas, created new areas of subtidal habitat that...Halophila engelmanni and shoalgrassHalodule wrightii as well as adjacent nonvege...

Seth P. King; P. Sheridan

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 1, Oregon, 1986 Final and Annual Reports.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes activities implemented for fisheries habitat improvement work on priority drainages in the Clackamas and Hood River sub-basins. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the reports on individual projects. (ACR)

Stuart, Amy

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Habitat-forming deep-sea corals in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We define habitat-forming deep-sea corals as those families of octocorals, hexacorals, and stylasterids with species that live deeper than 200 m, with a majority of species exhibiting complex branching morphol...

Peter Etnoyer; Lance E. Morgan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Building America Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat for Humanity, Edgewater, Florida  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case study describing a Habitat for Humanity home in coastal Florida with ICF walls, ducts in the thermal envelope in a furred-up ceiling chase, and HERS 49 without PV.

500

Characterization and Monitoring Data for Evaluating Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat in the Missouri River Mainstem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emergent sandbar habitat (ESH) in the Missouri River Mainstem System is a critical habitat element for several federally listed bird species: the endangered interior least tern (Sterna antillarum) and the threatened Northern Great Plains piping plover (Charadrius melodus). The Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) provides the primary operational management of the Missouri River and is responsible under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to take actions within its authorities to conserve listed species. To comply with the 2000 USFWS BiOp and the 2003 amended USFWS BiOp, the Corps has created habitats below Gavins Point Dam using mechanical means. Initial monitoring indicates that constructed sandbars provide suitable habitat features for nesting and foraging least terns and piping plovers. Terns and plovers are using constructed sandbars and successfully reproducing at or above levels stipulated in the BiOp. However, whether such positive impacts will persist cannot yet be adequately assessed at this time.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Downs, Janelle L.

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z