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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) provides for the protection of aquatic habitat and states that a permit is required: to alter the bed, bank or boundary of any water...

2

arabiensis aquatic habitat: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

habitat Hofmann, Hans A. 13 Aquatic Habitat Modifications in La Plata River Basin, Patagonia and Associated Marine Areas CiteSeer Summary: This paper describes the environmental...

3

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic aquatic habitats Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aquatic habitats in the Everglades ... Source: Cole, Jonathan J. - Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 5 AQUATIC PLANT...

4

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic habitat covariates Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interactions in vegetated aquatic... and Laboratory Evaluation of Habitat Use by Rainwater Killifish (Lucania ... Source: Jordan, Frank - Department of Biological...

5

atural aquatic habitats include ponds, lakes, rivers, streams, springs, estuaries, bays, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from small (ten surface acres) to large (the Great Lakes: Erie, Michigan, Huron, Ontario, and SuperiorN atural aquatic habitats include ponds, lakes, rivers, streams, springs, estuaries, bays little oxygen. Aquatic habitats can be classified as: · non-flowing waters like lakes and ponds, · slowly

Liskiewicz, Maciej

6

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Evaluation of the aquatic habitat and fish assemblage in an urban reach of the historic Rideau Canal, Ottawa,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of the aquatic habitat and fish assemblage in an urban reach of the historic Rideau communities, particularly in the urban reach in Ottawa between Hartwell's Lock and the outflow of Dows Lake natural and engineered habitat/substrate types across the period when the canal is at navigational water

Cooke, Steven J.

8

Jocko River Watershed conservation easement protects trout habitat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6.25 acre habitat acquisition in Montana's Jocko River Watershed for fish habitat mitigation (see map). Located in Lake County in northwestern Montana, this property was selected...

9

Zena conservation easement protects habitat in Willamette Valley...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

central Willamette Valley for fi sh and wildlife habitat mitigation. Located in the Eola Hills about eight miles northwest of Salem (see map), this property provides refuge for...

10

Utilization of submerged aquatic vegetation habitats by fishes and decapods in the Galvestion Bay Ecosystem, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . MATERIALS AND METHODS. . . . . . Page tu Site Selection. . Sampling Design. . Sampling Procedures. Statistical Analysis. 4 5 6 7 RESULTS. . Fish and Decapod Abundance and Distribution... the importance of physical, environtnental and other biological variables for each habitat site in relation to faunal density. MATERIALS AND METHODS Site Selection Three areas (six sites) within the Galveston Bay complex (Figure 1) were selected based...

Scott, Elizabeth A.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

11

Woody Debris as a Resource for Aquatic Macroinvertebrates in Stream and River Habitats of the Southeastern United States: A Review.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Woody debris is a valuable resource to most stream and river ecosystems, especially for the resident aquatic macroinvertebrate fauna.

Pitt, Daniel [Department of Entomology,University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602] [Department of Entomology,University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602; Batzer, Darold [Department of Entomology,University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602] [Department of Entomology,University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602

2010-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

A discussion of best management practices for the South Esk Catchment: mitigation of a diminished aquatic habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agriculture in order to be placed into conservation programmes. These relationships can be vital to the success of a management plan. The establishment of buffer zones was established an appropriate mitigation measure for the improvement of the aquatic...

Weaver, Shiloh

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

13

The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the engineering and design of additional in-stream and bank restoration, and the treatment of invasive speciesThe health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration opportunities exist to protect and restore critical elements of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Habitat and Wildlife

14

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic life protection Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

15

California spiny lobster (Panulirus interruptus) movement behavior and habitat use: Implications for the effectiveness of marine protected areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and R. S. Steneck. 1993. Kelp beds as habitat for Americanin southern California kelp forest ecosystems. Science 312:and reduced expectations in kelp forest communities. Journal

Withy-Allen, Kira R.Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Bottle Habitat Region: Great Lakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-liter plastic soda bottles for each group · A water source · A light source (sunlight or a halogen lamp) · BlackBottle Habitat Region: Great Lakes Grade Level(s): 5-8 Time Required: One 50 minute class period/Instructional Strategies: 1. Students will, in groups of four, construct 2 aquatic habitats using 2 two-liter soda bottles

17

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems review Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dever, Edward P. - College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University Collection: Geosciences 3 atural aquatic habitats include ponds, lakes, rivers, streams,...

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic emerging pollutants Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

circulate FENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY INFORMATION FOR THE Summary: 3 of 4 Beneficial Water Uses Affected by Pollution Habitat for aquatic species such as fish... Water...

19

The role of social aggregations and protected areas in killer whale conservation: The mixed blessing of critical habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decline. On 20 August 2007, a barge loaded with $10,000 L of diesel sank in the area, exposing 25, protected areas have been used to mitigate effects of human activities on mammals such as grizzly bears

20

CHAPTER SIX Stream Temperature and Aquatic Habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of increases in temper ature below darns and the outfall of the Hanford thermonuclear reactor. Conversely

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dams and barriers, construct fish passage, clean up marine debris, restore coastal wetlands, and remove including design and engineering of habitat restoration projects, on-the-ground restoration work, project. Acquiring damaged habitat is the first step in establishing a pipeline of GLRI-supported restoration

22

CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

23

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) provides for the protection of aquatic habitat and states that...

24

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

In press on Aquatic Sciences (paper accepted on 5th Buffagni et al., in press. The lentic lotic character of rivers and aquatic invertebrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In press on Aquatic Sciences (paper accepted on 5th May 2009) Buffagni et al., in press. The lentic-lotic character of rivers and aquatic invertebrates Key-words: Mediterranean rivers, Hydraulic habitat, LIFE index to identify the character of a river site in terms of local hydraulic conditions. Information about

Armanini, David G

26

AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 41: 39­48, 2005 Published November 11 INTRODUCTION) as are microbes from discussions on biogeography (e.g. Pielou 1979, Lomolino & Heaney 2004) or ecological geography (Longhurst 1998). To some extent this is probably because of a perception

Dolan, John

27

Habitats keep commercial and recreational fisheries strong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sea level rise. So what can we do? Protect and restore habitat Investments by private groups not only for our fisheries but for the communities--and economies--that rely on them. San Francisco Bay Bay gone, but the dam or poorly designed culvert remains, still preventing fish from getting to habitat

28

Habitat classification and wintering duck use of Mission Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigated in 1981-82. Saltgrass (Distichlis ~s icata) dominated Emergent wetlands and Flats, and marsh elder (Iva frutescens) dominated Scrub-Shrub habitats. Areas usually inundated were classified as Unconsolidated Bottom or Aquatic Bed habitat types..., covering approximately 50% of the non- inundated study area, were dominated by Distichlis ~s icata (saltgrass); comnon s bdomi ants ere ~gartina alta nifla a (s ouch co dgrass) and ~Scir us maritimus (bulrush) (Table 1). Marsh elder (Iva frutescens...

Alldredge, Judy Meuth

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. 1994, Caron et al. 1995) and serve as an important source of mortality for bacteria, microalgae nanoplank- ton function in the transfer of carbon and energy to higher trophic levels and as important and energy flow in aquatic ecosystems. Traditionally, heterotrophic nanoplanktonic protists have been

Caron, David

30

Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

31

Restoration of Soldier Spring: an isolated habitat for native  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the channel and restore aquatic habitat along 450 m of degraded stream. Following treatment, the bed refilled in the stream declined as the degradation worsened, but it rebounded following the restoration treatments. While the stream. New restoration efforts began in 1998 with support from a number of tribal, federal, and school

32

Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System (IBIS) for the Columbia River Basin(IBIS) for the Columbia

33

RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1 Nancy Reichard2 1 Presented Resources. Redwood Community Action Agency. Eureka, Calif. Abstract: Protecting riparian habitat from livestock grazing on private land is a complex task that requires paying attention to sociological

Standiford, Richard B.

34

Important Idaho habitat now protected through purchase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

River Wildlife Management Area just got bigger thanks to the 4.2 million purchase of Hammer Flat. The City of Boise, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the Bonneville Power...

35

Important Idaho habitat now protected through purchase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. |EndecahemeEMSLImagingOregonAerosol3 12

36

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

Coty, J

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

37

Landscape connectivity promotes plant biodiversity spillover into non-target habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape connectivity promotes plant biodiversity spillover into non-target habitats Lars A for review September 26, 2008) Conservation efforts typically focus on maximizing biodiversity in protected increasingly consider how management of protected areas can promote biodiversity beyond reserve borders

38

Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions between biota and their environment in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The group focuses particularly on the ecological interactions and their underlying ecological processes necessary to sustain ecosystem structure and function in their natural state

39

Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Gravity Currents in Aquatic Canopies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A lock exchange experiment is used to investigate the propagation of gravity currents through a random array of rigid, emergent cylinders which represents a canopy of aquatic plants. As canopy drag increases, the propagating ...

Tanino, Yukie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage, headgates and fishways. These designs were used to submit for project implementation funding through the WA Salmon Recovery Funding Board. (4) Complete 6 early action projects on Ahtanum Creek--One gravity diversion was replaced with a pump and pump end screen and 5 pump end screens were installed. (5) Conduct two topographic surveys--For the City of Yakima on the Fruitvale diversion for the North Yakima Conservation District to support the installation of a pumping plant which would eliminate the need to divert directly from the Naches River and build the gravel berm each year during low flows. For the Taylor Ditch system for the North Yakima Conservation District to support as feasibility of opening the ditch for habitat and at the same time maintaining irrigation deliveries. (6) Procure materials for use in future YTAHP projects, including siphon pipe, delivery pipe, rock, screens, and water meters. These materials will act as match and support the completion of these subsequent YTAHP projects. Overall, with broad agency support and Action Plan funding through BPA, the YTAHP has achieved substantial enhancements that support aquatic species and which will leverage subsequent work through engineering designs and materials. The program was also able to establish the personnel and equipment support for beginning the stream assessment process on tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas Counties. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat.

Myra, David (South Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council, Ellensburg, WA); Ready, Carol A. (Kittitas County Water Purveyors, Ellensburg, WA)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology: old and new challenges Andrea Belgrano Looking up ``aquatic food web'' on Google provides a dizzying array of eclectic sites and information (and disinformation!) to choose from. However, even within this morass it is clear that aquatic food-web research has

43

Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary. The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as Salmonid Benefits, was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh, 2001 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the mid-1980s, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) has been participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) efforts to mitigate for the negative impacts to fish and wildlife resulting from the development and operation of the 7 Columbia Basin Federal Hydropower System. BPA's mitigation obligations were formally recognized and mandated by the Northwest Power Act of 1980 and are guided by the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC's) Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA funds fish and wildlife projects throughout the Basin to meet the habitat and population restorative goals and objectives outlined in the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program and to fulfill its mitigation responsibilities under the Power Act. Impacts to wildlife resulting from hydrofacility construction/inundation were estimated using Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) in the mid and late 1980s and are documented in BPA' s Wildlife Loss Assessments (Rasmussen and Wright 1990,a,b,c,d) and in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lower Snake River Wildlife Habitat Compensation Evaluation (ACOE 1991). The loss assessments provided estimates of lost habitat quality and quantity for the target species selected to represent the habitat cover types impacted by hydropower construction/inundation. The NWPPC incorporated these losses into their Fish and Wildlife Program, recognizing them as the unannualized losses attributable to the construction/inundation of the federal hydropower system (NWPPC 1995 and 2000, Table 1 1-4). The HEP methodology is used by wildlife managers within the Columbia Basin to determine habitat values, expressed as Habitat Units, gained through BPA-funded mitigation project work. ODFW and the other Oregon wildlife managers (i.e., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Confederated Tribes of the Warms Springs Reservation of Oregon, Burns Paiute Tribe, and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation [CTUIR]) have been working together since 1991 to coordinate the planning, selection, and implementation of BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. In 1997, the Oregon wildlife managers developed a programmatic project for mitigation planning and implementation within Oregon. The Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area Additions project is one of many habitat acquisition and restoration projects proposed under the Oregon wildlife managers programmatic project that have been approved and recommended for funding by the NWPPC. The Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area Additions mitigation project will protect and restore wetland, riparian and other habitats on newly acquired parcels at ODFW's Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area (LMWA). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the acquisition and enhancement of Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area lands will contribute towards mitigating for habitat lost as a result of the development and operation of the Columbia Basin hydropower system. This report summarizes the HEP survey conducted in June 2001 to document the baseline habitat values on four parcels recently added to the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area: the 309.66-acre Wallender property, the 375.54-acre Simonis property, the 161.07-acre Conley Lake property, and the 74.55-acre Becker property. The 2001 HEP Team was comprised of the following members and agencies: Susan Barnes (ODFW), Allen Childs (CTUIR), Tracy Hames (Yakama Indian Nation), Dave Larson (ODFW), Cathy Nowak (Cat Tracks Wildlife Consulting), and Ken Rutherford (ODFW). Results of the HEP will be used to (1) determine the pre-restoration habitat values of the project sites, (2) the number of Habitat Units to be credited to BPA for protection of habitats within the project area, (3) determine the enhancement potential of the sites, and (4) develop a habitat management plan for the area.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (2006(2006--006006--00)00)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP 101HEP 101 Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed byHabitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP

46

Protection 1 Protection 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protection 1 Protection 1 Butler W. Lampson Xerox Corporation Palo Alto, California Abstract is a malicious act or accident that crashes the system--- this might be considered the ultimate degradation. 1, p 437. It was reprinted in ACM Operating Systems Rev. 8, 1 (Jan. 1974), p 18. This version

Lampson, Butler W.

47

Protection 1 Protection1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protection 1 Protection1 Butler W. Lampson Xerox Corporation Palo Alto, California Abstract is a malicious act or accident that crashes the system-- this might be considered the ultimate degradation. 1, p 437. It was reprinted in ACM Operating Systems Rev. 8, 1 (Jan. 1974), p 18. This version

Lampson, Butler W.

48

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY Aquatic Invasive Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 3 1. Abstract Ten North Umpqua Hydroelectric Project impoundments were surveyed for aquatic invasive Energy's North Umpqua Hydroelectric Project includes 11 impoundments within the North Umpqua River

49

Earth & Aquatic Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

behaviors in diverse environments, including the atmosphere, subsurface and stream sediment-water interfaces and aquatic ecosystems. Featured Programs and Projects Integrated...

50

Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix D Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum #12;COPYRIGHT DECEMBER Series 2 and Pond Series 3 Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Prepared for Bureau of Reclamation HILL, INC. III Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses

51

Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity Harvesting Prepared for considerations for biodiversity and wildlife habitat values during their development of a discussion paper paper. #12;2 A. INTRODUCTION When evaluating the biodiversity and wildlife habitat implications

52

FINAL REPORT ON THE AQUATIC MERCURY ASSESSMENT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 2000, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 issued a proposed Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for total mercury in the middle and lower Savannah River. The initial TMDL, which would have imposed a 1 ng/l mercury limit for discharges to the middle/lower Savannah River, was revised to 2.8 ng/l in the final TMDL released in February 2001. The TMDL was intended to protect people from the consumption of contaminated fish, which is the major route of mercury exposure to humans. The most bioaccumulative form of mercury is methylmercury, which is produced in aquatic environments by the action of microorganisms on inorganic mercury. Because of the environmental and economic significance of the mercury discharge limits that would have been imposed by the TMDL, the Savannah River Site (SRS) initiated several studies concerning: (1) mercury in SRS discharges, SRS streams and the Savannah River, (2) mercury bioaccumulation factors for Savannah River fish, (3) the use of clams to monitor the influence of mercury from tributary streams on biota in the Savannah River, and (4) mercury in rainwater falling on the SRS. The results of these studies are presented in detail in this report. The first study documented the occurrence, distribution and variation of total and methylmercury at SRS industrial outfalls, principal SRS streams and the Savannah River where it forms the border with the SRS. All of the analyses were performed using the EPA Method 1630/31 ultra low-level and contaminant-free techniques for measuring total and methylmercury. Total mercury at National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) outfalls ranged from 0.31-604 ng/l with a mean of 8.71 ng/l. Mercury-contaminated groundwater was the source for outfalls with significantly elevated mercury concentrations. Total mercury in SRS streams ranged from 0.95-15.7 ng/l. Mean total mercury levels in the streams varied from 2.39 ng/l in Pen Branch to 5.26 ng/l in Tims Branch. Methylmercury ranged from 0.002 ng/l in Upper Three Runs to 2.60 ng/l in Tims Branch. Total mercury in the Savannah River ranged from 0.62 ng/l to 43.9 ng/l, and methylmercury ranged from 0.036 ng/l to 7.54 ng/l. Both total and methylmercury concentrations were consistently high in the river near the mouth of Steel Creek. Total mercury was positively correlated with methylmercury (r = 0.88). Total mercury bound to particulates ranged from 41% to 57% in the river and from 28% to 90% in the streams. Particulate methylmercury varied from 9% to 37% in the river and from 6% to 79% in the streams. Small temporary pools in the Savannah River swamp area near and around Fourmile Branch had the highest concentrations observed in the Savannah River watershed, reaching 1,890 ng/l for total mercury and 34.0 ng/l for methylmercury. The second study developed a mercury bioaccumulation factor (BAF) for the Savannah River near SRS. A BAF is the ratio of the concentration of mercury in fish flesh to the concentration of mercury in the water. BAFs are important in the TMDL process because target concentrations for mercury in water are computed from BAFs. Mercury BAFs are known to differ substantially among fish species, water bodies, and possibly seasons. Knowledge of such variation is needed to determine a BAF that accurately represents average and extreme conditions in the water body under study. Analysis of fish tissue and aqueous methylmercury samples collected at a number of locations and over several seasons in a 110 km (68 mile) reach of the Savannah River demonstrated that BAFs for each species under study varied by factors of three to eight. Influences on BAF variability were location, habitat and season-related differences in fish mercury levels and seasonal differences in methylmercury levels in the water. Overall (all locations, habitats, and seasons) average BAFs were 3.7 x 10{sup 6} for largemouth bass, 1.4 x 10{sup 6} for sunfishes, and 2.5 x 10{sup 6} for white catfish. This study showed that determination of representative BAFs for large rivers requires the collect

Halverson, N

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Aquate Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300AlgoilEnergy Information theDevelopment Co. Place: FloridaAquate Solar

54

Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: The Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing SystemThe Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing System Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems: an overviewNetworked Aquatic Microbial Observing Sys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: The Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing SystemThe Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing System Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems Ocean Research Goals · Development of autonomous networks of heterogeneous sensors to monitor and sample

Smith, Ryan N.

55

Aquatic eutrophication promotes pathogenic infection in amphibians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic eutrophication promotes pathogenic infection in amphibians Pieter T. J. Johnson* , Jonathan-scale agents of environmental change affect host­pathogen interactions. Acceler- ated eutrophication of aquatic experimental evidence linking eutrophication and disease in a multihost parasite system. The trematode parasite

Johnson, Pieter

56

Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management Plans in Oregon Maribeth V. Gibbons is an integrated aquatic vegetation management plan? When is an IAVMP required? Part II: Developing a Plan Chapter and Reservoirs · Portland State University · Portland OR 97207 #12;Acknowledgements This manual benefited

57

aquatic environment part: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Range, the effects of these alterations on aquatic ecosystems and biota were probably small 17 ASSESSEMENT OF THE AQUATIC MACROPHYTE ENVIRONMENT WITH ESPECIAL EMPHASIS OF USING...

58

aquatic suction performance: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

suction feeding, while clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 12 Aquatic Series AQUATIC...

59

anopheles arabiensis aquatic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 27 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

60

aquatic toxicity workshop: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 46 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

aquatic midge chironomus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 37 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

62

Biomechanics and Energetics in Aquatic and Semiaquatic Mammals: Platypus to Whale*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of oscillating hydrofoils of aquatic mammals. Semi- aquatic mammals swim at the water surface and experience

Fish, Frank

63

Terrestrial habitat mapping of the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1996 Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE is in the process of remediating historical contamination on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Two key components are ecological risk assessment and monitoring. In 1994 a strategy was developed and a specific program was initiated to implement the strategy for the terrestrial biota of the entire ORR. This document details results of the first task: development of a habitat map and habitat models for key species of interest. During the last 50 years ORR has been a relatively protected island of plant and animal habitats in a region of rapidly expanding urbanization. A preliminary biodiversity assessment of the ORR by the Nature Conservancy in 1995 noted 272 occurrences of significant plant and animal species and communities. Field surveys of threatened and endangered species show that the ORR contains 20 rare plant species, 4 of which are on the state list of endangered species. The rest are either on the state list of threatened species or listed as being of special concern. The ORR provides habitat for some 60 reptilian and amphibian species; more than 120 species of terrestrial birds; 32 species of waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds; and about 40 mammalian species. The ORR is both a refuge for rare species and a reservoir of recruitment for surrounding environments and wildlife management areas. Cedar barrens, river bluffs, and wetlands have been identified as the habitat for most rare vascular plant species on the ORR.

Washington-Allen, R.A.; Ashwood, T.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The aquatic ecotoxicology of triazine herbicides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Triazine herbicides control plant growth by inhibiting photophosphorylation, but typically do not cause permanent cell damage or death. Effects on aquatic plants are reversible; photosynthesis resumes when the herbicide disappears from the water, and sometimes even while it is still present. Effects on aquatic plant communities are further ameliorated by species replacements, so the communities as a whole are less sensitive than their most sensitive species. Atrazine, a representative triazine herbicide, is toxic to aquatic plants (algae and macrophytes) at concentrations in the range of 20 to 200 {mu}g/L or less. Aquatic invertebrates and fish are much less sensitive than plants, with acute toxicity occurring at 1000 {mu}g/L or higher. Ecologically significant effects in aquatic ecosystems are likely only if plant communities are severely damaged by prolonged exposure to high atrazine concentrations.

Giddings, J.M. [ENSR Consulting & Engineering, Woods Hole, MA (United States)] [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Priest River Project, Technical Report 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geopressured habitat: A literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review of the geopressured-geothermal habitat is summarized. Findings are presented and discussed with respect to the principal topics: Casual agents are both geological and geochemical; they include disequilibrium compaction of sediments, clay diagenesis, aquathermal pressuring, hydrocarbon generation, and lateral tectonic compression. The overall physical and chemical characteristics of the habitats are dictated by varying combinations of sedimentation rates, alteration mineralogy, permeability, porosity and pressure, temperature, fluid content and chemistry, and hydrodynamic flow. Habitat pressure seals are considered in terms of their formation processes, geologic characteristics, and physical behavior, including pressure release and reservoir pressure recharge on a geologic time scale. World-wide occurrence of geopressured-geothermal habitats is noted. The main thrust of this topic concerns the U.S.A. and Canada; in addition, reference is made to occurrences in China and indications from deep-sea vents, as well as the contribution of paleo-overpressure to habitat initiation and maintenance. Identification and assessment of the habitat is addressed in relation to use of hydrogeologic, geophysical, geochemical, and geothermic techniques, as well as well-logging and drill-stem-test data. Conclusions concerning the adequacy of the current state of knowledge and its applicability to resource exploration and development are set forth, together with recommendations for the thrust of future work.

Negus-de Wys, Jane

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Title 5 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 95 Protection of Fish...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chapter 95 Protection of Fish and Game Habitat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 5 Alaska...

68

Evaluating Florida's Coastal Protected Areas: A Model for Coastal Management Plan Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biodiversity and habitat A. Protect depleted, threatened, rare, or endangered species or populations b. Preserve or restore the viability of representative habitats and ecosystems 2. Fishery management A. Control exploitation rates b. Protect...), ecosystem management (Brody, 2003e; Brody, Carrasco, & Highfield, 2003), stakeholder participation (Brody, 2003f; Burby, 2003), sprawl reduction (Brody, Carrasco, & Highfield, 2006), biodiversity (Brody, 2003c), industry participation in environmental...

Bernhardt, Sarah Praeger

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

69

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- The Potential Impacts on Aquatic...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The Potential Impacts on Aquatic Ecosystems from the Release of Trace Elements in Geothermal Fluids...

70

Mosquito larval habitat mapping using remote sensing and GIS: Implications of coalbed methane development and West Nile virus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential larval habitats of the mosquito Culex tarsalis (Coquillett), implicated as a primary vector of West Nile virus in Wyoming, were identified using integrated remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) analyses. The study area is in the Powder River Basin of north central Wyoming, an area that has been undergoing a significant increase in coalbed methane gas extractions since the late 1990s. Large volumes of water are discharged, impounded, and released during the extraction of methane gas, creating aquatic habitats that have the potential to support immature mosquito development. Landsat TM and ETM + data were initially classified into spectrally distinct water and vegetation classes, which were in turn used to identify suitable larval habitat sites. This initial habitat classification was refined using knowledge-based GIS techniques requiring spatial data layers for topography, streams, and soils to reduce the potential for overestimation of habitat. Accuracy assessment was carried out using field data and high-resolution aerial photography commensurate with one of the Landsat images. The classifier can identify likely habitat for ponds larger than 0.8 ha (2 acres) with generally satisfactory results (72.1%) with a lower detection limit of approximate to 0.4 ha (1 acre). Results show a 75% increase in potential larval habitats from 1999 to 2004 in the study area, primarily because of the large increase in small coalbed methane water discharge ponds. These results may facilitate mosquito abatement programs in the Powder River Basin with the potential for application throughout the state and region.

Zou, L.; Miller, S.N.; Schmidtmann, E.T. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Renewable Resources

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Behavior of introduced red drum and habitat-use overlap with largemouth bass in a power-plant cooling reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences BEHAVIOR OF INTRODUCED RED DRUM AND HABITAT-USE OVERLAP WITH LARGEMOUTH BASS IN A POWER-P~ COOLING RESERVOIR A Thesis by ROBERT CLAYTON SMITH Approved... Power-Plant Cooling Reservoir (December 1989) Robert Clayton Smith, B. S. , Loyola University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Brian R. Murphy The introduction of a non-native species into an aquatic community is a fisheries management practice...

Smith, Robert Clayton

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; West Beaver Lake Project, Technical Report 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 82.69 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 8.80 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Conifer forest habitat provides 70.33 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Open water provides 3.30 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Digital holographic imaging of aquatic species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this thesis is to design, develop and implement a digital holographic imaging (DHI) system, capable of capturing three-dimensional (3D) images of aquatic species. The images produced by this system are used in ...

Domnguez-Caballero, Jos Antonio

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation on lessons learned from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Aquatic Species Program 1978-1996 microalgae R&D activities, presented at the 2008 AFOSR Workshop in Washington, D.C.

Jarvis, E. E.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Land Acquisition protects fish habitat in Wahkiakum County -...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(BPA) is proposing to fund the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) through its contract with the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP) to acquire 305 acres of hillside forest,...

76

Acquisition protects fish habitat in Yakima County Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

facilities. The property would be owned and managed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. September 2008 Land to get management plan Once this property has been...

77

Hay Creek conservation easement protects trout habitat in Flathead...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

map). Once the proposed land is acquired, which is expected in spring 2009, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks would convey a conservation easement on the property to BPA to ensure...

78

Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange VisitorsforDepartmentPOET-DSMCarbonDepartment of

79

Land Acquisition protects fish habitat in Wahkiakum County - Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 CERN 73-11 Laboratory IPortal 2105 Site

80

Wildlife Supplement Table 1. Land protection status by habitat type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

None 2372 Montane mixed conifer forest 3653 High 813 Low 2660 Medium 89 None 91 Open water - lakes 47895 High 14560 Low 33061 None 274 Open water - lakes, rivers, streams 523 High 250 Low 217 None 55 Salamander Oregon Slender Salamander Tailed Frog Yes Great Basin Spadefoot Yes Yes Western Toad Yes Yes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Omak Creek acquisition protects endangered salmonid habitat - September 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 WholesaleEnergy's 1000 acres of land in North Central

82

Zena conservation easement protects habitat in Willamette Valley - August 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, part 2 ContinuingYanYoussefYueZdenekwinsAugust

83

Acquisition protects fish habitat in Yakima County Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building Technologies OfficeAccountingGuide theis proposing

84

Experts Discuss Models Role in Better Protecting U.S. Ports and Waterways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How can scientific models help save lives, property, and aquatic habitat during a terrorist attack on the nation's ports and rivers? Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory posed this question to scientific modeling and emergency response experts from across the country in a workshop held July 12-13, 2006, at Sequim, Wash.

Manke, Kristin L.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Grand Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing the opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project originally provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented under revisions of the Fish and Wild Program as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources, is the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No. 199202601). Work undertaken during 2008 included: (1) completing 1 new fencing project in the North Fork John Day subbasin that protects 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat, and 1 fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that protects an additional 0.59 miles of stream and 42.5 acres of habitat; (2) constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa river to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) planting 10,084 plants along 0.5 miles of the Wallowa Riverproject; (4) establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; and (7) completed a comprehensive project summary report to the Independent Scientific Review panel (ISRP) that provided our conclusions regarding benefits to focal species, along with management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 57 individual projects have been implemented, monitoring and maintained along 84.9 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams, that protect and enhance 3,564 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife] [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

River bed restoration boosts habitat mosaics and the demography of two rare non-aquatic vertebrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

e Office de Construction des Routes Nationales, Etat du Valais, CH-1950 Sion, Switzerland a r t i c stream under- went radical transformation as it mutated into a heterogeneous braided river boosting, essentially via the construction of levees and embankments for constraining water flow. Containments have

Richner, Heinz

87

Delta Subsidence Reversal, Levee Failure, and Aquatic HabitatA Cautionary Tale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. 2005. Subsidence, sea level rise, and seismicity in theaccretion, and sea level rise in South San Francisco Bayisland subsidence and sea level rise, increasing seismic

Bates, Matthew E.; Lund, Jay R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Delta Subsidence Reversal, Levee Failure, and Aquatic HabitatA Cautionary Tale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CS, Brown TA. 2009a. Peat accretion histories during thedrainage on the remaining peat in the SacramentoSan JoaquinCS, Brown TA. 2009a. Peat accretion histories during the

Bates, Matthew E.; Lund, Jay R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

3 Environmental Conditions 3.1 Characterization of Aquatic Habitat Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLM 1997, 2000; NRCS 2000 for specific methods), which define the ecological condition of streams in the Clover Creek (East Fork Bruneau) subwatershed and include Cedar, Cherry, House, Pole, Shack, and Three

90

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic food pathways Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: aquatic food pathways Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Summary: and population control 1994 Jrgens -- Impact of Daphnia...

91

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic resource health Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the valuable aquatic resources of Africa. www... .636* 2009 Impact Factor: 0.311* Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management Atmosphere-Ocean Published on behalf... of The Aquatic...

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic species program Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aquatic species program Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity Why Is Aquatic Biodiversity Declining? Summary: environmental dilemma. Although...

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic information network Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to categorize aquatic insects... Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity Aquatic Insect Biodiversity and Conservation J. Reese... on the planet. While most insects live on land,...

94

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

95

HSU Matt Johnson ADVANCED HABITAT ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HSU Matt Johnson ADVANCED HABITAT ECOLOGY BACKGROUND MATERIAL HSU WILDLIFE 531 Dr. Matt Johnson;39 #12;HSU Matt Johnson CHI-SQUARE GOODNESS-OF-FIT TESTS OF WILDLIFE HABITAT SELECTION In a nutshell

Johnson, Matthew

96

anaerobic aquatic environments: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology Websites Summary: AQUATIC BIOLOGY Aquat Biol Vol. 13: 79-88, 2011 doi: 10.3354ab00353 Published online July 21 INTRODUCTION Killer whales Orcinus orca are top...

97

aquatic food webs: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to choose from. However, even within this morass it is clear that aquatic food-web research has 2 Distribution of Phthalate Esters in a Marine Aquatic Food Web...

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophyte modeling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

macrophyte... . Principal determinants of aquatic ... Source: Toledo, University of - Lake Erie Center Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 27 AQUATIC...

99

Mapping locust habitats in River Ili Delta, Kazakhstan, using Landsat imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping locust habitats in River Ili Delta, Kazakhstan, using Landsat imagery Ramesh Sivanpillai a Protection, Almaty, Kazakhstan Received 11 August 2005; received in revised form 10 March 2006; accepted 21 March 2006 Available online 3 May 2006 Abstract The River Ili delta in southeast Kazakhstan

Latchininsky, Alexandre

100

Pollution of Aquatic Ecosystems Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle 24 Dr. Longley gone to NPS Workshop 26 Surface H20 Environments . 31 Water Treatment Feb 2Pollution of Aquatic Ecosystems Spring 2006 Jan. 17 Introduction 19 Water Characteristics & Water Wastewater Treatment 7 Chlorination & other Treatment methods 9 San Marcos Treatment Plants tours 14 Species

Aspbury, Andrea S. - Department of Biology, Texas State University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

#~i;:~~.:(' . AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-4 EFFECTS OF WATER CHEMISTRY ON SUBMERSED AQUATIC PLANTS: A SYNTHESIS by R. Michael Smart Environmental. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City. State, and ZIP Code) 3909 Halls Ferry Road IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION (If applicable) US Army Corps of Engineers Be. ADDRESS (City, Stitte

US Army Corps of Engineers

102

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement at Mountaintop Mining Sites Symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Welcome to this symposium which is part of the ongoing effort to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding mountaintop mining and valley fills. The EIS is being prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Surface Mining, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the State of West Virginia. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement (AEE) at mountaintop mining sites is one of fourteen technical areas identified for study by the EIS Interagency Steering Committee. Three goals were identified in the AEE Work Plan: 1. Assess mining and reclamation practices to show how mining operations might be carried out in a way that minimizes adverse impacts to streams and other environmental resources and to local communities. Clarify economic and technical constraints and benefits. 2. Help citizens clarify choices by showing whether there are affordable ways to enhance existing mining, reclamation, mitigation processes and/or procedures. 3. Ide identify data needed to improve environmental evaluation and design of mining projects to protect the environment. Todays symposium was proposed in the AEE Team Work Plans but coordinated planning for the event began September 15, 1999 when representatives from coal industry, environmental groups and government regulators met in Morgantown. The meeting participants worked with a facilitator from the Canaan Valley Institute to outline plans for the symposium. Several teams were formed to carry out the plans we outlined in the meeting.

Black, D. Courtney; Lawson, Peter; Morgan, John; Maggard, Randy; Schor, Horst; Powell, Rocky; Kirk, Ed. J.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

104

Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 6. Tritium Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 6. Tritium Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik 1 Physics of Aquatic Systems II 6. Tritium Werner Aeschbach-Hertig Institute of Environmental Physics University of Heidelberg Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 6. Tritium Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik 2

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

105

The Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills Habitat DescriptionDescriptionDescriptionDescriptionDescription  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by ancient oceans that rose and then receded in response to melting and freezing of polar ice caps. Beaches, characterized by rolling hills capped by deep coarse sands. They are wedged between the Coastal Plain, gopher tortoises are keystone species -- other animals and plants in the habitat are affected by tortoise

Georgia, University of

106

John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 2008 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.

Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Striped Bass Habitat Selection Rules in Reservoirs without Suitable Summer Habitat Offer Insight into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.--The traditional view of habitat requirements for inland striped bass Morone saxatilis suggests that these fish 2 mg/L. Once hypoxia forced striped bass into warmer water, the fish concentrated at the top to provide suitable habitat for adult fish. In severe cases, suitable habitat for adult striped bass may

108

Toxicity of trifluoroacetate to aquatic organisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the atmospheric degradation of several hydrofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons, trifluoroacetate (TFA) will be formed. Through precipitation, TFA will enter aquatic ecosystems. To evaluate the impact on the aquatic environment, an aquatic toxicity testing program was carried out with sodium trifluoroacetate (NaTFA). During acute toxicity tests, no effects of NaTFA on water fleas (Daphnia magna) and zebra fish (Danio retrio) were found at a concentration of 1,200 mg/L. A 7-d study with duckweed (Lemna gibba Ge) revealed a NOEC of 300 mg/L. On the basis of the results of five toxicity tests with Selenastrum capricornutum, they determined a NOEC of 0.12 mg/L. However, algal toxicity tests with NaTFA and Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus subspicatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Eugelan gracilis, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Navicula pelliculosa, Skeletonema costatum, Anabaena flos-aquae, and Microcystis aeruginosa resulted in EC50 values that were all higher than 100 mg/L. The toxicity of TFA to S. capricornutum could be due to metabolic defluorination to monofluoroacetate (MFA), which is known to inhibit the citric acid cycle. A toxicity test with MFA and S. capricornutum revealed it to be about three orders of magnitude more toxic than TFA. However, a bioactivation study revealed that defluorination of TFA was less than 4%. On the other hand, S. capricornutum exposed to a toxic concentration of NaTFA showed a recovery of growth when citric acid was added, suggesting that TFA (or a metabolite of TFA) interferes with the citric acid cycle. A recovery of the growth of S. capricornutum was also found when TFA was removed from the test solutions. Therefore, TFA should be considered algistatic and not algicidic for S. capricornutum. On the basis of the combined results of the laboratory tests and a previously reported semi-field study, they can consider a TFA concentration of 0.10 mg/L as safe for the aquatic ecosystem.

Berends, A.G.; Rooij, C.G. de [Solvay S.A., Brussels (Belgium); Boutonnet, J.C. [Elf Atochem, Levallois-Perret (France); Thompson, R.S. [Zeneca Ltd., Devon (United Kingdom). Brixham Environmental Lab.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

110

Protective Force  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes requirements for management and operation of the DOE Protective Force (PF), establishes requirements for firearms operations and defines the firearms courses of fire. Cancels: DOE M 473.2-1A DOE M 473.2-2

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Corrosion protection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

112

Protective Force  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual establishes requirements for management and operation of the DOE Protective Force, establishes requirements for firearms operations and defines the firearms courses of fire. Chg 1 dated 3/7/06. DOE M 470.4-3A cancels DOE M 470.4-3, Chg 1, Protective Force, dated 3-7-06, Attachment 2, Contractor Requirement Document (CRD) only (except for Section C). Chg 1, dated 3-7-06, cancels DOE M 470.4-3

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Physical Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B.

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

Physical Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Chg 1, dated 3/7/06. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

115

Toxicological benchmarks for screening potential contaminants of concern for effects on aquatic biota: 1996 revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents potential screening benchmarks for protection of aquatic life form contaminants in water. Because there is no guidance for screening for benchmarks, a set of alternative benchmarks is presented herein. This report presents the alternative benchmarks for chemicals that have been detected on the Oak Ridge Reservation. It also presents the data used to calculate the benchmarks and the sources of the data. It compares the benchmarks and discusses their relative conservatism and utility. Also included is the updates of benchmark values where appropriate, new benchmark values, secondary sources are replaced by primary sources, and a more complete documentation of the sources and derivation of all values are presented.

Suter, G.W. II [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tsao, C.L. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). School of the Environment] [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). School of the Environment

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats:...

117

aquatic hyphomycete clavariopsis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions between biota and their environment in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The group focuses particularly on the...

118

aquatic toxicity tests: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

suction feeding, while clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 132 AQUATIC CONSERVATION:...

119

aquatic species project: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 179 Aquatic Botany 78 (2004) 361369 The...

120

aquatic toxicity testing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

suction feeding, while clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 132 AQUATIC CONSERVATION:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

aquatic insect larvae: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

their potential to observe cold adaptations in living insect larvae Hammerton, James 5 APPLIED ISSUES Impacts of cattle on amphibian larvae and the aquatic Biology and...

122

aquatic origin bcr: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORIGINAL PAPER Tackling aquatic invasions: risks and opportunities for the aquarium fish industry invasions. A restrictive analysis using conservative estimates of fish...

123

aquatic plant management: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant Manage. 46: 1-7 Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: % of the fish species listed in the Endangered Spe- cies Act (Lassuy 1994). Invasive aquatic plant...

124

aquatic biota preliminary: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for optimizing bioaccumulation parameters (BAF and BSAF) in aquatic species, such as fish, whose exposure history. Keywords: Bioaccumulation factor Exposure range BSAF Sediments...

125

Aquatic Debris Monitoring Using Smartphone-Based Robotic Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to capture debris arrivals with reduced energy consumption. Keywords--Robotic sensor; aquatic debris of monitoring resolution. Re- cently, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) [14] [31] have been used

126

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF HEAVY METAL POLLUTION IN NATURAL AQUATIC SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

He who taught the use of the pen, Taught man that which he knew not" The distribution of heavy metals between soil and soil solutions is a key issue in evaluating the environmental impact of long term applications of heavy metals to land. Contamination of soils by heavy metals has been reported by many workers. Metal adsorption is affected by many factors, including soil pH, clay mineralogy, abundance of oxides and organic matter, soil composition and solution ionic strength. The pH is one of the many factors affecting mobility of heavy metals in soils and it is likely to be the most easily managed and the most significant. To provide the appropriate level of protection for aquatic life and other uses of the resource, it is important to be able to predict the environmental distribution of important metals on spatial and temporal scales and to do so with particular emphasis on the water column concentrations. Regulatory levels reflected in water quality criteria or standards are based on

Muhammad Rehan Tayab

127

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

Konopacky, Richard C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

aquatic weed control: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

saw timber, and burls. Culvert repairreplacement, road restoration or decommissioning, slope stabilization, habitat improvement projects, stream improvement projects,...

130

1 -SUBTIDAL 2 -INTERTIDAL RB ROCK UB UNCONSOLIDATED AB AQUATIC BED RF -REEF OW -OPEN WATER/ AB AQUATIC BED RF REEF RS ROCKY SHORE US -UNCONSOLIDATED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M - MARINE 1 - SUBTIDAL 2 - INTERTIDAL RB ­ ROCK UB ­ UNCONSOLIDATED AB ­ AQUATIC BED RF - REEF OW - OPEN WATER/ AB ­ AQUATIC BED RF­ REEF RS ­ ROCKY SHORE US - UNCONSOLIDATED BOTTOM BOTTOM Unknown Bottom ­ UNCONSOLIDATED AB ­ AQUATIC RF ­ REEF OW - OPEN WATER/ AB ­ AQUATIC RF­ REEF SB ­ STREAMBED RS - ROCKY US

Gray, Matthew

131

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contractual obligations with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's (ODFW), Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program (Program). The Program works cooperatively with private landowners to develop long-term restoration, under which, passive and active Habitat Improvement Projects are conducted. Historically, projects have included livestock exclusion fencing (passive restoration) to protect riparian habitats, along with the installation of instream structures (active restoration) to address erosion and improve fish habitat. In recent years, the focus of active restoration has shifted to bioengineering treatments and, more recently, to channel re-design and reconstruction aimed at improving fish habitat, by restoring stable channel function. This report provides a summary of Program activities for the 2004 calendar year (January 1 through December 31, 2004), within each of the four main project phases, including: (1) Implementation--Pre-Work, (2) Implementation--On Site Development, (3) Operation and Maintenance, and (4) Monitoring and Evaluation. This report also summarizes Program Administrative, Interagency Coordination, and Public Education activities.

St. Hilaire, Danny R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant species Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 46: 2008. 1 J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 46: 1-7 Summary: % of the fish species listed in the Endangered Spe- cies Act (Lassuy 1994). Invasive aquatic plant...

133

Protections: Sampling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16HamadaBaO/Al2O3Protecting Lab land andProtections

134

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Using Livestock to Manage Wildlife Habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock grazing can be an effective tool in managing wildlife habitat. This publication explains how grazing affects various wildlife species such as white-tailed deer, bobwhite quail and turkeys, and how to select the type of livestock needed...

Lyons, Robert K.; Wright, Byron D.

2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

137

Effects of Habitat Quality and Landscape Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 8, 2005 ... predictive power of a metapopulation model. Key words: .... extinction from a state with practically all habitat oc- cupied. The M. ... 1990, Weiss et al. 1993, Hanski et al. ...... A dynamic analysis of northern spotted owl viability.

138

Classification of Seafloor Habitats using Genetic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitats. The initial motivation to use GP for this task came from a work on diesel engine diagnosis [11 are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full

Fernandez, Thomas

139

towards a better knowledge of sparse habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is largely governed by the Habitats Directive, whose objectives are promoting the maintenance of biodiversity landscape units of the National Inventory of the Landscape in Sweden (NILS). To gather sufficient

140

USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-152. 1995. 141 Inland Habitat Suitability for the Marbled Murrelet in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was to the Marbled Murrelet population. Following the 1989 Exxon Valdez Oil spill, the protection of habitat surveys were conducted on Afognak Island, north of Kodiak Island (Cody and Gerlach 1993, U.S. Fish included sur- vey date, location relative to the head of a bay, elevation, slope, aspect, percentage

Standiford, Richard B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Physical Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of interests under the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) purview ranging from facilities, buildings, Government property, and employees to national security interests such as classified information, special nuclear material (SNM), and nuclear weapons. Cancels Section A of DOE M 470.4-2 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

SRO-NERP -7 Studies of Aquatic and Terrestria I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(affiliated with the University of Georgia), the Savannah River Laboratory (operated by E. 1. du Pont deSRO-NERP - 7 Studies of Aquatic and Terrestria I Environments of the Savannah River Plant, South OF THE AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT, SOUTH CAROLINA: A BIBLIOGRAPHY James G

Georgia, University of

143

Evaluation of the Aquatic Ecotoxicology of Fullerenes and Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of the Aquatic Ecotoxicology of Fullerenes and Nanotubes of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes on aquatic organisms. The number of papers published on this topic is not very high and there are differences in the scientific quality. Fullerenes and carbon nanotubes appear

Fischlin, Andreas

144

Postgraduate Overview MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postgraduate Overview MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER) New programme established to strengthen;1. Aims, Outcomes & Assessment 1.1. Overall Aims The MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER) is closely, rather than by formal tuition in the lecture theatre. In essence then, AER melds both UK and European

Chittka, Lars

145

Aquatic Chemistry Course Id: CHEM 605 (3 cr.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Chemistry Fall 2010 Course Id: CHEM 605 (3 cr.) Lecture: TR 3:40-5:20pm, REIC 165 of this course is to introduce students to the concepts and models used in aquatic chemistry while providing-base chemistry, complexation, precipitation-dissolution and reduction-oxidation reactions. Student Learning

Wagner, Diane

146

aquatic food web: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aquatic food web First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs'...

147

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant control Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crafts 1973). Bartley and Gangstad (1974) reported that for aquatic plant control, acrolein... al. 1989). Fluridone is used to control a variety of aquatic plant species in...

148

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for survival. Aquatic ecosystems consist of living organisms together... filled with rainwater, and is trans- formed from an aquatic ecosystem into a terrestrial one when......

149

aquatic case-bearing moths: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of aquatic herbicide association with herbicide appli- cations. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat 50 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity...

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic vegetation stressors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Causal Diagnosis and Prediction Summary: aquatic organisms, ranging from algae to fish, have been mechanistically linked to environmental stressors... examples of aquatic...

151

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic biota downstream Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sources of many classes... iii Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM Executive Summary The purpose... in the Fraser Basin's aquatic ecosystem. The...

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic pollution monitoring Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;v Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM and Canada-BC Water Quality... iii Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM...

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic environments biological Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 4 Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity Aquatic Insect Summary: things used most commonly for monitoring the health of...

154

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic effects subgroups Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

underwater is to use oxygen... Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity Aquatic Insect Biodiversity and Conservation J. Reese... on the planet. While most insects live on land,...

155

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Optimal placement of Marine Protected Areas Patrick De Leenheer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the reduction or elimination of fish populations and the degradation or even destruction of their habitats coastlines where fishing is controlled. MPA's can also lead to larger fish densities outside the protected area through spill-over, which in turn may increase the fishing yield. A natural question

De Leenheer, Patrick

157

Nowzari et al. Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25 Nowzari et al. · Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD ASS (EQUUS HEMIONUS ONAGER) IN QA- TROUYEH NATIONAL PARK, IRAN HANIYEH NOWZARI, Department of Environment, Abadeh Branch, Islamic Azad University, Abadeh, Iran. Address: No.475, 90 alley, Ghasrodasht Av

Rubenstein, Daniel I.

158

Aquatic chemistry of selenium: evidence of biomethylation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical species of dissolved selenium were examined in surface waters from three sites in the San Joaquin and Imperial Valleys of California. Six dissolved selenium species were identified: the inorganic species selenate and selenite; nonvolatile organic selenides, including seleno amino acids and a dimethylselenonium ion; and the volatile methylated forms dimethyl selenide and dimethyl diselenide. The occurrences of methylated selenium species in the aquatic environment has important implications regarding the biogeochemical behavior of selenium in natural aqueous systems. Laboratory studies indicate that the nonvolatile dimethylselenonium ion can be transformed into volatile dimethyl selenide at neutral pH, providing a pathway for the in situ production of dimethyl selenide in natural waters. Geochemical flux calculations indicate that outgassing of dimethyl selenide may be an important removal mechanism for dissolved selenium from aqueous systems. 22 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

Cooke, T.D.; Bruland, K.W.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program, 1996-2003 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contractual obligations with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's (ODFW), Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program (Program). The last Annual Program Report was submitted in 1997, and described projects undertaken in 1995. This report describes Program activities carried out in 2003, along with a summary of projects undertaken during the years 1996 through 2002. The Program works cooperatively with private landowners to develop long-term restoration agreements, under which, passive and active Habitat Improvement Projects are conducted. Historically, projects have included livestock exclusion fencing (passive restoration) to protect riparian habitats, along with the installation of instream structures (active restoration) to address erosion and improve fish habitat. In recent years, the focus of active restoration has shifted to bioengineering treatments and, more recently, to channel re-design and re-construction aimed at improving fish habitat, by restoring stable channel function. This report provides a summary table of past projects (1996-2002), along with a text description of more extensive habitat improvement projects, including: (1) Implementation of a four-phased project on the Lobato property (Birch Creek) beginning in 1996 and involving a demonstration bioengineering site and riparian improvements (fencing, planting), (2) Implementation of stable channel design/instream structure placement on the Houser property, East Birch Creek, beginning in 1998, an (3) Implementation of a joint, US Army Corps of Engineers/ODFW (cost share) project beginning in 2001 on the Brogoitti property, East Birch Creek, which involved implementation of stable channel design/construction and riparian improvement treatments.

St. Hilaire, Danny R.; Montgomery, Michael; Bailey, Timothy D. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Protecting Wildlife  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for Plutonium CleanupProposalTeam:RightsProtecting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Protecting Software  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16HamadaBaO/Al2O3Protecting Lab land and the

162

The aquatics robotics project is part of Extension 4-H's effort to develop the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aquatics robotics project is part of Extension 4-H's effort to develop the next generation of Kittson County's 4-H aquatic robotics team, was trained to collect aquatic macroinvertebrate samples science in Minnesota. Extension 4-H's aquatic robotics project engages youth in math and science

Minnesota, University of

163

arctic aquatic ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

164

arctic aquatic ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

165

aquatic ecosystems implications: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Washington are in poor health, are not meeting societies expectations, and have elevated hazard for fire, insects, and disease. Diversity in stream habitats and associated...

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous species habitat Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

species habitat Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Predicting the distribution of anadromous fish in fresh water using habitat models Steve Lindley Summary: , critical habitat, and...

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadronous fish habitat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anadronous fish habitat Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anadronous fish habitat Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Habitat Management:...

168

Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

169

Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2008. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting wetlands plugs at sites on Spring Creek (Head-waters). Many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). Physical sampling during 2008 included sediment and depth measurements (SADMS) in Spring Creek at the Car Removal site. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for 5 strata on Spring Creek. Water temperature and chemistry were monitored monthly on Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Diggie Creek, and Portneuf (Jimmy Drinks) and Blackfoot rivers. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in five reservation streams which included nine sites. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Spring Creek series remained relatively low, however, there was an increase of biomass overall since 1993. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were similar to 2006, and 2007, however, as in years past, high densities of macrophytes make it very difficult to see fry in addition to lack of field technicians. Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams stayed the same as 2007 at 1.5/hr. Numbers of fish larger than 18-inches caught by anglers increased from 2007 at .20 to .26/hr.

Osborne, Hunter [Shoshone Bannock Tribes

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Flow and Transport in Regions with Aquatic Vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This review describes mean and turbulent flow and mass transport in the presence of aquatic vegetation. Within emergent canopies, the turbulent length scales are set by the stem diameter and spacing, and the mean flow is ...

Nepf, Heidi

172

Flow-induced reconfiguration of buoyant and flexible aquatic vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant posture can play a key role in the health of aquatic vegetation, by setting drag, controlling light availability, and mediating the exchange of nutrients and oxygen. We study the flow-induced reconfiguration of ...

Nepf, Heidi

173

John M. Epifanio -Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

John M. Epifanio - Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology Illinois Natural History Survey 607 AND ACADEMIC INTERESTS Conservation Genetics & Molecular Ecology ­ Examination of structure & function Ecology, Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS). 2000 - 2001 Assistant National Program Leader. Fisheries

174

Postgraduate Overview MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postgraduate Overview MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER) Established programme to strengthen in the laboratory or field, rather than by formal tuition in the lecture theatre. In essence then, AER melds both UK

Chittka, Lars

175

Interactions between currents and the spatial structure of aquatic vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation is present in nearly all aquatic environments, ranging from meandering streams to constructed channels and rivers, as well as in lakes and coastal zones. This vegetation grows in a wide range of flow environments ...

Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

What can I do with this major? BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stormwater Management Hydrologic Phenomena: Measuring and Monitoring Water Resources Protection Wetland Protection Waste Management Operations Water Treatment Systems Aquatic Habitat Characterization public works departments Industry: Hydroelectric power Water treatment Environmental design

Escher, Christine

177

Aquatic primary production in a high-CO2 world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic primary production in a high-CO2 world Etienne Low-De´carie, Gregor F. Fussmann, and Graham-Penfield, Montreal, QC, H3A 1B1, Canada Here, we provide a review of the direct effect of increas- ing CO2 on aquatic: the assessment of theories about limitation of productivity and the integration of CO2 into the co

Fussman, Gregor

178

An Analysis of Hybrid Life Support Systems for Sustainable Habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of sustainable habitats on Earth, on other planetary surfaces, and in space, has motivated strategic planning with respect to life support (LS) system technology development and habitat design. Such planning ...

Shaw, Margaret Miller

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Estuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stream restoration activities. Recommend NOOA fund. 11. Scaling-Up Native Oyster Will restore 4 acresEstuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council Ranked Proposal Recommendation May 13, 2011 Project Name Description 1. Riverside Ranch Restoration Will restore 356 acres of estuarine

US Army Corps of Engineers

180

Conservation plan for protected species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitats in and around Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) support populations of various vertebrates and plants, including a number of threatened and endangered species. Adequate conservation of habitats and species, particularly protected species, can be facilitated through development and implementation of management plans. This document provides a comprehensive plan for the conservation of protected species on NPR-1, through compliance with terms and conditions expressed in Biological Opinions rendered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for NPR-1 activities. Six conservation strategies by which threatened and endangered species have been, and will be, protected are described: population monitoring, mitigation strategies, special studies, operating guidelines and policies, information transfer and outreach, and the endangered species conservation area. Population monitoring programs are essential for determining population densities and for assessing the effects of oil field developments and environmental factors on protected species. Mitigation strategies (preactivity surveys and habitat reclamation) are employed to minimize the loss of important habitats components and to restore previously disturbed lands to conditions more suitable for species` use. A number of special studies were undertaken between 1985 and 1995 to investigate the effectiveness of a variety of population and habitat management techniques with the goal of increasing the density of protected species. Operating guidelines and policies governing routine oil field activities continue to be implemented to minimize the potential for the incidental take of protected species and minimize damage to wildlife habitats. Information transfer and outreach activities are important means by which technical and nontechnical information concerning protected species conservation on NPR-1 is shared with both the scientific and non-scientific public.

Otten, M.R.M.; Cypher, B.L.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 12. Analytical Methods Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

techniques Mass spectrometry AMS Lab tour Noble gas mass spectrometry Stable isotope mass spectrometry Radiocarbon Literature: Mook (2001), Vol. 1, ch. 10 & 11 Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 12 fundamental analytical techniques Radiometry (decay counting, radioisotopes) Mass spectrometry (mass

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

182

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

Berger, Matthew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

AQUATIC BIOLOGY Vol. 7: 93105, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecological con- cern, because the biota have adapted to substantially lower UV irradiance than that imposed Artemiopsis stefanssoni (up to 37 µg mg­1 ). Concurrent analyses of food sources showed that scytonemin to providing a measure of UV protection, the pigments also indicate zooplankton food sources and potential

Vincent, Warwick F.

185

Management and Conservation Influence of Habitat Features and Hunter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the habitat characteristics (e.g., abundance of deer forage, visibility of the deer from the hunter's point

Laval, Universit

186

Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 7. Tritium and Helium-3 Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 7. Tritium and Helium-3 Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik 1 Physics of Aquatic Systems II 7. Tritium and Helium-3 Werner Aeschbach-Hertig Institute of Environmental Physics University of Heidelberg Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 7. Tritium and Helium-3

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

187

Habitat destruction and extinction in competitive and mutualistic metacommunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitat loss is a leading cause of extinction, it is important to identify what kind of species is most competitive metapopulations. Metacommunities of mutualists can suffer the abrupt extinction of both species species coexist to predict their response to habitat loss. Keywords Habitat destruction, extinction

188

Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects in British Columbia By Matthew Justice B of Resource Management (Planning) Title of Project: Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects #12;ABSTRACT This research explores the motivations of volunteers within fish-habitat rehabilitation

189

Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about these threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77.12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2001 field season (March to November, 2001).

Mendel, Glen Wesley; Trump, Jeremy; Karl, David

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work undertaken in 2005 included: (1) Four new fence projects were completed thereby protecting 7.55 miles of stream with 9.1 miles of new riparian fence (2) Fence removal 1.7 miles of barbed wire. (3) Completed three spring developments (repair work on two BLM springs on Cottonwood Creek (Dayville), 1 solar on Rock Creek/ Collins property). (4) Dredge tail leveling completed on 0.9 miles of the Middle Fork of the John Day River (5) Cut, hauled and placed 30 junipers on Indian Creek/Kuhl property for bank stability. (6) Collected and planted 1500 willow cuttings on Mountain Creek/Jones property. (7) Conducted steelhead redd counts on Lake Cr./Hoover property and Cottonwood Cr./Mascall properties (8) Seeded 200 lbs of native grass seed on projects where the sites were disturbed by fence construction activities. (9) Maintenance of all active project fences (72.74 miles), watergaps (60), spring developments (30) were checked and repairs performed. (10) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Program in 1984 we have installed 156.06 miles of riparian fence on leased property protecting 88.34 miles of anadromous fish bearing stream. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement Projects from 1996-2001, where the landowner received the materials, built and maintained the project we have a total of 230.92 miles of fence protecting 144.7 miles of stream and 3285 acres of riparian habitat.

Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Delano, Kenneth H. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Protecting Life on Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to thePeter B. Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to theof Protecting Life on Earth is to explain to an intelligent

Anderson, Byron P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Source Water Protection to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/2010-305b.pdf #12;World Resources Institute wri.org/project/eutrophication/map #12;Nitrogen in watershed soils. Welch et al. 2011. DOtemperature habitat loss due to eutrophication in Tenkiller Reservoir

Soerens, Thomas

193

Shore Protection Act (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Shore Protection Act is the primary legal authority for protection and management of Georgia's shoreline features including sand dunes, beaches, sandbars, and shoals, collectively known as the...

194

Office of Physical Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Physical Protection is comprised of a team of security specialists engaged in providing Headquarters-wide physical protection.

195

Aquatic Toxicity Information Retrieval Data Base (ACQUIRE). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of Acquire is to provide scientists and managers quick access to a comprehensive, systematic, computerized compilation of aquatic toxicity data. Scientific papers published both nationally and internationally on the toxicity of chemicals to aquatic organisms and plants are collected and reviewed for ACQUIRE. Independently compiled data files that meet ACQUIRE parameter and quality assurance criteria are also included. Selected toxicity test results and related testing information for any individual chemical from laboratory and field aquatic toxicity effects are included for tests with freshwater and marine organisms. The total number of data records in ACQUIRE is now over 105,300. This includes data from 6000 references, for 5200 chemicals and 2400 test species. A major data file, Acute Toxicity of Organic Chemicals (ATOC), has been incorporated into ACQUIRE. The ATOC file contains laboratory acute test data on 525 organic chemicals using juvenile fathead minnows.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic management options Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

30 ERDCELTR-05-4 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program Summary: and ponds may have lost their aquatic flora due to chronic disturbance or long-term vegetation management......

198

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant biomass Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biomass Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aquatic plant biomass Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 AQUATIC PLAN RESEARCH T CONTROL Summary:...

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic animal production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

database. EWRS International Symposium on Aquatic Weeds-An American Perspective page... 14 APIRS Funding Reduced page 15 A Q U A P H Y T E A Newsletter About AquAtic, wetlANd ANd...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic organisms submitted Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology ; Physics ; Biology and Medicine 99 1 -SUBTIDAL 2 -INTERTIDAL RB ROCK UB UNCONSOLIDATED AB AQUATIC BED RF -REEF OW -OPEN WATER AB AQUATIC BED RF REEF RS ROCKY SHORE US...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic worms eat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine 72 1 -SUBTIDAL 2 -INTERTIDAL RB ROCK UB UNCONSOLIDATED AB AQUATIC BED RF -REEF OW -OPEN WATER AB AQUATIC BED RF REEF RS ROCKY SHORE US...

202

Aquatic macroinvertebrate food resources for birds in a Texas coastal marsh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Emergent strata of the Impounded, Intermediate, and Saline wetlands had a greater diversity of aquatic macroinvertebrates than their corresponding open-marsh stratum. Aquatic macroinvertebrate standing crop peaked between March and April in all wetlands...

Sipocz, Andrew Vincent

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Best Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Develop educational materials related to aquatic plant identification and their specific managementBest Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E vegetation management with the ultimate goal of producing the best management practices protocol in Iowa

Koford, Rolf R.

204

Aquatic Ecology 36: 8595, 2002. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Ecology 36: 85­95, 2002. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 85

205

Protected Areas Stacy Philpott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Convention of Biological Diversity, 1992 #12;IUCN Protected Area Management Categories Ia. Strict Nature. Protected Landscape/ Seascape VI. Managed Resource Protected Area #12;Ia. Strict Nature Preserves and Ib. Wilderness Areas Natural preservation Research No No #12;II. National Parks Ecosystem protection

Gottgens, Hans

206

Fire Protection Program Metrics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Perry E. D Antonio, P.E., Acting Sr. Manager, Fire Protection - Sandia National Laboratories

207

Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003)Crowley County, Colorado: Energy ResourcesCrucial Habitat

208

Profiling Aquatic Diffusion Process Using Robotic Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach using smart aquatic mobile sensors such as robotic fish. In our approach, the robotic sensors pounds), and size (1-2 meters long), it is difficult to Yu Wang, Rui Tan and Guoliang Xing of autonomous robotic fish developed by the Smart Microsystems Laboratory at Michigan State University [6

Tan, Xiaobo

209

Anabranching As A Novel Restoration Design To Reduce Aquatic Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aquatic nutrients and increase residence time At Hydraulic Loads (cm) between 30-50% Total N and 20.H. and S.D. Wallace. 2009. Treatment Wetlands, 2nd ed. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL. Walter, R.C., Merritts, D Hydraulic Load = 50 cm Design Wetland Area = Runoff / Hydraulic Load Wetland Area ~ 1.07 ha #12;

210

Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood Products Using Batch Leaching Tests treated with one of five different waterborne chemical preservatives, were leached using 18-h batch- treated wood at concentrations above the U.S. federal toxicity characteristic limit (5 mg/L). All

Florida, University of

211

The Marine Mammal Ear: Specializations for Aquatic Audition and Echolocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

northern Pacific Ocean or in the Tethys Sea, a paleolithic body of water from which the Mediterranean terrestrial through amphibious to fully aquatic. 1.1 Adaptive Radiation of Cetacea Protocetid fossils center on the northern Tethys Sea. It is likelythat cetacean radiations are linked to the tectonic uplift and closure

212

Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic Ecosystems: The Role of Organic The distribution between sediments and water plays a key role in the food-chain transfer of hydrophobic organic chemicals. Current models and assessment methods of sediment-water distribution predominantly rely

Gobas, Frank

213

EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON FISH AND AQUATIC INSECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

391 392 EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON FISH AND AQUATIC INSECTS IN GALLATIN RIVER DRAINAGE IN MONTANA EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON STREAM BOTTOM ORGANISMS IN TWO MOUNTAIN STREAMS IN GEORGIA SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC, Commissioner Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, Daniel H. Janzen, Director EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON FISH

214

Prediction and the aquatic sciences1 Michael L. Pace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction and the aquatic sciences1 Michael L. Pace Abstract: The need for prediction is now, however, presented prediction narrowly and failed to account for the diversity of predictive approaches as well to set prediction within the proper scientific context. Examples from time series analysis

Pace, Michael L.

215

Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity Turtle Biodiversity and Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity Turtle Biodiversity and Conservation Joseph C. Mitchell, Department of Biology, University of Richmond, Richmond, Va. Kurt A. Buhlmann, Conservation International, Center for Applied Biodiversity Science,Washington, D.C. T urtles are freshwater, marine, and terrestrial

Liskiewicz, Maciej

216

Aquatic manoeuvering with counter-propagating waves: a novel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic manoeuvering with counter-propagating waves: a novel locomotive strategy Oscar M. Curet1 of these inward counter-propagating waves. In addition, we compare the flow structure and upward force generated by inward counter-propagating waves to standing waves, unidirectional waves, and outward counter-propagating

Lauder, George V.

217

Developing conservation plan for the Edwards Aquifer: Stakeholders reach consensus resolution to balance protection of endangered species and water use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fall 2012 tx H2O 17 Story by Courtney Smith ] Comal and San Marcos springs are the only known habitats for eight federally listed threatened or endangered species. Photo courtesy of the Edwards Aquifer Authority. What does it take... Aquifer region of Texas achieved a milestone in a struggle that has lasted nearly six decades. Working together, participants in the Edwards Aquifer Recovery Implementation Program (EARIP) developed a habitat conservation plan that will protect...

Smith, Courtney

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

aegypti larval habitats: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

patterns in modeled particle transport to estuarine habitat with comparisons to larval fish Geosciences Websites Summary: settlement patterns of red drum larvae (Sciaenops...

219

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

220

Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 3. Stable Isotopes -Theory Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Notation and definitions Origin and description of fractionation Fractionating processes Rayleigh distillation Literature: Mook Vol. I, ch. 3 and 4 Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 3. Stable Isotopes - Theory "concentration" or mixing ratio: Fractional abundance of given isotope relative to all isotopes of the element

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 9. Modeling Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik 5 Influence of mixing on transient gas tracer ages 2-comp. mixing Mook, 2001 Example: Mixing of fast and slow runoff components in a river Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 9. Modeling Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik 10 Mixed reactor model (exponential

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

222

Using Wildlife Species Richness to Identify Land Protection Priorities in California's Hardwood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or private groups, managing existing public and private lands for diversity values, regulating detrimental private land uses, and providing incentives for private habitat protection. Common to all these approaches is a need to determine the specific areas of land that warrant action. Nearly 12 percent of California has

Standiford, Richard B.

223

Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats Sze-Bi Hsu Feng-Bin Wang Xiao from the dynamics of harmful algae and zooplankton in flowing- water habitats where a main channel. For the system modeling the dynamics of algae and their toxin that contains little limiting nutrient, we

Hsu, Sze-Bi

224

Mathematical analysis of the optimal habitat configurations for species persistence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

susceptible to internal and external extinction factors. These theoretical results are supported that they are of two main types - ball-shaped or stripe-shaped. We formally prove that these optimal shapes depend that the optimal shape of the habitat realises a compromise between reducing the detrimental habitat edge effects

Hamel, François

225

USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

226

RESEARCH ARTICLE Habitat variables explain Loggerhead Shrike occurrence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are the spatial scales of habitat associations relevant to this species? Our study area was Fort Bliss Army are indicative of habitat quality in the vicinity of Fort Bliss. Local- and intermediate-scale variables best B. A. Locke Á D. Bash DPW, Division of Environment, IMWE-PWD-E, Bldg 624, Pleasanton Rd, Fort Bliss

Radeloff, Volker C.

227

Research Article Nesting Habitat Characteristics of the Marbled Murrelet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Article Nesting Habitat Characteristics of the Marbled Murrelet in Central California 94720, USA Abstract The marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) is a threatened seabird that nests published on murrelet nesting habitat in the coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) region. Here we present

Mladenoff, David

228

Incipient toxicity of lithium to freshwater organisms representing a salmonid habitat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because the eventual development of fusion power reactors could increase the mining, use and disposal of lithium five-fold by the year 2000, potential effects from unusual amounts of lithium in aquatic environments were investigated. Freshwater oganisms representing a Pacific Northwest salmonid habitat were exposed to elevated conentrations of lithium. Nine parameters were used to determine the incipient toxicity of lithium to rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), insect larvae (Chironomus sp.), and Columbia River periphyton. All three groups of biota were incipiently sensitive to lithium at concentrations ranging between 0.1 and 1 mg/L. These results correspond with the incipient toxicity of beryllium, a chemically similar component of fusion reactor cores. A maximum lithium concentration of 0.01 mg/L occurs naturally in most freshwater environments (beryllium is rarer). Therefore, a concentration range of 0.01 to 0.1 mg/L may be regarded as approaching toxic concentrations when assessing the hazards of lithium in freshwaters.

Emery, R.; Klopfer, D.C.; Skalski, J.R.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Protective Force Program Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, Protective Force Program, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Does not cancel other directives.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Livestock Risk Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock risk protection (LRP) insurance policies protect producers from adverse price changes in the livestock market. This publication explains how LRP works, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these polices, and gives examples...

Thompson, Bill; Bennett, Blake; Jones, Diana

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

231

Protection Program Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes requirements for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Protective Forces (FPF), Contractor Protective Forces (CPF), and the Physical Security of property and personnel under the cognizance of DOE.

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

232

HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

31 HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1 Department that the density of animals in a habitat #12;MEASURING HABITAT QUALITY · Johnson Trans. W. Sect. Wildl. Soc. 41

Johnson, Matthew

233

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity in mediterranean streams: an integrated modeling framework Adina M. Merenlender · Mary K. Matella of hydrologic habitat connectivity and benefits of habitat restoration alternatives we provide: (1) a review

Merenlender, Adina

234

RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPYRIGHT 2002 Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;3 #12;4 #12;5 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 98, No'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

Healy, Kevin Edward

235

Model Fire Protection Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

236

Corium protection assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A corium protection assembly includes a perforated base grid disposed below a pressure vessel containing a nuclear reactor core and spaced vertically above a containment vessel floor to define a sump therebetween. A plurality of layers of protective blocks are disposed on the grid for protecting the containment vessel floor from the corium.

Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Sirtori, IT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Influence of grazing management on population attributes, habitats, and habitat selection of bobwhites in south Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

grazing systems on La Copita Research Area, Jim Wells County, Texas. 51 Pooled within-groups correlations between habitat variables and discriminant scores produced by canonical discriminant analysis for two separate comparisons of available and quail... slapped reality into me and Dr. Folse helped me to comprehend some complex analyses. Ben Koerth, Jim Mutz, Dave McKown, James Tepera, Dave Martin, and Chafer Lite kept my spirits high and my tail in gear while I was doing my field work. Ben's advice...

Wilkins, Robert Neal

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

Coastal Marshlands Protection Act (Georgia  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act provides the Coastal Resources Division with the authority to protect tidal wetlands. The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act limits certain activities and...

239

Fire Protection Program Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

Sharry, J A

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

240

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromus fish habitat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anadromus fish habitat Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anadromus fish habitat Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Sierra Nevada Ecosystem...

242

The Role of Social Capital and Collaborative Negotiations in Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 2001. p. 108. Beatley, Timothy. Habitat ConservationA; Nation; Federal Report, Pg. A8. Beatley, Timothy. Habitatof California Press, 1981. Beatley, Timothy. Habitat

Jimeno, Nancy A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Habitat for Humanity South...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Home Case Study, Manatee County Habitat for Humanity, Ellenton, FL, Affordable DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat for Humanity, Edgewater, FL...

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - avian habitat fragmentation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF HABITAT FRAGMENTATION ON BIODIVERSITY Lenore Fahrig Ottawa-Carleton Institute... , landscape complementation s Abstract The literature on effects of habitat fragmentation on...

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic intertidal habitats Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the rocky intertidal... intertidal zone. We examined tidal effects on pollock distribution, their depth and habitat preferences... habitat. On falling tdes,pollock schooled...

246

Hay Creek conservation easement protects trout habitat in Flathead County.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cell 9Harvey Brooks, 1960 TheHasCitygate53-acre

247

Jocko River Watershed conservation easement protects trout habitat in Montana - FACT SHEET  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson LabJeffersonStandards andJianzhiAbout

248

Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

NeSmith, Frank (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Long, Mack (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Paks, Kalispell, MT); Matthews, Dayne (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC SEDIMENTS. A smaller organic contaminant database indicates sediment PAH levels exceed probable effect level criteria

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophyte lemna Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Great Lakes. Can J Fish Aquat Sci 61:1285- ... Source: Toledo, University of - Lake Erie Center Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology Page: << < 1 2...

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophytes cultured Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Great Lakes. Can J Fish Aquat Sci 61:1285- ... Source: Toledo, University of - Lake Erie Center Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 7 Macrophyte...

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophytes eicchornia Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Great Lakes. Can J Fish Aquat Sci 61:1285- ... Source: Toledo, University of - Lake Erie Center Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 15 85Wells et...

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophyte ecotoxicology Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Great Lakes. Can J Fish Aquat Sci 61:1285- ... Source: Toledo, University of - Lake Erie Center Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 20 85Wells et...

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic systems annual Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

72 Christine M. Mayer Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Lake Erie Center, 6200 Bayshore Summary: in aquatic systems. 2005 International...

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic microbial samples Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(EAWAG) Collection: Geosciences 51 Estuarine Microbial Food Web Patterns in a Lake Erie Coastal P.J. Lavrentyev1 Summary: . Introduction Aquatic microbial communities...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic macrophyte detritus Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Great Lakes. Can J Fish Aquat Sci 61:1285- ... Source: Toledo, University of - Lake Erie Center Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 73 PLEASE...

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystem response Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water quality analysis responsible... Aquatic Control Inc. is a privately owned lake management company ... Source: Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural...

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystem including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

submergedmacrophytes.Ecosystems9:112. Aquatic Ecology Laboratory at the Lake Erie Center (419) 530-4570; FAX: (419) 530... ... Source: Toledo, University of - Lake...

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecological risk Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aquatic invasive species. 21st Annual Symposium of ... Source: Toledo, University of - Lake Erie Center Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 47 MACROPHYTE...

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic toxicology research Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Toxicology... and toxicology in the assessment and modelling of aquatic ... Source: Saskatchewan, University of - Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Plasma Physics...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic organisms potential Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

United States. Aquatic organisms serve as important indicators of water quality... diseases and parasites that can infect native plants and animals. Invasive organ- isms can...

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic systems fmas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

streams, springs, estuaries, bays, and Summary: are extreme in the air of terrestrial eco- systems. In aquatic ecosystems, water serves as a buf- fer; that is... environment....

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic biological study Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Office of Admissions Santa Barbara, CA 93106-2016 Summary: ecology, population studies of aquatic organisms, biological oceanography, and limnology (the...

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems pollution Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for implementing aquatic ecosystem restoration projects pursuant to Section 206 of the Water Resources Development... for Section 206 projects (and separable elements thereof)...

265

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems endocrine Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Geosciences 3 Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM The purpose of the Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP) was to restore the environmental...

266

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystem restoration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Ecosystem Prediction- Aquatic... In a world where the demand for fresh surface water increases every ... Source: Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, NOAA...

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ECOSYSTEMS JOINT MODULE WITH UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA Summary: environments Fresh Water Ecosystems Aquatic policies Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Terrestrial... and...

268

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic animal health Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accomplishments in Research Species of plants or animals not native to a particular... ecosystem can have harmful effects when they "invade" the new envi- ronment. Aquatic...

269

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic life volume Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

COLUMBIA BASIN ... Source: Washington at Seattle, University of - School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology...

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic multispecies microarray Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Ecology 10 Herbicide Contamination of Freshwater Ecosystems: Impact on Microbial Communities Summary: ). These herbicides can enter aquatic ecosystems as a result of...

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic insects 1959--1985 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History Area Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 73 APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment Summary: with feeding on a diet of aquatic...

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic insect communities Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flagstaff Lab Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 39 APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment Summary: with feeding on a diet of aquatic...

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic level ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the past decade, research has been active in developing methods for measuring the levels of stress... in aquatic animals for the purpose of monitoring water pollution on...

274

Asset Protection Analysis Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Guide provides examples of the application of as set protection analysis to several common problems. Canceled by DOE N 251.80.

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

275

Protected Water Sources (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter designates protected water sources, which are subject to additional special conditions regarding water use. Permit applications for water withdrawals from these sources may still be...

276

Protective Actions and Reentry  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This volume defines appropriate protective actions and reentry of a site following an emergency. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

277

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

278

Environmental Protection Specialist  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as an environmental protection specialist within the Environmental Planning and Analysis department (KEC) of the Environment, Fish, and Wildlife ...

279

System Protection Control Craftman  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate will perform preventative and corrective maintenance on protective relays, revenue meters, telemetering schemes, substation control systems and various kinds of substation...

280

DOE Advanced Protection Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Circuit Fault Status - Four Faults Recorded * 10212007 (high winds) - Relay pick-ups, but no trip * 12252007 (high winds) - Protection operated correctly - Post-fault...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Physical Protection Program Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Supplements DOE O 473.1, by establishing requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Cancels: DOE M 5632.1C-1

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

282

Role of Tidal Saltwater Habitats for Juvenile Salmonids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drivers Population viability & resilience, habitats salmon use and need ·Productive feeding area ·Refuge from predators Role of Estuaries Historical Drivers ­ Production, abundance, mortality ·Conduit

283

Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver Zero Energy Demonstration Home  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brochure describes the 2005 demonstration home designed by NREL and the Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver. The completed home produced 24% more energy than it consumed over 12 months.

Not Available

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Habitat loss and the structure of plantanimal mutualistic networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTER Habitat loss and the structure of plant­animal mutualistic networks Miguel A. Fortuna Sevilla, Spain *Correspondence: E-mail: fortuna@ebd.csic.es Abstract Recent papers have described

Fortuna, Miguel A.

285

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

appliances, and ceiling fans, a solar water heater, an ERV, and a high-efficiency heat pump. To keep the ducts in conditioned space, the Habitat affiliate installed a rigid...

286

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Manatee County Habitat...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

has R-23 ICF walls, a spray-foamed sealed attic, solar hot water, and a ducted mini-split heat pump. Manatee County Habitat for Humanity - Ellenton, FL More Documents &...

287

COMPLETION REPORT Identifying Habitats for Greater Sage-Grouse Population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,093 km2 Atlantic Rim Project Area (ARPA) of south-central, Wyoming, which is being developed for coalbed methane natural gas (CBNG) resources. To reach our objective we modeled habitat selection, as resource

Beck, Jeffrey L.

288

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

executive director for the Habitat affiliate. "We started doing ENERGY STAR about 5 years ago, and DOE Builders Challenge 3 years ago, and then DOE Zero Energy Ready Home...

289

Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) 5-year Review for 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...............................................................................................................................9 4 ENVIRONMENTAL AND MANAGEMENT CHANGES SINCE 2005 EFH EIS ANALYSIS.................................................................................................................... 10 4.1 Environmental and habitat changes since 2005 EFH EIS ..............................................................................10 4.2 Research since the EFH EIS

290

Relationship of land-use patterns to quail habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELATIONSHIP OF LAND-USE PATTERNS TO QUAIL HABITAT A Thesis CFRALD OSCAR CRFFSTAD Submitted to the Craduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCF. August 1976 Major... Subject: Range Science RELATIONSHIP OP LAND-USE PATTERNS TO QUAIL HABITAT A Thesis by GERALD OSCAR GREVSTAD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) Head of Department) (Member) (Member) August 1976 "a ABSTRACT Relationship...

Grevstad, Gerald Oscar

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Impacts of habitat fragmentation on neotropical migrants in east Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE December 1996 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences IMPACTS OF HABITAT FRAGMENTATION ON NEOTROPICAL MIGRANTS IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by ALIX DENISE DOWLING Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... and Fisheries Sciences ABSTRACT Impacts of Habitat Fragmentation on Neotropical Migrants in East Texas. (December 1996) Alix Denise Dowling, B. S. , Indiana University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. I&eith Arnold In this study, point counts were used...

Dowling, Alix Denise

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Aquatic Species Program review: proceedings of principal investigators meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Aquatic Species Program is to improve the productivity, conversion to fuels, and cost efficiency of aquatic plant culture technologies. The emphasis of the program is on developing a mass culture technology for cultivating oil-yielding microalgae in the American southwest. A technical and economic analysis indicated that such a concept would be feasible if (1) lipid yields from microalgae are improved, (2) there is sufficient saline water for large-scale development, and (3) microalgal lipids can be economically converted to conventional fuels. It was determined that fuels from microalgal lipids presented better options than converting the microalgal biomass to either alcohols or methane. All lipids can potentially be catalytically converted to gasoline, or the fatty acids can be converted to substitute diesel fuels. The Southwest has the necessary low, flat, underutilized lands, and carbon dioxide is available from either natural deposits or flue gas from industrial plants. The amount of saline water available will probably determine how much fuel can be produced from aquatic species, and this question should be answered during 1985. The largest constraint of this technology is the economical production of an oil-rich microalgal feedstock. The agenda for the review was divided into four sections: species selection and characterization, applied physiological studies, outdoor mass cultivation, and systems design and analysis. Papers from these presentations are included in these proceedings. Program advances were reported in the areas of species collection and selection, modulated light physiology, mass culture yields, harvesting of microalgae, mass culture facility design and analysis, and assessments on fuel options from microalgae. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Washington Joint Aquatic Resources Permit Application | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS dataIndiana:Coop Inc Place: VermontInformation Aquatic

294

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish DOE procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 CFR Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects, ad in DOE P 443.1, Policy on the Protection of Human Subjects. Cancels DOE O 1300.3. Canceled by DOE O 443.1A.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes Department of Energy (DOE) procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects; and in DOE P 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, dated 12-20-07. Cancels DOE O 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B.

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

296

Protective Force Program Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, PROTECTIVE FORCE PROGRAM, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Change 1 revised pages in Chapters IV and VI on 12/20/2001.

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

297

Environmental protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California's commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities.

R. C. Holland

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Environmental Protection Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To implement sound stewardship practices that are protective of the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources impacted by the Department of Energy (DOE) operations and by which DOE cost effectively meets or exceeds compliance with applicable environmental; public health; and resource protection laws, regulations, and DOE requirements. Cancels DOE 5400.1 and DOE N 450.4.

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan serves as an aid to management and staff to implement new environmental programs in a timely manner.

Brekke, D.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media A Comparison of Self-Protecting Digital Content and AACS Independent Security Evaluators www.securityevaluators.com May 3, 2005 Copyright for Optical Media 2 #12;Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media 3 Executive

Amir, Yair

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Habitat Acquisition Strategies for Grassland Birds in an Urbanizing Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for protection change as total protected effective area is traded off against total distance. As area is weighted heavily, the selected parcels coalesce around core reserves but protect less area. The differences protection in metropolitan areas is commonly used as a policy for regulating landscape change in the United

Miller, James R.

302

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality in Sandia Canyon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1990, field studies of water quality and stream macroinvertebrate communities were initiated in Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The studies were designed to establish baseline data and to determine the effects of routine discharges of industrial and sanitary waste. Water quality measurements were taken and aquatic macroinvertebrates sampled at three permanent stations within the canyon. Two of the three sample stations are located where the stream regularly receives industrial and sanitary waste effluents. These stations exhibited a low diversity of macroinvertebrates and slightly degraded water quality. The last sample station, located approximately 0.4 km (0.25 mi) downstream from the nearest wastewater outfall, appears to be in a zone of recovery where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams in the Los Alamos area. A large increase in macroinvertebrate diversity was also observed at the third station. These results indicate that effluents discharged into Sandia Canyon have a marked effect on water quality and aquatic macroinvertebrate communities.

Bennett, K.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

AQUATIC ASSESSMENT OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AND ITS REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This modeling study evaluated aquatic environment affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident and the effectiveness of remediation efforts. Study results indicate that radionuclide concentrations in the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers were well above the drinking water limits immediately after the Chernobyl accident, but have decreased significantly in subsequent years due to flashing, burying, and decay. Because high concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs, the major radionuclides affecting human health through aquatic pathways, are associated with flooding, an earthen dike was constructed along the Pripyat River in its most contaminated floodplain. The dike was successful in reducing the 90Sr influx to the river by half. A 100-m-high movable dome called the New Safe Confinement is planned to cover the Chernobyl Shelter (formally called the sarcophagus) that was erected shortly after the accident. The NSC will reduce radionuclide contamination further in these rivers and nearby groundwater; however, even if the Chernobyl Shelter collapses before the NSC is built, the resulting peak concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs in the Dnieper River would still be below the drinking water limits.

Onishi, Yasuo; Kivva, Sergey L.; Zheleznyak, Mark J.; Voitsekhovitch, Oleg V.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Global distribution of N2O emissions from aquatic systems: natural emissions and anthropogenic eects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global distribution of N2O emissions from aquatic systems: natural emissions and anthropogenic, are increasing due to human activities. Our analysis suggests that a third of global anthropogenic N2O emission the remainder. Over 80% of aquatic anthropogenic N2O emissions are from the Northern Hemisphere mid

Seitzinger, Sybil

305

A COMPARISON OF THE AQUATIC IMPACTS OF LARGE HYDRO AND SMALL HYDRO PROJECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON OF THE AQUATIC IMPACTS OF LARGE HYDRO AND SMALL HYDRO PROJECTS by Lara A. Taylor, P Project: A Comparison of the Aquatic Impacts of Large Hydro and Small Hydro Projects Project No.: 501 of small hydro development in British Columbia has raised concerns surrounding the effects

306

AQUA: an aquatic walking robot Christina Georgiades*, Andrew German**, Andrew Hogue**, Hui Liu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thrusters and buoyancy in order to maintain its pose. In addition to the obvious energy consumption issue the AQUA project to develop a fully autonomous walking aquatic vehicle. It describes the basic design as on naturally occurring underwater landmarks and trinocular stereo. Keywords-autonomous robot, aquatic robot

307

Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for DOE Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This order establishes the Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for Department of Energy (DOE) operations. Cancels Interim Management Directive No. 5001, Safety, Health And Environmental Protection dated 9-29-77.

1980-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fire protection design criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, national Fire Protection Association Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard, along with other delineated criteria, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

Myra, D.; Ready, C.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Protective Force Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To prescribe Department of Energy policy, responsibilities, and requirements for the management and operation of the Protective Force Program. Chg 1 dated 2-13-95. Cancels DOE O 5632.7 and DOE O 5632.8.

1995-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

311

Environmental Protection Act (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act states general provisions for the protection of the environment. It also states specific regulations for air, water and land pollution as well as atomic radiation, toxic chemical and oil...

312

United States Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental problems today and building a science knowledge base necessary to manage our ecological resources wisely, understand how pollutants affect our health, and prevent or reduce environmental risksUnited States Environmental Protection Agency Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry

313

Protection of Tidewaters (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Protection of Tidewaters Act establishes the State of Georgia as the owner of the beds of all tidewaters within the State, except where title by a private party can be traced to a valid British...

314

Protective Coatings for Turbomachinery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for power plant efficiency and reliability, the need to prevent corrosion and erosion is growing. Operators, overhaulers, and manufacturers have been using protective coatings for over twenty-five years to prevent erosion and corrosion. The evolution...

McCune, B.; Hilty, L.

315

Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commissioner of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources is required to determine a general groundwater protection strategy and groundwater quality standards for the state, to be approved by...

316

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Policy is to establish DOE-specific principles for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Cancels DOE P 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

317

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The purpose of this Policy is to establish DOE-specific policy for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Canceled by DOE P 443.1A.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Physical Protection Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes Department of Energy management objectives, requirements and responsibilities for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Cancels DOE 5632.1C. Canceled by DOE O 470.4.

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

319

Mondriaan memory protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability and security are quickly becoming users' biggest concern due to the increasing reliance on computers in all areas of society. Hardware-enforced, fine-grained memory protection can increase the reliability and ...

Witchel, Emmett Jethro, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Cavern Protection (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is public policy of the state to provide for the protection of caves on or under Texas lands. For the purposes of this legislation, cave means any naturally occurring subterranean cavity, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Federal Protective Force  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual establishes requirements for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal protective forces (FPFs). Cancels DOE M 470.4-3, Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Voluntary Protection Program- Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) promotes safety and health excellence through cooperative efforts among labor, management, and government at the Department of Energy (DOE) contractor sites. DOE has also formed partnerships with other Federal agencies and the private sector for both advancing and sharing its Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) experiences and preparing for program challenges in the next century. The safety and health of contractor and federal employees are a high priority for the Department.

323

Environmental Protection Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The objective is to implement sound stewardship practices that are protective of the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources impacted by DOE operations, and meet or exceed compliance with applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection requirements cost effectively. The revision provides specific expectations for implementation of Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environment, Energy, and Transportation Management. Cancels DOE O 450.1. Canceled by DOE O 436.1.

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

324

Environmental Protection Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To implement sound stewardship practices that are protective of the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources impacted by the Department of Energy (DOE) operations and by which DOE cost effectively meets or exceeds compliance with applicable environmental; public health; and resource protection laws, regulations, and DOE requirements. Chg 1, dated 1-24-05; Chg 2, dated 12-7-05; Admin Chg 1, dated 1-3-07. Cancels DOE 5400.1 and DOE N 450.4.

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

General Environmental Protection Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities for Department of Energy (DOE) Operations for assuring compliance with applicable Federal, State and local environmental protection laws and regulations, Executive Orders, and internal Department policies. Cancels DOE O 5480.1A. Para. 2b, 4b, and 4c of Chap. II and para. 2d and 3b of Chap. III canceled by DOE O 231.1.

1990-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

326

Radiation Protection | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The Federal Regulation governing the use of radioactive materials at Ames Laboratory is 10 CFR 835. To implement this...

327

A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

Marmorek, David

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

PAUL B. HOOK Wetland and Watershed Scientist, Intermountain Aquatics, Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design for water resource protection Native-plant-based streambank bioengineering and treatment wetland and plant effects in wastewater treatment wetlands and riparian buffers Wetland and riparian restoration in surface and groundwater hydrology.** Residential wastewater treatment wetland, Jackson, WY (research

Maxwell, Bruce D.

330

Habitat Appraisal Guide for Rio Grande Wild Turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Spears et al. (2007) found ground vegetation positively infl uenced prefl ight poult survival. Shrubs 2.0?6.5 feet in height provided important cover for prefl ight poults (Spears et al. 2007), and areas with shrubs ?6.5 feet were avoided. As poults... to determine if appropriate conditions exist. This habitat appraisal does not take into account rainfall, which is a very important factor for Rio Grande wild turkeys and habitat. Therefore, it may be necessary to envision areas as they might look under...

Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Ransom, Dean; DeMaso, Stephen; Schwertner, T. Wayne; Collier, Bret

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Cost-Effective Mapping of Benthic Habitats in Inland Reservoirs through Split-Beam Sonar, Indicator Kriging, and Historical Geologic Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because bottom substrate composition is an important control on the temporal and spatial location of the aquatic community, accurate maps of benthic habitats of inland lakes and reservoirs provide valuable information to managers, recreational users, and scientists. Therefore, we collected vertical, split-beam sonar data (roughness [E1], hardness [E2], and bathymetry) and sediment samples to make such maps. Statistical calibration between sonar parameters and sediment classes was problematic because the E1:E2 ratios for soft (muck and clay) sediments overlapped a lower and narrower range for hard (gravel) substrates. Thus, we used indicator kriging (IK) to map the probability that unsampled locations did not contain coarse sediments. To overcome the calibration issue we tested proxies for the natural processes and anthropogenic history of the reservoir as potential predictive variables. Of these, a geologic map proved to be the most useful. The central alluvial valley and mudflats contained mainly muck and organic-rich clays. The surrounding glacial till and shale bedrock uplands contained mainly poorly sorted gravels. Anomalies in the sonar data suggested that the organic-rich sediments also contained trapped gases, presenting additional interpretive issues for the mapping. We extended the capability of inexpensive split-beam sonar units through the incorporation of historic geologic maps and other records as well as validation with dredge samples. Through the integration of information from multiple data sets, were able to objectively identify bottom substrate and provide reservoir users with an accurate map of available benthic habitat.

Venteris, Erik R.; May, Cassandra

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

332

Data Protection Policy Page 1 DATA PROTECTION POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Protection Policy Page 1 DATA PROTECTION POLICY POLICY STATEMENT The University intends to fully comply with all requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998 (,,Act) in so far as it affects the Universitys activities. SCOPE This Data Protection Policy: Covers the processing of all personal information

Greenlees, John

333

Changes in Habitat and Populations of Steelhead Trout, Coho Salmon, and Chinook Salmon in Fish Creek, Oregon; Habitat Improvement, 1983-1987 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction and evaluation of salmonid habitat improvements on Fish Creek, a tributary of the upper Clackamas River, began in 1982 as a cooperative venture between the Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest, and the Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit of the Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW), USDA Forest Service. The project was initially conceived as a 5-year effort (1982-1987) to be financed with Forest Service funds. The habitat improvement program and the evaluation of improvements were both expanded in mid-1983 when the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to cooperatively fund work on Fish Creek. Habitat improvement work in the basin is guided by the Fish Creek Habitat Rehabilitation-Enhancement Framework developed cooperatively by the Estacada Ranger District, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Pacific Northwest Research Station. The framework examines potential factors limiting production of salmonids in the basin, and the appropriate habitat improvement measures needed to address the limiting factors. Habitat improvement work in the basin has been designed to: (1) improve quantity, quality, and distribution of spawning habitat for coho and spring chinook salmon and steelhead trout, (2) increase low flow rearing habitat for steelhead trout and coho salmon, (3) improve overwintering habitat for coho salmon and steelhead trout, (4) rehabilitate riparian vegetation to improve stream shading to benefit all species, and (5) evaluate improvement projects from a drainage wide perspective. The objectives of the evaluation include: (1) Drainage-wide evaluation and quantification of changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat improvements. (2) Evaluation and quantification of changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements. (3) Benefit-cost analysis of habitat improvements.

Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Hohler, David B.; Cain, Thomas C. (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Federal policy and the endangered species act: the politics, perceptions, and technologies of protecting sea turtles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences PEDERAL POLICY AND THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT: THE POLITICS, PERCEPTIONS~ AND TECHNOLOGIES OP PROTECTING SEA TURTLES A Thesis ALAN DEAN... perceptions were the primary factors which influenced decisionmaking. The orientation of the National Marine Fisheries Service to promote commercial fishing delayed formulation of regulations aimed at ending incidental catch. Critical habitat designations...

Risenhoover, Alan Dean

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Rack protection monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Microscope collision protection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

DeNure, Charles R. (Pocatello, ID)

2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

337

Mapping red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) habitat suitability using GIS and remote sensing techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The British red squirrel population has dramatically declined in the last years. The survival of the species in the UK may depend on the careful selection and management of suitable habitats. A deep understanding of its habitat requirements...

de Lamo, Xavier

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

E-Print Network 3.0 - area habitat evaluation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

loss and fragmentation impacts... into populations that are too small to be self-sustaining. I Areas of habitats are so small that the core area... by creating new habitats...

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing habitat quality Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

< 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1 Summary: There are 2 basic approaches to conceptualizing how to measure habitat...

340

The Effects of Habitat Complexity on the Cognitive Performance of Two Fish Species and Their Hybrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and their hybrids; I then investigated the relationship between habitat complexity and cognitive performance as well as the performance of hybrids compared to the parental species. Cognitive performance does not seem effected by habitat complexity. The hybrid...

Chance, Heather

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

On the economic optimality of marine reserves when fishing damages habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I expand a spatially-explicit bioeconomic fishery model to include the negative effects of fishing effort on habitat quality. I consider two forms of effort driven habitat damage: First, fishing effort may ...

Moeller, Holly Villacorta

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits April 17-19th, 2013 ISRP Review Team (4 at the Sheraton Airport at 7:15 a.m. Site Visits: Depart airport and head east: Wind, Klickitat, White Salmon in this review: 1998-019-00 Wind River Watershed Underwood Conservation District (UCD), US Forest Service (USFS

343

Extinction rates under nonrandom patterns of habitat loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conversion on species extinctions assume that habitat conversion occurs at ran- dom. This assumption allows predictions about extinction rates based on the speciesarea relationship. We show that the spatially compositional gradients, or species richness, also alter pre- dicted species extinction rates. We illustrate

344

THE BIOLOGY OF RARE AND DECLINING SPECIES AND HABITATS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activities on declining species and habitats. Rarity, declining populations, and extinctions are natural may underiie llaturalpopulation declines of species leading to extirpationsand extinctions (Allendorf: additional factors push species towards extinction Ziswiler (1967) noted that 53 of the 77 species of birds

345

Biodiversity as spatial insurance: the effects of habitat fragmentation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitat destruction (e.g. strip min- ing or clear cutting of forests), conversion to agri- culture (e.g. conversion of grasslands to croplands or rangelands, or conversion of forests to planta- tions that these effects may be weaker or masked by other covarying factors in the environ- ment (Grace et al. 2007, Hector

Gonzalez, Andrew

346

Hybrid fitness across time and habitats Michael L. Arnold1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid fitness across time and habitats Michael L. Arnold1 and Noland H. Martin2 1 Department­San Marcos, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA There has been considerable debate about the role of hybrids in the evolutionary process. One question has involved the relative fitness of hybrid versus non-hybrid genotypes

Aspbury, Andrea S. - Department of Biology, Texas State University

347

Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium P. M. Scheifele Department significant levels of background noise due to pumps and motors. This noise, together with pool architecture to quantify the ambient noise levels in the water from machine vibration and from in-air performance speaker

Johnson, Michael T.

348

adaptable habitat construction: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

adaptable habitat construction First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Appendix J 2008...

349

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic invertebrate communities Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 4 Cranberry Bogs: The effect of cultivation and restoration on habitat distribution, benthic invertebrate communities, and food webs in...

350

Environmental protection implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. SNL is committed to operating in full compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental laws, regulations, and standards. Furthermore, SNL/California strives to go beyond compliance with legal requirements by making every effort practical to reduce impacts to the environment to levels as low as reasonably achievable.

Holland, R.C.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. This report focuses on the following: notification of environmental occurrences; general planning and reporting; special programs and plans; environmental monitoring program; and quality assurance and data verification.

Brekke, D.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Protections = Defenses in Depth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16HamadaBaO/Al2O3Protecting Lab land andProtections =

353

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative nursery habitat Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

population growth... forms of intraspecific habitat ... Source: Levin, Lisa - Integrative Oceanography Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography Collection:...

355

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology berlandstrasse 133  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Eawag ?berlandstrasse 133 P.O. Box the last decades, research efforts have mainly focused on bioethanol and biodiesel production. These first

Wehrli, Bernhard

356

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic biota due Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aquatic biota due Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 COMBINED ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF SEDIMENT AND WATER COLUMN CONTAMINATED BY DIFFUSE POLLUTION Summary: by the authors to assess...

357

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic exposure assessment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of aquatic biota (1 rad d-1 or 10 mGy d... risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed uranium mining ... Source: Yucca Mountain Project, US EPA Collection: Environmental...

358

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic insect behaviours Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41 Concentrating samples can lead to seed losses in soil bank estimations Summary: , many fresh water, but no marine, aquatic plants are...

359

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic heavy metals Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Principles of Ecotoxicology, SCOPE Report 12, Chapter 11, pp 239-255. Heavy metals, Pollutants, Toxicity... fIJJ US Army Corps of Engineers AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM...

360

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic environments adjacent Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: aquatic environments adjacent Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Journal of Animal Ecology 2009, 78, 338345 doi: 10.1111j.1365-2656.2008.01498.x 2008 The Authors. Journal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic organic fractions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: aquatic organic fractions Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Journal of Animal Ecology 2009, 78, 338345 doi: 10.1111j.1365-2656.2008.01498.x 2008 The Authors. Journal...

362

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant wastewater Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wastewater Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aquatic plant wastewater Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 1S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 The Magazine...

363

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plants water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aquatic plants water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NO LONGER HENRY'S HUDSON: EXOTIC SPECIES...

364

Interactions among flow, sediment deposition and aquatic vegetation in a channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic vegetation is commonly present in rivers in many forms. This thesis consists of two studies, which examine the flow structure around a patch of emergent, rigid vegetation in a laboratory channel. The vegetation ...

Zong, Lijun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic natural organic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

366

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic environments etude Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

367

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant wolffia Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

368

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual aquatic toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

369

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant culture Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

370

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plants collected Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

371

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic organisms Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

372

E-Print Network 3.0 - area aquatic resources Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

373

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis aquatic plants Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic animal models Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

375

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant lemna Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plants imported Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

377

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic organisms caused Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

378

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic environment state Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

379

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic escape response Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

380

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic center volume Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plants Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

382

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic toxicity properties Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

383

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic life Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

384

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic toxicity classification Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic environment il Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic animals evolution Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stress in Submerse Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland... or approval oCthe use of such commercial products. o PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER...

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant exudates Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aquatic plant exudates Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Plant and Soil 222: 191202, 2000. 2000 Kluwer Academic...

388

Drilling fluids and the arctic tundra of Alaska: assessing contamination of wetlands habitat and the toxicity to aquatic invertebrates and fish (journal version)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drilling for oil on the North Slope of Alaska results in the release of large volumes of used drilling fluids into arctic wetlands. These releases usually come from regulated discharges or seepage from reserve pits constructed to hold used drilling fluids. A study of five drill sites and their reserve pits showed an increase in common and trace elements and organic hydrocarbons in ponds near to and distant from reserve pits. Ions elevated in water were Ba, Cl, Cr, K, SO4 and Zn. Concentrations of Cu, Cr, Fe, Pb, and Si in sediments were higher in near and distant ponds than in control ponds. The predominant organics in drill-site waters and sediments consisted of aromatic and paraffinic hydrocarbons characteristic of petroleum or a refined product of petroleum. In 96-hr exposures in the field, toxicity to Daphnia Middendorffiana was observed in water from all reserve pits, and from two of five near ponds, but not from distant ponds. In laboratory tests with Daphnia magna, growth and reproduction were reduced in dilutions of 2.5% drilling fluid (2.5 drilling fluid: 97.5 dilution water) from one reserve pit, and 25% drilling fluid from a second.

Woodward, D.F.; Snyder-Conn, E.; Riley, R.G.; Garland, T.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United influencing total fish biomass in streams, but few studies have evaluated the relative influence of habitat and pH together. We measured total fish biomass, stream habitat, and stream pH in sixteen sites from

Kraft, Clifford E.

390

Assessing the distribution, habitat, and population size of the threatened Dupont's lark Chersophilus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

North African range, as well as on its preferred habitat, population density and size. Fieldwork), with important populations believed to be present in the steppe-like habitat of North Africa (Cramp, 1988Assessing the distribution, habitat, and population size of the threatened Dupont's lark

Oñate, Juan J.

391

2005 Proc. Annu. Conf. SEAFWA Movement and Habitat Selection of Largemouth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Annu. Conf. Southeast. Assoc. Fish and Wild. Agencies 59:227240 Habitat selection by largemouth bass2005 Proc. Annu. Conf. SEAFWA Movement and Habitat Selection of Largemouth Bass in a Florida Steep Street, Ruskin, FL 33570 Abstract: The movement and habitat selection of largemouth bass (Micropterus

Hill, Jeffrey E.

392

Quantitative Measures of Rearing And Spawning Habitat Characteristics For Stream-Dwelling Salmonids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for stream-dwelling salmonids: guidelines for habitat restoration. Province of British Columbia, MinistryQuantitative Measures of Rearing And Spawning Habitat Characteristics For Stream-Dwelling Salmonids: Guidelines For Habitat Restoration by E.R. Keeley and P.A. Slaney Watershed Restoration Project Report No. 4

Keeley, Ernest R.

393

United States Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Health and Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (40 CFR Part 197)--Final Rule Response to Comments Document #12;Yucca Mountain Standards Response to Comments Standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada 40 CFR Part 197 June, 2001 Office of Radiation and Indoor Air U

394

Armored garment for protecting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight, armored protective garment for protecting an arm or leg from blast superheated gases, blast overpressure shock, shrapnel, and spall from a explosive device, such as a Rocket Propelled Grenade (RPG) or a roadside Improvised Explosive Device (IED). The garment has a ballistic sleeve made of a ballistic fabric, such as an aramid fiber (e.g., KEVLAR.RTM.) cloth, that prevents thermal burns from the blast superheated gases, while providing some protection from fragments. Additionally, the garment has two or more rigid armor inserts that cover the upper and lower arm and protect against high-velocity projectiles, shrapnel and spall. The rigid inserts can be made of multiple plies of a carbon/epoxy composite laminate. The combination of 6 layers of KEVLAR.RTM. fabric and 28 plies of carbon/epoxy laminate inserts (with the inserts being sandwiched in-between the KEVLAR.RTM. layers), can meet the level IIIA fragmentation minimum V.sub.50 requirements for the US Interceptor Outer Tactical Vest.

Purvis, James W. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, II, Jack F. (Albuquerque, NM); Whinery, Larry D. (Albuquerque, NM); Brazfield, Richard (Albuquerque, NM); Lawrie, Catherine (Tijeras, NM); Lawrie, David (Tijeras, NM); Preece, Dale S. (Watkins, CO)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fish passage and protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of reprints on fish passage and protection topics from: American Fisheries Society; American Society of Civil Engineers; Harza Engineering Company; Hydro Review Magazine; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Independent Energy Magazine; National Hydropower Association; Northwest Hydroelectric Association; United States Army Corps of Engineers; United States Committee on large dams; and the United States Department of the Interior.

Rinehart, B.N.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

United States Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

federal and state agencies to prepare for emergencies at U.S. nuclear plants, transportation accidents is actively involved with other U.S. government agencies for preparing to respond to acts of chemical, EPAprovides support to the Emergency ManagementAgency by: (1) establishing guidelines for protecting

397

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

Protective Force Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes policy, requirements, responsibilities, and authorities, for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Extended until 7-7-06 by DOE N 251.64, dated 7-7-05 Cancels: DOE 5632.7A

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Contractor Protective Force  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual establishes requirements for the management and operation of the U.S. Department of Energy contractor protective forces. Cancels: DOE M 470.4-3 Chg 1, CRD (Attachment 2) only, except for Section C. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

400

Cybersecurity: Protecting Our  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cybersecurity: Protecting Our Data THE IMPORTANCE OF CYBERSECURITY "The cyber threat is one prosperity in the 21st century will depend on cybersecurity." President Barack Obama We live in a wired world and cybersecurity to function properly. Threats in cyberspace will soon equal or surpass that fromterrorism

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Golden-cheeked Warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) habitat fragmentation in Travis County, Texas: a remote sensing and geographical information system analysis of habitat extent, pattern and condition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis procedures were assessed for their utility in characterizing fragmentation patterns. Benson (1990) attempted to calculate a fractal dimension of potential GCW habitat "patches" within larger GCW habitat 'sites' and then correlate this parameter... recreational recreational Study Site Size (ha) 3, 420 1, 655 1, 202 1, 069 1, 833 504 1, 393 517 93 BULL CREEK Bull Creek (1, 655 ha) is characterized by a large, nearly contiguous block of habitat (Table 1). The topography is dominated by three...

Moses, Michael Edwin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M. [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for DOE Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes the Environmental Protection, Safety. and Health Protection Program for Department of Energy (DOE) operations. Cancels DOE 5480.1, dated 5-5-1980, its chapters are not canceled. Canceled by DOE O 5480.1B

1981-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

405

Protecting waters of recreational and ecological significance: an analysis of state practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and other chemicals continue to be dumped into our nation's waters each day (National Geographic, 1993). This fact affects us directly through our utilization of water for recreational purposes. We need to be able to catch and potentially eat fish without... aquatic ecosystem. In a sense, any human activity that would lower the water quality of a designated ONRW for the long-term is not permitted. This protection extends to areas upstream from the ONRW, in a sense if logging, mining, or other human...

Darrow, Jeff T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Development of a Habitat Suitability Index Model for the Sage Sparrow on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mitigation threshold guidelines for the Hanford Site are based on habitat requirements of the sage sparrow (Amphispiza belli) and only apply to areas with a mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) overstory and a native understory. The sage sparrow habitat requirements are based on literature values and are not specific to the Hanford Site. To refine these guidelines for the Site, a multi-year study was undertaken to quantify habitat characteristics of sage sparrow territories. These characteristics were then used to develop a habitat suitability index (HSI) model which can be used to estimate the habitat value of specific locations on the Site.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Simmons, Mary Ann; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Becker, James M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Natural Resources Protection Act (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Maine's Department of Environmental Protection requires permits for most activities that occur in a protected natural resource area or adjacent to water resources such as rivers or wetlands. An ...

408

Environmental Protection and Natural Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

59 Stat. 1219. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).1992. Integrated Environmental Plan for the Mexican-U.S.EPA, A92-171.toc. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (

Snchez-Rodrguez, Roberto; Mumme, Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Protected Water Area System (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Natural Resource Commission maintains a state plan for the design and establishment of a protected water area system and those adjacent lands needed to protect the integrity of that system. A...

410

Unequal Error Protection Turbo Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unequal Error Protection Turbo Codes Diploma Thesis Neele von Deetzen Arbeitsbereich Nachrichtentechnik School of Engineering and Science Bremen, February 28th, 2005 #12;Unequal Error Protection Turbo Convolutional Codes / Turbo Codes 18 3.1 Structure

Henkel, Werner

411

Natural Resources Environmental Protection Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-term Trend in Cs-137 Average On and Near Off-site Sampling Deer Sampling ­ 12 on-site, 5 off-site samplesCi/g, wet weight, from sample just off the south boundary. ­ Ten-year trend for on and near off-site samplesCi/g, dry weight (background) Aquatic Sampling - Surveillance ­ On- and Off-site fish sampling indicated

Homes, Christopher C.

412

Habitat reclamation plan to mitigate for the loss of habitat due to oil and gas production activities under maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities associated with oil and gas development under the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) from 1975 to 2025 will disturb approximately 3,354 acres. Based on 1976 aerial photographs and using a dot grid methodology, the amount of land disturbed prior to MER is estimated to be 3,603 acres. Disturbances on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) were mapped using 1988 aerial photography and a geographical information system. A total of 6,079 acres were classified as disturbed as of June, 1988. The overall objective of this document is to provide specific information relating to the on-site habitat restoration program at NPRC. The specific objectives, which relate to the terms and conditions that must be met by DOE as a means of protecting the San Joaquin kit fox from incidental take are to: (1) determine the amount and location of disturbed lands on NPR-1 and the number of acres disturbed as a result of MER activities, (2) develop a long term (10 year) program to restore an equivalent on-site acres to that lost from prior project-related actions, and (3) examine alternative means to offset kit fox habitat loss.

Anderson, D.C.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Demonstration Dock Designed to Benefit Eelgrass Habitat Restoration (Washington)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The derelict Thomas Oil Dock on state tidelands in Port Townsend, Washington, was redesigned for the Northwest Maritime Center by a committee including marine scientists, architects, engineers, educators, regulators, and user groups. The committee's objectives were to create a ''demonstration dock'' using the best-available technologies and design features to restore nearshore habitat functions, particularly for threatened fisheries resources, while accommodating the unique requirements of the educational facility to house vessels ranging from historic tall ships to sea kayaks. A key nearshore habitat restoration goal was to reduce fragmentation of eelgrass where shade from the existing dock inhibited growth, by improving conditions with a new dock design and transplanting eelgrass to connect existing patches. Ecological conditions were evaluated through diver surveys; mapping existing eelgrass, macroalgae, and substrates; and review of controlling factors. Data on the attenuation an d diffusion of photosynthetically-active radiation (PAR) was collected and evaluated relative to eelgrass light requirements. Potential shade impacts of existing and alternative dock designs and materials were modeled. Key design features to improve habitat functions included the installation of reflective material under the dock to increase the incidence of PAR at the substrate level, reduction in the number of piles and associated shade impacts through the use of steel piles instead of wood, increase in the length of the trestle to 286 to move the greatest area of overwater structure beyond the range of eelgrass, and the use of grating in strategic locations to reduce the potential of a light/dark barrier to fish passage.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Gayaldo, Perry F.; Curtis, Craig A.; Court, Brian L.; Pierce, David M.; Robison, David S.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Evaluating stream habitat using a 2D hydraulic model Supervisor: Dr Rhian Thomas (Rhian.thomas@glasgow.ac.uk)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

including pearl fishing, industrial and agricultural pollution, siltation, physical riverbed habitat of habitat restorations, such as the construction of habitat enhancement measures and the removal of past in meters, depth and substrate data, and the construction of habitat suitability curves for Atlantic salmon

Guo, Zaoyang

416

Designing radiation protection signs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Entry into hazardous areas without the proper protective equipment is extremely dangerous and must be prevented whenever possible. Current postings of radiological hazards at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) do not incorporate recent findings concerning effective warning presentation. Warning information should be highly visible, quickly, and easily understood. While continuing to comply with industry standards (e.g., Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines), these findings can be incorporated into existing radiological sign design, making them more effective in terms of usability and compliance. Suggestions are provided for designing more effective postings within stated guidelines.

Rodriguez, M.A.; Richey, C.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Income Protection (IP) Insurance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the daily futures market closing prices for the insured crop prior to the sales closing date and during harvest. IP uses the Group Risk Plan?s (GRP) county yield index to adjust IP premium rates. The insurance is provided for an enter- prise unit... equals 27.5 percent of the approved yield times 100 percent of the projected price. An insured?s total guaranteed dollar amount of protection is the net acres of the insured crop (acres times share) in the county multiplied by the IP dollar guaran- tee...

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

418

Protecting your personal information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16HamadaBaO/Al2O3Protecting Lab land and

419

Aquatic toxicity information on VAX VMS backup (ACQUIRE for VMS). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of Acquire is to provide scientists and managers quick access to a comprehensive, systematic, computerized compilation of aquatic toxicity data. Scientific papers published both nationally and internationally on the toxicity of chemicals to aquatic organisms and plants are collected and reviewed for ACQUIRE. Independently compiled data files that meet ACQUIRE parameter and quality assurance criteria are also included. Selected toxicity test results and related testing information for any individual chemical from laboratory and field aquatic toxicity effects are included for tests with freshwater and marine organisms. The total number of data records in ACQUIRE is now over 105,300. This includes data from 6000 references, for 5200 chemicals and 2400 test species. A major data file, Acute Toxicity of Organic Chemicals (ATOC), has been incorporated into ACQUIRE. The ATOC file contains laboratory acute test data on 525 organic chemicals using juvenile fathead minnows.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the 2010 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) project EST-P-09-1, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, and known as the 'Salmon Benefits' study. The primary goal of the study is to establish scientific methods to quantify habitat restoration benefits to listed salmon and trout in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) in three required areas: habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival (Figure ES.1). The general study approach was to first evaluate the state of the science regarding the ability to quantify benefits to listed salmon and trout from habitat restoration actions in the LCRE in the 2009 project year, and then, if feasible, in subsequent project years to develop quantitative indices of habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival. Based on the 2009 literature review, the following definitions are used in this study. Habitat connectivity is defined as a landscape descriptor concerning the ability of organisms to move among habitat patches, including the spatial arrangement of habitats (structural connectivity) and how the perception and behavior of salmon affect the potential for movement among habitats (functional connectivity). Life history is defined as the combination of traits exhibited by an organism throughout its life cycle, and for the purposes of this investigation, a life history strategy refers to the body size and temporal patterns of estuarine usage exhibited by migrating juvenile salmon. Survival is defined as the probability of fish remaining alive over a defined amount of space and/or time. The objectives of the 4-year study are as follows: (1) develop and test a quantitative index of juvenile salmon habitat connectivity in the LCRE incorporating structural, functional, and hydrologic components; (2) develop and test a quantitative index of the early life history diversity of juvenile salmon in the LCRE; (3) assess and, if feasible, develop and test a quantitative index of the survival benefits of tidal wetland habitat restoration (hydrologic reconnection) in the LCRE; and (4) synthesize the results of investigations into the indices for habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival benefits.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, J. R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ostrand, Kenneth G.; Hanson, Kyle C.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Donley, Erin E.; Ke, Yinghai; Buenau, Kate E.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Townsend, Richard L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency...

422

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: (1) procurement of one access easement with a private landowner, (2) design, layout, and implementation of 3.36 miles of instream structure maintenance, (3) inspection and routine maintenance of 15.1 miles of fence, (4) revegetation along 3.36 miles of stream, (5) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, (6) extensive interagency coordination, and (7) environmental education activities with local high school students.

Bailey, Timothy D.; Laws, Troy S. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Evaluation of development of wild turkey habitat in New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hebeet L, 8yiaer 9eheittad to the Qxadaate whoa], of tha Agrtealtersl aad Roahaeieal Collage af Teaa? ie $Nthial fluff llllwet af tha ~aiJAsoet& feF tho 60~ of J ?eaarg, l958 Rior Sab)eats Wildlife Raeegesaet RFALUATION OF DEFHLORKNT OF NLD... TUHKZI HABITAT IH IE? RZCLCO Robert L. Spioer Approved ae to etFle and oontent bye Chalrjman of Coea1. ttee Head of or Stadent, Achrlsor Panner' p l$$S 'This studP was a pro)est of tho Federal kid Division of tho New Xoaieo Qaue and Pish...

Spicer, Robert L

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Aquatic Vertebrate Assemblages in the Middle Trinity River Basin, with Emphasis on Turtles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between the two study sites, turtle species richness decreased, whereas habitat overlap between species increased. I analyzed the capture efficiency of 7 trap types used throughout the course of this project and found that effectiveness of each trap type...

Riedle, Jimmy

2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

425

Walla Walla Subbasin DRAFT Aquatic RM&E Plan Prepared by: CTUIR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an interim set of guidelines that will assure a systematic approach to directing and funding RME. Further as a reliable measure of habitat and population response to recovery actions taken in the Walla Walla subbasin

426

Design and performance of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center photovoltaic system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A building-integrated DC PV array has been constructed on the Georgia Tech campus. The array is mounted on the roof of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center (GTAC), site of the aquatic events during the 1996 Paralympic and Olympic Games in Atlanta. At the time of its construction, it was the world`s largest roof-mounted photovoltaic array, comprised of 2,856 modules and rates at 342 kW. This section describes the electrical and physical layout of the PV system, and the associated data acquisition system (DAS) which monitors the performance of the system and collects measurements of several important meteorological parameters.

Rohatgi, A.; Begovic, M.; Long, R.; Ropp, M.; Pregelj, A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Uranium in the Near-shore Aquatic Food Chain: Studies on Periphyton and Asian Clams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The benthic aquatic organisms in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River are the first biological receptors that can be exposed to groundwater contaminants coming from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The primary contaminant of concern in the former nuclear fuels processing area at the Site, known as the 300 Area, is uranium. Currently, there are no national clean up criteria for uranium and ecological receptors. This report summarizes efforts to characterize biological uptake of uranium in the food chain of the benthic aquatic organisms and provide information to be used in future assessments of uranium and the ecosystem.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Miley, Terri B.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Brandt, Charles A.; Napier, Bruce A.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

UGA IACUC Guidelines for the Use of Tricaine Methanesulfonate (MS-222) in Fishes and Other Aquatic Animals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UGA IACUC Guidelines for the Use of Tricaine Methanesulfonate (MS-222) in Fishes and Other Aquatic Animals MS-222 is used for anesthesia and euthanasia of fishes and other aquatic species. See widely between species and is affected by water temperature, hardness, and size of the individual fish

Hall, Daniel

429

A Visual Servoing System for an Aquatic Swimming Robot Junaed Sattar, Philippe Giguere, Gregory Dudek and Chris Prahacs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Visual Servoing System for an Aquatic Swimming Robot Junaed Sattar, Philippe Giguere, Gregory. INTRODUCTION We describe the visually-based servo control of a swim- ming aquatic robot. In recent work we have developed and deployed a swimming robot that uses legged motion to swim and navigate underwater and which

430

Ecology and welfare of aquatic animals in wild capture B. K. Diggles S. J. Cooke J. D. Rose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEWS Ecology and welfare of aquatic animals in wild capture fisheries B. K. Diggles · S. J Freedoms'' approach to animal welfare was originally devised for farmed terrestrial animals, and has been within food production systems. There are now moves towards assessing and addressing aquatic animal

Cooke, Steven J.

431

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into ECO-TEK's Solar Aquatics System (SAS) for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-TEK's Solar Aquatics System (SAS) for the UBC Farm Centre Building Asad Khan Harshanvit Singh Sean Henderson of a project/report". #12; APSC 262 FINAL REPORT An Investigation into ECO-TEK's Solar Aquatics System (SAS) for the UBC Farm Centre Building Asad Khan Harshanvit Singh Sean Henderson Wesley Shuen Tutorial Instructor

432

Survey of protected vascular plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vascular plant surveys were initiated during fiscal year 1992 by the environmentally sensitive areas program to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered (T&E) vascular plant species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). T&E species receive protection under federal and state regulations. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that federally-funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. T&E plant species found on or near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Twenty-eight species identified on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these have been under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing (listed in the formerly-used C2 candidate category). Additional species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR. A range of habitats support the rare taxa on the ORR: river bluffs, sinkholes, calcareous barrens, wetlands, utility corridors, and forests. The list of T&E plant species and their locations on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated. The purpose of this document is to present information on the listed T&E plant species currently known to occur on the ORR as well as listed species potentially occurring on the ORR based on geographic range and habitat availability. For the purpose of this report, {open_quotes}T&E species{close_quotes} include all federal- and state-listed species, including candidates for listing, and species of special concern. Consideration of T&E plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival.

Awl, D.J.; Pounds, L.R.; Rosensteel, B.A.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for thermally protecting heat sensitive components of tools. The apparatus comprises a Dewar for holding the heat sensitive components. The Dewar has spaced-apart inside and outside walls, an open top end and a bottom end. An insulating plug is located in the top end. The inside wall has portions defining an inside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar and the outside wall has portions defining an outside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar. A bottom connector has inside and outside components. The inside component sealably engages the inside wall aperture and the outside component sealably engages the outside wall aperture. The inside component is operatively connected to the heat sensitive components and to the outside component. The connections can be made with optical fibers or with electrically conducting wires.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Moore, Troy K. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Protective link for superconducting coil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

Umans, Stephen D. (Belmont, MA)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

435

Habitat Niche Modeling in the Texas Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum): Applications to Planned Translocation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??I studied translocation of Texas horned lizards on Tinker Air Force Base, Midwest City, Oklahoma, using correlative and mechanistic habitat suitability models. My goals were (more)

Bogosian III, Victor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous fisheries habitat Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Predicting the distribution of anadromous fish in fresh water using habitat models Steve Lindley Summary: 134 Predicting the...

437

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing avian habitat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Texas A&M University, Spatial Sciences Laboratory Collection: Geosciences 5 Assessing Landscape and Habitat Factors at Multiple Scales: What Drives Avian Abundance and Distribution...

438

Habitat types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and plant species of concern  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide a comprehensive source of the best available information on Hanford Site sensitive and critical habitats and plants and animals of importance or special status. In this report, sensitive habitats include areas known to be used by threatened, endangered, or sensitive plant or animal species, wetlands, preserves and refuges, and other sensitive habitats outlined in the Hanford Site Baseline Risk Assessment Methodology. Potentially important species for risk assessment and species of special concern with regard to their status as threatened, endangered, or sensitive are described, and potential habitats for these species identified.

Downs, J.L.; Rickard, W.H.; Brandt, C.A. [and others

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Hunting, Habitat, and Indigenous Settlement Patterns: A Geographic Analysis of Bugl Wildlife Use in Western Panama  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation analyzes indigenous wildlife use from a geographic perspective, focusing on the relationships between hunting, habitat, and settlement patterns. Fieldwork took place among five neighboring communities in ...

Smith, Derek Anthony

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

Protection of Forest Resources (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute addresses the conservation and protection of forest resources by encouraging the use of land management best practices pertaining to soil erosion, timber sale planning, associated road...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Minnesota Peatland Protection Act (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain peatland core areas are designated as scientific and natural areas, and development is restricted. Currently, only two peatlands have been protected: the Pine Creek Peatland in Roseau...

442

Ground Water Protection (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

North Dakota has a degradation prevention program for groundwater protection, with standards established by the Department of Health. This section addresses groundwater standards, quality...

443

Groundwater Protection Plan (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Groundwater Protection Plans (GPPs) are required for all facilities having the potential to impact groundwater. They are preventive maintenance documents that cover all processes and materials at...

444

Classified Matter Protection and Control  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 471.2, which establishes policy for the protection and control of classified and unclassified information. Does not cancel other directives.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

445

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

446

MIE -H&S -08 -Personal Protection Personal Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type of work. Safety glasses 2. Safety boots are optional, except when heavy parts are to be moved or worked on. Open toe shoes must not worn at the work site or in the laboratories. Safety boots 3. GlovesMIE - H&S - 08 - Personal Protection Personal Protection 1. Safety glasses must be worn when any

447

Data Protection Policy Version History Data Protection Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROTECTION POLICY 1. Introduction 1.1 The Data Protection Act 1998 applies to all personal information about state that: 1. Personal data shall be processed fairly and lawfully 2. Personal data shall be obtained incompatible with that purpose or purposes 3. Personal data shall be adequate, relevant and not excessive

Doran, Simon J.

448

EPA's Radiation Protection Standards Protecting the Environment from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cancer. EPA does not regulate naturally occurring radiation or the non-ionizing radiation that is emittedEPA's Radiation Protection Standards Protecting the Environment from Radioactive Materials EPA materials. These radioactive materials emit ionizing radiation, which can damage living tissue and cause

449

International PatentInternational Patent Protection: 1990 -Protection: 1990 -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International PatentInternational Patent Protection: 1990 -Protection: 1990 - 20052005 Measurement and TrendsMeasurement and Trends Patent Strength and Stages of EconomicPatent Strength and Stages of Economic DevelopmentDevelopment #12;I. Measurement & TrendsI. Measurement & Trends Patent Rights Index (0

Lansky, Joshua

450

Optical Delineation of Benthic Habitat Using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve understanding and characterization of coastal regions, there has been an increasing emphasis on autonomous systems that can sample the ocean on relevant scales. Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) with active propulsion are especially well suited for studies of the coastal ocean because they are able to provide systematic and near-synoptic spatial observations. With this capability, science users are beginning to integrate sensor suits for a broad range of specific and often novel applications. Here, the relatively mature Remote Environmental Monitoring Units (REMUS) AUV system is configured with multi-spectral radiometers to delineate benthic habitat in Sequim Bay, WA. The vehicle was deployed in a grid pattern along 5 km of coastline in depths from 30 to less than 2 meters. Similar to satellite and/or aerial remote sensing, the bandwidth ratios from the downward looking radiance sensor and upward looking irradiance sensor were used to identify beds of eelgrass on sub-meter scales. Strong correlations were found between the optical reflectance signals and the geo-referenced in situ data collected with underwater video within the grid. Results demonstrate the ability of AUVs to map littoral habitats at high resolution and highlight the overall utility of the REMUS vehicle for nearshore oceanography.

Moline, Mark A.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Evans, Nathan R.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into a CIRS style Solar Aquatic System at the UBC Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a CIRS style Solar Aquatic System at the UBC Farm Kevin Chow Andrew Fong Ka Fai (Philip) Wong University investigation into a CIRS style Solar Aquatic System at the UBC Farm Submitted by Kevin Chow Andrew Fong Ka Fai;Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impacts of installing a Solar Aquatic System

452

Predicting travel costs for recreational visits at aquatic sites within the Caribbean National Forest using GIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Predicting travel costs for recreational visits at aquatic sites within the Caribbean National at locations in one of three watersheds that originate in the Caribbean Nation Forest to determine the models resources of the Caribbean National Forest while enhancing recreational opportunities. Keywords: Puerto Rico

453

228 USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-114. 2003 Part 5: Historical Aquatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FrontRangearedammedanddiverted to provide water to the surrounding regions, and they are constricted by roads and railroads, stocked with fish, polluted by mining wastes and urban runoff. Yet many of the people who visit the Front Range trade; and (3) from 1859 to 2002 during which more extensive and complex changes occurred in the aquatic

454

14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ ) = the incident solar irradiance in relative energy units; F = factor modifying that flux as a function of ozone14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems Warwick F in these ecosystems may also be more vulnerable to UV toxicity because of the inhibiting effects of cold tempera

Vincent, Warwick F.

455

Project 35013 Species-and Site-specific Impacts of Gas Supersaturation on Aquatic Animals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

three species tend to be bottom oriented and deep water species, and most TDG effects are in the upperProject 35013 Species- and Site-specific Impacts of Gas Supersaturation on Aquatic Animals Sponsor in the river?" The proposal was submitted primarily at the request of the state water quality agencies

456

Aquatic Mammals 2003, 29.2, 202213 Acoustic communication ranges for northern elephant seals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Mammals 2003, 29.2, 202­213 Acoustic communication ranges for northern elephant seals communication range estimates for four northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) vocalization types and lower limit of auditory lter widths for the northern elephant seal auditory system. Signal de- tection

Reichmuth, Colleen

457

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology berlandstrasse 133  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Eawag ?berlandstrasse 133 P.O. Box in Sustainable Water Resources Management Pradeep Aggarwal International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna will discuss the IAEA's programme which develops and helps apply isotope techniques for used to build

Wehrli, Bernhard

458

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology berlandstrasse 133  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Eawag ?berlandstrasse 133 P.O. Box, and derive carbon and energy from the plant photosynthate flux, and extract mineral elements from soil agents, driven by the carbon flux from their plant hosts. [1] Taylor L.L., Leake J.R., Quirk J., Hardy K

Wehrli, Bernhard

459

Use of Benthic Macroinvertebrate Indices to Assess Aquatic Health in a Mixed-Landuse Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

degradation from storm water runoff and point source discharges (Plafkin et al. 1989), and indicating stream assemblage health in this study were: richness, percent model affinity, family-level biotic index). Urbanization frequently impacts aquatic ecosystems through increases in nonpoint source pollutants

Pennuto, Chris

460

03/0924 1 st INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON THE USE OF AQUATIC MACROPKYTES FOR WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filters (RBF). "Rustic" and rather simple wastewater treatment systems for such small communities in rural03/0924 1 st INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON THE USE OF AQUATIC MACROPKYTES FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS £-10 CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT : THE FRENCH EXPERIENCE Catherine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Emerging contaminants in wastewater and river water: Risks for human water security and aquatic ecosystem sustainability?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emerging contaminants in wastewater and river water: Risks for human water security and aquatic and Environmental Science (BRGM), Orléans, France ; 2 National Research Institute for Rural Engineering, Water systems. Since degradation rates in conventional sewage treatment plants (STP) are rather low, ECs enter

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

462

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Factsheet: Hydropower and ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Factsheet: Hydropower and ecology to gross final energy consumption is only about 2% ­ hydropower plays a vital role. This is largely due be stored in reservoirs. Hydropower supplies around 56% of Switzerland's electricity needs. Worldwide

Wehrli, Bernhard

463

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2013 AQUATIC WEED CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Replacement stocking of grass carp is necessary when fish are lost. A permit is required to stock grass carp of Natural Resources (SC DNR) now requires a free of charge permit prior to stocking tilapia and triploid grass carp for aquatic weed control in SC. A permit can be obtained from SC DNR at 803-734-3891 or from

Stuart, Steven J.

464

Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725) Fall 2006 will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of invasion ecology and will emphasize aspects related will be presented the ecological concepts and debates underlying this developing field; the biology and life history

Watson, Craig A.

465

Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Electricity consumption in the public  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the public municipal sector (rough estimates, 1995) 4 Factsheet: Water and energy This information sheet inhabitant (around 3 watts, based on household consumption). · In the public municipal sector, water suppliesEawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Electricity consumption

Wehrli, Bernhard

466

Effectiveness of Mechanical Aerationin Floating Aquatic Macrophyte-Based Wastewater Treatment Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effectiveness of Mechanical Aerationin Floating Aquatic Macrophyte-Based Wastewater Treatment to evaluate its effect on wastewater treatment effi- ciency andplantgrowth. Light aeration (0.003 and0.021Lnr2 tanks. Heavy aeration (1.03 and 3.53 L nr2 min-1 ) raised wastewater dissolved oxygen(DO) concentrations

Florida, University of

467

NREL Fall 2013 Seminar Series "Using Aquatic Ecosystem Science to Inform Freshwater Resource Use and Sustainability"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affected by the combination of physical, biological and chemical transformations within aquatic ecosystems Freshwater Ecosystems" Dec 6 Ted Stets, US Geological Survey Title: "Century of Trends: Historical Perspectives on the Evolution of Water Quality in the US" Dec 13 Brian Bledsoe, CSU's Department of Civil

MacDonald, Lee

468

Warming, eutrophication, and predator loss amplify subsidies between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Canada, Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada predators on the flux of biomass between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. We demonstrated that predatory., 2009), and also become detri- tus inputs that supply carbon and nitrogen to terrestrial plants (Gratton

Palen, Wendy J.

469

A Beginner's Guide to Water Management--Aquatic Plants in Florida Lakes1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CIR 111 A Beginner's Guide to Water Management--Aquatic Plants in Florida Lakes1 Florida LAKEWATCH2 to familiarizing citizens with the language and techniques used by those involved in water management within and Conservation. LAKEWATCH facilitates public involvement in the management of Florida waters by training citizen

Watson, Craig A.

470

Aquatic Botany 69 (2001) 89108 Geographic variation in growth responses in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Botany 69 (2001) 89­108 Geographic variation in growth responses in Phragmites australis of Botany (CAS), Dukelská 145, CZ-37982 Trebon, Czech Republic Abstract Phragmites australis; Flowering time; Morphology; Biomass allocation; Phragmites australis 1. Introduction Along a latitudinal

Brix, Hans

471

Aquatic Botany 64 (1999) 303315 Organic acids in the sediments of wetlands dominated by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of lower organic acids in the sediments of stands of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. were Large-scale decline of the common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud.) in European waterAquatic Botany 64 (1999) 303­315 Organic acids in the sediments of wetlands dominated by Phragmites

Brix, Hans

472

Aquatic Botany 69 (2001) 313324 Are Phragmites-dominated wetlands a net source or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, P.O. Box 8602, Riccarton, Christchurch, New Zealand Abstract Phragmites australis wetlands act.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Carbon cycling; Gas transport; Methane emission; Phragmites australisAquatic Botany 69 (2001) 313­324 Are Phragmites-dominated wetlands a net source or net sink

Brix, Hans

473

MASTER THESIS IN AQUATIC PHOTOCHEMISTRY Sunlight-induced carbon dioxide emissions from lakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MASTER THESIS IN AQUATIC PHOTOCHEMISTRY Sunlight-induced carbon dioxide emissions from lakes The emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from inland waters are substantial on a global scale. Yet, the fundamental question remains open which proportion of these CO2 emissions is induced by sunlight via photochemical

Uppsala Universitet

474

Environmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

linked with gas transfer. Microbreaking, or the breakdown of small-scale waves that do not entrain airEnvironmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems; accepted 5 April 2007; published 17 May 2007. [1] Air-water gas transfer influences CO2 and other

Ho, David

475

Groundwater protection management program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a groundwater protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable Federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office has prepared a ``Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan`` (groundwater protection plan) of sufficient scope and detail to reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter 3, for special program planning. The groundwater protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor groundwater resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies project technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA groundwater protection management program. In addition, the groundwater protection plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA sites (long-term care at disposal sites and groundwater restoration at processing sites). This plan will be reviewed annually and updated every 3 years in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Adaptive protection algorithm and system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An adaptive protection algorithm and system for protecting electrical distribution systems traces the flow of power through a distribution system, assigns a value (or rank) to each circuit breaker in the system and then determines the appropriate trip set points based on the assigned rank.

Hedrick, Paul (Pittsburgh, PA) [Pittsburgh, PA; Toms, Helen L. (Irwin, PA) [Irwin, PA; Miller, Roger M. (Mars, PA) [Mars, PA

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

477

Protecting Your Hands and Feet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protecting Your Hands and Feet Treating Feet Though foot skin is similar to hand skin, the problem gardeners usually have to deal with on their feet is wetness. Proper footwear is the best protection. Look powder will also help. Dust feet, not the floor or carpet, by putting your foot in a paper bag before

Liskiewicz, Maciej

478

Corrosion protection for silver reflectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of protecting silver reflectors from damage caused by contact with gaseous substances which are often present in the atmosphere and a silver reflector which is so protected. The inventive method comprises at least partially coating a reflector with a metal oxide such as aluminum oxide to a thickness of 15 .ANG. or less.

Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Scott, Marion L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

FOOD, ACTIVITY, AND HABITAT OF THREE "PICKERTYPE" MICROCARNIVOROUS FISHES IN THE KELP FORESTS OFF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOOD, ACTIVITY, AND HABITAT OF THREE "PICKER·TYPE" MICROCARNIVOROUS FISHES IN THE KELP FORESTS OFF, and habitat preference were compared between the kelp perch, Brachyistius frenatus; the sefiorita, Oxyjulis californica; and the white seaperch, Phanerodonfurcatus, all of which co-occur in areas of reef and kelp off

480

Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Review of Hydraulic;Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Name PHABSIM Spatial scale and Observations on Flow Determination in New Zealand Regulated Streams: Advances in Ecology. Plenum Press, New

Tullos, Desiree

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aquatic habitat protection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is an urgent need to capture metadata on the rapidly growing number of genomic, metagenomic and related sequences, such as 16S ribosomal genes. This need is a major focus within the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), and Habitat is a key metadata descriptor in the proposed 'Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) specification. The goal of the work described here is to provide a light-weight, easy-to-use (small) set of terms ('Habitat-Lite') that captures high-level information about habitat while preserving a mapping to the recently launched Environment Ontology (EnvO). Our motivation for building Habitat-Lite is to meet the needs of multiple users, such as annotators curating these data, database providers hosting the data, and biologists and bioinformaticians alike who need to search and employ such data in comparative analyses. Here, we report a case study based on semi-automated identification of terms from GenBank and GOLD. We estimate that the terms in the initial version of Habitat-Lite would provide useful labels for over 60% of the kinds of information found in the GenBank isolation-source field, and around 85% of the terms in the GOLD habitat field. We present a revised version of Habitat-Lite and invite the community's feedback on its further development in order to provide a minimum list of terms to capture high-level habitat information and to provide classification bins needed for future studies.

Kyrpides, Nikos; Hirschman, Lynette; Clark, Cheryl; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Mardis, Scott; Luciano, Joanne; Kottmann, Renzo; Cole, James; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Field, Dawn

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Sediment Quality Triad Assessment in Kachemak Bay: Characterization of Soft Bottom Benthic Habitats and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment Quality Triad Assessment in Kachemak Bay: Characterization of Soft Bottom Benthic Habitats. Sediment Quality Triad Assessment in Kachemak Bay: Characterization of Soft Bottom Benthic Habitats and Contaminant Bioeffects Assessment. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 104. 170pp. #12;iii Sediment Quality

483

HABITAT SELECTION OF A LARGE HERBIVORE AT HIGH DENSITY AND WITHOUT PREDATION: TRADE-OFF BETWEEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

summer home ranges and core areas. We sampled vegetation in the core areas and in the rest of the home habitat patches over forested ones, suggesting that they adopted a foraging strategy favoring energy of habitat selection demonstrate that herbivores can adjust their behavior to other limiting factors when

Laval, Université

484

Habitat loss and the disassembly of mutalistic networks Miguel A. Fortuna, Abhay Krishna and Jordi Bascompte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

938 Habitat loss and the disassembly of mutalistic networks Miguel A. Fortuna, Abhay Krishna and Jordi Bascompte M. A. Fortuna (fortuna@ebd.csic.es), A. Krishna and J. Bascompte, Integrative Ecology for their robustness to habitat loss, Fortuna and Bascompte (2006) analyzed a spatially implicit meta-community model

Fortuna, Miguel A.

485

Habitat for Humanity: La Grange, Georgia, 2003 Jimmy Carter Work Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Troup-Chambers Habitat for Humanity built a Habitat house to ENERGY STAR standards in LaGrange, Georgia, in 2003. The project was so successfully that all Troup-Chambers houses will now be built to ENERGY STAR standards.

Not Available

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Stream habitat and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) physiological stress responses to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stream habitat and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) physiological stress responses to streamside and sedimentation, loss of habitat complexity) are potentially stressful to stream-dwelling fish. We examined stream Columbia using 15 streams divided into three categories: old growth (reference), recently logged (clear

Hinch, Scott G.

487

Nest-Site Habitat of Cavity-Nesting Birds at the San Joaquin Experimental Range1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

279 Nest-Site Habitat of Cavity-Nesting Birds at the San Joaquin Experimental Range1 Kathryn L. Purcell2 and Jared Verner2 Abstract Detailed information about the nesting habitats of birds, including those needed for successful nesting, can provide a better understanding of the ecological factors

Standiford, Richard B.

488

Multiscale Sagebrush Rangeland Habitat Modeling in the Gunnison Basin of Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiscale Sagebrush Rangeland Habitat Modeling in the Gunnison Basin of Colorado Open-File Report" in Gunnison Basin, Colorado, 2007 (photograph by Lorie Brummer, U.S. Geological Survey). #12;Multiscale Sagebrush Rangeland Habitat Modeling in the Gunnison Basin of Colorado By Collin G. Homer, Cameron L

Aldridge, Cameron

489

Habitat Use and Movements of Adult White Bass in Lake Poinsett  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.. SOUTH DAKOTA c ) o o o Habitat Use and Movements of Adult White Bass in Lake Poinsett South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks Wildlife Division Joe Foss Building Pierre, South Dakota 57501-3182 Completion Report No. 99-15 #12;,-. ...., (""l r" rm Habitat Use and Movements ofAdult White Bass in Lake

490

Effects of piscivore-mediated habitat use on growth, diet and zooplankton consumption of roach: an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of piscivore-mediated habitat use on growth, diet and zooplankton consumption of roach, Limnological Institute, Konstanz, Germany SUMMARY 1. We used an individual based modelling approach for roach; (ii) analyse the relevance of these habitat shifts for the diet, activity costs and growth of roach

491

FISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) from a natal stream and is applied as a case study in California's Shasta River. Restoration activitiesFISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa * and J. R. LUNDb restoration alternatives for improving fish habitat by evaluating tradeoffs between fish production

Pasternack, Gregory B.

492

Contrasting bee foraging in response to resource scale and local habitat management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mexico, we investigated the influence of coffee floral resource levels and habitat management on native of environmental cues in order to conserve energy and maximize resource acquisition. Because most habitats have is provisioned to offspring and the latter of which is mostly consumed by bees in order to sustain their high

493

The Potential Impacts of OTEC Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a marine renewable energy technology with the potential to contribute significantly to the baseload power needs of tropical island communities and remote U.S. military installations. As with other renewable energy technologies, however, there are potential challenges to its commercialization: technological, financial, social, and environmental. Given the large volumes of seawater required to drive the electricity-producing cycle, there is potential for the intakes to negatively impact the marine resources of the source waterbody through the impingement and entrainment of marine organisms. The goal of this project was to identify feasible warm water intake designs for a land-based OTEC facility proposed for development in Port Allen, Kauai and to characterize the populations of ichthyoplankton near the proposed warm water intake location that could be at risk of entrainment. The specific objectives of this project were to: Complete a site-specific assessment of available and feasible warm water intake technologies to determine the best intake designs for minimizing impacts to aquatic organisms at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Complete a field sampling program to collect biological data to characterize the baseline populations of ichthyoplankton near the sites being considered for the warm water intake at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Various intake design options are presented with the focus on providing adequate environmental protection to the local ichthyoplankton population while providing an economically viable intake option to the OTEC developer. Further definition by NOAA and other environmental regulators is required to further refine the designs presented to meet all US regulations for future OTEC development.

Oney, Stephen K. [OTE Corporation; Hogan, Timothy [Alden Research Laboratory; Steinbeck, John [Tenera Environmental

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

494

Wigwam River Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program : 2000 Data Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wigwam River bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat monitoring program is a trans-boundary initiative implemented by the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks (MOE), in cooperation with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The Wigwam River is an important fisheries stream located in southeastern British Columbia that supports healthy populations of both bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout (Figure 1.1). This river has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning stream in the Kootenay Region (Baxter and Westover 2000, Cope 1998). In addition, the Wigwam River supports some of the largest Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) in the Kootenay Region. These fish are highly sought after by anglers (Westover 1999a, 1999b). Bull trout populations have declined in many areas of their range within Montana and throughout the northwest including British Columbia. Bull trout were blue listed as vulnerable in British Columbia by the B.C. Conservation Data Center (Cannings 1993) and although there are many healthy populations of bull trout in the East Kootenays they remain a species of special concern. Bull trout in the United States portion of the Columbia River were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The upper Kootenay River is within the Kootenai sub-basin of the Mountain Columbia Province, one of the eleven Eco-provinces that make up the Columbia River Basin. MOE applied for and received funding from BPA to assess and monitor the status of wild, native stocks of bull trout in tributaries to Lake Koocanusa (Libby Reservoir) and the upper Kootenay River. This task is one of many that was undertaken to ''Monitor and Protect Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir'' (BPA Project Number 2000-04-00).

Cope, R.S.; Morris, K.J.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Effects of Habitat Characteristics on Occupancy and Productivity of a Forest-Dependent Songbird in an Urban Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determined minimum patch-size thresholds for productivity measurements, and also monitored effects on productivity from canopy cover, woodland composition, distance to and size of the nearest habitat patch, and distance to the nearest habitat patch >100 ha. I...

Robinson, Dianne Hali

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

496

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

Rissman, Adena

497

Systematic review of the influence of foraging habitat on red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relationships between foraging habitat and reproductive success provide compelling evidence of the contribution of specific vegetative features to foraging habitat quality, a potentially limiting factor for many animal populations. For example, foraging habitat quality likely will gain importance in the recovery of the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis (RCW) in the USA as immediate nesting constraints are mitigated. Several researchers have characterized resource selection by foraging RCWs, but emerging research linking reproductive success (e.g. clutch size, nestling and fledgling production, and group size) and foraging habitat features has yet to be synthesized. Therefore, we reviewed peer-refereed scientific literature and technical resources (e.g. books, symposia proceedings, and technical reports) that examined RCW foraging ecology, foraging habitat, or demography to evaluate evidence for effects of the key foraging habitat features described in the species recovery plan on group reproductive success. Fitness-based habitat models suggest foraging habitat with low to intermediate pine Pinus spp. densities, presence of large and old pines, minimal midstory development, and herbaceous groundcover support more productive RCW groups. However, the relationships between some foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success are not well supported by empirical data. In addition, few regression models account for > 30% of variation in reproductive success, and unstandardized multiple and simple linear regression coefficient estimates typically range from -0.100 to 0.100, suggesting ancillary variables and perhaps indirect mechanisms influence reproductive success. These findings suggest additional research is needed to address uncertainty in relationships between foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success and in the mechanisms underlying those relationships.

Garabedian, James E. [North Carolina State University

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Protection Program Operations (11-18-10)  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This new Order will combine the current requirements of DOE Manuals 470.4-2A, Physical Protection; M 470.4-3A, Protective Force; and 470.4-8, Federal Protective Force, into a single consolidated, streamlined Order.

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

499

Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Coal Bed Methane Protection Act establishes a long-term coal bed methane protection account and a coal bed methane protection program for the purpose of compensating private landowners and...

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Caves contain unique habitats populated by specialized, endemic invertebrates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pro- duced only 2% of the speci- mens, but 30% of the species identi- fied. Future stud- ies ranked as rare at the state level (i.e., S1­S2). For some species, this ranking may reflect incomplete. Based on the observed diversity and endemicity, we determined that protecting six of the eight caves

Taylor, Steven J.