Sample records for aquatic habitat protection

  1. Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) provides for the protection of aquatic habitat and states that a permit is required: to alter the bed, bank or boundary of any water...

  2. arabiensis aquatic habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitat Hofmann, Hans A. 13 Aquatic Habitat Modifications in La Plata River Basin, Patagonia and Associated Marine Areas CiteSeer Summary: This paper describes the environmental...

  3. aquatic habitat covariates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitat Hofmann, Hans A. 15 Aquatic Habitat Modifications in La Plata River Basin, Patagonia and Associated Marine Areas CiteSeer Summary: This paper describes the environmental...

  4. anaerobic aquatic habitats: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitat Hofmann, Hans A. 13 Aquatic Habitat Modifications in La Plata River Basin, Patagonia and Associated Marine Areas CiteSeer Summary: This paper describes the environmental...

  5. Omak Creek acquisition protects endangered salmonid habitat ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to protect habitat for endangered salmon and steelhead along Omak Creek in Okano- gan County. This acquisition would protect spawning, rearing and migratory habitat of...

  6. The Effect of Shoreline Recreational Angling Activities on Aquatic and Riparian Habitat Within an Urban Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooke, Steven J.

    The Effect of Shoreline Recreational Angling Activities on Aquatic and Riparian Habitat Within activity may negatively impact littoral and riparian habitats independent of any direct or indirect influences of fish harvest or fishing mortality through mechanisms such as disturbance (e.g., trampling

  7. Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

  8. Jocko River Watershed conservation easement protects trout habitat...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6.25 acre habitat acquisition in Montana's Jocko River Watershed for fish habitat mitigation (see map). Located in Lake County in northwestern Montana, this property was selected...

  9. Utilization of submerged aquatic vegetation habitats by fishes and decapods in the Galvestion Bay Ecosystem, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Elizabeth A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . MATERIALS AND METHODS. . . . . . Page tu Site Selection. . Sampling Design. . Sampling Procedures. Statistical Analysis. 4 5 6 7 RESULTS. . Fish and Decapod Abundance and Distribution... the importance of physical, environtnental and other biological variables for each habitat site in relation to faunal density. MATERIALS AND METHODS Site Selection Three areas (six sites) within the Galveston Bay complex (Figure 1) were selected based...

  10. A discussion of best management practices for the South Esk Catchment: mitigation of a diminished aquatic habitat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Shiloh

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    agriculture in order to be placed into conservation programmes. These relationships can be vital to the success of a management plan. The establishment of buffer zones was established an appropriate mitigation measure for the improvement of the aquatic...

  11. The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the engineering and design of additional in-stream and bank restoration, and the treatment of invasive speciesThe health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration opportunities exist to protect and restore critical elements of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Habitat and Wildlife

  12. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  13. California spiny lobster (Panulirus interruptus) movement behavior and habitat use: Implications for the effectiveness of marine protected areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withy-Allen, Kira R.Y.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R. S. Steneck. 1993. Kelp beds as habitat for Americanin southern California kelp forest ecosystems. Science 312:and reduced expectations in kelp forest communities. Journal

  14. Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golder Associates, Inc.

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

  15. Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

  16. Aquatic Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranski, Dr. Michael J. [Catawba College

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an assessment of the natural area value of eight Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and seven Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties in east Tennessee. It follows a previous study in 2009 that analyzed and evaluated terrestrial natural areas on the Reservation. The purpose of both studies was to evaluate and rank those specially designated areas on the Reservation that contain sensitive species, special habitats, and natural area value. Natural areas receive special protections through established statutes, regulations, and policies. The ORR contains 33,542 acres (13,574 ha) administered by the Department of Energy. The surface waters of the Reservation range from 1st-order to 5th-order streams, but the majority of the streams recognized as ANAs and ARAs are 1st- and 2nd-order streams. East Fork Poplar Creek is a 4th-order stream and the largest watershed that drains Reservation lands. All the waters of the Reservation eventually reach the Clinch River on the southern and western boundaries of the ORR. All available information was collected, synthesized, and evaluated. Field observations were made to support and supplement the available information. Geographic information system mapping techniques were used to develop several quantitative attributes about the study areas. Narrative descriptions of each ANA and ARA and tables of numerical data were prepared. Criteria for assessment and evaluation were developed, and eight categories of factors were devised to produce a ranking system. The evaluation factors used in the ranking system were: (A) size of area, (B) percentage of watershed protected, (C) taxa present with protected status, (D) overall biotic diversity, (E) stream features, (F) water quality and use support ratings, (G) disturbance regime, and (H) other factors. Each factor was evaluated on a 5-point ranking scale (0-4), and each area received a composite score, where 32 was the maximum score possible. A highly ranked ANA or ARA is one that is large in size compared to other areas, includes a greater proportion of the watershed within Reservation boundaries, contains a number of status taxa at high densities, exhibits a high overall biodiversity, has very good or excellent habitat and water quality, is well protected and isolated from disturbances, and shows several other characteristics that contribute to natural area value. In this report, the term 'natural area' is loosely defined as a terrestrial or aquatic system that exhibits, or is thought to exhibit, high natural integrity and other significant natural values. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate and rank the currently recognized Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for their natural area value. A previous study (Baranski 2009) analyzed, evaluated, and ranked terrestrial areas (Natural Areas [NAs], Reference Areas [RAs], and Cooperative Management Areas [CMAs]) on the ORR for natural area value, and a precise methodology for natural area evaluation was developed. The present study is intended to be a complement and companion to the terrestrial area study and attempts to employ a similar methodology for aquatic areas so that aquatic and terrestrial areas can be compared on a similar scale. This study specifically develops criteria for assessing the ecological, biodiversity, and natural area importance and significance of aquatic systems on the Reservation in a relevant and consistent manner. The information can be integrated into the Tennessee Natural Heritage Program (http://tn.gov/environment/na/nhp.shtml) system and applied to potential new aquatic areas. Further, the information will be useful in planning, management, and protection efforts on the ORR.

  17. The role of social aggregations and protected areas in killer whale conservation: The mixed blessing of critical habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decline. On 20 August 2007, a barge loaded with $10,000 L of diesel sank in the area, exposing 25, protected areas have been used to mitigate effects of human activities on mammals such as grizzly bears

  18. Aquatic Life and Habitat Inventory Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belzer, Wayne

    >50% gravel or larger substrate; gravel, cobble, boulders; dominant substrate type is gravel or larger Moderately Stable 30-50% gravel or larger substrate; dominant substrate type is mix of gravel with some finer sediments Moderately... Unstable 10-29.9% gravel or larger substrate; dominant substrate type is finer than gravel, but may still be a mix of sizes Unstable gravel or larger substrate; substrate is uniform sand, silt, clay, or bedrock Score___1___ 4 3 2 1...

  19. CHAPTER SIX Stream Temperature and Aquatic Habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of increases in temper ature below darns and the outfall of the Hanford thermonuclear reactor. Conversely

  20. The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dams and barriers, construct fish passage, clean up marine debris, restore coastal wetlands, and remove including design and engineering of habitat restoration projects, on-the-ground restoration work, project. Acquiring damaged habitat is the first step in establishing a pipeline of GLRI-supported restoration

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) provides for the protection of aquatic habitat and states that...

  2. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

  3. March 4, 16, and 18 Chapter 6: Habitat Degradation and Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    March 4, 16, and 18 Chapter 6: Habitat Degradation and Loss Chapter 7: Habitat Fragmentation Chapter 12: Landscape Ecology and Management #12;· What constitutes habitat degradation? When is habitat habitat degradation · Pollution as a form of habitat degradation · Protect what's left · Conservation

  4. In press on Aquatic Sciences (paper accepted on 5th Buffagni et al., in press. The lentic lotic character of rivers and aquatic invertebrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armanini, David G

    In press on Aquatic Sciences (paper accepted on 5th May 2009) Buffagni et al., in press. The lentic-lotic character of rivers and aquatic invertebrates Key-words: Mediterranean rivers, Hydraulic habitat, LIFE index to identify the character of a river site in terms of local hydraulic conditions. Information about

  5. area aquatic resources: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    evaluated include the potential for loss of special-status (endangered, threatened, rare, or protected) species associated with habitat in the Project area, potential loss of...

  6. Commencement Bay cumulative impact study: Historic review of special aquatic sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats area, of which Commencement Bay is a part, has been designated by the Environmental Protection Agency as a Superfund site. Development in and around Commencement Bay have resulted in significant shoreline alterations, loss of substantial aquatic, mudflat and delta wetland habitat, and degradation of water quality. Dredging of nearshore areas to support port and harbor facilities for the Port of Tacoma has been carried out since the turn of the century by public and private industry. Areas south of the waterways have been diked, filled, and channelized for construction of storage buildings, shipping facilities, and various commercial and industrial purposes. Continued development pressures, maintenance dredging, and other activities necessitate an evaluation of the cumulative impacts of such activities on the remaining aquatic sites of Commencement Bay. Various resource agency and tribal recommendations resulted in the Commencement Bay Cumulative Impact Study, which was designed to produce the most complete historic record documenting loss of special aquatic sites. The baseline information will be used to quantify the cumulative impacts beginning in the mid-1800's through 1941 as a management tool. Commencement Bay is generally defined as a geographic region of south Puget Sound in Washington State extending from Brown's Point to Point Defiance. It provides a natural harbor for ships because there are no bars or other obstructions at the entrance to the bay.

  7. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

  8. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 22: 301­313, 2000 Published October 26 of the phytoplankton community. This community was dominated by cells, which averaged 77% (range 41 to 98, and might contribute to fueling planktonic communities with the limiting nutrient through regeneration. KEY

  9. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolan, John

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 41: 39­48, 2005 Published November 11 INTRODUCTION) as are microbes from discussions on biogeography (e.g. Pielou 1979, Lomolino & Heaney 2004) or ecological geography (Longhurst 1998). To some extent this is probably because of a perception

  10. Habitats keep commercial and recreational fisheries strong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sea level rise. So what can we do? Protect and restore habitat Investments by private groups not only for our fisheries but for the communities--and economies--that rely on them. San Francisco Bay Bay gone, but the dam or poorly designed culvert remains, still preventing fish from getting to habitat

  11. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to as bacterial pro- duction (BP). Bacterial respiration (BR) represents the end result of cellular metabolism) is used as an indicator of bacterial metabolism and carbon processing in the analysis of aquatic transects in the Hudson River estuary where there is a gradient in BP and BR along the flow path

  12. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caron, David

    al. 1994, Caron et al. 1995) and serve as an important source of mortality for bacteria, microalgae nanoplank- ton function in the transfer of carbon and energy to higher trophic levels and as important and energy flow in aquatic ecosystems. Traditionally, heterotrophic nanoplanktonic protists have been

  13. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  14. Restoration of Soldier Spring: an isolated habitat for native

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the channel and restore aquatic habitat along 450 m of degraded stream. Following treatment, the bed refilled in the stream declined as the degradation worsened, but it rebounded following the restoration treatments. While the stream. New restoration efforts began in 1998 with support from a number of tribal, federal, and school

  15. Evaluation of Macroinvertebrate Communities and Habitat for Selected Stream Reaches at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.J. Henne; K.J. Buckley

    2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second aquatic biological monitoring report generated by Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) Water Quality and Hydrology Group. The study has been conducted to generate impact-based assessments of habitat and water quality for LANL waterways. The monitoring program was designed to allow for the detection of spatial and temporal trends in water and habitat quality through ongoing, biannual monitoring of habitat characteristics and benthic aquatic macroinvertebrate communities at six key sites in Los Alamos, Sandia, Water, Pajarito, and Starmer's Gulch Canyons. Data were collected on aquatic habitat characteristics, channel substrate, and macroinvertebrate communities during 2001 and 2002. Aquatic habitat scores were stable between 2001 and 2002 at all locations except Starmer's Gulch and Pajarito Canyon, which had lower scores in 2002 due to low flow conditions. Channel substrate changes were most evident at the upper Los Alamos and Pajarito study reaches. The macroinvertebrate Stream Condition Index (SCI) indicated moderate to severe impairment at upper Los Alamos Canyon, slight to moderate impairment at upper Sandia Canyon, and little or no impairment at lower Sandia Canyon, Starmer's Gulch, and Pajarito Canyon. Habitat, substrate, and macroinvertebrate data from the site in upper Los Alamos Canyon indicated severe impacts from the Cerro Grande Fire of 2000. Impairment in the macroinvertebrate community at upper Sandia Canyon was probably due to effluent-dominated flow at that site. The minimal impairment SCI scores for the lower Sandia site indicated that water quality improved with distance downstream from the outfall at upper Sandia Canyon.

  16. Failed Recruitment of Southern Toads (Bufo terrestris) in a Trace Element-Contaminated Breeding Habitat: Direct and Indirect Effects That May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    of disposing of coal ash in open aquatic basins may result in sink habitats for some amphibian populations study in which embry- onic southern toads (Bufo terrestris) were held in a site polluted with coal ash

  17. RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1 Nancy Reichard2 1 Presented Resources. Redwood Community Action Agency. Eureka, Calif. Abstract: Protecting riparian habitat from livestock grazing on private land is a complex task that requires paying attention to sociological

  18. Annotated Checklist of the Aquatic snails of the Mariana Islands, Micronesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcilwain, Jenny

    Marine Laboratory University of Guam University of Guam Marine Laboratory Technical Report 147 March 2013 Ma'åse! #12;iv #12;v SUMMARY This report provides an annotated checklist of all the aquatic snails habitats. Guam's southern half is volcanic and laced with streams and a few sizable rivers, as well

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

  20. Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions between biota and their environment in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The group focuses particularly on the ecological interactions and their underlying ecological processes necessary to sustain ecosystem structure and function in their natural state

  1. Important Idaho habitat now protected through purchase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 12 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Thursday, June 28, 2012 CONTACT: IDFG, Michael Keckler, 208-287-2870 City of Boise, Adam Park 208-384-4402 BPA, Teresa...

  2. Important Idaho habitat now protected through purchase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |HotImpact ofVisiting20143 12 BONNEVILLE

  3. aquatic species program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    invasive species (AIS) is an aquatic parasite 5 Aquatic Pesticide Monitoring Program Review of Alternative Aquatic Pest Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

  4. Aquatic ecosystems: effects of solar ultraviolet radiation and interactions with other climatic change factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrest, Robert C.

    -water and terrestrial habitats.8 However, protection is not perfect, and UV-B can cause molecular damage to lipids in biomass productivity due to enhanced UV-B are relayed through all levels of the intricate food web

  5. PROTECTED AREAS AMENDMENTS AND.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as critical fish and wildlife habitat. The "protected areas" amendment is a major step in the Council's efforts to rebuild fish and wildlife populations that have been damaged by hydroelectric development. Low also imposed significant costs. The Northwest's fish and wildlife have suffered extensive losses

  6. Natural regeneration in two central Idaho grand fir habitat types. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geier-Hayes, K.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural regeneration of five conifer species was surveyed in two central Idaho grand fir habitat types. The habitat types range from warm, dry (grand fir/white spirea) to mesic (Grand fir/Mountain Maple). Four harvest-regeneration methods and four site preparation techniques were sampled. Recommendations for obtaining natural regeneration vary primarily by habitat type. Conifer seedlings in the warm, dry grand fir white spirea habitat type require site protection for establishment. In the mesic grand fir/mountain maple habitat type, tall shrub potential can reduce the opportunity to establish early seral conifer species.

  7. Waterfowl habitats on reclaimed surface mined lands in southwestern Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, W.G.; Klimstra, W.D.; Nawrot, J.R.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loss of quality wetland habitat is probably the most important factor affecting populations of waterfowl in the United States. To counteract this problem programs for protecting critical habitats have been established and research for innovative methods to create wetlands are being pursued. Recently, attention has been given to evaluation of wetland habitats on lands surface-mined and to methods of reclamation to enhance their development as part of future planning. These data indicate quality wetland habitats can be a legitimate aspect of reclaimed surface-mined lands; and selective overburden handling, grading so as to maximize biologically productive zones and selective plantings contribute importantly to their value. Currently bond release criteria by the Illinois regulatory authority for wildlife habitat and developed water resources discourages reclamation that would maximize quality wetland habitats. Suggested changes in these criteria include alternative vegetation requirements for wetland habitats, more leniency on seasonally inundated shallow water areas, and variation from topsoil requirements when adequate unconsolidated substitute material is available. It is believed that such allowances would result in incentives for the industry to develop wetland habitats so vital to continued enjoyment of waterfowl resources.

  8. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, David (South Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council, Ellensburg, WA); Ready, Carol A. (Kittitas County Water Purveyors, Ellensburg, WA)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage, headgates and fishways. These designs were used to submit for project implementation funding through the WA Salmon Recovery Funding Board. (4) Complete 6 early action projects on Ahtanum Creek--One gravity diversion was replaced with a pump and pump end screen and 5 pump end screens were installed. (5) Conduct two topographic surveys--For the City of Yakima on the Fruitvale diversion for the North Yakima Conservation District to support the installation of a pumping plant which would eliminate the need to divert directly from the Naches River and build the gravel berm each year during low flows. For the Taylor Ditch system for the North Yakima Conservation District to support as feasibility of opening the ditch for habitat and at the same time maintaining irrigation deliveries. (6) Procure materials for use in future YTAHP projects, including siphon pipe, delivery pipe, rock, screens, and water meters. These materials will act as match and support the completion of these subsequent YTAHP projects. Overall, with broad agency support and Action Plan funding through BPA, the YTAHP has achieved substantial enhancements that support aquatic species and which will leverage subsequent work through engineering designs and materials. The program was also able to establish the personnel and equipment support for beginning the stream assessment process on tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas Counties. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat.

  9. Earth & Aquatic Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth and Aquatic Sciences SHARE Earth and Aquatic Sciences Create and apply new knowledge across multiple scales to aid decision makers on the stewardship of air, water and land...

  10. INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology: old and new challenges Andrea Belgrano Looking up ``aquatic food web'' on Google provides a dizzying array of eclectic sites and information (and disinformation!) to choose from. However, even within this morass it is clear that aquatic food-web research has

  11. POTENTAIL HABITAT MOUNTAIN PLOVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that is bordered by I-25 to the east, property boundaries to the north and west, and the power plant to the south cover of yucca and cholla on hills characterize the area bordered by the solar evaporation ponds by the guard shack to the south, the plant to the west, and I-25 to the east is potential habitat. This town

  12. Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Geospatial Information Technologies at the National Academy of Sciences; Lead for the Spatial ApplicationNorthwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System (IBIS) for the Columbia River Basin(IBIS) for the Columbia

  13. Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled “Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary.” The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as “Salmonid Benefits,” was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  14. PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY Aquatic Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 3 1. Abstract Ten North Umpqua Hydroelectric Project impoundments were surveyed for aquatic invasive Energy's North Umpqua Hydroelectric Project includes 11 impoundments within the North Umpqua River

  15. Sustainable Aquatic Resources and Biotechnology (SARB)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Aquatic Resources and Biotechnology (SARB) Focus discipline areas: Food technology Systems Focus discipline areas: crop ecology & physiology, abiotic stress, genotype & environmental

  16. Aquatic Macroinvertebrates for Assessing Water Quality Effects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aquatic Macroinvertebrates for Assessing Water Quality Effects Associated with Bioenergy May 14 2015 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM Latha Baskaran, Environmental Sciences Division Center for...

  17. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh, 2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the mid-1980s, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) has been participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) efforts to mitigate for the negative impacts to fish and wildlife resulting from the development and operation of the 7 Columbia Basin Federal Hydropower System. BPA's mitigation obligations were formally recognized and mandated by the Northwest Power Act of 1980 and are guided by the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC's) Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA funds fish and wildlife projects throughout the Basin to meet the habitat and population restorative goals and objectives outlined in the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program and to fulfill its mitigation responsibilities under the Power Act. Impacts to wildlife resulting from hydrofacility construction/inundation were estimated using Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) in the mid and late 1980s and are documented in BPA' s Wildlife Loss Assessments (Rasmussen and Wright 1990,a,b,c,d) and in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lower Snake River Wildlife Habitat Compensation Evaluation (ACOE 1991). The loss assessments provided estimates of lost habitat quality and quantity for the target species selected to represent the habitat cover types impacted by hydropower construction/inundation. The NWPPC incorporated these losses into their Fish and Wildlife Program, recognizing them as the unannualized losses attributable to the construction/inundation of the federal hydropower system (NWPPC 1995 and 2000, Table 1 1-4). The HEP methodology is used by wildlife managers within the Columbia Basin to determine habitat values, expressed as Habitat Units, gained through BPA-funded mitigation project work. ODFW and the other Oregon wildlife managers (i.e., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Confederated Tribes of the Warms Springs Reservation of Oregon, Burns Paiute Tribe, and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation [CTUIR]) have been working together since 1991 to coordinate the planning, selection, and implementation of BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. In 1997, the Oregon wildlife managers developed a programmatic project for mitigation planning and implementation within Oregon. The Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area Additions project is one of many habitat acquisition and restoration projects proposed under the Oregon wildlife managers programmatic project that have been approved and recommended for funding by the NWPPC. The Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area Additions mitigation project will protect and restore wetland, riparian and other habitats on newly acquired parcels at ODFW's Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area (LMWA). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the acquisition and enhancement of Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area lands will contribute towards mitigating for habitat lost as a result of the development and operation of the Columbia Basin hydropower system. This report summarizes the HEP survey conducted in June 2001 to document the baseline habitat values on four parcels recently added to the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area: the 309.66-acre Wallender property, the 375.54-acre Simonis property, the 161.07-acre Conley Lake property, and the 74.55-acre Becker property. The 2001 HEP Team was comprised of the following members and agencies: Susan Barnes (ODFW), Allen Childs (CTUIR), Tracy Hames (Yakama Indian Nation), Dave Larson (ODFW), Cathy Nowak (Cat Tracks Wildlife Consulting), and Ken Rutherford (ODFW). Results of the HEP will be used to (1) determine the pre-restoration habitat values of the project sites, (2) the number of Habitat Units to be credited to BPA for protection of habitats within the project area, (3) determine the enhancement potential of the sites, and (4) develop a habitat management plan for the area.

  18. FINAL REPORT ON THE AQUATIC MERCURY ASSESSMENT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, N

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 2000, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 issued a proposed Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for total mercury in the middle and lower Savannah River. The initial TMDL, which would have imposed a 1 ng/l mercury limit for discharges to the middle/lower Savannah River, was revised to 2.8 ng/l in the final TMDL released in February 2001. The TMDL was intended to protect people from the consumption of contaminated fish, which is the major route of mercury exposure to humans. The most bioaccumulative form of mercury is methylmercury, which is produced in aquatic environments by the action of microorganisms on inorganic mercury. Because of the environmental and economic significance of the mercury discharge limits that would have been imposed by the TMDL, the Savannah River Site (SRS) initiated several studies concerning: (1) mercury in SRS discharges, SRS streams and the Savannah River, (2) mercury bioaccumulation factors for Savannah River fish, (3) the use of clams to monitor the influence of mercury from tributary streams on biota in the Savannah River, and (4) mercury in rainwater falling on the SRS. The results of these studies are presented in detail in this report. The first study documented the occurrence, distribution and variation of total and methylmercury at SRS industrial outfalls, principal SRS streams and the Savannah River where it forms the border with the SRS. All of the analyses were performed using the EPA Method 1630/31 ultra low-level and contaminant-free techniques for measuring total and methylmercury. Total mercury at National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) outfalls ranged from 0.31-604 ng/l with a mean of 8.71 ng/l. Mercury-contaminated groundwater was the source for outfalls with significantly elevated mercury concentrations. Total mercury in SRS streams ranged from 0.95-15.7 ng/l. Mean total mercury levels in the streams varied from 2.39 ng/l in Pen Branch to 5.26 ng/l in Tims Branch. Methylmercury ranged from 0.002 ng/l in Upper Three Runs to 2.60 ng/l in Tims Branch. Total mercury in the Savannah River ranged from 0.62 ng/l to 43.9 ng/l, and methylmercury ranged from 0.036 ng/l to 7.54 ng/l. Both total and methylmercury concentrations were consistently high in the river near the mouth of Steel Creek. Total mercury was positively correlated with methylmercury (r = 0.88). Total mercury bound to particulates ranged from 41% to 57% in the river and from 28% to 90% in the streams. Particulate methylmercury varied from 9% to 37% in the river and from 6% to 79% in the streams. Small temporary pools in the Savannah River swamp area near and around Fourmile Branch had the highest concentrations observed in the Savannah River watershed, reaching 1,890 ng/l for total mercury and 34.0 ng/l for methylmercury. The second study developed a mercury bioaccumulation factor (BAF) for the Savannah River near SRS. A BAF is the ratio of the concentration of mercury in fish flesh to the concentration of mercury in the water. BAFs are important in the TMDL process because target concentrations for mercury in water are computed from BAFs. Mercury BAFs are known to differ substantially among fish species, water bodies, and possibly seasons. Knowledge of such variation is needed to determine a BAF that accurately represents average and extreme conditions in the water body under study. Analysis of fish tissue and aqueous methylmercury samples collected at a number of locations and over several seasons in a 110 km (68 mile) reach of the Savannah River demonstrated that BAFs for each species under study varied by factors of three to eight. Influences on BAF variability were location, habitat and season-related differences in fish mercury levels and seasonal differences in methylmercury levels in the water. Overall (all locations, habitats, and seasons) average BAFs were 3.7 x 10{sup 6} for largemouth bass, 1.4 x 10{sup 6} for sunfishes, and 2.5 x 10{sup 6} for white catfish. This study showed that determination of representative BAFs for large rivers requires the collect

  19. aquatic life protection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 5 UBC Social Ecological Economic Development...

  20. Aquate Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrim County,Delhi (NCT), IndiaOpenAquate Solar Jump to:

  1. aquatic organisms investigations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Azam et al. 1983). Net DOC Hansell, Dennis 106 Aquatic Pesticide Monitoring Program Review of Alternative Aquatic Pest Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

  2. aquatic suction performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    suction feeding, while clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 12 Aquatic Series AQUATIC...

  3. aquatic insect behaviours: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 48 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  4. anopheles arabiensis aquatic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 27 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  5. annual aquatic toxicity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 47 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  6. aquatic fungus blastocladiella: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 24 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  7. aquatic humic substances: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 34 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  8. aquatic toxicity workshop: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 46 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  9. aquatic immunotoxicological studies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 38 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  10. aquatic bacterial production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 48 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  11. aquatic bacterium caulobacter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 29 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  12. aquatic pathogen viral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 42 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  13. aquatic toxicity classification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 44 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  14. aquatic midge chironomus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 37 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  15. aquatic toxicity properties: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 40 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  16. Human Assisted Robotic Team Campaigns for Aquatic Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. J. (2007a). Autonomous robotic sensing experiments at sanand development of a wireless robotic networked aquaticHuman Assisted Robotic Team Campaigns for Aquatic Monitoring

  17. aquatic environment part: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Range, the effects of these alterations on aquatic ecosystems and biota were probably small 17 ASSESSEMENT OF THE AQUATIC MACROPHYTE ENVIRONMENT WITH ESPECIAL EMPHASIS OF USING...

  18. aquatic bioaccumulation model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conservation www.geog.ucl.ac.ukaquatic LONDON'S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY 12;Sampling a small shallow lake (Picture: Carl Sayer) Aquatic Science at UCL of our aquatic resources....

  19. Aquatic eutrophication promotes pathogenic infection in amphibians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Pieter

    Aquatic eutrophication promotes pathogenic infection in amphibians Pieter T. J. Johnson* , Jonathan-scale agents of environmental change affect host­pathogen interactions. Acceler- ated eutrophication of aquatic experimental evidence linking eutrophication and disease in a multihost parasite system. The trematode parasite

  20. Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management Plans in Oregon Maribeth V. Gibbons is an integrated aquatic vegetation management plan? When is an IAVMP required? Part II: Developing a Plan Chapter and Reservoirs · Portland State University · Portland OR 97207 #12;Acknowledgements This manual benefited

  1. Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix D Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum #12;COPYRIGHT DECEMBER Series 2 and Pond Series 3 Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Prepared for Bureau of Reclamation HILL, INC. III Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses

  2. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biological resource publications Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan for Los Alamos National Laboratory Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and...

  3. Protection 1 Protection 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampson, Butler W.

    Protection 1 Protection 1 Butler W. Lampson Xerox Corporation Palo Alto, California Abstract is a malicious act or accident that crashes the system--- this might be considered the ultimate degradation. 1, p 437. It was reprinted in ACM Operating Systems Rev. 8, 1 (Jan. 1974), p 18. This version

  4. Protection 1 Protection1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampson, Butler W.

    Protection 1 Protection1 Butler W. Lampson Xerox Corporation Palo Alto, California Abstract is a malicious act or accident that crashes the system-- this might be considered the ultimate degradation. 1, p 437. It was reprinted in ACM Operating Systems Rev. 8, 1 (Jan. 1974), p 18. This version

  5. Assessing Perpetual Conservation Easements as a Tool for Land Protection: The Private Landowner Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroman, Dianne A

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Perpetual conservation easements have become one the primary tools used for long-term land protection and are credited with helping protect endangered species, preventing habitat fragmentation, maintaining ecosystem functions and conserving working...

  6. Terrestrial habitat mapping of the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1996 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington-Allen, R.A.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE is in the process of remediating historical contamination on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Two key components are ecological risk assessment and monitoring. In 1994 a strategy was developed and a specific program was initiated to implement the strategy for the terrestrial biota of the entire ORR. This document details results of the first task: development of a habitat map and habitat models for key species of interest. During the last 50 years ORR has been a relatively protected island of plant and animal habitats in a region of rapidly expanding urbanization. A preliminary biodiversity assessment of the ORR by the Nature Conservancy in 1995 noted 272 occurrences of significant plant and animal species and communities. Field surveys of threatened and endangered species show that the ORR contains 20 rare plant species, 4 of which are on the state list of endangered species. The rest are either on the state list of threatened species or listed as being of special concern. The ORR provides habitat for some 60 reptilian and amphibian species; more than 120 species of terrestrial birds; 32 species of waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds; and about 40 mammalian species. The ORR is both a refuge for rare species and a reservoir of recruitment for surrounding environments and wildlife management areas. Cedar barrens, river bluffs, and wetlands have been identified as the habitat for most rare vascular plant species on the ORR.

  7. Title 5 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 95 Protection of Fish...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chapter 95 Protection of Fish and Game Habitat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 5 Alaska...

  8. Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, E. E.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on lessons learned from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Aquatic Species Program 1978-1996 microalgae R&D activities, presented at the 2008 AFOSR Workshop in Washington, D.C.

  9. Digital holographic imaging of aquatic species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domínguez-Caballero, José Antonio

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this thesis is to design, develop and implement a digital holographic imaging (DHI) system, capable of capturing three-dimensional (3D) images of aquatic species. The images produced by this system are used in ...

  10. Geopressured habitat: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-de Wys, Jane

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review of the geopressured-geothermal habitat is summarized. Findings are presented and discussed with respect to the principal topics: Casual agents are both geological and geochemical; they include disequilibrium compaction of sediments, clay diagenesis, aquathermal pressuring, hydrocarbon generation, and lateral tectonic compression. The overall physical and chemical characteristics of the habitats are dictated by varying combinations of sedimentation rates, alteration mineralogy, permeability, porosity and pressure, temperature, fluid content and chemistry, and hydrodynamic flow. Habitat pressure seals are considered in terms of their formation processes, geologic characteristics, and physical behavior, including pressure release and reservoir pressure recharge on a geologic time scale. World-wide occurrence of geopressured-geothermal habitats is noted. The main thrust of this topic concerns the U.S.A. and Canada; in addition, reference is made to occurrences in China and indications from deep-sea vents, as well as the contribution of paleo-overpressure to habitat initiation and maintenance. Identification and assessment of the habitat is addressed in relation to use of hydrogeologic, geophysical, geochemical, and geothermic techniques, as well as well-logging and drill-stem-test data. Conclusions concerning the adequacy of the current state of knowledge and its applicability to resource exploration and development are set forth, together with recommendations for the thrust of future work.

  11. Determining Home Range and Preferred Habitat of Feral Horses on the Nevada National Security Site Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Ashley V. [NSTec

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Feral horses (Equus caballus) are free-roaming descendants of domesticated horses and legally protected by the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, which mandates how feral horses and burros should be managed and protected on federal lands. Using a geographic information system to determine the home range and suitable habitat of feral horses on the federally managed Nevada National Security Site can enable wildlife biologists in making best management practice recommendations. Home range was estimated at 88.1 square kilometers. Site suitability was calculated for elevation, forage, slope, water presence and horse observations. These variables were combined in successive iterations into one polygon. Suitability rankings established that 85 square kilometers are most suitable habitat, with 2,052 square kilometers of good habitat 1,252 square kilometers of fair habitat and 122 square kilometers of least suitable habitat.

  12. 3 Environmental Conditions 3.1 Characterization of Aquatic Habitat Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BLM 1997, 2000; NRCS 2000 for specific methods), which define the ecological condition of streams in the Clover Creek (East Fork Bruneau) subwatershed and include Cedar, Cherry, House, Pole, Shack, and Three

  13. River bed restoration boosts habitat mosaics and the demography of two rare non-aquatic vertebrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    e Office de Construction des Routes Nationales, Etat du Valais, CH-1950 Sion, Switzerland a r t i c stream under- went radical transformation as it mutated into a heterogeneous braided river boosting, essentially via the construction of levees and embankments for constraining water flow. Containments have

  14. LONGITUDINAL PATTERNS IN STREAM CHANNEL GEOMORPHOLOGY AND AQUATIC HABITAT IN THE LUQUILLO MOUNTAINS OF PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF PUERTO RICO Andrew Stephen Pike A DISSERTATION in Earth and Environmental Science Presented and logistical support while in the field was made possible by the El Verde Field Station (University of Puerto Rico), the Sabana Research Center (United States Forest Service), and the International Institute

  15. Delta Subsidence Reversal, Levee Failure, and Aquatic Habitat—A Cautionary Tale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Matthew E.; Lund, Jay R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CS, Brown TA. 2009a. Peat accretion histories during thedrainage on the remaining peat in the Sacramento–San JoaquinCS, Brown TA. 2009a. Peat accretion histories during the

  16. Wildlife Supplement Table 1. Land protection status by habitat type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponderosa pine forest and woodlands 4739 High 13 Low 1341 None 3385 Subalpine parkland 4394 High 2883 Low

  17. Land Acquisition protects fish habitat in Wahkiakum County -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (BPA) is proposing to fund the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) through its contract with the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP) to acquire 305 acres of hillside forest,...

  18. Hay Creek conservation easement protects trout habitat in Flathead...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    map). Once the proposed land is acquired, which is expected in spring 2009, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks would convey a conservation easement on the property to BPA to ensure...

  19. Acquisition protects fish habitat in Yakima County Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities. The property would be owned and managed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. September 2008 Land to get management plan Once this property has been...

  20. Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMakeEducationRemediationDepartment of Energy Identifying

  1. Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse(Expired)of Energy Photo Gallery:Boosting

  2. Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

  3. anaerobic aquatic environments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecology Websites Summary: AQUATIC BIOLOGY Aquat Biol Vol. 13: 79-88, 2011 doi: 10.3354ab00353 Published online July 21 INTRODUCTION Killer whales Orcinus orca are top...

  4. aquatic contaminants alter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: DISEASES OF AQUATIC ORGANISMS Dis Aquat Org Vol. 104: 203-214, 2013 doi: 10.3354dao02587 Published June 13 INTRODUCTION Iridoviruses are a family of large,...

  5. aquatic lebanese environments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecology Websites Summary: AQUATIC BIOLOGY Aquat Biol Vol. 13: 79-88, 2011 doi: 10.3354ab00353 Published online July 21 INTRODUCTION Killer whales Orcinus orca are top...

  6. aquatic environments adjacent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecology Websites Summary: AQUATIC BIOLOGY Aquat Biol Vol. 13: 79-88, 2011 doi: 10.3354ab00353 Published online July 21 INTRODUCTION Killer whales Orcinus orca are top...

  7. aquatic food webs: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to choose from. However, even within this morass it is clear that aquatic food-web research has 2 Distribution of Phthalate Esters in a Marine Aquatic Food Web...

  8. Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 6. Tritium Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 6. Tritium Universität HeidelbergInstitut für Umweltphysik 1 Physics of Aquatic Systems II ­ 6. Tritium Werner Aeschbach-Hertig Institute of Environmental Physics University of Heidelberg Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 6. Tritium Universität HeidelbergInstitut für Umweltphysik 2

  9. GEOMORPHIC AND AQUATIC CONDITIONS INFLUENCING SALMONIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TO ECOSYSTEM CLASSIFICATION LIBRARY HATFIELD MARINE SCfEHC£CENTER" OREGON STATE UNIVERS.TY NEWPORT; OREGONGEOMORPHIC AND AQUATIC CONDITIONS INFLUENCING SALMONIDS AND STREAM CLASSIFICATION ,WITH APPLICATION . . . . . : ··: ·· ~.... : :.... : ·· .. . I. · MARltYN pons GUIN LIBRARY, . · HATFIELD MARt'NE SC!l:Nj;E CENtER . OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

  10. #~i;:~~.:(' . AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -4 EFFECTS OF WATER CHEMISTRY ON SUBMERSED AQUATIC PLANTS: A SYNTHESIS by R. Michael Smart Environmental. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City. State, and ZIP Code) 3909 Halls Ferry Road IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION (If applicable) US Army Corps of Engineers Be. ADDRESS (City, Stitte

  11. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement at Mountaintop Mining Sites Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D. Courtney; Lawson, Peter; Morgan, John; Maggard, Randy; Schor, Horst; Powell, Rocky; Kirk, Ed. J.

    2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to this symposium which is part of the ongoing effort to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding mountaintop mining and valley fills. The EIS is being prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Surface Mining, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the State of West Virginia. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement (AEE) at mountaintop mining sites is one of fourteen technical areas identified for study by the EIS Interagency Steering Committee. Three goals were identified in the AEE Work Plan: 1. Assess mining and reclamation practices to show how mining operations might be carried out in a way that minimizes adverse impacts to streams and other environmental resources and to local communities. Clarify economic and technical constraints and benefits. 2. Help citizens clarify choices by showing whether there are affordable ways to enhance existing mining, reclamation, mitigation processes and/or procedures. 3. Ide identify data needed to improve environmental evaluation and design of mining projects to protect the environment. Today’s symposium was proposed in the AEE Team Work Plans but coordinated planning for the event began September 15, 1999 when representatives from coal industry, environmental groups and government regulators met in Morgantown. The meeting participants worked with a facilitator from the Canaan Valley Institute to outline plans for the symposium. Several teams were formed to carry out the plans we outlined in the meeting.

  12. Mapping locust habitats in River Ili Delta, Kazakhstan, using Landsat imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchininsky, Alexandre

    Mapping locust habitats in River Ili Delta, Kazakhstan, using Landsat imagery Ramesh Sivanpillai a Protection, Almaty, Kazakhstan Received 11 August 2005; received in revised form 10 March 2006; accepted 21 March 2006 Available online 3 May 2006 Abstract The River Ili delta in southeast Kazakhstan

  13. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaempts, Eric

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  14. Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

  15. Toxicity of trifluoroacetate to aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berends, A.G.; Rooij, C.G. de [Solvay S.A., Brussels (Belgium); Boutonnet, J.C. [Elf Atochem, Levallois-Perret (France); Thompson, R.S. [Zeneca Ltd., Devon (United Kingdom). Brixham Environmental Lab.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the atmospheric degradation of several hydrofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons, trifluoroacetate (TFA) will be formed. Through precipitation, TFA will enter aquatic ecosystems. To evaluate the impact on the aquatic environment, an aquatic toxicity testing program was carried out with sodium trifluoroacetate (NaTFA). During acute toxicity tests, no effects of NaTFA on water fleas (Daphnia magna) and zebra fish (Danio retrio) were found at a concentration of 1,200 mg/L. A 7-d study with duckweed (Lemna gibba Ge) revealed a NOEC of 300 mg/L. On the basis of the results of five toxicity tests with Selenastrum capricornutum, they determined a NOEC of 0.12 mg/L. However, algal toxicity tests with NaTFA and Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus subspicatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Eugelan gracilis, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Navicula pelliculosa, Skeletonema costatum, Anabaena flos-aquae, and Microcystis aeruginosa resulted in EC50 values that were all higher than 100 mg/L. The toxicity of TFA to S. capricornutum could be due to metabolic defluorination to monofluoroacetate (MFA), which is known to inhibit the citric acid cycle. A toxicity test with MFA and S. capricornutum revealed it to be about three orders of magnitude more toxic than TFA. However, a bioactivation study revealed that defluorination of TFA was less than 4%. On the other hand, S. capricornutum exposed to a toxic concentration of NaTFA showed a recovery of growth when citric acid was added, suggesting that TFA (or a metabolite of TFA) interferes with the citric acid cycle. A recovery of the growth of S. capricornutum was also found when TFA was removed from the test solutions. Therefore, TFA should be considered algistatic and not algicidic for S. capricornutum. On the basis of the combined results of the laboratory tests and a previously reported semi-field study, they can consider a TFA concentration of 0.10 mg/L as safe for the aquatic ecosystem.

  16. The Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills Habitat DescriptionDescriptionDescriptionDescriptionDescription

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    by ancient oceans that rose and then receded in response to melting and freezing of polar ice caps. Beaches, characterized by rolling hills capped by deep coarse sands. They are wedged between the Coastal Plain, gopher tortoises are keystone species -- other animals and plants in the habitat are affected by tortoise

  17. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkman, Jed (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002 and 2003, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts on private properties in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of this effort is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled nine properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and four properties on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Major accomplishments during the reporting period include the following: (1) Secured approximately $229,000 in project cost share; (2) Purchase of 46 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River to be protected perpetually for native fish and wildlife; (3) Developed three new 15 year conservation easements with private landowners; (4) Installed 3000 feet of weed barrier tarp with new plantings within project area on the mainstem Walla Walla River; (5) Expanded easement area on Couse Creek to include an additional 0.5 miles of stream corridor and 32 acres of upland habitat; (6) Restored 12 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River and 32 acres on Couse Creek to native perennial grasses; and (7) Installed 50,000+ new native plants/cuttings within project areas.

  18. Striped Bass Habitat Selection Rules in Reservoirs without Suitable Summer Habitat Offer Insight into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .--The traditional view of habitat requirements for inland striped bass Morone saxatilis suggests that these fish 2 mg/L. Once hypoxia forced striped bass into warmer water, the fish concentrated at the top to provide suitable habitat for adult fish. In severe cases, suitable habitat for adult striped bass may

  19. aquatic origin bcr: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORIGINAL PAPER Tackling aquatic invasions: risks and opportunities for the aquarium fish industry invasions. A restrictive analysis using conservative estimates of fish...

  20. aquatic biota downstream: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for optimizing bioaccumulation parameters (BAF and BSAF) in aquatic species, such as fish, whose exposure history. Keywords: Bioaccumulation factor Exposure range BSAF Sediments...

  1. aquatic plant management: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant Manage. 46: 1-7 Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: % of the fish species listed in the Endangered Spe- cies Act (Lassuy 1994). Invasive aquatic plant...

  2. aquatic biota preliminary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for optimizing bioaccumulation parameters (BAF and BSAF) in aquatic species, such as fish, whose exposure history. Keywords: Bioaccumulation factor Exposure range BSAF Sediments...

  3. aquatic toxicity tests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    suction feeding, while clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 132 AQUATIC CONSERVATION:...

  4. antarctic aquatic species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 194 Aquatic Botany 78 (2004) 361369 The...

  5. aquatic species project: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 179 Aquatic Botany 78 (2004) 361369 The...

  6. aquatic toxicity testing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    suction feeding, while clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 132 AQUATIC CONSERVATION:...

  7. aquatic utricularia species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 148 Aquatic Botany 78 (2004) 361369 The...

  8. aquatic species carcinogen: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 157 Aquatic Botany 78 (2004) 361369 The...

  9. aquatic insect larvae: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their potential to observe cold adaptations in living insect larvae Hammerton, James 5 APPLIED ISSUES Impacts of cattle on amphibian larvae and the aquatic Biology and...

  10. aquatic management options: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Anthropogenic impacts such as fishing and eutrophication are significant challenges to the sustainable management of aquatic ecosystems....

  11. aquatic pollution monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 39 Potential uses and constraints of...

  12. aquatic mercury assessment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 4 Dark Oxidation of Dissolved and Liquid...

  13. aquatic exposure assessment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 2 Olfactory assessment of predation risk in...

  14. aquatic environment state: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    176 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: ;l and organismal level to population-level impacts; 12;Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms 143 considerations Toxicity...

  15. Aquatic Debris Monitoring Using Smartphone-Based Robotic Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to capture debris arrivals with reduced energy consumption. Keywords--Robotic sensor; aquatic debris of monitoring resolution. Re- cently, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) [14] [31] have been used

  16. aquatic natural organic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbellaria, New Caledonia, Piscinquilinus Boyer, Edmond 15 Calculating the ecological impacts of animal-borne instruments on aquatic organisms Environmental Sciences and Ecology...

  17. aquatic ecological risk: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    176 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: ;l and organismal level to population-level impacts; 12;Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms 143 considerations Toxicity...

  18. aquatic hyphomycete clavariopsis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions between biota and their environment in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The group focuses particularly on the...

  19. aquatic macrophyte ecotoxicology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic matter; CPOM 1. Introduction Retention of particulate Horvath, Thomas G. 7 Impacts of grass carp and hybrid carp on aquatic macrophytes and endemic fish populations...

  20. Outcomes of Chronic Arsenic Exposure on Aquatic Insects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mogren, Christina Loraine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) feeding andNotonecta unifasciata Guerin (Hemiptera: Notonectidae). PhDand fungi by aquatic Hemiptera, Trichoptera, and other

  1. aquatic organisms submitted: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology Websites Summary: marine turtles as model aquatic organisms and conducted wind tunnel experiments to measure the fluid drag marine taxa. 3. The drag of the marine...

  2. aquatic resource health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aquatic & Invasive Plants Resources you can use 12; Plant Information Watson, Craig A. 5 Health Care Resource Guide Physics Websites Summary: Health Care Resource Guide 2014 for...

  3. Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

  4. aquatic weed control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    saw timber, and burls. Culvert repairreplacement, road restoration or decommissioning, slope stabilization, habitat improvement projects, stream improvement projects,...

  5. Focal Species and Representative Habitats Chuck Peven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) recruitment, and flood control efforts that include LWD removal, berm construction, and stream channelization extensively at habitat use and conditions within the Wenatchee River Basin. They used the Habitat Quality any of the variation for bull trout, while the total salmonid density and biomass varied significantly

  6. Aquatic species project report: FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.M. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Sprague, S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project, which is managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The project is focused on applying genetic engineering techniques to enhance the lipid, or oil, production of microalgae. Those lipids can be extracted and processed into high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. Because microalgae require carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse'' gas, as a nutrient, project researchers also study the role that microalgae could play in a possible global climate change mitigation strategy.

  7. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant control Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crafts 1973). Bartley and Gangstad (1974) reported that for aquatic plant control, acrolein... al. 1989). Fluridone is used to control a variety of aquatic plant species in...

  9. aquatic case-bearing moths: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 50 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophyte detritus Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    matter by macrophytes in a first... . The effects of aquatic macrophytes on the stream microenvironment. Aquat. Bot. 14, 309-324. Hearne, J... .A., 1991. The measurement...

  11. Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research...

  12. Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents...

  13. Protective Force

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes requirements for management and operation of the DOE Protective Force (PF), establishes requirements for firearms operations and defines the firearms courses of fire. Cancels: DOE M 473.2-1A DOE M 473.2-2

  14. Aquatic primary production in a high-CO2 world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fussman, Gregor

    Aquatic primary production in a high-CO2 world Etienne Low-De´carie, Gregor F. Fussmann, and Graham-Penfield, Montreal, QC, H3A 1B1, Canada Here, we provide a review of the direct effect of increas- ing CO2 on aquatic: the assessment of theories about limitation of productivity and the integration of CO2 into the co

  15. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  16. aquatic food web: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aquatic food web First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs'...

  17. Protective Force

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes requirements for management and operation of the DOE Protective Force, establishes requirements for firearms operations and defines the firearms courses of fire. Chg 1 dated 3/7/06. DOE M 470.4-3A cancels DOE M 470.4-3, Chg 1, Protective Force, dated 3-7-06, Attachment 2, Contractor Requirement Document (CRD) only (except for Section C). Chg 1, dated 3-7-06, cancels DOE M 470.4-3

  18. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Chg 1, dated 3/7/06. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B

  19. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B.

  20. Corrosion protection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  1. Intense ultraviolet perturbations on aquatic primary producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guimarais, Mayrene; Horvath, Jorge

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last decade, the hypothesis that one or more biodiversity drops in the Phanerozoic eon, evident in the geological record, might have been caused by the most powerful kind of stellar explosion so far known (Gamma Ray Bursts) has been discussed in several works. These stellar explosions could have left an imprint in the biological evolution on Earth and in other habitable planets. In this work we calculate the short-term lethality that a GRB would produce in the aquatic primary producers on Earth. This effect on life appears as a result of ultraviolet (UV) re-transmission in the atmosphere of a fraction of the gamma energy, resulting in an intense UV flash capable of penetrating ~ tens of meters in the water column in the ocean. We focus on the action of the UV flash on phytoplankton, as they are the main contributors to global aquatic primary productivity. Our results suggest that the UV flash could cause an hemispheric reduction of phytoplankton biomass in the upper mixed layer of the World Ocean o...

  2. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

  3. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

  4. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopacky, Richard C.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

  5. Classification of Seafloor Habitats using Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    habitats. The initial motivation to use GP for this task came from a work on diesel engine diagnosis [11 are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full

  6. Aquatic chemistry of selenium: evidence of biomethylation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, T.D.; Bruland, K.W.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical species of dissolved selenium were examined in surface waters from three sites in the San Joaquin and Imperial Valleys of California. Six dissolved selenium species were identified: the inorganic species selenate and selenite; nonvolatile organic selenides, including seleno amino acids and a dimethylselenonium ion; and the volatile methylated forms dimethyl selenide and dimethyl diselenide. The occurrences of methylated selenium species in the aquatic environment has important implications regarding the biogeochemical behavior of selenium in natural aqueous systems. Laboratory studies indicate that the nonvolatile dimethylselenonium ion can be transformed into volatile dimethyl selenide at neutral pH, providing a pathway for the in situ production of dimethyl selenide in natural waters. Geochemical flux calculations indicate that outgassing of dimethyl selenide may be an important removal mechanism for dissolved selenium from aqueous systems. 22 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  7. Habitat restoration on naval petroleum reserves in Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C. [EG& G Energy Measurements, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of several task performed under contract to the Department of Energy (DOE) by EG & G Energy Measurements as part of the endangered species program is the restoration of abandoned well pads, roads, pipelines and soil borrow sites resulting from oil and gas production activities on Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). Naval Petroleum Reserves in California is located in the Elk Hills approximately 30 miles southwest of Bakersfield in the rain shadow of the coastal range. Annual precipitation is approximately five inches. Reclamation of disturbed habitat on NPRC began with research plots and test trials in the early 1980s. Full scale reclamation began in 1985 and has continued through the 1989 planting season. Almost 700 acres have been revegetated, which represents over 1,200 sites distributed over the 47,250 acres of NPRC and averaging less than .75 acre in size. Monitoring of the sites began in 1987 to establish reclamation success and evaluate reclamation techniques. Reclamation objectives include the improvement of wildlife habitat for four endangered species living on NPRC, and the protection of the soils from wind and water erosion on the disturbed sites.

  8. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, Vance

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

  9. Optimal placement of Marine Protected Areas Patrick De Leenheer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Leenheer, Patrick

    to the reduction or elimination of fish populations and the degradation or even destruction of their habitats coastlines where fishing is controlled. MPA's can also lead to larger fish densities outside the protected area through spill-over, which in turn may increase the fishing yield. A natural question

  10. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The annual report contains three individual subproject papers detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1989. Subproject 1 contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject 2 contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. This report has been sub-divided into two parts: Part 1; stream evaluation and Part 2; pond series evaluation. Subproject 3 concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. This report summarizes the evaluation of the project to date including the 1989 pre-construction evaluation conducted within the East Fork drainage. Dredge mining has degraded spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River and in Bear Valley Creek. Mining, agricultural, and grazing practices degraded habitat in the East Fork of the Salmon River. Biological monitoring of the success of habitat enhancement for Bear Valley Creek and Yankee Fork are presented in this report. Physical and biological inventories prior to habitat enhancement in East Fork were also conducted. Four series of off-channel ponds of the Yankee Fork are shown to provide effective rearing habitat for chinook salmon. 45 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

  11. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of interests under the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) purview ranging from facilities, buildings, Government property, and employees to national security interests such as classified information, special nuclear material (SNM), and nuclear weapons. Cancels Section A of DOE M 470.4-2 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

  12. App D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Restoration, Management 83 2.4.6 Compatibility of Wetland Management and Stream Management 84 2 2.5.5 Protection, Restoration, Management 103 2.5.6 Compatibility of Pond Management and StreamApp D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of Terrestrial Habitats

  13. Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, Will

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focuses on the lower Klickitat River and its tributaries that provide or affect salmonid habitat. The overall goal is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of watersheds supporting anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss) which are listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU. Restoration activities are aimed at restoring stream processes by removing or mitigating watershed perturbances and improving habitat conditions and water quality. In addition to steelhead, habitat improvements benefit Chinook (O. tshawytscha) and coho (O. kisutch) salmon, resident rainbow trout, and enhance habitat for many terrestrial and amphibian wildlife species. Protection activities compliment restoration efforts within the subbasin by securing refugia and preventing degradation. Since 90% of the project area is in private ownership, maximum effectiveness will be accomplished via cooperation with state, federal, tribal, and private entities. The project addresses goals and objectives presented in the Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the 1994 NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. Feedback from the 2000 Provincial Review process indicated a need for better information management to aid development of geographic priorities. Thus, an emphasis has been placed on database development and a review of existing information prior to pursuing more extensive implementation. Planning and design was initiated on several restoration projects. These priorities will be refined in future reports as the additional data is collected and analyzed. Tasks listed are for the April 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 contract cycle, for which work was delayed during the summer of 2001 because the contract was not finalized until mid-August 2001. Accomplishments are provided for the September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 reporting period. During this reporting period, significant progress was made on acquisition and development of spatial data, monitoring of steelhead spawning, riparian revegetation, streamflow monitoring, completion of maintenance and repair work, completion of a working version of a habitat database, and completion of the Swale Creek assessment.

  14. aquatic ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

  15. aquatic ecosystems final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

  16. arctic aquatic ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

  17. aquatic ecosystem including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

  18. aquatic ecosystems pollution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

  19. arctic aquatic ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

  20. aquatic ecosystems implications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

  1. aquatic ecosystems review: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

  2. aquatic ecosystem response: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

  3. aquatic ecosystems endocrine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

  4. aquatic systems fmas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Cleveland Public Library;Conservation Challenges of Freshwater Habitats Eutrophication Acidification Non-indigenous species 12 Gottgens, Hans 13 Sorption of...

  5. aquatic plant culture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Semi-aquatic mammals have been restricted to morphologies and swimming behaviors Fish, Frank 256 Nitro-culture and Inoculation. Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  6. Limnology Conservation of Aquatic Resources Zoology and Environmental Studies 315

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    ecosystems. Emphasis will be on human impacts and interactions with aquatic systems, and the synthesis management 26. Exotic species 27. Global warming issues #12;Sample Class Schedule: Lec. Date Topic Lecturer 1

  7. Interactions between currents and the spatial structure of aquatic vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation is present in nearly all aquatic environments, ranging from meandering streams to constructed channels and rivers, as well as in lakes and coastal zones. This vegetation grows in a wide range of flow environments ...

  8. Flow-induced reconfiguration of buoyant and flexible aquatic vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Plant posture can play a key role in the health of aquatic vegetation, by setting drag, controlling light availability, and mediating the exchange of nutrients and oxygen. We study the flow-induced reconfiguration of ...

  9. John M. Epifanio -Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John M. Epifanio - Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology Illinois Natural History Survey 607 AND ACADEMIC INTERESTS Conservation Genetics & Molecular Ecology ­ Examination of structure & function Ecology, Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS). 2000 - 2001 Assistant National Program Leader. Fisheries

  10. Flow and Transport in Regions with Aquatic Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    This review describes mean and turbulent flow and mass transport in the presence of aquatic vegetation. Within emergent canopies, the turbulent length scales are set by the stem diameter and spacing, and the mean flow is ...

  11. Nowzari et al. Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Daniel I.

    25 Nowzari et al. · Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD ASS (EQUUS HEMIONUS ONAGER) IN QA- TROUYEH NATIONAL PARK, IRAN HANIYEH NOWZARI, Department of the IVth International Wildlife Management Congress: 25-30, 2013 Horses, zebras and asses, members

  12. Protections: Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromisingProtecting your personal

  13. Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 12. Analytical Methods Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    techniques ­ Mass spectrometry ­ AMS · Lab tour ­ Noble gas mass spectrometry ­ Stable isotope mass spectrometry ­ Radiocarbon · Literature: Mook (2001), Vol. 1, ch. 10 & 11 Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 12 fundamental analytical techniques · Radiometry (decay counting, radioisotopes) · Mass spectrometry (mass

  14. Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 7. Tritium and Helium-3 Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 7. Tritium and Helium-3 Universität HeidelbergInstitut für Umweltphysik 1 Physics of Aquatic Systems II ­ 7. Tritium and Helium-3 Werner Aeschbach-Hertig Institute of Environmental Physics University of Heidelberg Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 7. Tritium and Helium-3

  15. FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

  16. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  17. Protecting Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromising MagnesiumDOE/RichlandStructureProtecting

  18. AQUATIC BIOLOGY Vol. 7: 93105, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    ecological con- cern, because the biota have adapted to substantially lower UV irradiance than that imposed Artemiopsis stefanssoni (up to 37 µg mg­1 ). Concurrent analyses of food sources showed that scytonemin to providing a measure of UV protection, the pigments also indicate zooplankton food sources and potential

  19. Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, Hunter [Shoshone Bannock Tribes

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2008. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting wetlands plugs at sites on Spring Creek (Head-waters). Many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). Physical sampling during 2008 included sediment and depth measurements (SADMS) in Spring Creek at the Car Removal site. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for 5 strata on Spring Creek. Water temperature and chemistry were monitored monthly on Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Diggie Creek, and Portneuf (Jimmy Drinks) and Blackfoot rivers. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in five reservation streams which included nine sites. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Spring Creek series remained relatively low, however, there was an increase of biomass overall since 1993. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were similar to 2006, and 2007, however, as in years past, high densities of macrophytes make it very difficult to see fry in addition to lack of field technicians. Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams stayed the same as 2007 at 1.5/hr. Numbers of fish larger than 18-inches caught by anglers increased from 2007 at .20 to .26/hr.

  20. Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

  1. Conservation plan for protected species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otten, M.R.M.; Cypher, B.L.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitats in and around Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) support populations of various vertebrates and plants, including a number of threatened and endangered species. Adequate conservation of habitats and species, particularly protected species, can be facilitated through development and implementation of management plans. This document provides a comprehensive plan for the conservation of protected species on NPR-1, through compliance with terms and conditions expressed in Biological Opinions rendered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for NPR-1 activities. Six conservation strategies by which threatened and endangered species have been, and will be, protected are described: population monitoring, mitigation strategies, special studies, operating guidelines and policies, information transfer and outreach, and the endangered species conservation area. Population monitoring programs are essential for determining population densities and for assessing the effects of oil field developments and environmental factors on protected species. Mitigation strategies (preactivity surveys and habitat reclamation) are employed to minimize the loss of important habitats components and to restore previously disturbed lands to conditions more suitable for species` use. A number of special studies were undertaken between 1985 and 1995 to investigate the effectiveness of a variety of population and habitat management techniques with the goal of increasing the density of protected species. Operating guidelines and policies governing routine oil field activities continue to be implemented to minimize the potential for the incidental take of protected species and minimize damage to wildlife habitats. Information transfer and outreach activities are important means by which technical and nontechnical information concerning protected species conservation on NPR-1 is shared with both the scientific and non-scientific public.

  2. PDX\\APP J_EDT ASSESSMENT LOWER WILL.DOC 1 Draft EDT Assessment of Aquatic Habitat in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Sellwood Bridge. The segment has considerable open space, as well as commercial and industrial land uses condition between these two "bookends" allowed us to define good and bad conditions and to analyze how of data and information used to rate the condition of the environmental attributes EDT uses to evaluate

  3. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

  4. Use of social information for habitat selection in songbirds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Shannon Leigh

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    that may result in improved fitness, resulting in positive behavioral responses to conspecifics as a habitat selection strategy. I conducted 3 replicated, manipulative experiments to investigate use of conspecific cues in habitat selection for the golden...

  5. An Analysis of Hybrid Life Support Systems for Sustainable Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Margaret Miller

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of sustainable habitats on Earth, on other planetary surfaces, and in space, has motivated strategic planning with respect to life support (LS) system technology development and habitat design. Such planning ...

  6. Seasonal structure of fish communities at three barrier island habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitts, Donald Eugene

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    habitats with previously reported values from similar habitats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Map of Galveston Island showing sampling stations (JB = jettied beachfront, OB = open beachfront and SM = saltmarsh). Water... abundance in beach seine collections grouped by habitat and month (JB = jettied beachfront, OB = open beachfront and SN = saltmarsh) . 46 1B Cluster analysis dendrogram of mean species abundance in beach seine collections grouped by habitat and month...

  7. Management and Conservation Influence of Habitat Features and Hunter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    the habitat characteristics (e.g., abundance of deer forage, visibility of the deer from the hunter's point

  8. alternative nursery habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Birds . Conservation Boyer, Edmond 12 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Assessing the Effects of Management Alternatives on Habitat Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  9. Technical Report 20061 COASTAL HABITATS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report 2006­1 COASTAL HABITATS IN PUGET SOUND: A Research Plan in Support of the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership Prepared in support of the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership November 2006 Logsdon, University of Washington Doug Myers, Puget Sound Action Team Jan Newton, University of Washington

  10. Estuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    stream restoration activities. Recommend NOOA fund. 11. Scaling-Up Native Oyster Will restore 4 acresEstuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council Ranked Proposal Recommendation May 13, 2011 Project Name Description 1. Riverside Ranch Restoration Will restore 356 acres of estuarine

  11. LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7 LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS Edward S. Rutherford1 Background, the Lake Michigan LaMP was developed to comply with provisions in the GLWQA and to guide management-ranging, cooperative effort to design and implement a strategy for the 1 E.S. Rutherford. University of Michigan School

  12. Historical_Habitats File Geodatabase Feature Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical_Habitats File Geodatabase Feature Class Tags Historical ecology, Ventura, Oxnard View, Meiners Oaks, Camarillo, Somis, Ventura River, Santa Clara River, Calleguas Creek, Santa Paula Springs, Ormond Beach, Mandalay Beach, Pierpont Bay, McGrath Lake, Ventura County, Los Angeles County

  13. The Habitats Directive, Coastal Habitats and Climate Change -Case Studies from the South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    and mudflat areas, which decline under all the sea-level rise scenarios considered. Compensation locations ­ `managed realignment' ­ is a response to the loss of saltmarsh and mudflat habitats (ENVIRONMENT

  14. Habitat destruction and extinction in competitive and mutualistic metacommunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    habitat loss is a leading cause of extinction, it is important to identify what kind of species is most competitive metapopulations. Metacommunities of mutualists can suffer the abrupt extinction of both species species coexist to predict their response to habitat loss. Keywords Habitat destruction, extinction

  15. Influence of grazing management on population attributes, habitats, and habitat selection of bobwhites in south Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, Robert Neal

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accounting for the comparatively poorer quail survival and reproduction on the 2PDG. Discriminant analysis procedures were used to delineate differences between quail selected and available habitats. fusil on both areas selected sites which were best... RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Grazing Pressures Population Attributes Habitat Characteristics Discriminant Analysis CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS LITERATURE CITED 19 23 23 25 32 58 69 74 APPENDIX A APPENDIX B VITA 77 78 79 LIST OF TABLES...

  16. Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

  17. Aquatic Toxicity Information Retrieval Data Base (ACQUIRE). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of Acquire is to provide scientists and managers quick access to a comprehensive, systematic, computerized compilation of aquatic toxicity data. Scientific papers published both nationally and internationally on the toxicity of chemicals to aquatic organisms and plants are collected and reviewed for ACQUIRE. Independently compiled data files that meet ACQUIRE parameter and quality assurance criteria are also included. Selected toxicity test results and related testing information for any individual chemical from laboratory and field aquatic toxicity effects are included for tests with freshwater and marine organisms. The total number of data records in ACQUIRE is now over 105,300. This includes data from 6000 references, for 5200 chemicals and 2400 test species. A major data file, Acute Toxicity of Organic Chemicals (ATOC), has been incorporated into ACQUIRE. The ATOC file contains laboratory acute test data on 525 organic chemicals using juvenile fathead minnows.

  18. Best Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    . Develop educational materials related to aquatic plant identification and their specific managementBest Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E vegetation management with the ultimate goal of producing the best management practices protocol in Iowa

  19. Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, Glen Wesley; Trump, Jeremy; Karl, David

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about these threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77.12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2001 field season (March to November, 2001).

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic environment il Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (APCRP) Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 42 APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment Summary: basal resources, aquatic...

  1. Navy aquatic hazardous waste sites: the problem and possible solutions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, R.K.; Wild, W.J.; Richter, K.E.; Lapota, D.; Stang, P.M.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data on 367 hazardous waste disposal sites at 58 Navy Marine Corps activities, located in the coastal zone, were reviewed to characterize the contaminants, disposal methods, and potentially impacted environments present at navy aquatic hazardous waste sites. This report identifies Navy aquatic hazardous waste site problems, assesses technology requirements, and describes remedial pilot projects being initiated at impacted aquatic sites.

  2. Hydrological and habitat controls of algal biodiversity and biomass in a subtropical flood-pulsed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    ;Microalgae, base of aquatic food webs Ecosystem services. Provisioning: food, fiber and fuel. Regulating

  3. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  4. Source Water Protection to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    /2010-305b.pdf #12;World Resources Institute wri.org/project/eutrophication/map #12;Nitrogen in watershed soils. Welch et al. 2011. DOtemperature habitat loss due to eutrophication in Tenkiller Reservoir

  5. Protecting Life on Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to thePeter B. Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to theof Protecting Life on Earth is “to explain to an intelligent

  6. environmental management radiation protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    EHS environmental management biosafety radiation protection industrial hygiene safety Working: Biosafety, Environmental Management, Industrial Hygiene, Radiation Protection and Safety. Each specialized Management Program, Industrial Hygiene, Radiation Protection Program, and the Safety Program. (http

  7. Aquatic manoeuvering with counter-propagating waves: a novel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    Aquatic manoeuvering with counter-propagating waves: a novel locomotive strategy Oscar M. Curet1 of these inward counter-propagating waves. In addition, we compare the flow structure and upward force generated by inward counter-propagating waves to standing waves, unidirectional waves, and outward counter-propagating

  8. Anabranching As A Novel Restoration Design To Reduce Aquatic Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    aquatic nutrients and increase residence time At Hydraulic Loads (cm) between 30-50% Total N and 20.H. and S.D. Wallace. 2009. Treatment Wetlands, 2nd ed. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL. Walter, R.C., Merritts, D Hydraulic Load = 50 cm Design Wetland Area = Runoff / Hydraulic Load Wetland Area ~ 1.07 ha #12;

  9. Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood Products Using Batch Leaching Tests treated with one of five different waterborne chemical preservatives, were leached using 18-h batch- treated wood at concentrations above the U.S. federal toxicity characteristic limit (5 mg/L). All

  10. EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON FISH AND AQUATIC INSECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    391 392 EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON FISH AND AQUATIC INSECTS IN GALLATIN RIVER DRAINAGE IN MONTANA EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON STREAM BOTTOM ORGANISMS IN TWO MOUNTAIN STREAMS IN GEORGIA SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC, Commissioner Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, Daniel H. Janzen, Director EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON FISH

  11. Prediction and the aquatic sciences1 Michael L. Pace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    Prediction and the aquatic sciences1 Michael L. Pace Abstract: The need for prediction is now, however, presented prediction narrowly and failed to account for the diversity of predictive approaches as well to set prediction within the proper scientific context. Examples from time series analysis

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLE Community structure and differential responses of aquatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Robert K. "Rob"

    , pollution, sedimentation, introduced species, or altered hydrology (Johnson et al. 2002). Modeling of future. The occurrence and abundance of several species also were modeled to test hypotheses regarding the importance an agricultural landscape of the Midwest. The ability of aquatic turtles to disperse in a frag- mented landscape

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Genetically modified crops and aquatic ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    of genetically modified (GM) crops. The ERA for terrestrial agroecosystems is well-developed, whereas guidance for ERA of GM crops in aquatic ecosystems is not as well-defined. The purpose of this document studies are necessary to inform the risk assessment for a specific GM crop should be done on a case

  14. Office of Physical Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Physical Protection is comprised of a team of security specialists engaged in providing Headquarters-wide physical protection.

  15. DOE Advanced Protection Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    protection logic in each relay 17 Copyright 2010, Southern California Edison Advanced Protection on the System of the Future * Use fault-interrupting switches with relays...

  16. Shore Protection Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Shore Protection Act is the primary legal authority for protection and management of Georgia's shoreline features including sand dunes, beaches, sandbars, and shoals, collectively known as the...

  17. Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 3. Stable Isotopes -Theory Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    ­ Notation and definitions ­ Origin and description of fractionation ­ Fractionating processes ­ Rayleigh distillation Literature: Mook Vol. I, ch. 3 and 4 Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 3. Stable Isotopes - Theory "concentration" or mixing ratio: Fractional abundance of given isotope relative to all isotopes of the element

  18. Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 9. Modeling Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    HeidelbergInstitut für Umweltphysik 5 Influence of mixing on transient gas tracer ages · 2-comp. mixing Mook, 2001 Example: Mixing of fast and slow runoff components in a river Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 9. Modeling Universität HeidelbergInstitut für Umweltphysik 10 Mixed reactor model (exponential

  19. Developing conservation plan for the Edwards Aquifer: Stakeholders reach consensus resolution to balance protection of endangered species and water use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Courtney

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fall 2012 tx H2O 17 Story by Courtney Smith ] Comal and San Marcos springs are the only known habitats for eight federally listed threatened or endangered species. Photo courtesy of the Edwards Aquifer Authority. What does it take... Aquifer region of Texas achieved a milestone in a struggle that has lasted nearly six decades. Working together, participants in the Edwards Aquifer Recovery Implementation Program (EARIP) developed a habitat conservation plan that will protect...

  20. Protected Areas Stacy Philpott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    · Convention of Biological Diversity, 1992 #12;IUCN Protected Area Management Categories Ia. Strict Nature. Protected Landscape/ Seascape VI. Managed Resource Protected Area #12;Ia. Strict Nature Preserves and Ib. Wilderness Areas · Natural preservation · Research · No · No #12;II. National Parks · Ecosystem protection

  1. Fire Protection Program Metrics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Perry E. D ’Antonio, P.E., Acting Sr. Manager, Fire Protection - Sandia National Laboratories

  2. aegypti larval habitats: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    patterns in modeled particle transport to estuarine habitat with comparisons to larval fish Geosciences Websites Summary: settlement patterns of red drum larvae (Sciaenops...

  3. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

  4. anopheline breeding habitats: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    strategies (e.g., maintaining engineered wetlands with an appropriate hydroperiod length) employed in cases of direct habitat loss. The timing of emigration away from natal...

  5. Relationship between juvenile steelhead survival and winter habitat availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric; Kayed, Sammy; Post, Charles

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ugedal. 2007. Shelter availability affects behaviour, size-and winter habitat availability Eric Huber, Sammy Kayed, andThe establishment and availability of interstitial spaces

  6. Major habitat purchase in Columbia estuary benefits salmon ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fredlund, Corps, 503-808-4510 (EDITORS: Click for maps, photos and video.) Major habitat purchase in Columbia estuary benefits salmon The Columbia Land Trust, Bonneville Power...

  7. Habitat for Humanity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy | Open Energy Sector:ErgenicsHabitat

  8. Using Wildlife Species Richness to Identify Land Protection Priorities in California's Hardwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    or private groups, managing existing public and private lands for diversity values, regulating detrimental private land uses, and providing incentives for private habitat protection. Common to all these approaches is a need to determine the specific areas of land that warrant action. Nearly 12 percent of California has

  9. What can I do with this major? BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    NATURAL RESOURCES Design, Build, Operate, Maintain: Drainage, Irrigation Systems and Water Control Structures Instrumentation and Control Systems Stormwater Management Systems Erosion and Sediment Control Protection Waste Management Operations Water Treatment Systems Aquatic Habitat Characterization

  10. MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity in mediterranean streams: an integrated modeling framework Adina M. Merenlender · Mary K. Matella of hydrologic habitat connectivity and benefits of habitat restoration alternatives we provide: (1) a review

  11. Habitat configuration and availability influences the settlement of temperate reef fishes (Tripterygiidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shima, Jeff

    Habitat configuration and availability influences the settlement of temperate reef fishes 29 September 2013 Available online 23 October 2013 Keywords: Attraction vs. production Fragmentation Habitat availability Habitat configuration Settlement Tripterygiidae To survive, most benthic marine

  12. Nesting Range, Spatial Use, Habitat Selection and Sex Identification of the Greater Raodrunner (Geococcyx californianus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montalvo, Andrea

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    .05 percent. Habitat selection ratios showed a preference for ridge as well as grassland habitat and avoidance of bare ground and flatland habitats. The location data from west Texas was further analyzed to build a predictive logistic regression model...

  13. USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

  14. anadronous fish habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anadronous fish habitat First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Essential Fish Habitat and...

  15. anadromus fish habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anadromus fish habitat First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Essential Fish Habitat and...

  16. Accomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, National Environmental Policy and conservation of Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) through fishery management, and environmental review of nonAccomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2006

  17. Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Sze-Bi

    Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats Sze-Bi Hsu Feng-Bin Wang Xiao from the dynamics of harmful algae and zooplankton in flowing- water habitats where a main channel. For the system modeling the dynamics of algae and their toxin that contains little limiting nutrient, we

  18. Influence of Habitat Modifications on Habitat Composition and Anadromous Salmonid Populations in Fish Creek, Oregon, 1983-1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, Gordon H.; Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Hohler, David B. (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification of degraded habitats to increase populations of anadromous salmonids is a major focus of management agencies throughout the Pacific Northwest. Millions of dollars are spent annually on such efforts. Inherent in implementing habitat improvements is the need for quantitative evaluation of the biological and physical effects of such work. Reeves et al. (in press), however, noted that such evaluations are rare, making it difficult to assess the true results of habitat work. While it is not economically possible to thoroughly evaluate every habitat project, it is essential that intensive evaluations be done on selected representative projects. One such evaluation program has been underway since 1982 on Fish Creek, a tributary of the Clackamas River near Estacada, OR. Habitat modification has been done by the USDA Forest Service, Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest with funding provided in part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The USDA Forest Service, Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit, Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW), Corvallis, OR is charged with: (1) evaluating the biological and physical responses to habitat modifications on a basin scale; and (2) developing a cost-benefit analysis of the program. Preliminary results have been reported in a series of annual publications, Everest and Sedell 1983, 1984 and Everest et al. 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) report 1988 observations of biological and physical changes in habitat, salmonid populations, and smolt production in Fish Creek, and (2) examine preliminary trends in fish habitat and populations related to habitat improvement over the period 1983-1988. We have prefaced the trends in the latter objective as preliminary because we believe it could take a minimum of 10 years before the full biological and physical responses to habitat work are realized. We therefore urge caution in interpreting these preliminary results.

  19. SRO-NERP -7 Studies of Aquatic and Terrestria I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    the United States. A central file of papers referenced in this bibliography will be maintained at the library are not included in the central file, but are available in the library at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory to four broad categories: 1) habitats, 2) descriptive data, 3) types of studies, and 4) component

  20. Long-term effects of dredging operations program: Assessing bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms exposed to contaminated sediments. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, J.U.; McFarland, V.A.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper synthesizes previous work on bioaccumulation to provide a working document for the environmental impact on the aquatic environment due to bioaccumulation of sediment contaminants resulting from dredging operations and dredged material placement. Emphasis is placed on explanation of basic concepts concerning, and factors influencing, sediment contaminant bioaccumulation and bioavailability. The paper presents several numerical methods for assessing bioaccumulation, including a simple method for estimating theoretical bioaccumulation potential (TBP) from sediment chemistry for neutral organic chemicals. Methods are also given for projecting contaminant concentrations in organism tissues when steady state is achieved, based on laboratory or field exposures to contaminated sediments. These assessments are presented in the context of the US Environmental Protection Agency's tiered testing approach for dredged material evaluation. The various numerical methods for bioaccumulation assessment are illustrated and compared using step-by-step example calculations with hypothetical and actual data.

  1. Protection Program Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes requirements for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Protective Forces (FPF), Contractor Protective Forces (CPF), and the Physical Security of property and personnel under the cognizance of DOE.

  2. Interaction, protection and epidemics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Sanjeev; Vigier, Adrien

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    unique equilibrium: individuals who invest in protection choose to interact more relative to those who do not invest in protection. Changes in the contagiousness of the disease have non-monotonic effects: as a result interaction initially falls...

  3. Voluntary Protection Program Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary O'Leary formally announced a new initiative, "The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOEVPP)," which is designed to recognize contractor sites that are providing excellent safety and health protection to their employees.

  4. Protective Force Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, Protective Force Program, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Does not cancel other directives.

  5. AQUATIC PLANT CONTRO ~~fR~DHcOfRAN~ESCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    AQUATIC PLANT CONTRO ~~fR~DHcOfRAN~ESCO MISCELLANEOUS PAPER A-88-6 PERSISTENCE OF DICHLOBENIL

  6. Evolution of aquatic insect behaviours across a gradient of disturbance predictability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evolution of aquatic insect behaviours across a gradient of disturbance predictability David A `sufficient'. At one extreme, large infrequent disturbances such as hurricanes and tsunamis may devastate

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic insects 1959--1985 Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History Area Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 73 APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment Summary: with feeding on a diet of aquatic...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant wastewater Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 56 APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment Summary: , terrestrial versus aquatic food...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plants invertebrates Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology ; Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources 42 APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment Summary: , terrestrial versus aquatic food...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic food pathways Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Madison Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 28 APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment Summary: , terrestrial versus aquatic food...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic organic fractions Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (APCRP) Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 49 APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment Summary: into aquatic food webs because...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic insect communities Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flagstaff Lab Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 39 APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment Summary: with feeding on a diet of aquatic...

  13. The Role of Social Capital and Collaborative Negotiations in Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimeno, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    March 2001. p. 108. Beatley, Timothy. Habitat ConservationA; Nation; Federal Report, Pg. A8. Beatley, Timothy. Habitatof California Press, 1981. Beatley, Timothy. Habitat

  14. Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asotin County Conservation District

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

  15. RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2002 D. Delacroix* J. P. Guerre** P. Leblanc'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

  16. Corium protection assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Sirtori, IT)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corium protection assembly includes a perforated base grid disposed below a pressure vessel containing a nuclear reactor core and spaced vertically above a containment vessel floor to define a sump therebetween. A plurality of layers of protective blocks are disposed on the grid for protecting the containment vessel floor from the corium.

  17. Model Fire Protection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

  18. Coastal Marshlands Protection Act (Georgia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act provides the Coastal Resources Division with the authority to protect tidal wetlands. The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act limits certain activities and...

  19. Radiation Protection Guidance Hospital Staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Page 1 Radiation Protection Guidance For Hospital Staff Prepared for Stanford ..................................................................................................................... 17 The Basic Principles of Radiation Protection........................................................... 17 Protection against Radiation Exposure

  20. Fire Protection Program Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, J A

    2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

  1. Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NeSmith, Frank (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Long, Mack (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Paks, Kalispell, MT); Matthews, Dayne (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

  2. A COMPARISON OF THE AQUATIC IMPACTS OF LARGE HYDRO AND SMALL HYDRO PROJECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A COMPARISON OF THE AQUATIC IMPACTS OF LARGE HYDRO AND SMALL HYDRO PROJECTS by Lara A. Taylor, P Project: A Comparison of the Aquatic Impacts of Large Hydro and Small Hydro Projects Project No.: 501 of small hydro development in British Columbia has raised concerns surrounding the effects

  3. AQUA: an aquatic walking robot Christina Georgiades*, Andrew German**, Andrew Hogue**, Hui Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thrusters and buoyancy in order to maintain its pose. In addition to the obvious energy consumption issue the AQUA project to develop a fully autonomous walking aquatic vehicle. It describes the basic design as on naturally occurring underwater landmarks and trinocular stereo. Keywords-autonomous robot, aquatic robot

  4. Lung collapse among aquatic reptiles and amphibians during long-term diving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brainerd, Elizabeth

    Lung collapse among aquatic reptiles and amphibians during long-term diving Gordon R. Ultscha requirements, but serves to keep lungs inflated that would otherwise collapse during prolonged submergence. We also suggest that lung deflation is routine in hibernating aquatic reptiles and amphibians

  5. Aquatic Species Program Review: Proceedings of the March 1983 Principal Investigators Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

  6. Global distribution of N2O emissions from aquatic systems: natural emissions and anthropogenic eects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitzinger, Sybil

    Global distribution of N2O emissions from aquatic systems: natural emissions and anthropogenic, are increasing due to human activities. Our analysis suggests that a third of global anthropogenic N2O emission the remainder. Over 80% of aquatic anthropogenic N2O emissions are from the Northern Hemisphere mid

  7. Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities in the Hood River basin that occurred over the October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003 period (FY 03). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 03. A description of the progress during FY 03 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are provided. OBJECTIVE 1 - Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administrative oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts, personnel, implementation, and monitoring was provided. OBJECTIVE 2 - Continue to coordinate, implement, and revise, as needed, the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document was utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan (Coccoli, 2002), ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document has been reviewed by many, including stakeholders, agencies, and interested parties. The Hood River Watershed Group Coordinator and author of the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan, Holly Coccoli, has updated and revised the plan. Changes will be reflected in the Hood River Subbasin Plan, and after submission of the Subbasin Plan, a formally revised version of the Monitoring Plan will be put out for review. This will more specifically address changes in the Hood River subbasin since 2000, and reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River subbasin regarding monitoring. OBJECTIVE 3 - Evaluate and monitor the habitat, accessibility, and presence of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout upstream of the Middle Fork Irrigation District water sources on Evans Creek. Through this project, BPA funded the Middle Fork Irrigation District (MFID) a total of $194,000 in FY 03 for the Glacier Ditch- Evans Creek project. BPA funds accounted for approximately 30% of the project while the remaining 70% was cost-shared by the MFID, the US Forest Service, and the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. The MFID operated irrigation diversions on Evans Creek (Hutson pond RM 4.0 and the Evans Creek diversion RM 5.5), a tributary to the East Fork Hood River. Both diversions had inadequate upstream fish passage, and utilized Evans Creek to transport Eliot Branch water to distribute irrigation water lower in the basin. This project consisted of: piping a portion of the Glacier ditch to create a pressurized irrigation pipeline system, piping the Hutson extension, removing the culvert on Evans Creek near the Glacier ditch, removing the culvert above the Hutson pond, revegetating the disturbed areas, and providing adequate and approved fish passage on Evans Creek. Prior to any work, Brian Connors with MFID completed a NEPA checklist. Some of the key regulatory points of this project included wetland delineations, a cultural resources survey, and consultations with NOAA Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This project will eliminate the overflow of silty water into Evans Creek and West Fork Evans Creek. Upon completion of this project, access to 2.5 miles of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout habitat will be restored. Elimination of the interbasin transfer of water will discontinue the conveyance of silty Eliot Branch water into clear East Fork tributaries. Additionally, less water taken from Coe Branch, Eliot Branch, and Laurance Lake which will benefit listed steelhead and bull trout. The Glacier Ditch provided irrigation water from the Eliot Branch to upper valley orchards and agriculture for more than 100 years. The Glacier Ditch served approximately 1,438 acres with 18 cfs of water. The Glacier Ditch portion of this project

  8. area habitat evaluation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or test results. Please return this form to: Gray Squirrel; Wildlife Service; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service 1987-01-01 2 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Group CiteSeer Summary:...

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    executive director for the Habitat affiliate. "We started doing ENERGY STAR about 5 years ago, and DOE Builders Challenge 3 years ago, and then DOE Zero Energy Ready Home...

  10. Developing Lowland Habitat Networks in Scotland: Phase 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Lowland Habitat Networks in Scotland: Phase 2 Jonathan Humphrey1 , Mike Smith1 reproduced from Ordnance Survey material with the permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of the Controller...............................................................................11 3.5 Construction of landuse change scenarios

  11. Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver Zero Energy Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes the 2005 demonstration home designed by NREL and the Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver. The completed home produced 24% more energy than it consumed over 12 months.

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    appliances, and ceiling fans, a solar water heater, an ERV, and a high-efficiency heat pump. To keep the ducts in conditioned space, the Habitat affiliate installed a rigid...

  13. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Manatee County Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    R-23 ICF walls, a spray-foamed sealed attic, solar hot water, and a ducted mini-split heat pump. Manatee County Habitat for Humanity - Ellenton, FL More Documents & Publications...

  14. Habitat loss and the structure of plantanimal mutualistic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortuna, Miguel A.

    LETTER Habitat loss and the structure of plant­animal mutualistic networks Miguel A. Fortuna Sevilla, Spain *Correspondence: E-mail: fortuna@ebd.csic.es Abstract Recent papers have described

  15. Habitat associations of fish assemblages in the Sulphur River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Michael Neal

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an instream flow study, information on summer distribution of fishes and habitat variables was collected from six sites at each of three flows in the Sulphur River, Texas. I evaluated (1) spatiotemporal relationships between instream...

  16. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Carl Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A baseline habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Carl property (160 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also helped assess the general ecological condition of the property. The Carl property appeared damaged from livestock grazing and exhibited a high percentage of invasive forbs. Exotic grasses, while present, did not comprise a large percentage of the available cover in most areas. Cover types were primarily grassland/shrubsteppe with a limited emergent vegetation component. Baseline HEP surveys generated 356.11 HUs or 2.2 HUs per acre. Habitat units were associated with the following HEP models: California quail (47.69 HUs), western meadowlark (114.78 HUs), mallard (131.93 HUs), Canada goose (60.34 HUs), and mink (1.38 HUs).

  17. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Graves Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Graves property (140 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also documented the general ecological condition of the property. The Graves property was significantly damaged from past/present livestock grazing practices. Baseline HEP surveys generated 284.28 habitat units (HUs) or 2.03 HUs per acre. Of these, 275.50 HUs were associated with the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type while 8.78 HUs were tied to the riparian shrub cover type.

  18. Habitat Appraisal Guide for Rio Grande Wild Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Ransom, Dean; DeMaso, Stephen; Schwertner, T. Wayne; Collier, Bret

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    and structure of the roost 5 Glennon and Porter (1999) found that townships in southwest New York with greater interspersion of forests and open areas supported larger turkey populations. Further- more, habitat suitability increased by provid- ing smaller...

  19. Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) 5-year Review for 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...............................................................................................................................9 4 ENVIRONMENTAL AND MANAGEMENT CHANGES SINCE 2005 EFH EIS ANALYSIS.................................................................................................................... 10 4.1 Environmental and habitat changes since 2005 EFH EIS ..............................................................................10 4.2 Research since the EFH EIS

  20. DIALOG: Fostering Early Career Development Across the Aquatic Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline Susan Weiler, PhD

    2004-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 447 dissertation abstracts were received for the DIALOG V Program, with 146 individuals applying for the DIALOG V Symposium; 47 were invited and 45 have accepted. This represents a significant increase compared to the DIALOG IV Program in which 221 abstracts were registered and 124 applied for the symposium. The importance of the dissertation registration service is indicated by the increasing number of individuals who take time to register their dissertation even when they are not interested in applying to the symposium. The number of visits to the webpage has also increased significantly over the years. This also reflects graduate interest in being part of the on-line Dissertation Registry and receiving the weekly electronic DIALOG Newsletter. See http://aslo.org/phd.html for details. The DIALOG symposium reaches approximately 40 new PI's at a pivotal point in their research careers. Based on their comments, the symposium changes the way participants think, communicate, and approach their research. The science community and the general population will benefit from the perspectives these new PI's bring back to their home institutions and share with their students and colleagues. This group should act as a catalyst to move the entire field in exciting new, interdisciplinary directions. To reach more graduates, plans are underway to establish the symposium on an annual basis. By facilitating the development of close collegial ties, symposium participants come away with a network of colleagues from around the globe with interests in aquatic science research and education. Past participants are collaborating on research proposals, and all have noted that participation has enabled them to develop a more interdisciplinary view of their field, influencing the way they interpret, communicate, and approacli their research. The dissertation registry provides a unique introduction to the work of this most recent generation of aquatic scientists. Each year increasing numbers of graduates take advantage of the opportunity to be part of this international collection, and more scientists, employers and administrators use this resource to identify recent graduates and get an overview of their work. Dissertation abstracts are submitted on line and immediately posted on the ASLO web site in a format that can be searched by year, name, and key words (www.aslo.org/phd.html). In addition to the recognition, program participants receive a compilation of abstracts, a directory, and a demographic profile of their cohort. An electronic distribution list keeps recent grads informed about job opportunities, resources, recent advances across the aquatic sciences, and-other research and professional news. Finally, the interdisciplinary symposium offers a unique opportunity for grads to get to know each other and share common experiences, and address the challenges and opportunities facing new professionals. The DIALOG Program is a long-term investment in human resources and science infrastructure. The most interesting and important questions in aquatic and other sciences are increasingly interdisciplinary and this program brings together scientists from across the full spectrum of biologically relevant aquatic science. The DIALOG database will become increasingly useful as more graduates participate. While the full impact of the program will probably not be realized for many years, there have already been many tangible results. Several interdisciplinary (including some international) research collaborations have been started; an international student exchange program has been set up at two institutions; several workshops and meeting sessions have been organized; and the entire group continues to communicate about research, education, and science policy issues via an electronic distribution list. The goal of the DIALOG symposium is to foster cross-disciplinary and international understanding and interactions at an early career stage, so that interdisciplinary perspectives and collegial relationships can build over a full professional life

  1. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  2. Waterfowl food and habitat utilization on a southern reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouchley, James Kelby

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Twenty ? one waterfowl surveys were conducted during the first season 12 and data from 13 of these were used in the habitat utilization analysis. Eight surveys were in the second seasons analysis. These surveys were chosen on the basis of thoroughness...WATERFOWL FOOD AND HABITAT UTILIZATION ON A SOUTHERN RESERVOIR A Thesis by JAMES KELBY OUCHLEY 1 Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May...

  3. Greater sage-grouse winter habitat selection and energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, K.E.; Naugle, D.E.; Walker, B.L.; Graham, J.M. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent energy development has resulted in rapid and large-scale changes to western shrub-steppe ecosystems without a complete understanding of its potential impacts on wildlife populations. We modeled winter habitat use by female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, to 1) identify landscape features that influenced sage-grouse habitat selection, 2) assess the scale at which selection occurred, 3) spatially depict winter habitat quality in a Geographic Information System, and 4) assess the effect of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development on winter habitat selection. We developed a model of winter habitat selection based on 435 aerial relocations of 200 radiomarked female sage-grouse obtained during the winters of 2005 and 2006. Percent sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) cover on the landscape was an important predictor of use by sage-grouse in winter. Sage-grouse were 1.3 times more likely to occupy sagebrush habitats that lacked CBNG wells within a 4-km{sup 2} area, compared to those that had the maximum density of 12.3 wells per 4 km{sup 2} allowed on federal lands. We validated the model with 74 locations from 74 radiomarked individuals obtained during the winters of 2004 and 2007. This winter habitat model based on vegetation, topography, and CBNG avoidance was highly predictive (validation R{sup 2} = 0.984). Our spatially explicit model can be used to identify areas that provide the best remaining habitat for wintering sage-grouse in the PRB to mitigate impacts of energy development.

  4. Habitat selection of the Wood Thrush nesting in east Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrie, Neil Ross

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HABITAT SELECTION OF THE WOOD THRUSH NESTING IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by NEIL ROSS CARRIE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1995 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences HABITAT SELECTION OF THE WOOD THRUSH NESTING IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by NEIL ROSS CARRIE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  5. Protective Actions and Reentry

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume defines appropriate protective actions and reentry of a site following an emergency. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  6. Physical Protection Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Supplements DOE O 473.1, by establishing requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Cancels: DOE M 5632.1C-1

  7. Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

  8. Environmental Protection Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as an environmental protection specialist within the Environmental Planning and Analysis department (KEC) of the Environment, Fish, and Wildlife ...

  9. System Protection Control Craftman

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate will perform preventative and corrective maintenance on protective relays, revenue meters, telemetering schemes, substation control systems and various kinds of substation...

  10. Asset Protection Analysis Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides examples of the application of as set protection analysis to several common problems. Canceled by DOE N 251.80.

  11. NOAA Selects Muskegon Lake as Habitat Focus Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , foundries, a coal-fired power plant, and a paper mill. Muskegon Lake has suffered water quality concerns on the fishery, aquatic organisms and vegetation in Muskegon Lake; · monitoring the socio-economic impacts Fisheries, and the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory have implemented numerous projects

  12. Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To implement sound stewardship practices that are protective of the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources impacted by the Department of Energy (DOE) operations and by which DOE cost effectively meets or exceeds compliance with applicable environmental; public health; and resource protection laws, regulations, and DOE requirements. Cancels DOE 5400.1 and DOE N 450.4.

  13. Environmental protection Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. C. Holland

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California's commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities.

  14. Safety & Environmental Protection Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    of care in waste storage and disposal is available on Safety and Environmental Protection Service's (SEPS sustainably and to protect the environment and, in line with this, recycles waste wherever practicable to biological properties). In addition some activities produce radioactive waste. Radioactive waste

  15. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish DOE procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 CFR Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects, ad in DOE P 443.1, Policy on the Protection of Human Subjects. Cancels DOE O 1300.3. Canceled by DOE O 443.1A.

  16. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes Department of Energy (DOE) procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects; and in DOE P 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, dated 12-20-07. Cancels DOE O 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B.

  17. Protective Force Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, PROTECTIVE FORCE PROGRAM, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Change 1 revised pages in Chapters IV and VI on 12/20/2001.

  18. Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media A Comparison of Self-Protecting Digital Content and AACS Independent Security Evaluators www.securityevaluators.com May 3, 2005 Copyright for Optical Media 2 #12;Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media 3 Executive

  19. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. McLachlan

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

  20. Habitat Acquisition Strategies for Grassland Birds in an Urbanizing Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, James R.

    for protection change as total protected effective area is traded off against total distance. As area is weighted heavily, the selected parcels coalesce around core reserves but protect less area. The differences protection in metropolitan areas is commonly used as a policy for regulating landscape change in the United

  1. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, D.; Ready, C.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

  2. Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for DOE Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1980-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This order establishes the Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for Department of Energy (DOE) operations. Cancels Interim Management Directive No. 5001, Safety, Health And Environmental Protection dated 9-29-77.

  3. PAUL B. HOOK Wetland and Watershed Scientist, Intermountain Aquatics, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    design for water resource protection Native-plant-based streambank bioengineering and treatment wetland and plant effects in wastewater treatment wetlands and riparian buffers Wetland and riparian restoration in surface and groundwater hydrology.** Residential wastewater treatment wetland, Jackson, WY (research

  4. A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmorek, David

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

  5. Cost-Effective Mapping of Benthic Habitats in Inland Reservoirs through Split-Beam Sonar, Indicator Kriging, and Historical Geologic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; May, Cassandra

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Because bottom substrate composition is an important control on the temporal and spatial location of the aquatic community, accurate maps of benthic habitats of inland lakes and reservoirs provide valuable information to managers, recreational users, and scientists. Therefore, we collected vertical, split-beam sonar data (roughness [E1], hardness [E2], and bathymetry) and sediment samples to make such maps. Statistical calibration between sonar parameters and sediment classes was problematic because the E1:E2 ratios for soft (muck and clay) sediments overlapped a lower and narrower range for hard (gravel) substrates. Thus, we used indicator kriging (IK) to map the probability that unsampled locations did not contain coarse sediments. To overcome the calibration issue we tested proxies for the natural processes and anthropogenic history of the reservoir as potential predictive variables. Of these, a geologic map proved to be the most useful. The central alluvial valley and mudflats contained mainly muck and organic-rich clays. The surrounding glacial till and shale bedrock uplands contained mainly poorly sorted gravels. Anomalies in the sonar data suggested that the organic-rich sediments also contained trapped gases, presenting additional interpretive issues for the mapping. We extended the capability of inexpensive split-beam sonar units through the incorporation of historic geologic maps and other records as well as validation with dredge samples. Through the integration of information from multiple data sets, were able to objectively identify bottom substrate and provide reservoir users with an accurate map of available benthic habitat.

  6. Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, national Fire Protection Association Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard, along with other delineated criteria, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  7. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, Supplement A: Habitat Enhancement Evaluation of Fish and Wash Creeks, 1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everest, Fred

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat improvements for anadromous salmonids on Fish Creek in the upper Clackamas Basin were evaluated. The primary objectives of the evaluation effort include: (1) evaluate and quantify the changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat improvements; (2) evaluate and quantify the changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements; and (3) evaluate the cost-effectiveness of habitat improvements developed with BPA and KV funds on Fish Creek. This report integrates data for the evaluation efforts collected in the Fish Creek Basin in 1982 and 1983. 3 references, 34 figures, 23 tables.

  8. Mondriaan memory protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witchel, Emmett Jethro, 1970-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability and security are quickly becoming users' biggest concern due to the increasing reliance on computers in all areas of society. Hardware-enforced, fine-grained memory protection can increase the reliability and ...

  9. Protective Coatings for Turbomachinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCune, B.; Hilty, L.

    of these coatings has lead to the development of tailored coatings for different applications. In addition, coatings now offer multiple benefits. The most advanced compressor coatings restore surface finish, resist erosion, and provide protection from corrosion....

  10. Environmental Protection Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act states general provisions for the protection of the environment. It also states specific regulations for air, water and land pollution as well as atomic radiation, toxic chemical and oil...

  11. Physical Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes Department of Energy management objectives, requirements and responsibilities for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Cancels DOE 5632.1C. Canceled by DOE O 470.4.

  12. Cavern Protection (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is public policy of the state to provide for the protection of caves on or under Texas lands. For the purposes of this legislation, “cave” means any naturally occurring subterranean cavity, and...

  13. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Policy is to establish DOE-specific principles for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Cancels DOE P 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B

  14. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Policy is to establish DOE-specific policy for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Canceled by DOE P 443.1A.

  15. Cybersecurity: Protecting Our

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    prosperity in the 21st century will depend on cybersecurity." President Barack Obama We live in a wired world, ipads, game consoles, and other web-enabled devices also need to be protected from viruses and malware

  16. Federal Protective Force

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes requirements for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal protective forces (FPFs). Cancels DOE M 470.4-3, Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

  17. Groundwater Protection Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, D.G.

    1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document will be a useful reference for those engaged in groundwater protection and management. This document presents a great deal of detail while still addressing the larger issues.

  18. Protective Force Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    To prescribe Department of Energy policy, responsibilities, and requirements for the management and operation of the Protective Force Program. Chg 1 dated 2-13-95. Cancels DOE O 5632.7 and DOE O 5632.8.

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic invertebrate communities Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Sciences and Ecology 4 Cranberry Bogs: The effect of cultivation and restoration on habitat distribution, benthic invertebrate communities, and food webs in...

  20. Local Environmental Pollution Strongly Influences Culturable Bacterial Aerosols at an Urban Aquatic Superfund Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uriarte, Maria

    Local Environmental Pollution Strongly Influences Culturable Bacterial Aerosols at an Urban Aquatic Information ABSTRACT: In polluted environments, when microbial aerosols originate locally, species composition of the aerosols should reflect the polluted source. To test the connection between local environmental pollution

  1. LETTER Community ecology theory predicts the effects of agrochemical mixtures on aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajeunesse, Marc J.

    LETTER Community ecology theory predicts the effects of agrochemical mixtures on aquatic experiment to examine the effects of pairwise agrochemical mixtures [fertiliser, herbicide (atrazine. As postulated, the responses of biodiversity and ecosystem properties to agrochemicals alone and in mixtures

  2. An endangered oasis of aquatic microbial biodiversity in the Chihuahuan desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forney, Larry J.

    An endangered oasis of aquatic microbial biodiversity in the Chihuahuan desert Valeria Souza, representing a desert oasis of high biodiversity. Here, we combine data from molecular microbiology and geology

  3. Carbon Dynamics in Aquatic Ecosystems in Response to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Altered Nutrients Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Chao

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquatic ecosystems will experience altered inorganic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous availability in the future due to elevated atmospheric CO2, stronger stratification and anthropogenic activities. Despite its importance in modulating global...

  4. Interactions among flow, sediment deposition and aquatic vegetation in a channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong, Lijun

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquatic vegetation is commonly present in rivers in many forms. This thesis consists of two studies, which examine the flow structure around a patch of emergent, rigid vegetation in a laboratory channel. The vegetation ...

  5. Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To implement sound stewardship practices that are protective of the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources impacted by the Department of Energy (DOE) operations and by which DOE cost effectively meets or exceeds compliance with applicable environmental; public health; and resource protection laws, regulations, and DOE requirements. Chg 1, dated 1-24-05; Chg 2, dated 12-7-05; Admin Chg 1, dated 1-3-07. Cancels DOE 5400.1 and DOE N 450.4.

  6. Advanced worker protection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, B.; Duncan, P.; Myers, J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project will result in the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS will be built around a life support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack will be combined with advanced protective garments, advanced liquid cooling garment, respirator, communications, and support equipment to provide improved worker protection, simplified system maintenance, and dramatically improve worker productivity through longer duration work cycles. Phase I of the project has resulted in a full scale prototype Advanced Worker Protection Ensemble (AWPE, everything the worker will wear), with sub-scale support equipment, suitable for integrated testing and preliminary evaluation. Phase II will culminate in a full scale, certified, pre-production AWPS and a site demonstration.

  7. General Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1990-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities for Department of Energy (DOE) Operations for assuring compliance with applicable Federal, State and local environmental protection laws and regulations, Executive Orders, and internal Department policies. Cancels DOE O 5480.1A. Para. 2b, 4b, and 4c of Chap. II and para. 2d and 3b of Chap. III canceled by DOE O 231.1.

  8. Voluntary Protection Program- Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) promotes safety and health excellence through cooperative efforts among labor, management, and government at the Department of Energy (DOE) contractor sites. DOE has also formed partnerships with other Federal agencies and the private sector for both advancing and sharing its Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) experiences and preparing for program challenges in the next century. The safety and health of contractor and federal employees are a high priority for the Department.

  9. Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to implement sound stewardship practices that are protective of the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources impacted by DOE operations, and meet or exceed compliance with applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection requirements cost effectively. The revision provides specific expectations for implementation of Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environment, Energy, and Transportation Management. Cancels DOE O 450.1. Canceled by DOE O 436.1.

  10. Environmental Protection Act (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Environmental Protection Act is Ontario's key legislation for environmental protection. The act grants the Ministry of the Environment broad powers to deal with the discharge of contaminants...

  11. Influence of Nutrients and Integrated Mosquito Management Tactics on Mosquitoes and Their Habitat Microbiomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demisse, Dagne Duguma

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plant of potential bioremediation importance, and itslarvae and two emergent aquatic plants of bioremediationto facilitate the bioremediation processes in wetlands via (

  12. Data Protection Policy Version History Data Protection Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    Data Protection Policy Version History ­ Data Protection Policy Version Author Revisions Made Date and Strategy taken by James Newby to the Executive Board 2009. Information Compliance Unit 1 July 2009 #12;DATA PROTECTION POLICY 1. Introduction 1.1 The Data Protection Act 1998 applies to all personal information about

  13. Data Protection Policy Page 1 DATA PROTECTION POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenlees, John

    Data Protection Policy Page 1 DATA PROTECTION POLICY POLICY STATEMENT The University intends to fully comply with all requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998 (,,Act) in so far as it affects the Universitys activities. SCOPE This Data Protection Policy: Covers the processing of all personal information

  14. Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project; Klickitat Watershed Enhancement, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, Will

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of stream reaches and watersheds supporting native anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss; ESA- listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU) and spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha). Habitat restoration activities in the Klickitat subbasin augment goals and objectives of the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the NMFS Biological Opinion (All-H paper). Work is conducted to enhance instream and contributing upland habitat to facilitate increased natural production potential for native salmonid stocks. Efforts in the Klickitat Subbasin fall into two main categories: (1) identification and prioritization of sites for protection and restoration activities, (2) implementation of protection and restoration measures. KWEP personnel also assist monitoring efforts of the YKFP Monitoring & Evaluation Project. During the September 2002-August 2003 reporting period, KWEP personnel continued efforts to address feedback from the August 2000 Provincial Review that indicated a need for better information management and development of geographic priorities by: (1) Assisting development of the Strategic Habitat Plan for the Klickitat Lead Entity (Task A3.1) and Klickitat steelhead EDT model (Task A4.1); (2) Improving the functionality of reference point, habitat unit, and large woody debris modules of the habitat database as well as addition of a temperature module (Tasks A1.1-1.2); (3) Continuing development and acquisition of GIS data (Task A1.3); (4) Ongoing data collection efforts to fill information gaps including streamflow, habitat, and temperature (Objectives C1 and C2); and (5) Completion of planning, field work, and hydrologic modeling associated with roads assessment in the White Creek watershed (Task A4.2). Significant milestones associated with restoration projects during the reporting period included: (1) Completion of the Surveyors Fish Creek Passage Enhancement project (Task B2.3); (2) Completion of interagency agreements for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat Mill (Task B2.10) projects; (3) Completion of topographic surveys for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4), Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5), Trout Creek and Bear Creek culvert replacements (Task B2.7), and Snyder Swale II (Task B2.13) projects; (4) Completion of the Snyder Swale II - Phase 1 project (Task B2.13); (5) Completion of design, planning, and permitting for the Klickitat Mill project (Task B2.10) and initiation of construction; (6) Design for the Trout and Bear Creek culverts (B2.7) were brought to the 60% level; and (7) Completion of design work for the for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5) projects.

  15. On the economic optimality of marine reserves when fishing damages habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Holly Villacorta

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I expand a spatially-explicit bioeconomic fishery model to include the negative effects of fishing effort on habitat quality. I consider two forms of effort driven habitat damage: First, fishing effort may ...

  16. Assessment of estuarine habitats for resident and estuarine-dependent species: tools for conservation and management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervette, Virginia Rhea

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    My research in coastal Ecuador and the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) elucidated differences in value of shallow estuarine habitats for fishes and invertebrates. I focused on mangrove and tidal river habitats in Ecuador, ...

  17. Will a Forest Habitat Network in the Scottish Highlands be both feasible and truly sustainable? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Vanessa

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forest Habitat Network (FHN) concept has emerged in recent years as a strategy to reverse processes of deforestation and ecosystem degradation by connecting existing woodland habitat and increasing forest area. This thesis presents a wide...

  18. The impacts of mining on the habitat ecology of raccoons in east-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beucler, Michele

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat alterations associated with strip-mining and reclamation may reduce the suitability of an area for wildlife by redistributing requirements for survival and reproduction. I evaluated several predictions regarding the impacts of habitat...

  19. Biodiesel from aquatic species. Project report: FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.M.; Sprague, S.; Jarvis, E.E.; Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Zeiler, K.G.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers in the Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project focus on the use of microalgae as a feedstock for producing renewable, high-energy liquid fuels. The program`s basic premise is that microalgae, which have been called the most productive biochemical factories in the world, can produce up to 30 times more oil per unit of growth area than land plants. It is estimated that 150 to 400 barrels of oil per acre per year (0.06 to 0.16 million liters/hectar) could be produced with microalgal oil technology. Initial commercialization of this technology is envisioned for the desert Southwest because this area provides high solar radiation and offers flat land that has few competing uses (hence low land costs). Similarly, there are large saline aquifers with few competing uses in the region. This water source could provide a suitable, low-cost medium for the growth of many microalgae. The primary area of research during FY 1993 was the effort to genetically improve microalgae in order to control the timing and magnitude of lipid accumulation. Increased lipid content will have a direct effect on fuel price, and the control of lipid content is a major project goal. The paper describes progress on the following: culture collection; molecular biology of lipid biosynthesis; microalgal transformation; and environmental, safety, and health and quality assurance.

  20. Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M. [and others

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

  1. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Donna

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

  2. Rack protection monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  3. Distribution, habitat preference, competitive interactions and predation of French Polynesian Bryozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Connor D

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT PREFERENCE, COMPETITIVE INTERACTIONSfronds, I quantified the distribution of bryozoans in aorea, French Polynesia; distribution I NTRODUCTION Fouling

  4. Ontogenetic shift in habitat by early juvenile queen conch,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    using suction dredges (Iversen et a!., 1987; Stoner, unpub1. data) but few early juveniles have been populations IAppeldoorn, 1984), mass rearing of large juveniles (1- and 2-years-old) is costly (Siddall, 1983 with the identification of suitable habitats (Iversen et a!., 1986; Stoner and Sandt. 1991; Stoner, unpub1. data). Despite

  5. anadromous fish habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anadromous fish habitat First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Working paper on restoration...

  6. Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits April 17-19th, 2013 ISRP Review Team (4 at the Sheraton Airport at 7:15 a.m. Site Visits: Depart airport and head east: Wind, Klickitat, White Salmon in this review: 1998-019-00 Wind River Watershed Underwood Conservation District (UCD), US Forest Service (USFS

  7. Habitat Abstracting Logic Melissa Bingham, Eric Cummings, Vincenzo Buttari, Sherryll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Jennifer S.

    habitat, navigates towards can, secures can, and abstracts it by locating recycle bin and then disposes World Applications ·Detection and removal of objects in an environment unsafe for humans. ·Recycling faster when battery is fully charged. Advisor: Dr. Jennifer Kay of Rowan University Computer Science

  8. Extinction rates under nonrandom patterns of habitat loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conversion on species extinctions assume that habitat conversion occurs at ran- dom. This assumption allows predictions about extinction rates based on the species­area relationship. We show that the spatially compositional gradients, or species richness, also alter pre- dicted species extinction rates. We illustrate

  9. THE BIOLOGY OF RARE AND DECLINING SPECIES AND HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activities on declining species and habitats. Rarity, declining populations, and extinctions are natural may underiie llaturalpopulation declines of species leading to extirpationsand extinctions (Allendorf: additional factors push species towards extinction Ziswiler (1967) noted that 53 of the 77 species of birds

  10. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR 912 Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1 Martin B. Main by establishing and managing desirable native plants. Native wetland plants play important ecological roles many more species than non-native plants because native wildlife evolved with native plant communities

  11. Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael T.

    Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium P. M. Scheifele Department significant levels of background noise due to pumps and motors. This noise, together with pool architecture to quantify the ambient noise levels in the water from machine vibration and from in-air performance speaker

  12. An Analysis of a Large Scale Habitat Monitoring Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    of the Atlantic University of California, Berkeley 2150 Shattuck Avenue 105 Eden St. Berkeley, California 94720 Berkeley, California 94704 Bar Harbor, ME 04609 ABSTRACT Habitat and environmental monitoring is a driving underestimated the impact of multi- hop traffic overhearing and the nuances of power source selection. While

  13. adaptable habitat construction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adaptable habitat construction First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Appendix J 2008...

  14. Effects of Anthropogenic Nutrient Enrichment on Exotic and Restored Native Aquatic Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parnell, Allison

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    OF TABLES .................................................................................................... xii 1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................... 1 1.1 Eutrophication... growth rates and total nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates and distance from nutrient source input ............. 62 1 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Eutrophication of Wetland Habitats The degradation of estuarine habitats has been...

  15. Drilling fluids and the arctic tundra of Alaska: assessing contamination of wetlands habitat and the toxicity to aquatic invertebrates and fish (journal version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, D.F.; Snyder-Conn, E.; Riley, R.G.; Garland, T.R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling for oil on the North Slope of Alaska results in the release of large volumes of used drilling fluids into arctic wetlands. These releases usually come from regulated discharges or seepage from reserve pits constructed to hold used drilling fluids. A study of five drill sites and their reserve pits showed an increase in common and trace elements and organic hydrocarbons in ponds near to and distant from reserve pits. Ions elevated in water were Ba, Cl, Cr, K, SO4 and Zn. Concentrations of Cu, Cr, Fe, Pb, and Si in sediments were higher in near and distant ponds than in control ponds. The predominant organics in drill-site waters and sediments consisted of aromatic and paraffinic hydrocarbons characteristic of petroleum or a refined product of petroleum. In 96-hr exposures in the field, toxicity to Daphnia Middendorffiana was observed in water from all reserve pits, and from two of five near ponds, but not from distant ponds. In laboratory tests with Daphnia magna, growth and reproduction were reduced in dilutions of 2.5% drilling fluid (2.5 drilling fluid: 97.5 dilution water) from one reserve pit, and 25% drilling fluid from a second.

  16. Advanced Worker Protection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) is a liquid-air-based, self-contained breathing and cooling system with a duration of 2 hrs. AWPS employs a patented system developed by Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS), and was demonstrated at their facility in Houston, TX as well as at Kansas State University, Manhattan. The heart of the system is the life-support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack is combined with advanced protective garments, an advanced liquid cooling garment (LCG), a respirator, and communications and support equipment. The prototype unit development and testing under Phase 1 has demonstrated that AWPS has the ability to meet performance criteria. These criteria were developed with an understanding of both the AWPS capabilities and the DOE decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities protection needs.

  17. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeNure, Charles R. (Pocatello, ID)

    2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  18. Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United influencing total fish biomass in streams, but few studies have evaluated the relative influence of habitat and pH together. We measured total fish biomass, stream habitat, and stream pH in sixteen sites from

  19. 2005 Proc. Annu. Conf. SEAFWA Movement and Habitat Selection of Largemouth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    . Annu. Conf. Southeast. Assoc. Fish and Wild. Agencies 59:227­240 Habitat selection by largemouth bass2005 Proc. Annu. Conf. SEAFWA Movement and Habitat Selection of Largemouth Bass in a Florida Steep Street, Ruskin, FL 33570 Abstract: The movement and habitat selection of largemouth bass (Micropterus

  20. Quantitative Measures of Rearing And Spawning Habitat Characteristics For Stream-Dwelling Salmonids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    for stream-dwelling salmonids: guidelines for habitat restoration. Province of British Columbia, MinistryQuantitative Measures of Rearing And Spawning Habitat Characteristics For Stream-Dwelling Salmonids: Guidelines For Habitat Restoration by E.R. Keeley and P.A. Slaney Watershed Restoration Project Report No. 4

  1. OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA of Resource Management Title of Thesis: Overlap of predicted cold-water coral habitat and bottom- contact-contact fishing on cold-water corals (class Anthozoa) due to the role corals play in providing biogenic habitat

  2. Environmental protection implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. SNL is committed to operating in full compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental laws, regulations, and standards. Furthermore, SNL/California strives to go beyond compliance with legal requirements by making every effort practical to reduce impacts to the environment to levels as low as reasonably achievable.

  3. Environmental Protection Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brekke, D.D.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. This report focuses on the following: notification of environmental occurrences; general planning and reporting; special programs and plans; environmental monitoring program; and quality assurance and data verification.

  4. Protections = Defenses in Depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromisingProtecting your personal informationProtections

  5. Golden-cheeked Warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) habitat fragmentation in Travis County, Texas: a remote sensing and geographical information system analysis of habitat extent, pattern and condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moses, Michael Edwin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis procedures were assessed for their utility in characterizing fragmentation patterns. Benson (1990) attempted to calculate a fractal dimension of potential GCW habitat "patches" within larger GCW habitat 'sites' and then correlate this parameter... recreational recreational Study Site Size (ha) 3, 420 1, 655 1, 202 1, 069 1, 833 504 1, 393 517 93 BULL CREEK Bull Creek (1, 655 ha) is characterized by a large, nearly contiguous block of habitat (Table 1). The topography is dominated by three...

  6. Fish passage and protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinehart, B.N.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of reprints on fish passage and protection topics from: American Fisheries Society; American Society of Civil Engineers; Harza Engineering Company; Hydro Review Magazine; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Independent Energy Magazine; National Hydropower Association; Northwest Hydroelectric Association; United States Army Corps of Engineers; United States Committee on large dams; and the United States Department of the Interior.

  7. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

  8. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

    1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

  9. Protective Force Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes policy, requirements, responsibilities, and authorities, for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Extended until 7-7-06 by DOE N 251.64, dated 7-7-05 Cancels: DOE 5632.7A

  10. Contractor Protective Force

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes requirements for the management and operation of the U.S. Department of Energy contractor protective forces. Cancels: DOE M 470.4-3 Chg 1, CRD (Attachment 2) only, except for Section C. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

  11. Livestock Risk Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Bill; Bennett, Blake; Jones, Diana

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    risk insurance with an ending date of coverage that meets their risk management objectives. Feeder cattle producers may want the end date of coverage to match the William Thompson, Blake Bennett and DeDe Jones* Figure 1: Livestock Risk Protection...

  12. United States Environmental Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (DOE) must demonstrate compliance with these standards. The NRC will use its licensing regulations to determine whether DOE has demonstrated compliance with standards prior to receiving the necessary licenses Public Health and Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (40 CFR Part

  13. Aquatic Studies at the Proposed George Parkhouse I Reservoir Site on the South Sulphur River in Northeast Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelwick, Frances P.; Burgess, Christine C.

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    , and assess habitats, 2) measure ambient water quality parameters, 3) report the abundance of fish of each species collected in each habitat at each of three sample sites upstream (unchannelized reach) and three sample sites downstream (channelized reach...

  14. Development of a Habitat Suitability Index Model for the Sage Sparrow on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Simmons, Mary Ann; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Becker, James M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mitigation threshold guidelines for the Hanford Site are based on habitat requirements of the sage sparrow (Amphispiza belli) and only apply to areas with a mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) overstory and a native understory. The sage sparrow habitat requirements are based on literature values and are not specific to the Hanford Site. To refine these guidelines for the Site, a multi-year study was undertaken to quantify habitat characteristics of sage sparrow territories. These characteristics were then used to develop a habitat suitability index (HSI) model which can be used to estimate the habitat value of specific locations on the Site.

  15. Integration of geographic information systems and logistic multiple regression for aquatic macrophyte modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumalani, S. [Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Geography; Jensen, J.R.; Althausen, J.D.; Burkhalter, S. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geography; Mackey, H.E. Jr. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since aquatic macrophytes have an important influence on the physical and chemical processes of an ecosystem while simultaneously affecting human activity, it is imperative that they be inventoried and managed wisely. However, mapping wetlands can be a major challenge because they are found in diverse geographic areas ranging from small tributary streams, to shrub or scrub and marsh communities, to open water lacustrian environments. In addition, the type and spatial distribution of wetlands can change dramatically from season to season, especially when nonpersistent species are present. This research, focuses on developing a model for predicting the future growth and distribution of aquatic macrophytes. This model will use a geographic information system (GIS) to analyze some of the biophysical variables that affect aquatic macrophyte growth and distribution. The data will provide scientists information on the future spatial growth and distribution of aquatic macrophytes. This study focuses on the Savannah River Site Par Pond (1,000 ha) and L Lake (400 ha) these are two cooling ponds that have received thermal effluent from nuclear reactor operations. Par Pond was constructed in 1958, and natural invasion of wetland has occurred over its 35-year history, with much of the shoreline having developed extensive beds of persistent and non-persistent aquatic macrophytes.

  16. Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for DOE Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1981-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes the Environmental Protection, Safety. and Health Protection Program for Department of Energy (DOE) operations. Cancels DOE 5480.1, dated 5-5-1980, its chapters are not canceled. Canceled by DOE O 5480.1B

  17. Habitat reclamation plan to mitigate for the loss of habitat due to oil and gas production activities under maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities associated with oil and gas development under the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) from 1975 to 2025 will disturb approximately 3,354 acres. Based on 1976 aerial photographs and using a dot grid methodology, the amount of land disturbed prior to MER is estimated to be 3,603 acres. Disturbances on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) were mapped using 1988 aerial photography and a geographical information system. A total of 6,079 acres were classified as disturbed as of June, 1988. The overall objective of this document is to provide specific information relating to the on-site habitat restoration program at NPRC. The specific objectives, which relate to the terms and conditions that must be met by DOE as a means of protecting the San Joaquin kit fox from incidental take are to: (1) determine the amount and location of disturbed lands on NPR-1 and the number of acres disturbed as a result of MER activities, (2) develop a long term (10 year) program to restore an equivalent on-site acres to that lost from prior project-related actions, and (3) examine alternative means to offset kit fox habitat loss.

  18. Aquatic toxicity information on VAX VMS backup (ACQUIRE for VMS). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of Acquire is to provide scientists and managers quick access to a comprehensive, systematic, computerized compilation of aquatic toxicity data. Scientific papers published both nationally and internationally on the toxicity of chemicals to aquatic organisms and plants are collected and reviewed for ACQUIRE. Independently compiled data files that meet ACQUIRE parameter and quality assurance criteria are also included. Selected toxicity test results and related testing information for any individual chemical from laboratory and field aquatic toxicity effects are included for tests with freshwater and marine organisms. The total number of data records in ACQUIRE is now over 105,300. This includes data from 6000 references, for 5200 chemicals and 2400 test species. A major data file, Acute Toxicity of Organic Chemicals (ATOC), has been incorporated into ACQUIRE. The ATOC file contains laboratory acute test data on 525 organic chemicals using juvenile fathead minnows.

  19. Evaluating stream habitat using a 2D hydraulic model Supervisor: Dr Rhian Thomas (Rhian.thomas@glasgow.ac.uk)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    including pearl fishing, industrial and agricultural pollution, siltation, physical riverbed habitat of habitat restorations, such as the construction of habitat enhancement measures and the removal of past in meters, depth and substrate data, and the construction of habitat suitability curves for Atlantic salmon

  20. Role of Tidal Saltwater Habitats for Juvenile Salmonids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Which Habitats are Used by Juvenile Salmon April 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90) ScrubShrub Forested Emergent #12;0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% CS WSI PAB PE UCC ETI LES composition varies through the year 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov From

  1. Natural Resources Protection Act (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maine's Department of Environmental Protection requires permits for most activities that occur in a protected natural resource area or adjacent to water resources such as rivers or wetlands. An ...

  2. Environmental Protection and Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Roberto; Mumme, Stephen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    59 Stat. 1219. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).1992. Integrated Environmental Plan for the Mexican-U.S.EPA, A92-171.toc. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (

  3. Protected Water Area System (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Natural Resource Commission maintains a state plan for the design and establishment of a protected water area system and those adjacent lands needed to protect the integrity of that system. A...

  4. Unequal Error Protection Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henkel, Werner

    Unequal Error Protection Turbo Codes Diploma Thesis Neele von Deetzen Arbeitsbereich Nachrichtentechnik School of Engineering and Science Bremen, February 28th, 2005 #12;Unequal Error Protection Turbo Convolutional Codes / Turbo Codes 18 3.1 Structure

  5. Radiation protection at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

  6. Demonstration Dock Designed to Benefit Eelgrass Habitat Restoration (Washington)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Gayaldo, Perry F.; Curtis, Craig A.; Court, Brian L.; Pierce, David M.; Robison, David S.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The derelict Thomas Oil Dock on state tidelands in Port Townsend, Washington, was redesigned for the Northwest Maritime Center by a committee including marine scientists, architects, engineers, educators, regulators, and user groups. The committee's objectives were to create a ''demonstration dock'' using the best-available technologies and design features to restore nearshore habitat functions, particularly for threatened fisheries resources, while accommodating the unique requirements of the educational facility to house vessels ranging from historic tall ships to sea kayaks. A key nearshore habitat restoration goal was to reduce fragmentation of eelgrass where shade from the existing dock inhibited growth, by improving conditions with a new dock design and transplanting eelgrass to connect existing patches. Ecological conditions were evaluated through diver surveys; mapping existing eelgrass, macroalgae, and substrates; and review of controlling factors. Data on the attenuation an d diffusion of photosynthetically-active radiation (PAR) was collected and evaluated relative to eelgrass light requirements. Potential shade impacts of existing and alternative dock designs and materials were modeled. Key design features to improve habitat functions included the installation of reflective material under the dock to increase the incidence of PAR at the substrate level, reduction in the number of piles and associated shade impacts through the use of steel piles instead of wood, increase in the length of the trestle to 286 to move the greatest area of overwater structure beyond the range of eelgrass, and the use of grating in strategic locations to reduce the potential of a light/dark barrier to fish passage.

  7. UGA IACUC Guidelines for the Use of Tricaine Methanesulfonate (MS-222) in Fishes and Other Aquatic Animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Daniel

    UGA IACUC Guidelines for the Use of Tricaine Methanesulfonate (MS-222) in Fishes and Other Aquatic Animals MS-222 is used for anesthesia and euthanasia of fishes and other aquatic species. See widely between species and is affected by water temperature, hardness, and size of the individual fish

  8. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into ECO-TEK's Solar Aquatics System (SAS) for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -TEK's Solar Aquatics System (SAS) for the UBC Farm Centre Building Asad Khan Harshanvit Singh Sean Henderson of a project/report". #12; APSC 262 FINAL REPORT An Investigation into ECO-TEK's Solar Aquatics System (SAS) for the UBC Farm Centre Building Asad Khan Harshanvit Singh Sean Henderson Wesley Shuen Tutorial Instructor

  9. GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

    2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

  10. Design and performance of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center photovoltaic system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, A.; Begovic, M.; Long, R.; Ropp, M.; Pregelj, A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A building-integrated DC PV array has been constructed on the Georgia Tech campus. The array is mounted on the roof of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center (GTAC), site of the aquatic events during the 1996 Paralympic and Olympic Games in Atlanta. At the time of its construction, it was the world`s largest roof-mounted photovoltaic array, comprised of 2,856 modules and rates at 342 kW. This section describes the electrical and physical layout of the PV system, and the associated data acquisition system (DAS) which monitors the performance of the system and collects measurements of several important meteorological parameters.

  11. Production of extracellular nucleic acids by genetically altered bacteria in aquatic-environment microcosms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, J.H.; David, A.W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors which affect the production of extracellular DNA by genetically altered strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas cepacia, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum in aquatic environments were investigated. The presence or absence of the ambient microbial community had little effect on the production of extracellular DNA. Results indicate the extracellular-DNA production by genetically altered bacteria released into aquatic environments is more strongly influenced by physiochemical factors than biotic factors; extracellular-DNA production rates are usually greater for organisms released in freshwater than marine environments; and ambient microbial populations can readily utilize materials released by these organisms.

  12. Conceptual Spawning Habitat Model to Aid in ESA Recovery Plans for Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop a spawning habitat model that can be used to determine the physical habitat factors that are necessary to define the production potential for fall chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Columbia River's Hanford Reach and Snake River. This project addresses RPA 155 in the NMFS 2000 Biological Opinion: Action 155: BPA, working with BOR, the Corps, EPA, and USGS, shall develop a program to: (1) Identify mainstem habitat sampling reaches, survey conditions, describe cause-and-effect relationships, and identify research needs; (2) Develop improvement plans for all mainstem reaches; and (3) Initiate improvements in three mainstem reaches. During FY 2003 we continued to collect and analyze information on fall chinook salmon spawning habitat characteristics in the Hanford Reach that will be used to address RPA 155, i.e., items 1-3 above. For example, in FY 2003: (1) We continued to survey spawning habitat in the Hanford Reach and develop a 2-dimensional hydraulic and habitat model that will be capable of predicting suitability of fall chinook salmon habitat in the Hanford Reach; (2) Monitor how hydro operations altered the physical and chemical characteristics of the river and the hyporheic zone within fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach; (3) Published a paper on the impacts of the Columbia River hydroelectric system on main-stem habitats of fall chinook salmon (Dauble et al. 2003). This paper was made possible with data collected on this project; (4) Continued to analyze data collected in previous years that will ultimately be used to identify cause-and-effect relationships and identify research needs that will assist managers in the improvement of fall chinook habitat quality in main-stem reaches. During FY 2004 we plan to: (1) Complete preliminary reporting and submit papers based on the results of the project through FY 2004. Although we have proposed additional analysis of data be conducted in FY 2005, we anticipate a significant number of key papers being prepared and submitted in FY 2004 which will go toward identifying the data gaps this RPA is intended to address; (2) Make available data from this project for use on Project 2003-038-00 ('Evaluate restoration potential of Snake River fall chinook salmon') which is a BPA-funded project that will start in FY 2004; and (3) Present results of our work at regional and national meetings in order to facilitate technology transfer and information sharing. The objective of this project is to define the production potential of fall chinook salmon that spawn in the Hanford Reach. We will provide fisheries and resource managers with the information they need to determine if the Hanford Reach fall chinook salmon population is indeed healthy, and whether this population will be capable of seeding other satellite populations in the future. We will accomplish this purpose by continuing our on-going research at determining the carrying capacity of the Hanford Reach for producing fall chinook salmon under current operational scenarios, and then begin an assessment of whether the Reach is functioning as a model of a normative river as is widely believed. The product of our research will be a better understanding of the key habitat features for mainstem populations of anadromous salmonids, as well as a better understanding of the measures that must be taken to ensure long-term protection of the Hanford Reach fall chinook population. Although the project was originally funded in FY 1994, it was significantly redefined in FY 2000. At that time five tasks were proposed to accomplish the project objective. The purpose of this progress report is to briefly describe the activities that have been completed on each of the five tasks from FY 2000 through FY 2003.

  13. Walla Walla Subbasin DRAFT Aquatic RM&E Plan Prepared by: CTUIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as an interim set of guidelines that will assure a systematic approach to directing and funding RME. Further as a reliable measure of habitat and population response to recovery actions taken in the Walla Walla subbasin

  14. Aquatic Vertebrate Assemblages in the Middle Trinity River Basin, with Emphasis on Turtles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riedle, Jimmy

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    between the two study sites, turtle species richness decreased, whereas habitat overlap between species increased. I analyzed the capture efficiency of 7 trap types used throughout the course of this project and found that effectiveness of each trap type...

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into a CIRS style Solar Aquatic System at the UBC Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into a CIRS style Solar Aquatic System at the UBC Farm Kevin Chow Andrew Fong Ka Fai (Philip) Wong University investigation into a CIRS style Solar Aquatic System at the UBC Farm Submitted by Kevin Chow Andrew Fong Ka Fai;Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impacts of installing a Solar Aquatic System

  16. Designing radiation protection signs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, M.A.; Richey, C.L.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entry into hazardous areas without the proper protective equipment is extremely dangerous and must be prevented whenever possible. Current postings of radiological hazards at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) do not incorporate recent findings concerning effective warning presentation. Warning information should be highly visible, quickly, and easily understood. While continuing to comply with industry standards (e.g., Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines), these findings can be incorporated into existing radiological sign design, making them more effective in terms of usability and compliance. Suggestions are provided for designing more effective postings within stated guidelines.

  17. ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOENurse Triage Lines SupportPolicyProcess andProtecting

  18. Protecting your personal information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromisingProtecting your personal information Community

  19. Protection Upgrades Project (4580)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromisingProtecting your personal information

  20. Abundance, Behavior, and Habitat Utilization by Coho Salmon and Steelhead Trout in Fish Creek, Oregon, as Influenced by Habitat Enhancement, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, John (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR); Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Heller, David A. (Mount Hood National Forest, Gresham, OR)

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction and evaluation of salmonid habitat improvements on Fish Creek, a tributary of the upper Clackamas River, was continued in fiscal year 1985 by the Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest, and the Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit of the Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (PNW), USDA Forest Service. The study began in 1982 when PNW entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to evaluate fish habitat improvements in the Fish Creek basin on the Estacada Ranger District. The project was initially conceived as a 5-year effort (19824986) to be financed by Forest Service funds. Several factors limiting production of salmonids in the basin were identified during the first year of the study, and the scope of the habitat improvement effort was subsequently enlarged. The habitat improvement program and the evaluation of improvements were both expanded in mid-1983 when the Bonneville Power Administration entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to provide additional funding for work on Fish Creek. Habitat improvement work in the basin is designed to increase the annual number of chinook and coho salmon, and steelhead trout smolt outmigrants. The primary objectives of the evaluation include the: (1) Evaluation and quantification of changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat Improvements. (2) Evaluation and quantification of changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements. (3) Evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of habitat improvements developed with BPA and Forest Service funds on Fish Creek. Several prototype enhancement projects were constructed and tested during the first three years of the study. The Intention was to identify successful techniques that could then be broadly applied within the bash. This stepwise procedure has been largely successful in identifying the most promising enhancement techniques for the Fish Creek basin. To date, 7-10 percent of the habitat area in the basin has been treated. When work on Fish Creek is completed, it is estimated that 50-60 percent of the total habitat area used by anadromous salmonids will have received some form of treatment. This annual progress report will focus on the projects completed in the basin In 1983, 1984, and 1985, and their evaluation. Winter habitat use and coho salmon and steelhead trout smolt production will also be emphasized.

  1. Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, J. R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ostrand, Kenneth G.; Hanson, Kyle C.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Donley, Erin E.; Ke, Yinghai; Buenau, Kate E.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 2010 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) project EST-P-09-1, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, and known as the 'Salmon Benefits' study. The primary goal of the study is to establish scientific methods to quantify habitat restoration benefits to listed salmon and trout in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) in three required areas: habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival (Figure ES.1). The general study approach was to first evaluate the state of the science regarding the ability to quantify benefits to listed salmon and trout from habitat restoration actions in the LCRE in the 2009 project year, and then, if feasible, in subsequent project years to develop quantitative indices of habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival. Based on the 2009 literature review, the following definitions are used in this study. Habitat connectivity is defined as a landscape descriptor concerning the ability of organisms to move among habitat patches, including the spatial arrangement of habitats (structural connectivity) and how the perception and behavior of salmon affect the potential for movement among habitats (functional connectivity). Life history is defined as the combination of traits exhibited by an organism throughout its life cycle, and for the purposes of this investigation, a life history strategy refers to the body size and temporal patterns of estuarine usage exhibited by migrating juvenile salmon. Survival is defined as the probability of fish remaining alive over a defined amount of space and/or time. The objectives of the 4-year study are as follows: (1) develop and test a quantitative index of juvenile salmon habitat connectivity in the LCRE incorporating structural, functional, and hydrologic components; (2) develop and test a quantitative index of the early life history diversity of juvenile salmon in the LCRE; (3) assess and, if feasible, develop and test a quantitative index of the survival benefits of tidal wetland habitat restoration (hydrologic reconnection) in the LCRE; and (4) synthesize the results of investigations into the indices for habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival benefits.

  2. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  3. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2013 AQUATIC WEED CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    . Replacement stocking of grass carp is necessary when fish are lost. A permit is required to stock grass carp of Natural Resources (SC DNR) now requires a free of charge permit prior to stocking tilapia and triploid grass carp for aquatic weed control in SC. A permit can be obtained from SC DNR at 803-734-3891 or from

  4. Predicting travel costs for recreational visits at aquatic sites within the Caribbean National Forest using GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Predicting travel costs for recreational visits at aquatic sites within the Caribbean National to visit various recreation sites. Cost surface models, developed in a GIS, can estimate the amount' predictive capabilities. The GIS models were then used to estimate the travel costs associated

  5. Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Electricity consumption in the public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    in the public municipal sector (rough estimates, 1995) 4 Factsheet: Water and energy This information sheet inhabitant (around 3 watts, based on household consumption). · In the public municipal sector, water suppliesEawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Electricity consumption

  6. Warming, eutrophication, and predator loss amplify subsidies between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palen, Wendy J.

    , Canada, Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada predators on the flux of biomass between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. We demonstrated that predatory., 2009), and also become detri- tus inputs that supply carbon and nitrogen to terrestrial plants (Gratton

  7. Buccal oscillation and lung ventilation in a semi-aquatic turtle, Platysternon megacephalum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brainerd, Elizabeth

    Buccal oscillation and lung ventilation in a semi-aquatic turtle, Platysternon megacephalum Kelly A including feeding, lung ventilation, buccopharyngeal respiration, thermoregulation, olfaction, defense of these buccal oscillations is 7.8 times smaller than the mean tidal volume of lung ventilation (combined mean

  8. Aquatic Toxicology 68 (2004) 112 Responses of benthic fish exposed to contaminants in outdoor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were provided with ample uncontaminated food resources. Because aquatic disposal of ash can also January 2004 Abstract Previous laboratory studies indicate that coal combustion wastes (a mixture composed of fly ash and other lower volume wastes such as bottom ash; hereafter collectively referred to as ash

  9. Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology berlandstrasse 133

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Energy Technology: Wind and Carbon Capture and Storage in the United States Jennie Stephens Clark technologies including wind power and carbon capture and storage (CCS) and national level socioEawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Eawag Überlandstrasse 133 P.O. Box

  10. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS AND AQUATIC SYSTEMS UF-Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of wetlands and aquatic systems in relation to elemental cycling as related to water quality, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and sea level rise. OVERALL COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1) To provide students with the basic concepts involved in biogeochemical cycling of macroelements (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus

  11. AQUA: an aquatic walking robot Christina Georgiades*, Andrew German**, Andrew Hogue**, Hui Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milios, Evangelos E.

    that are being taken within the AQUA project to develop a fully autonomous walking aquatic vehicle. It describes landmarks as well as on naturally occurring underwater landmarks and trinocular stereo. Keywords-autonomous is required to get the vehicle to the close proximity of the task, the task itself relies on the vehicle

  12. Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp Production Radomir Schmidt,, Prapakorn Tantoyotai, Sirine C. Fakra, Matthew A, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2, Canada United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, SJVASC

  13. Mechanisms Regulating Mercury Bioavailability for Methylating Microorganisms in the Aquatic Environment: A Critical Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in aquatic food webs is the methylation of inorganic forms of the metal, a process that is primarily mediated methylation occurs and the processes that control mercury bioavailability to these organisms. Methylmercury, and natural organic matter. These interactions result in a mixture of dissolved, nanoparticulate, and larger

  14. Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond, Massachusetts (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond interpretation of the hydrogen isotope ratios of plant leaf waxes extracted from sediments requires a thor- ough at a single site to determine how leaf wax hydro- gen isotope (D/H) ratios differ in different plant types

  15. Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Factsheet: Hydropower and ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Factsheet: Hydropower and ecology to gross final energy consumption is only about 2% ­ hydropower plays a vital role. This is largely due be stored in reservoirs. Hydropower supplies around 56% of Switzerland's electricity needs. Worldwide

  16. 14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    + ) = the incident solar irradiance in relative energy units; F = factor modifying that flux as a function of ozone14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems Warwick F in these ecosystems may also be more vulnerable to UV toxicity because of the inhibiting effects of cold tempera

  17. Aquatic Ecology 36: 8595, 2002. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquatic Ecology 36: 85­95, 2002. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 85, a spatially explicit ecosystem-based modeling tool, allowed us to compare the ecological consequences these realistic but worrisome ecological predictions. When coupled with an overall reduction in harvest pressure

  18. Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725) Fall 2006 will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of invasion ecology and will emphasize aspects related will be presented the ecological concepts and debates underlying this developing field; the biology and life history

  19. Several lineages of benthic animals have made the evolutionary transition between an aquatic and a terrestrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehl, Mimi

    on inter-leg coordination and motor control (e.g. Chasserat and Clarac, 1983; Clarac, 1981, 1984; Clarac control with analyses of the mechanics of locomoting on underwater substrata is required before we can locomotion to predict trends in the kinematics of aquatic pedestrian locomotion. Using these models, we

  20. ERDC/ELSR-00-8EnvironmentalLaboratory Aquatic Plant Control Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/ELSR-00-8EnvironmentalLaboratory Aquatic Plant Control Research Program Sediment Resuspension Sediment Resuspension Dynamics in Canopy- and Meadow-Forming Submersed Macrophyte Communities by William F resuspension dynamics in canopy- and meadow-forming submersed macrophyte communities / by John W. Barko

  1. MASTER THESIS IN AQUATIC PHOTOCHEMISTRY Sunlight-induced carbon dioxide emissions from lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uppsala Universitet

    MASTER THESIS IN AQUATIC PHOTOCHEMISTRY Sunlight-induced carbon dioxide emissions from lakes The emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from inland waters are substantial on a global scale. Yet, the fundamental question remains open which proportion of these CO2 emissions is induced by sunlight via photochemical

  2. Use of Benthic Macroinvertebrate Indices to Assess Aquatic Health in a Mixed-Landuse Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennuto, Chris

    degradation from storm water runoff and point source discharges (Plafkin et al. 1989), and indicating stream assemblage health in this study were: richness, percent model affinity, family-level biotic index). Urbanization frequently impacts aquatic ecosystems through increases in nonpoint source pollutants

  3. Hazard/Risk Assessment A REFINED AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR A PYRETHROID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    the agricultural dispersion model (AGDISP) [24] to estimate concentrations of permethrin in a standard 2-m deep:water partition coefficients, and a high affinity to bind to sediment and dissolved organic matter [12]. Studies concentration of pyr- ethroids and the toxicity to aquatic organisms that are not sediment dwellers [13

  4. 1 st INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON THE USE OF AQUATIC MACROPHYTES FOR WASTEWATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    ON THE USE OF AQUATIC MACROPHYTES FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS May 8 ­ 10, 2003 - Lisb 3 DANISH EXPERIENCES WITH WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS Hans Brix Department of Plant is described. KEYWORDS Constructed wetland; reed bed; root-zone system; treatment wetland; vertical flow

  5. Survey of protected vascular plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awl, D.J.; Pounds, L.R.; Rosensteel, B.A.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vascular plant surveys were initiated during fiscal year 1992 by the environmentally sensitive areas program to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered (T&E) vascular plant species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). T&E species receive protection under federal and state regulations. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that federally-funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. T&E plant species found on or near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Twenty-eight species identified on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these have been under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing (listed in the formerly-used C2 candidate category). Additional species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR. A range of habitats support the rare taxa on the ORR: river bluffs, sinkholes, calcareous barrens, wetlands, utility corridors, and forests. The list of T&E plant species and their locations on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated. The purpose of this document is to present information on the listed T&E plant species currently known to occur on the ORR as well as listed species potentially occurring on the ORR based on geographic range and habitat availability. For the purpose of this report, {open_quotes}T&E species{close_quotes} include all federal- and state-listed species, including candidates for listing, and species of special concern. Consideration of T&E plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival.

  6. ADVANCED WORKER PROTECTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judson Hedgehock

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    From 1993 to 2000, OSS worked under a cost share contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS is a protective ensemble that provides the user with both breathing air and cooling for a NIOSH-rated duration of two hours. The ensemble consists of a liquid air based backpack, a Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG), and an outer protective garment. The AWPS project was divided into two phases. During Phase 1, OSS developed and tested a full-scale prototype AWPS. The testing showed that workers using the AWPS could work twice as long as workers using a standard SCBA. The testing also provided performance data on the AWPS in different environments that was used during Phase 2 to optimize the design. During Phase 1, OSS also performed a life-cycle cost analysis on a representative clean up effort. The analysis indicated that the AWPS could save the DOE millions of dollars on D and D activities and improve the health and safety of their workers. During Phase 2, OSS worked to optimize the AWPS design to increase system reliability, to improve system performance and comfort, and to reduce the backpack weight and manufacturing costs. To support this design effort, OSS developed and tested several different generations of prototype units. Two separate successful evaluations of the ensemble were performed by the International Union of Operation Engineers (IUOE). The results of these evaluations were used to drive the design. During Phase 2, OSS also pursued certifying the AWPS with the applicable government agencies. The initial intent during Phase 2 was to finalize the design and then to certify the system. OSS and Scott Health and Safety Products teamed to optimize the AWPS design and then certify the system with the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH). Unfortunately, technical and programmatic difficulties prevented us from obtaining NIOSH certification. Despite the inability of NIOSH to certify the design, OSS was able to develop and successfully test, in both the lab and in the field, a prototype AWPS. They clearly demonstrated that a system which provides cooling can significantly increase worker productivity by extending the time they can function in a protective garment. They were also able to develop mature outer garment and LCG designs that provide considerable benefits over current protective equipment, such as self donning and doffing, better visibility, and machine washable. A thorough discussion of the activities performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 is presented in the AWPS Final Report. The report also describes the current system design, outlines the steps needed to certify the AWPS, discusses the technical and programmatic issues that prevented the system from being certified, and presents conclusions and recommendations based upon the seven year effort.

  7. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency...

  8. Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment More Documents & Publications Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection...

  9. Hunting, Habitat, and Indigenous Settlement Patterns: A Geographic Analysis of Buglé Wildlife Use in Western Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Derek Anthony

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation analyzes indigenous wildlife use from a geographic perspective, focusing on the relationships between hunting, habitat, and settlement patterns. Fieldwork took place among five neighboring communities in ...

  10. Availability, usage and expected contribution of potential nursery habitats for the California halibut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fodrie, Fredrick Joel; Mendoza, Guillermo F.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a damsel?sh re?ect availability of suitable habitat.locate/ecss Availability, usage and expected contribution ofthe spatial coverage (availability) of all potential nursery

  11. The effects of background adaptation and food availability on habitat preference of Corythoichthys flavofasciatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, Neetha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADAPTATION AND FOOD AVAILABILITY ON HABITAT PREFERENCE OFchoice is related to the availability of food, presence ofbackground adaptation, food availability, or a combination

  12. Habitat types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and plant species of concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, J.L.; Rickard, W.H.; Brandt, C.A. [and others

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to provide a comprehensive source of the best available information on Hanford Site sensitive and critical habitats and plants and animals of importance or special status. In this report, sensitive habitats include areas known to be used by threatened, endangered, or sensitive plant or animal species, wetlands, preserves and refuges, and other sensitive habitats outlined in the Hanford Site Baseline Risk Assessment Methodology. Potentially important species for risk assessment and species of special concern with regard to their status as threatened, endangered, or sensitive are described, and potential habitats for these species identified.

  13. Evaluation of development of wild turkey habitat in New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spicer, Robert L

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hebeet L, 8yiaer 9eheittad to the Qxadaate whoa], of tha Agrtealtersl aad Roahaeieal Collage af Teaa? ie $Nthial fluff llllwet af tha ~aiJAsoet& feF tho 60~ of J ?eaarg, l958 Rior Sab)eats Wildlife Raeegesaet RFALUATION OF DEFHLORKNT OF NLD... TUHKZI HABITAT IH IE? RZCLCO Robert L. Spioer Approved ae to etFle and oontent bye Chalrjman of Coea1. ttee Head of or Stadent, Achrlsor Panner' p l$$S 'This studP was a pro)est of tho Federal kid Division of tho New Xoaieo Qaue and Pish...

  14. Alaska Fish Habitat Permit Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60Alameda2008 | Open Energy2009 ||Fish Habitat

  15. Hawaii Habitat Conservation Plans Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEI Reference LibraryAddHawaii Habitat Conservation

  16. Title 50 CFR 226 Designated Critical Habitat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePty LtdOpenHabitat Jump to: navigation,

  17. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umans, Stephen D. (Belmont, MA)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  18. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Moore, Troy K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for thermally protecting heat sensitive components of tools. The apparatus comprises a Dewar for holding the heat sensitive components. The Dewar has spaced-apart inside and outside walls, an open top end and a bottom end. An insulating plug is located in the top end. The inside wall has portions defining an inside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar and the outside wall has portions defining an outside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar. A bottom connector has inside and outside components. The inside component sealably engages the inside wall aperture and the outside component sealably engages the outside wall aperture. The inside component is operatively connected to the heat sensitive components and to the outside component. The connections can be made with optical fibers or with electrically conducting wires.

  19. The Potential Impacts of OTEC Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oney, Stephen K. [OTE Corporation; Hogan, Timothy [Alden Research Laboratory; Steinbeck, John [Tenera Environmental

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a marine renewable energy technology with the potential to contribute significantly to the baseload power needs of tropical island communities and remote U.S. military installations. As with other renewable energy technologies, however, there are potential challenges to its commercialization: technological, financial, social, and environmental. Given the large volumes of seawater required to drive the electricity-producing cycle, there is potential for the intakes to negatively impact the marine resources of the source waterbody through the impingement and entrainment of marine organisms. The goal of this project was to identify feasible warm water intake designs for a land-based OTEC facility proposed for development in Port Allen, Kauai and to characterize the populations of ichthyoplankton near the proposed warm water intake location that could be at risk of entrainment. The specific objectives of this project were to: • Complete a site-specific assessment of available and feasible warm water intake technologies to determine the best intake designs for minimizing impacts to aquatic organisms at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. • Complete a field sampling program to collect biological data to characterize the baseline populations of ichthyoplankton near the sites being considered for the warm water intake at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Various intake design options are presented with the focus on providing adequate environmental protection to the local ichthyoplankton population while providing an economically viable intake option to the OTEC developer. Further definition by NOAA and other environmental regulators is required to further refine the designs presented to meet all US regulations for future OTEC development.

  20. MEETING SUMMARY OF THE ESTUARY HABITAT RESTORATION COUNCIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Restoration, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS); · Mr. Paul Cough, Director, Oceans and Coastal Protection the exact amount of FY 2011 funds that would be available for new projects. Paul Cough noted and the other

  1. Classified Matter Protection and Control

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 471.2, which establishes policy for the protection and control of classified and unclassified information. Does not cancel other directives.

  2. Groundwater Protection Plan (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Groundwater Protection Plans (GPPs) are required for all facilities having the potential to impact groundwater. They are “preventive maintenance” documents that cover all processes and materials at...

  3. Environmental Protection | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Protection Argonne's environmental stewardship leverages our R&D programs to help reduce our own electricity use, water consumption and environmental emissions....

  4. CEBAF - environmental protection program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important objective in the successful operation of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is to ensure protection of the public and the environment. To meet this objective, the Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc., (SURA) is committed to working with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop, implement, and manage a sound and workable environmental protection program at CEBAF. This environmental protection plan includes information on environmental monitoring, long-range monitoring, groundwater protection, waste minimization, and pollution prevention awareness program plan.

  5. Minnesota Peatland Protection Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain peatland core areas are designated as scientific and natural areas, and development is restricted. Currently, only two peatlands have been protected: the Pine Creek Peatland in Roseau...

  6. Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

  7. Ground Water Protection (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Dakota has a degradation prevention program for groundwater protection, with standards established by the Department of Health. This section addresses groundwater standards, quality...

  8. Protection of Forest Resources (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute addresses the conservation and protection of forest resources by encouraging the use of land management best practices pertaining to soil erosion, timber sale planning, associated road...

  9. Optical Delineation of Benthic Habitat Using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moline, Mark A.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Evans, Nathan R.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve understanding and characterization of coastal regions, there has been an increasing emphasis on autonomous systems that can sample the ocean on relevant scales. Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) with active propulsion are especially well suited for studies of the coastal ocean because they are able to provide systematic and near-synoptic spatial observations. With this capability, science users are beginning to integrate sensor suits for a broad range of specific and often novel applications. Here, the relatively mature Remote Environmental Monitoring Units (REMUS) AUV system is configured with multi-spectral radiometers to delineate benthic habitat in Sequim Bay, WA. The vehicle was deployed in a grid pattern along 5 km of coastline in depths from 30 to less than 2 meters. Similar to satellite and/or aerial remote sensing, the bandwidth ratios from the downward looking radiance sensor and upward looking irradiance sensor were used to identify beds of eelgrass on sub-meter scales. Strong correlations were found between the optical reflectance signals and the geo-referenced in situ data collected with underwater video within the grid. Results demonstrate the ability of AUVs to map littoral habitats at high resolution and highlight the overall utility of the REMUS vehicle for nearshore oceanography.

  10. International PatentInternational Patent Protection: 1990 -Protection: 1990 -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansky, Joshua

    International PatentInternational Patent Protection: 1990 -Protection: 1990 - 20052005 Measurement and TrendsMeasurement and Trends Patent Strength and Stages of EconomicPatent Strength and Stages of Economic DevelopmentDevelopment #12;I. Measurement & TrendsI. Measurement & Trends Patent Rights Index (0

  11. Combined group ECC protection and subgroup parity protection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan G.; Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system are disclosed for providing combined error code protection and subgroup parity protection for a given group of n bits. The method comprises the steps of identifying a number, m, of redundant bits for said error protection; and constructing a matrix P, wherein multiplying said given group of n bits with P produces m redundant error correction code (ECC) protection bits, and two columns of P provide parity protection for subgroups of said given group of n bits. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the matrix P is constructed by generating permutations of m bit wide vectors with three or more, but an odd number of, elements with value one and the other elements with value zero; and assigning said vectors to rows of the matrix P.

  12. Identification and Protection of a Bat Colony in the 183-F Clearwell: Mitigation of Bat Habitat on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. A. Gano, J. G. Lucas, C. T. Lindsey

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An ecological investigation was conducted to evaluate mitigation options for demolition of a retired facility that contained a maternity roost of approximately 2,000 Myotis yumanensis bats. The recommendation from the study was to leave the non-contaminated structure intact and fence the area.

  13. Ratsnakes and Brush Piles: Intended and Unintended Consequences of Improving Habitat for Wildlife?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weatherhead, Patrick J.

    Ratsnakes and Brush Piles: Intended and Unintended Consequences of Improving Habitat for Wildlife, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Champaign 61820 ABSTRACT.--Brush pile creation is a common habitat of brush pile creation and the indirect effects of brush piles on multi-species interactions. Here we

  14. HABITAT SELECTION OF A LARGE HERBIVORE AT HIGH DENSITY AND WITHOUT PREDATION: TRADE-OFF BETWEEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    summer home ranges and core areas. We sampled vegetation in the core areas and in the rest of the home habitat patches over forested ones, suggesting that they adopted a foraging strategy favoring energy of habitat selection demonstrate that herbivores can adjust their behavior to other limiting factors when

  15. Journal of Biogeography (1992)I9,383-390 Habitat distribution of canary chaffinchesamong islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Biogeography (1992)I9,383-390 Habitat distribution of canary chaffinchesamong islands studied for the Canary Islands (Tenerife and El Hierro). The Common Chaffinch was significantly denser time. Key words. Canary Islands, Chaffinches (Fringilla spp.), habitat preferences, competitive

  16. How fragmentation and corridors affect wind dynamics and seed dispersal in open habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orrock, John

    Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; c Movement Ecology Laboratory, Department widespread human-induced changes such as habitat loss, landscape fragmentation, and climate instability measurements, and seed releases in a large-scale experimental landscape to show that habitat corridors affect

  17. DIETARY OVERLAP IN FRUGIVOROUSAND INSECTIVOROUS BATS FROM EDAPHIC CERRADO HABITATS OF BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    DIETARY OVERLAP IN FRUGIVOROUSAND INSECTIVOROUS BATS FROM EDAPHIC CERRADO HABITATS OF BRAZIL north- eastern Brazil suggest significant ecologicalseparation of species. Nonetheless, recent sim edaphic Cerrado habitats on the Chapada do Araripe in northeastern Brazil. For each of the 11 most common

  18. Habitat loss and the disassembly of mutalistic networks Miguel A. Fortuna, Abhay Krishna and Jordi Bascompte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortuna, Miguel A.

    938 Habitat loss and the disassembly of mutalistic networks Miguel A. Fortuna, Abhay Krishna and Jordi Bascompte M. A. Fortuna (fortuna@ebd.csic.es), A. Krishna and J. Bascompte, Integrative Ecology for their robustness to habitat loss, Fortuna and Bascompte (2006) analyzed a spatially implicit meta-community model

  19. Assessment of estuarine habitats for resident and estuarine-dependent species: tools for conservation and management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervette, Virginia Rhea

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and provide us with countless other services. In spite of all this, humans all over the world continue to negatively impact estuarine ecosystems through activities such as alteration of habitat, pollution, and compromising freshwater input. In general, we... Salt marsh ecosystems in Gulf of Mexico................................ 6 Nursery habitat hypothesis ....................................................... 7 Dissertation objectives...

  20. Habitat Use and Movements of Adult White Bass in Lake Poinsett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .. SOUTH DAKOTA c ) o o o Habitat Use and Movements of Adult White Bass in Lake Poinsett South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks Wildlife Division Joe Foss Building Pierre, South Dakota 57501-3182 Completion Report No. 99-15 #12;,-. ...., (""l r" rm Habitat Use and Movements ofAdult White Bass in Lake

  1. Effects of piscivore-mediated habitat use on growth, diet and zooplankton consumption of roach: an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of piscivore-mediated habitat use on growth, diet and zooplankton consumption of roach, Limnological Institute, Konstanz, Germany SUMMARY 1. We used an individual based modelling approach for roach; (ii) analyse the relevance of these habitat shifts for the diet, activity costs and growth of roach

  2. FISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    ) from a natal stream and is applied as a case study in California's Shasta River. Restoration activitiesFISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa * and J. R. LUNDb restoration alternatives for improving fish habitat by evaluating tradeoffs between fish production

  3. FOOD, ACTIVITY, AND HABITAT OF THREE "PICKERTYPE" MICROCARNIVOROUS FISHES IN THE KELP FORESTS OFF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOOD, ACTIVITY, AND HABITAT OF THREE "PICKER·TYPE" MICROCARNIVOROUS FISHES IN THE KELP FORESTS OFF, and habitat preference were compared between the kelp perch, Brachyistius frenatus; the sefiorita, Oxyjulis californica; and the white seaperch, Phanerodonfurcatus, all of which co-occur in areas of reef and kelp off

  4. Accomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation and Management Act, Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, National Environmental Policy Act, FederalAccomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2004 This report provides a summary of Habitat Conservation Division (HCD) activities in support of the sustainable

  5. Accomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation and Management Act, Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, National Environmental Policy Act, FederalAccomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2005 This report provides a summary of Habitat Conservation Division (HCD) activities in support of the sustainable

  6. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy, and F. C. Blomquist. 2014. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for Greater Sage-Grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development. Ecosphere 5(2):15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES13-00238. 1 Abstract

  7. Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Review of Hydraulic;Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Name PHABSIM Spatial scale and Observations on Flow Determination in New Zealand Regulated Streams: Advances in Ecology. Plenum Press, New

  8. Cooperator Report: Habitat Requirements of Steelhead in the Upper Salinas River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lisa C.

    Cooperator Report: Habitat Requirements of Steelhead in the Upper Salinas River Watershed Jenna L the abundance, distribution, and habitat requirements of steelhead in the upper Salinas River watershed. We, and reproduce (Thompson & Larsen 2004). The Salinas River and its tributaries have been designated

  9. Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Hirschman, Lynette; Clark, Cheryl; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Mardis, Scott; Luciano, Joanne; Kottmann, Renzo; Cole, James; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Field, Dawn

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an urgent need to capture metadata on the rapidly growing number of genomic, metagenomic and related sequences, such as 16S ribosomal genes. This need is a major focus within the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), and Habitat is a key metadata descriptor in the proposed 'Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) specification. The goal of the work described here is to provide a light-weight, easy-to-use (small) set of terms ('Habitat-Lite') that captures high-level information about habitat while preserving a mapping to the recently launched Environment Ontology (EnvO). Our motivation for building Habitat-Lite is to meet the needs of multiple users, such as annotators curating these data, database providers hosting the data, and biologists and bioinformaticians alike who need to search and employ such data in comparative analyses. Here, we report a case study based on semi-automated identification of terms from GenBank and GOLD. We estimate that the terms in the initial version of Habitat-Lite would provide useful labels for over 60% of the kinds of information found in the GenBank isolation-source field, and around 85% of the terms in the GOLD habitat field. We present a revised version of Habitat-Lite and invite the community's feedback on its further development in order to provide a minimum list of terms to capture high-level habitat information and to provide classification bins needed for future studies.

  10. Habitat for Humanity: La Grange, Georgia, 2003 Jimmy Carter Work Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Troup-Chambers Habitat for Humanity built a Habitat house to ENERGY STAR standards in LaGrange, Georgia, in 2003. The project was so successfully that all Troup-Chambers houses will now be built to ENERGY STAR standards.

  11. Data Protection Office October 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Data Protection Office October 2010 AUTHORISATION FORM FOR DATA PROCESSING BY STUDENTS This form should be completed where students are processing personal data for research or study purposes. In order to meet the requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998 and ensure the personal data is being processed

  12. Groundwater protection management program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a groundwater protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable Federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office has prepared a ``Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan`` (groundwater protection plan) of sufficient scope and detail to reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter 3, for special program planning. The groundwater protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor groundwater resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies project technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA groundwater protection management program. In addition, the groundwater protection plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA sites (long-term care at disposal sites and groundwater restoration at processing sites). This plan will be reviewed annually and updated every 3 years in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  13. Adaptive protection algorithm and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hedrick, Paul (Pittsburgh, PA) [Pittsburgh, PA; Toms, Helen L. (Irwin, PA) [Irwin, PA; Miller, Roger M. (Mars, PA) [Mars, PA

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An adaptive protection algorithm and system for protecting electrical distribution systems traces the flow of power through a distribution system, assigns a value (or rank) to each circuit breaker in the system and then determines the appropriate trip set points based on the assigned rank.

  14. Protecting Your Hands and Feet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Protecting Your Hands and Feet Treating Feet Though foot skin is similar to hand skin, the problem gardeners usually have to deal with on their feet is wetness. Proper footwear is the best protection. Look powder will also help. Dust feet, not the floor or carpet, by putting your foot in a paper bag before

  15. Sustainable Stanford Protecting Stanford's assets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogyo, Matthew

    ... Benefits Labs Protect your samples ­ During energy and equipment failure ­ Reduce risk of valuable sample Study #12;Protect Stanford's Assets & Save Energy Stanford `s Energy Retrofit Program has since 1993 biological samples · The -80C freezers alone require more energy than the entire Gilbert Building (5 Million

  16. Publications, Personnel and Government Organizations Related to the Limnology, Aquatic Biology and Ichthyology of the Inland Waters of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, W.J.

    TR- 5 1966 Publications, Personnel and Government Organizations Related to Limnology, Aquatic Biology and Ichthyology of the Inland Waters of Texas W.J. Clark Texas Water Resources Institute...

  17. Publications, Personnel and Government Organizations Related to the Limnology, Aquatic Biology and Ichthyology of the Inland Waters of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, W.J.

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the result of a growing concern about the rate at which development of the water resources of Texas is outstripping biological and ecological knowledge of the aquatic environments concerned. Most Texas ...

  18. An Evaluation of the Effects of Geothermal Energy Development on Aquatic Biota in the Gysers Area of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resh, Vincent H.; Flynn, Thomas S.; Lamberti, Gary A; McElravy, Eric

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    28. White, J . 1974. Geothermal energy i s not nonpolluting.required t o develop geothermal energy. American Water WorksOF THE EFFECTS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT ON AQUATIC

  19. Aquatic Studies at the Proposed George Parkhouse I Reservoir Site on the South Sulphur River in Northeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelwick, Frances P.; Burgess, Christine C.

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquatic Studies at the Proposed George Parkhouse I Reservoir Site on the South Sulphur River in Northeast Texas December 31, 2002 Submitted to Texas Water Development Board P.O. Box 13231, Capitol Station 1700 N Congress...

  20. Effects of Habitat Characteristics on Occupancy and Productivity of a Forest-Dependent Songbird in an Urban Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Dianne Hali

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    determined minimum patch-size thresholds for productivity measurements, and also monitored effects on productivity from canopy cover, woodland composition, distance to and size of the nearest habitat patch, and distance to the nearest habitat patch >100 ha. I...