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1

X-ray optics developments at the APS for third-generation synchrotron radiation sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High brilliance third-generation synchrotron radiation sources simultaneously provide both a need and an opportunity for the development of new x-ray optical components. The high power and power densities of the x-ray beams produced by insertion devices have forced researchers to consider novel, and what may seem like exotic, approaches to the mitigation of thermal distortions that can dilute the beam brilliance delivered to the experiment or next optical component. Once the power has been filtered by such high heat load optical elements, specialized components can be employed that take advantage of the high degree of brilliance. This presentation reviews the performance of optical components that have been designed, fabricated, and tested at the Advanced Photon Source, starting with high heat load components and followed by examples of several specialized devices such as a milli-eV resolution (in-line) monochromator, a high energy x-ray phase retarder, and a phase zone plate with submicron focusing capability.

Mills, D.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Producing X-rays at the APS  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

None

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

3

X-ray lithography source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

X-ray lithography source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Miniature x-ray source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Miniature x-ray source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Compact x-ray source and panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

8

Focused X-ray source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2AP-XPSAPS50 -Issue 60 (2.19)1DCS and APS

10

Tunable X-ray source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

11

APS Bending Magnet X-rays and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2AP-XPS MeasuresIrradiation of Nd-Fe-B

12

Ultrafast X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy using Laser-Driven Electron X-ray Sources (LEXS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ultrafast x-rays, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, terawatt lasers, ultrafast reaction dynamics, atomic motion atomic motion by scrutinizing the changes in x- ray absorption spectra during reactions. FirstUltrafast X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy using Laser-Driven Electron X-ray Sources (LEXS) Guangjun

Guo, Ting

13

X-ray source populations in galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Today's sensitive, high-resolution X-ray observations allow the study of populations of X-ray sources, in the luminosity range of Galactic X-ray binaries, in galaxies as distant as 20-30 Mpc. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, providing a direct probe of the evolved binary component of different stellar populations. The study of the X-ray populations of E and S0 galaxies has revamped the debate on the formation and evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and on the role of globular clusters in these processes. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar populations, the amount of sources in star forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Short-lived, luminous, high-mass binaries (HMXBs) dominate these young populations. The most luminous sources in these systems are the debated ULXs, which have been suggested to be ~100-1000 Msol black holes, but could alternatively include a number of binaries with stellar mass black holes. Very soft sources have also been discovered in many galaxies and their nature is currently being debated. Observations of the deep X-ray sky, and comparison with deep optical surveys, are providing the first evidence of the X-ray evolution of galaxies.

G. Fabbiano

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

X-ray source for mammography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

X-ray source for mammography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

Logan, C.M.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ultraluminous X-ray Sources: The most extreme X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Ultraluminous X-ray Sources: The most extreme X-ray binaries Luca Zampieri INAF ULXs ­ Lubiana ­ May 11, 2012- LZ #12;6 · X-ray observations of nearby galaxies show a population of pointlike, off-nuclear sources with L >> Ledd for 1 Msun (L>1.0e39 erg/s) UltraLuminous X-ray Sources (e

?umer, Slobodan

20

Catalog of supersoft X-ray sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This catalog comprises an up-to-date (December 1999) list of luminous (>10^36 erg/s), binary supersoft X-ray sources. This electronic version (including the accompannying Web-pages) supersedes the printed version of Greiner (1996).

J. Greiner

2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

APS Upgrade | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

APS View Larger The brightness and energy of x-ray beams are critical properties for research. Higher brightness means more x-rays can be focused onto a smaller, laser-like spot,...

22

Novel X-Ray Imaging Opportunities for the RPI Linear Accelerator's Tunable, Quasi-monochromatic X-ray Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel X-Ray Imaging Opportunities for the RPI Linear Accelerator's Tunable, Quasi-monochromatic X-ray of an intense, tunable, polarized, and quasi-monochromatic X-ray source has been ongoing at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute since 2001 [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. This X-ray source, known as Parametric X-rays (PXR

Danon, Yaron

23

Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATIONS CONSTITUTING THE GALACTIC RIDGE X-RAY EMISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe K{alpha} emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

Morihana, Kumiko [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Yoshida, Tessei, E-mail: morihana@crab.riken.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

25

X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A laser triggered vacuum spark x-ray lithography source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ionized state or the physical processes occurring 15 in a high temperature plasma. There are many advantages to the use of the vacuum spark as an x-ray source; the simplicity of the machine is one. The x-ray output is within the range usable for x-ray... spark apparatus ha- been studied here to determine its applicability to x-ray lithography. A capacitor which stored approximately 3 KJ supplied most of the energy for the plasma. A Nd-YAG laser was used to supply electrons and metallic atoms...

Keating, Richard Allen

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Laser Copper Plasma X-ray Source Debris Characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Copper Plasma X-ray Source Debris Characterization A Thesis Presented by David Hurley 3, 2007 Vice President for Research and Dean of Graduate studies #12;Abstract Laser copper plasma for x-ray lithography. Copper debris in the form of vapor, ions, dust, and high-speed particles

Huston, Dryver R.

28

X-Ray Source Based on the Parametric X-Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prospects of parametric x-rays (PXR) application for the development of a tuneable quasi-monochromatic x-ray source for medical imaging are discussed. Analysis of basic requirements for electron accelerator shows that it must be relatively low-energy and high-current linac. In comparison with known ultra-relativistic cases, at low energies PXR properties will be modified to a great extent by multiple scattering of the electrons. PXR intensity dependence on target thickness and beam energy are calculated taking multiple scattering into account. It is concluded that PXR source based on real medical accelerators is feasible and can provide x-ray flux needful for obtaining high quality medical images.

Alexander Lobko; Olga Lugovskaya

2005-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

29

New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

Roger Falcone

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

30

Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Langeveld, Willem G. J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., 520 Almanor Ave. Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Hernandez, Michael [XScell corp., 2134 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

31

Optimized Volumetric Scanning for X-Ray Array Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) is the science and technology of determining non-invasively the internal structure of manufactured parts, objects, and materials. NDE application areas include medicine, industrial manufacturing, military, homeland security, and airport luggage screening. X-ray measurement systems are most widely used because of their ability to image through a wide range of material densities (from human tissue in medical applications to the dense materials of weapon components). Traditional x-ray systems involve a single source and detector system that rotate and/or translate about the object under evaluation. At each angular location, the source projects x-rays through the object. The rays undergo attenuation proportional to the density of the object's constitutive material. The detector records a measure of the attenuation. Mathematical algorithms are used to invert the forward attenuated ray projection process to form images of the object. This is known as computed tomography (CT). In recent years, the single-source x-ray NDE systems have been generalized to arrays of x-ray sources. Array sources permit multiple views of the object with fewer rotations and translations of the source/detector system. The spatially diverse nature of x-ray array sources has the potential of reducing data collection time, reducing imaging artifacts, and increasing the resolution of the resultant images. Most of the existing CT algorithms were not derived from array source models with a spatially diverse set of viewing perspectives. Single-source x-ray CT data collection, processing, and imaging methods and algorithms are not applicable when the source location is expanded from one dimension (a rotating and/or translating point source) to two (a rotating and/or translating array). They must be reformulated. The goal of this project is to determine the applicability of x-ray array sources to problems of interest to LLNL and its customers. It is believed array source data collection will be faster while yielding higher resolution reconstructions with fewer artifacts. There are three tasks in the research: (1) Develop forward array source analytic and computational models; (2) Research and develop array source reconstruction algorithms; and (3) Perform experiments.

Lehman, S K; Foudray, A M; Wang, A; Kallman, J S; Martz, H

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

32

Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray source is disclosed having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events. 5 figs.

Bird, C.R.; Rockett, P.D.

1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Catalog of Luminous Supersoft X-ray Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This catalog comprises an up-to-date list of luminous (>10^36 erg/s) supersoft X-ray sources. We include in this catalog accreting binary sources of high luminosity which are thought to be in a state of (steady or recurrent) hydrogen burning. Since CAL 83, the prototype, is known to have an ionisation nebula, and further supersoft binaries are expected to also have one, we include also sources associated with very luminous planetary nebulae. Not included are PG 1159 stars which reach similar magnitudes but form a rather distinct class. Excluded are also supersoft active galactic nuclei which reach luminosities up to 10^45 erg/s.

J. Greiner

1996-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric x-ray sources Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics 2 X-ray Emission from Massive Stars Summary: of the distribution 12;The Sun is a strong source of x-rays (10-5 of the total energy it emits) It must have...

36

Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in line with those reported for other models for radiology or mammography. Conclusions: A new version of the TASMIP model for the estimation of x-ray spectra in microfocus x-ray sources has been developed and validated experimentally. Similarly to other versions of TASMIP, the estimation of spectra is very simple, involving only the evaluation of polynomial expressions.

Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J., E-mail: juanjose.vaquero@uc3m.es [Departamento de Bioingeniera e Ingeniera Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigacin Sanitaria Gregorio Maran, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Desco, M. [Departamento de Bioingeniera e Ingeniera Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain) [Departamento de Bioingeniera e Ingeniera Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigacin Sanitaria Gregorio Maran, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Centro de Investigacin Biomdica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid ES28029 (Spain)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Probing stellar winds and accretion physics in high-mass X-ray binaries and ultra-luminous X-ray sources with LOFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of high-mass X-ray binaries and ultra-luminous X-ray sources. For a summary, we refer to the paper.

Orlandini, M; Zampieri, L; Bozzo, E; Baykal, A; Blay, P; Chernyakova, M; Corbet, R; D'A, A; Enoto, T; Ferrigno, C; Finger, M; Klochkov, D; Kreykenbohm, I; Inam, S C; Jenke, P; Masetti, N; Manousakis, A; Mihara, T; Paul, B; Postnov, K; Reig, P; Romano, P; Santangelo, A; Shakura, N; Staubert, R; Torrejn, J M; Walter, R; Wilms, J; Wilson-Hodge, C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Chandra X-ray Study of NGC 1068: II. The Luminous X-ray Source Population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of the compact X-ray source population in the Seyfert~2 galaxy NGC 1068, imaged with Chandra. We find a total of 84 compact sources, of which 66 are projected onto the galactic disk of NGC 1068. Spectra of the brightest sources have been modeled with both multi-color disk blackbody and power-law models. The power-law model provides the better description of the spectrum for most of these sources. Five sources have 0.4-8 keV intrinsic luminosities greater than 10^{39} erg/s, assuming that their emission is isotropic and that they are associated with NGC 1068. We refer to these sources as Intermediate Luminosity X-ray Objects (IXOs). If these five sources are X-ray binaries accreting with luminosities that are both sub-Eddington and isotropic, then the implied source masses are >7 solar masses, and so they are inferred to be black holes. The brightest source has a much harder spectrum (Gamma = 0.9\\pm0.1) than that found in Galactic black hole candidates and other IXOs. It also shows large-amplitude variability on both short-term and long-term timescales. The ratio of the number of sources with luminosities greater than 2.1 x 10^{38} erg/s in the 0.4-8 keV band to the rate of massive star formation is the same, to within a factor of two, for NGC 1068, the Antennae, NGC 5194 (the main galaxy in M51), and the Circinus galaxy. This suggests that the rate of production of X-ray binaries per massive star is approximately the same for galaxies with currently active star formation, including ``starbursts''.

David A. Smith; Andrew S. Wilson

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

Note: A novel normalization scheme for laser-based plasma x-ray sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A kHz repetition rate laser pump-X-ray probe system for ultrafast X-ray diffraction is set up based on a laser-driven plasma X-ray source. A simple and reliable normalization approach has been developed to minimize the impact of large X-ray pulse intensity fluctuation on data quality. It utilizes one single X-ray area detector to record both sample and reference signals simultaneously. Performance of this novel normalization method is demonstrated in reflectivity oscillation measurement of a superlattice sample at sub-ps resolution.

Zhang, B. B.; Sun, D. R.; Tao, Y., E-mail: taoy@ihep.ac.cn [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, S. S. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100090 (China)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Identification of X-ray Point Sources and Study on the Nature of 62 X-ray Globular Cluster Candidates in M31  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper includes two parts. The first is to present the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 49 globular cluster (GC) X-ray sources in the BATC 13 intermediate-band filters from 3800 to 10000 A, and identify 8 unidentified X-ray sources in M31. Using the X-ray data of Einstein observation from 1979 to 1980, ROSAT HRI observation in 1990, Chandra HRC and ACIS-I observations from 1999 to 2001, and the BATC optical survey from 1995 to 1999, we find 49 GC X-ray sources and 8 new unidentified X-ray sources in the BATC M31 field. By analyzing SEDs and FWHMs, 4 of the 8 X-ray sources may be GC candidates. The second is to present some statistical relationships about 62 GC X-ray sources, of which 58 are already known, and 4 are identified in this paper. The distribution of M31 GC X-ray sources' V mags is bimodal, with peaks at m_v = 15.65 and m_v = 17.89, which is different from the distribution of GC candidates. The distribution of B-V color shows that,the GC X-ray sources seem to be associated preferentially ...

Fan, Z; Zhou, X; Chen, J; Jiang, Z; Wu, Z; Fan, Zhou; Ma, Jun; Zhou, Xu; Chen, Jiansheng; Jiang, Zhaoji; Wu, Zhenyu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Cumulative luminosity functions of the X-ray point source population in M31  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present preliminary results from a detailed analysis of the X-ray point sources in the XMM-Newton survey of M31. These sources are expected to be mostly X-ray binaries. We have so far studied 225 of the 535 sources found by automated source detection. Only sources which were present in all three EPIC images were considered. X-ray binaries are identified by their energy spectrum and power density spectrum. Unlike in other surveys we have obtained source luminosities from freely fit emission models. We present uncorrected luminosity functions of the sources analysed so far.

L. Shaw Greening; C. Tonkin; R. Barnard; U. Kolb; J. P. Osborne

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

42

Development and characterization of a novel compact x-ray source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with values reported in the literature. It was necessary, however, to prepare the samples using single elements to reduce matrix affects and lessen effects of overlapping peaks. In general the x-ray source shows potential as a portable x-ray source that may...

Woo, Ronald Yut

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

X-ray periodicities in sources observed by the RXTE ASM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The X-ray intensities measured from 230 X-ray sources observed by the RXTE All-Sky Monitor (ASM) were analyzed for periodic behavior. The ASM has been observing sources for nine years in the 1.5-12 keV energy range. In ...

Shivamoggi, Vasudha B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Technical Report Ultrafast X-ray Science at the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Technical Report Ultrafast X-ray Science at the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source Kelly J. Gaffney ultrafast phenomena. These techniques involve excitation of a sample with an ultrafast laser pump pulse, USA The ultrafast, high brightness x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) sources of the future have

Wechsler, Risa H.

45

DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

Sterling Backus

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

A Record Run for the APS X-ray Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICSHe β-ResearchNew MethodAlp of XSD Elected to

47

The Ultra Luminous X-ray sources in the High Velocity System of NGC 1275  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the results of a study of X-ray point sources coincident with the High Velocity System (HVS) projected in front of NGC 1275. A very deep X-ray image of the core of the Perseus cluster made with the Chandra Observatory has been used. We find a population of Ultra-Luminous X-ray sources (ULX; 7 sources with LX [0.5-7 keV] > 7x10^39 erg/s). As with the ULX populations in the Antennae and Cartwheel galaxies, those in the HVS are associated with a region of very active star formation. Several sources have possible optical counterparts found on HST images, although the X-ray brightest one does not. Absorbed power-law models fit the X-ray spectra, with most having a photon index between 2 and 3.

O. Gonzalez-Martin; A. C. Fabian; J. S. Sanders

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

48

THREE NEW GALACTIC CENTER X-RAY SOURCES IDENTIFIED WITH NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have conducted a near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 47 candidate counterparts to X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory near the Galactic center (GC). Though a significant number of these astrometric matches are likely to be spurious, we sought out spectral characteristics of active stars and interacting binaries, such as hot, massive spectral types or emission lines, in order to corroborate the X-ray activity and certify the authenticity of the match. We present three new spectroscopic identifications, including a Be high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) or a ? Cassiopeiae (Cas) system, a symbiotic X-ray binary, and an O-type star of unknown luminosity class. The Be HMXB/? Cas system and the symbiotic X-ray binary are the first of their classes to be spectroscopically identified in the GC region.

DeWitt, Curtis [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Sarajedini, Ata [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sellgren, Kris [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bauer, Franz E., E-mail: curtis.n.dewitt@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronoma y Astrofsica, Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen K? x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-?m scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

Ohsuka, Shinji, E-mail: ohsuka@crl.hpk.co.jp [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-8601 (Japan); The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, 1955-1 Kurematsu-cho, Nishi-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 431-1202 (Japan); Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-8601 (Japan); Nakano, Tomoyasu [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-8601 (Japan); Ray-Focus Co. Ltd., 6009 Shinpara, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-0003 (Japan); Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Optimal focusing for a linac-based hard x-ray source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spite of having a small average beam current limit, a linac can have features that make it attractive as an x-ray source: high energy, ultralow emittance and energy spread, and flexible beamline optics. Unlike a storage ring, in which an (undulator) radiation source is necessarily short and positioned at an electron beam waist, in a linac the undulator can be long and the electron beam can be adjusted to have a (virtual) waist far downstream toward the x-ray target. Using a planned CEBAF beamline as an example, this paper shows that a factor of 2000 in beam current can be overcome to produce a monochromatic hard x-ray source comparable with, or even exceeding, the performance of an x-ray line at a third generation storage ring. Optimal electron beam focusing conditions for x-ray flux density and brilliance are derived, and are verified by simulations using the SRW code.

Liu, C.; Krafft, G.; Talman, R.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

51

In-situ X-ray diffraction system using sources and detectors at fixed angular positions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray diffraction technique for measuring a known characteristic of a sample of a material in an in-situ state. The technique includes using an x-ray source for emitting substantially divergent x-ray radiation--with a collimating optic disposed with respect to the fixed source for producing a substantially parallel beam of x-ray radiation by receiving and redirecting the divergent paths of the divergent x-ray radiation. A first x-ray detector collects radiation diffracted from the sample; wherein the source and detector are fixed, during operation thereof, in position relative to each other and in at least one dimension relative to the sample according to a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample. A second x-ray detector may be fixed relative to the first x-ray detector according to the a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample, especially in a phase monitoring embodiment of the present invention.

Gibson, David M. (Voorheesville, NY); Gibson, Walter M. (Voorheesville, NY); Huang, Huapeng (Latham, NY)

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

52

X-ray Diffraction and Multi-Frame Phase Contrast Imaging Diagnostics for IMPULSE at the Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diagnostic needs of any dynamic loading platform present unique technical challenges that must be addressed in order to accurately measure in situ material properties in an extreme environment. The IMPULSE platform (IMPact system for Ultrafast Synchrotron Experiments) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is no exception and, in fact, may be more challenging, as the imaging diagnostics must be synchronized to both the experiment and the 60 ps wide x-ray bunches produced at APS. The technical challenges of time-resolved x-ray diffraction imaging and high-resolution multi-frame phase contrast imaging (PCI) are described in this paper. Example data from recent IMPULSE experiments are shown to illustrate the advances and evolution of these diagnostics with a focus on comparing the performance of two intensified CCD cameras and their suitability for multi-frame PCI. The continued development of these diagnostics is fundamentally important to IMPULSE and many other loading platforms and will benefit future facilities such as the Dynamic Compression Sector at APS and MaRIE at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Iverson, Adam [National Security Technologies, LLC; Carlson, Carl [National Security Technologies, LLC; Young, Jason [National Security Technologies, LLC; Curtis, Alden [National Security Technologies, LLC; Jensen, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramos, Kyle [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yeager, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fezza, Kamel [Argonne National Laboratory

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

53

New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources or Fiat Lux: what's under the dome and watching atoms with x-rays (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2008: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

Falcone, Roger

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

54

X-ray holographic microscopy experiments at the Brookhaven synchrotron light source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soft x-ray holographic microscopy is discussed from an experimental point of view. Three series of measurements have been carried out using the Brookhaven 750 MeV storage ring as an x-ray source. Young slits fringes, Gabor (in line) holograms and various data pertaining to the soft x-ray performance of photographic plates are reported. The measurements are discussed in terms of the technique for recording them and the experimental limitations in effect. Some discussion is also given of the issues involved in reconstruction using visible light.

Howells, M.R.; Iarocci, M.; Kenney, J.; Kirz, J.; Rarback, H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Optical synchronization system for femtosecond X-ray sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Femtosecond pump/probe experiments using short X-Ray and optical pulses require precise synchronization between 100 meter-10 km separated lasers in a various experiments. For stabilization in the hundred femtosecond range a CW laser is amplitude modulated at 1-10 GHz, the signal retroreflected from the far end, and the relative phase used to correct the transit time with various implementations. For the sub-10 fsec range the laser frequency itself is upshifted 55 MHz with an acousto-optical modulator, retroreflected, upshifted again and phase compared at the sending end to a 110 MHz reference. Initial experiments indicate less than 1 fsec timing jitter. To lock lasers in the sub-10 fs range two single-frequency lasers separated by several teraHertz will be lock to a master modelocked fiber laser, transmit the two frequencies over fiber, and lock two comb lines of a slave laser to these frequencies, thus synchronizing the two modelocked laser envelopes.

Wilcox, Russell B. (El Cerrito, CA); Holzwarth, Ronald (Munich, DE)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

56

X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

Radley, Ian (Glenmont, NY); Bievenue, Thomas J. (Delmar, NY); Burdett, John H. (Charlton, NY); Gallagher, Brian W. (Guilderland, NY); Shakshober, Stuart M. (Hudson, NY); Chen, Zewu (Schenectady, NY); Moore, Michael D. (Alplaus, NY)

2008-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

57

On-site Real-Time Inspection System for Pump-impeller using X-band Linac X-ray Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods of nondestructive testing (NDT) are generally ultrasonic, neutron, eddy-current and X-rays, NDT by using X-rays, in particular, is the most useful inspection technique having high resolution. We can especially evaluate corroded pipes of petrochemical complex, nuclear and thermal-power plants by the high energy X-ray NDT system. We develop a portable X-ray NDT system with X-band linac and magnetron. This system can generate a 950 keV electron beam. We are able to get X-ray images of samples with 1 mm spatial resolution. This system has application to real time impeller inspection because linac based X-ray sources are able to generate pulsed X-rays. So, we can inspect the rotating impeller if the X-ray pulse rate is synchronized with the impeller rotation rate. This system has application in condition based maintenance (CBM) of nuclear plants, for example. However, 950 keV X-ray source can only be used for thin tubes with 20 mm thickness. We have started design of a 3.95 MeV X-band linac for broader X-ray NDT application. We think that this X-ray NDT system will be useful for corrosion wastage and cracking in thicker tubes at nuclear plants and impeller of larger pumps. This system consists of X-band linac, thermionic cathode electron gun, magnetron and waveguide components. For achieving higher electric fields the 3.95 MeV X-band linac structure has the side-coupled acceleration structure. This structure has more efficient acceleration than the 950 keV linac with alternating periodic structure (APS). We adopt a 1.3 MW magnetron for the RF source. This accelerator system is about 30 cm long. The beam current is about 150 mA, and X-ray dose rate is 10 Gy at 1 m/500 pps. In this paper, the detail of the whole system concept and the electromagnetic field of designed linac structure will be reported.

Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Natsui, Takuya; Taguchi, Hiroki; Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Lee, Ki woo; Hashimoto, Eiko; Sakamoto, Fumito; Sakumi, Akira; Yusa, Noritaka; Uesaka, Mitsuru [Nuclear Professional School, the University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakamura, Naoki; Yamamoto, Masashi; Tanabe, Eiji [Accuthera Inc. 2-7-6 Kurigi, Asao, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 215-0033 Japan (Japan)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

A microfocus x-ray source based on a nonmetal liquid-jet anode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate stable operation of a nonmetallic anode in an electron-impact x-ray source. A high-brightness electron beam is focused on a {approx}70 m/s speed, {approx}10 {mu}m diameter methanol jet producing stable x-ray emission with peak spectral brightness at {approx}5.4x10{sup 5} photons/(sx{mu}m{sup 2}xsrx0.1%BW). The jet is fully evaporated in the interaction point. The shape of a simulated spectrum using Monte Carlo methods shows good agreement with experimental data, and the theoretical brightness values give an upper limit for the achievable x-ray emission from jets with very high velocities. Using this anode concept, all compounds and elements found in liquid form are potentially usable for x-ray generation.

Tuohimaa, T.; Ewald, J.; Schlie, M.; Hertz, H. M.; Vogt, U. [Biomedical and X-ray Physics, Department of Applied Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology/Albanova, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Fernandez-Varea, J. M. [Facultat de Fisica (ECM), Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, ES-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

59

Optical identification of hard X-ray source IGRJ18257-0707  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of the optical identification of hard X-ray source IGRJ18257-0707 trough the spectroscopic observations of its optical counterpart with RTT150 telescope. Accurate position of the X-ray source, determined using Chandra observations, allowed us to associate this source with the faint optical object (m_R=~20.4), which shows broad H_\\alpha emission line in its optical spectrum. Therefore we conclude that the source IGRJ18257-0707 is a type 1 Seyfert galaxy at redshift z=0.037.

R. A. Burenin; I. F. Bikmaev; M. G. Revnivtsev; J. A. Tomsick; S. Yu. Sazonov; M. N. Pavlinskiy; R. A. Sunyaev

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

60

X-ray source considerations in operation of digital detector arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digital Detector Arrays (DDA) are increasingly replacing film in radiography applications. Standards exist for characterizing the performance of these detectors, and for using them in specific inspections. We have observed that the selection of the x-ray source to use with these detectors can also have a significant influence on the performance. We look at differences between standard, and micro-focus x-ray tubes, and end-window vs. side-window micro-focus tubes. We find that for best results, one must calibrate the DDA for the source settings used during an inspection. This is particularly true for variable-focus sources.

Jensen, Terrence; Wendt, Scott [Iowa State University, Center for NDE, 1915 Scholl Road, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analysis of Off-Nuclear X-Ray Sources in Galaxy NGC 4945  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, X-ray astronomy has been used to investigate objects such as galaxies, clusters of galaxies, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), quasars, starburst superbubbles of hot gas, X-ray binary systems, stars, supernova remnants, and interstellar and intergalactic material. By studying the x-ray emission patterns of these objects, we can gain a greater understanding of their structure and evolution. We analyze X-ray emission from the galaxy NGC 4945 using data taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations (CIAO) software package was used to extract and fit energy spectra and to extract light curves for the brightest off-nuclear sources in two different observations of NGC 4945 (January, 2000 and May, 2004). A majority of sources were closely fit by both absorbed power law and absorbed bremsstrahlung models, with a significantly poorer {chi}{sup 2}/dof for the absorbed blackbody model, and most sources had little variability. This indicates that the sources are accreting binary systems with either a neutron star or black hole as the compact object. The calculated luminosities were about 10{sup 38} erg/s, which implies that the mass of the accreting object is close to 10 solar masses and must be a black hole.

Harrison, Sarah M.; /MIT /SLAC

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

62

Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Microtomography from a Compact Laser Driven Betatron Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called Betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present the first phase-contrast micro-tomogram revealing quantitative electron density values of a biological sample using betatron X-rays, and a comprehensive source characterization. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential fo...

Wenz, J; Khrennikov, K; Bech, M; Thibault, P; Heigoldt, M; Pfeiffer, F; Karsch, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Population of Ultraluminous X-ray Sources with An Accreting Neutron Star  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are believed to be X-ray binary systems, but previous observational and theoretical studies tend to prefer a black hole rather than a neutron star accretor. The recent discovery of 1.37 s pulsations from the ULX M82 X-2 has established its nature as a magnetized neutron star. In this work we model the formation history of neutron star ULXs in an M82- or Milky Way-like galaxy, by use of both binary population synthesis and detailed binary evolution calculations. We find that the birthrate is around $10^{-4}\\, \\rm yr^{-1}$ for the incipient X-ray binaries in both cases. We demonstrate the distribution of the ULX population in the donor mass - orbital period plane. Our results suggest that, compared with black hole X-ray binaries, neutron star X-ray binaries may significantly contribute to the ULX population, and high-mass and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries dominate the neutron star ULX population in M82- and Milky Way-like galaxies, respectively.

Shao, Yong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET Center for X-ray Optics and Advanced Light Source Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Introduction X-Ray Properties of Elements Electron Binding Energies X-Ray Levels of Few Electron Ions Now Available Order X-Ray Data Booklet http://xdb.lbl.gov/ (1 of 3) [2

Meagher, Mary

65

Hard X-ray Sources from Miniature Plasma Focus Devices Vernica Raspa1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hard X-ray Sources from Miniature Plasma Focus Devices Verónica Raspa1 , Patricio Silva, José been obtained. Introduction The plasma focus (PF) device is a known source of dense transient high temperature plasmas, and it has been studied since late 50`s [1] . A plasma focus is a particular pinch

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

66

Development of a model of an x-ray tube transmission source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the development of an x-ray tube based source for transmission measurements of UF6 gas, we have developed a one-dimensional, spreadsheet-based model of the source. Starting with the spectrum produced by an x-ray tube we apply the linear attenuation coefficients for various notch filters, the aluminum pipe, and UF6 gas. This model allows calculation of the transmitted spectrum based on the type of filter, the thickness of the filter, the x-ray tube high voltage, the Al pipe thickness, and the UF6 gas pressure. The sensitivity of the magnitude of the transmission peak produced by the notch filter to any of these variables can be explored quickly and easily to narrow the choices for experimental measurements. To validate the spreadsheet based model, comparisons have been made to various experimental data.

Goda, Joetta M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Cal E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Demonstration of Successful X-ray Thomson Scattering Using Picosecond K-(alpha) X-ray Sources for the Characterization of Dense Heated Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the first successful K-{alpha} x-ray Thomson scattering experiment from solid density plasmas for use as a diagnostic in determining the temperature, density, and ionization state of warm dense matter with picosecond resolution. The development of this source as a diagnostic and stringent requirements for successful K-{alpha} x-ray Thomson scattering are addressed. Data for the experimental techniques described in this paper [1] suggest the capability of single shot characterization of warm dense matter and the ability to use this scattering source at future Free Electron Lasers (FEL) where comparable scattering signal levels are predicted.

Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Doeppner, T; Falcone, R; Glenzer, S; Morse, E C

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

68

A Systematic Search for Supersoft X-Ray Sources in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have conducted a systematic search for supersoft X-ray sources using the ROSAT all-sky survey data. With the optical identification of the selected sources being almost complete, we discuss the statistics of the various source classes and their observability. Besides supersoft close binary sources this search also can be used to estimate the number of isolated neutron stars in the Galaxy, such as those described by Stocke et al. 1995 and Walter et al. 1996.

J. Greiner

1996-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

Development of procedures for refurbishing x-ray optics at the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of procedures for refurbishing x-ray optics atpractical and robust procedures for refurbishing x-ray

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Electron beam-based sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of various methods for generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses using relativistic electron beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons is considered. The importance of the time-resolved studies of matter at picosecond (ps), femtosecond (fs), and atttosecond (as) time scales using x-rays has been widely recognized including by award of a Nobel Prize in 1999 [Zewa]. Extensive reviews of scientific drivers can be found in [BES1, BES2, BES3, Lawr, Whit]. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas [Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp], high-order harmonic generation [Schn, Rund, Wang, Arpi], and laser-driven anode sources [Ande]. In addition, ultrafast streak-camera detectors have been applied at synchrotron sources to achieve temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale [Wulf, Lind1]. In this paper, we focus on a different group of techniques that are based on the use of the relativistic electron beam produced in conventional accelerators. In the first part we review several techniques that utilize spontaneous emission of electrons and show how solitary sub-ps x-ray pulses can be obtained at existing storage ring based synchrotron light sources and linacs. In the second part we consider coherent emission of electrons in the free-electron lasers (FELs) and review several techniques for a generation of solitary sub-fs x-ray pulses. Remarkably, the x-ray pulses that can be obtained with the FELs are not only significantly shorter than the ones considered in Part 1, but also carry more photons per pulse by many orders of magnitude.

Zholents, A.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of the first tunable Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the easily aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The LPA is driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses, and produces high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit efficiently retro-reflects the LPA driving pulse with relativistic intensity into oncoming electrons to produce $2\\times10^{7}$ CBS x-ray photons per shot with 10-20 mrad angular divergence and 50 % (FWHM) energy spread without detectable bremsstrahlung background. The x-ray central energy is tuned from 75 KeV to 200 KeV by tuning the LPA e-beam central energy. Particle-in-cell simulations of the LPA, the drive pulse/PM interaction and CBS agree well with measurements.

Tsai, Hai-En; Shaw, Joseph; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Downer, M C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Dose characterization of the rad source 2400 x-ray irradiator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The RS 2400 irradiator has been looked to as a replacement for discontinued gamma irradiators. The RS 2400 has a cylindrical, rather than point, x-ray source, which yields higher dose rates. The irradiator unit allows the user to set the current...

Wagner, Jennifer Ann Koop

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

A new endstation at the Swiss Light Source for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of liquid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new liquid microjet endstation designed for ultraviolet (UPS) and X-ray (XPS) photoelectron, and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The new endstation, which is based on a Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 electron spectrometer, is the first liquid microjet endstation capable of operating in vacuum and in ambient pressures up to the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid water at room temperature. In addition, the Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 energy analyzer of this new endstation allows for XPS measurements up to 7000 eV electron kinetic energy that will enable electronic structure measurements of bulk solutions and buried interfaces from liquid microjet samples. The endstation is designed to operate at the soft X-ray SIM beamline and at the tender X-ray Phoenix beamline. The endstation can also be operated using a Scienta 5 K ultraviolet helium lamp for dedicated UPS measurements at the vapor-liquid interface using either He I or He II ? lines. The design concept, first results from UPS, soft X-ray XPS, and partial electron yield XAS measurements, and an outlook to the potential of this endstation are presented.

Brown, Matthew A.; Redondo, Amaia Beloqui; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Mchler, Jean-Pierre [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zrich, CH-8093 Zrich (Switzerland)] [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zrich, CH-8093 Zrich (Switzerland); Jordan, Inga; Wrner, Hans Jakob [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zrich, CH-8093 Zrich (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zrich, CH-8093 Zrich (Switzerland); Lee, Ming-Tao; Ammann, Markus; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Birrer, Mario; Honegger, Juri; Wetter, Reto [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)] [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zrich, CH-8093 Zrich (Switzerland) [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zrich, CH-8093 Zrich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

An Ultraluminous X-ray Source Powered by An Accreting Neutron Star  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULX) are off-nuclear point sources in nearby galaxies whose X-ray luminosity exceeds the theoretical maximum for spherical infall (the Eddington limit) onto stellar-mass black holes. Their luminosity ranges from $10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1} $10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$), which require black hole masses MBH >50 solar masses and/or significant departures from the standard thin disk accretion that powers bright Galactic X-ray binaries. Here we report broadband X-ray observations of the nuclear region of the galaxy M82, which contains two bright ULXs. The observations reveal pulsations of average period 1.37 s with a 2.5-day sinusoidal modulation. The pulsations result from the rotation of a magnetized neutron star, and the modulation arises from its binary orbit. The pulsed flux alone corresponds to $L_X$(3 - 30 keV) = $4.9 \\times 10^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The pulsating source is spatially coincident with a variable ULX which can reach $L_X$ (0.3 - 10 keV) = $1.8 \\times 10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$. This ...

Bachetti, M; Walton, D J; Grefenstette, B W; Chakrabarty, D; Frst, F; Barret, D; Beloborodov, A; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Hailey, C J; Hornschemeier, A; Kaspi, V; Kulkarni, S R; Maccarone, T; Miller, J M; Rana, V; Stern, D; Tendulkar, S P; Tomsick, J; Webb, N A; Zhang, W W

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Design and Assembly of a Telecentric Zoom Lens for the Cygnus X-ray Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cygnus is a high-energy radiographic x-ray source. The rod-pinch x-ray diode produces a point source measuring 1 mm diameter. The target object is placed 1.5 m from the x-ray source, with a large LYSO scintillator at 2.4 m. Different-sized objects are imploded within a containment vessel. A large pellicle deflects the scintillator light out of the x-ray path into an 11-element zoom lens coupled to a CCD camera. The zoom lens and CCD must be as close as possible to the scintillator to maximize light collection. A telecentric lens design minimizes image blur from a volume source. To maximize the resolution of test objects of different sizes, the scintillator and zoom lens can be translated along the x-ray axis. Zoom lens magnifications are changed when different-sized scintillators and recording cameras are used (50 or 62 mm square format). The LYSO scintillator measures 200 200 mm and is 5 mm thick. The scintillator produces blue light peaking at 435 nm, so special lens materials are required. By swapping out one lens element and allowing all lenses to move, the zoom lens can also use a CsI(Tl) scintillator that produces green light centered at 550 nm. All lenses are coated with anti-reflective coating for both wavelength bands. Two sets of doublets, the stop, and the CCD camera move during zoom operations. One doublet has XY compensation. The first three lenses use fused silica for radiation damage control. The 60 lb of glass inside the 340 lb mechanical structure is oriented vertically.

Malone, R M; Brown, K K; Curtis, A H; Esquibel, D L; Frayer, D K; Frogget, B C; Furlanetto, M R; Garten, J R; Haines, T J; Howe, R A; Huerta, J A; Kaufman, M I; King, N.S. P; Lutz, S S; McGillivray, K D

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Phase I, study of a miniature X-ray source for interstitial radiotherapy of brain metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite a variety of stereotactic techniques used to increase intracranical local control, dose escalation strategies remain controversial, with respect to therapeutric gain, convenience, and cost effectiveness, in the setting of brain metastases. In this report, we summarize our experience with the safety and efficacy of a new miniature X-ray device for interstitial radiosurgical treatment of intracranial metastatic neoplasms. Although the role of surgical resection of solitary metastases is established, aggressive treatment with proton, gamma knife, and linac radiation therapy for these lesions is under investigation. The new miniature X-ray device offers a very localized, convenient, time and cost efficient means of delivering radiotherapy to these lesions, with lower normal tissue exposure than gamma knife or proton beam techniques. Retreatment of previously irradiated areas are also now under investigation as part of a Phase II trial. The photon radiosurgery system is a miniature battery operated 40 kV x-ray device designed by the Photoelectron Corporation for use in the interstitial treatment of small tumors ({ge}3 cm in diameter) in humans. This 10 cm long, low current, high voltage X-ray generator is easily mounted in a stereotactic frame and produces low energy (10-20 KeV) x-rays to be emitted from the 10 cm long, 3.2 mm diameter probe, after stereotactic insertion into the tumor. Two scintillation detectors positioned on the stereotactic frame near the patient`s scalp monitor radiation. The spherical X-ray beam behaves essentially as a point source, with dose rate nominally 150 cGy/min. at a distance of 10mm, for a beam current of 40 {mu}A and a voltage of 40 kv.

Douglas, R.M.; Beatty, J.; Biggs, P. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others] [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

X-ray observations of NGC 1365: time-resolved eclipse of the X-ray source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an extraordinary variation of the X-ray spectrum of the obscured AGN in NGC 1365, which was observed by Chandra to change from Compton-thin to Compton-thick and back to Compton-thin in four days. This fast variation imply a a size of ~10^14 cm for the emitting region, and an extremely compact size (~10^16 cm) of the clumpy circumnuclear absorber.

G. Risaliti

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

78

Compact x-ray source based on burst-mode inverse Compton scattering at 100kHz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A design for a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) with flux and brilliance orders of magnitude beyond existing laboratory scale sources is presented. The source is based on inverse Compton scattering of a high brightness ...

Bessuille, J.

79

Workshops on Science Enabled by a Coherent, CW, Synchrotron X-ray Source, June 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June of 2011 we held six two-day workshops called "XDL-2011: Science at the Hard X-ray Diffraction Limit". The six workshops covered (1) Diffraction-based imaging techniques, (2) Biomolecular structure from non-crystalline materials, (3) Ultra-fast science, (4) High-pressure science, (5) Materials research with nano-beams and (6) X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), In each workshop, invited speaker from around the world presented examples of novel experiments that require a CW, diffraction-limited source. During the workshop, each invited speaker provided a one-page description of the experiment and an illustrative graphic. The experiments identified by the workshops demonstrate the broad and deep scientific case for a CW coherent synchrotron x-ray source. The next step is to perform detailed simulations of the best of these ideas to test them quantitatively and to guide detailed x-ray beam-line designs. These designs are the first step toward developing detailed facility designs and cost estimates.

Brock, Joel

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

80

The (anti)correlation of the sub-mm and X-ray background sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The connection between the sub-mm and the hard X-ray backgrounds is studied by comparing data at 2-10 keV and at 850um for a sample of 34 sources at fluxes (or limiting fluxes) which resolve most of the background in the two bands. These data were obtained with new SCUBA observations and by correlating data sets available from the literature. None of the 11 hard X-ray (2-10 keV) sources has a counterpart at 850um, with the exception of a faint Chandra source, which is a candidate type 2 QSO at high redshift. These data indicate that 2-10 keV sources brighter than 10^-15 erg s-1 cm-2, which make at least 75% of the background in this band, contribute for less than 7% to the submillimetric background. Out of the 24 SCUBA sources 23 are undetected by Chandra. These data indicate that most of these SCUBA sources must be powered either by starburst activity, or by an AGN which is obscured by a column Nh > 10^25 cm-2, with a reflection efficiency in the hard X-rays significantly lower than 1% in most cases.

P. Severgnini

2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Real world issues for the new soft x-ray synchrotron sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new generation of synchrotron radiation light sources covering the VUV, soft x-ray and hard x-ray spectral regions is under construction in several countries. They are designed specifically to use periodic magnetic undulators and low-emittance electron or positron beams to produce high-brightness near-diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation beams. An introduction to the properties of undulator radiation is followed by a discussion of some of the challenges to be faced at the new facilities. Examples of predicted undulator output from the Advanced Light Source, a third generation 1--2 GeV storage ring optimized for undulator use, are used to highlight differences from present synchrotron radiation sources, including high beam power, partial coherence, harmonics, and other unusual spectral and angular properties of undulator radiation. 8 refs., 2 figs.

Kincaid, B.M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

NSLS (National Synchrotron Light Source) X-19A beamline performance for x-ray absorption measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the X-19A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described. The beamline is designed for high resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy over a wide energy range. All of the beamline optical components are compatible with ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) operation. This permits measurements to be made in a window-less mode, thereby facilitating lower energy (<4 KeV) studies. To upgrade the beamline performance, several possible improvements in instrumentation and practice are discussed to increase photon statistics with an optimum energy resolution, while decreasing the harmonic contamination and noise level. A special effort has been made to improve the stability and UHV compatibility of the monochromator system. Initial x-ray absorption results demonstrate the capabilities of this beamline for x-ray absorption studies of low Z elements (e.g. S) in highly dilute systems. The future use of this beamline for carrying out various x-ray absorption experiments is presented. 10 refs., 4 figs.

Yang, C.Y.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Stefan, P.M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA). Dept. of Chemistry; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

National Synchrotron Light Source users manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beam lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source in the years to come will be based, in large part, on the size of the users community and the diversity of the scientific disciplines represented by these users. In order to promote this philosophy, this National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Users Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beam Lines, has been published. This manual serves a number of purposes. In an effort to attract new research, it will present to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture and capabilities of the various VUV and x-ray beam lines and storage rings. We anticipate that this publication will be updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes at the NSLS.

Gmuer, N.F.; White-DePace, S.M. (eds.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE VISIBILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE a new method for imaging spectroscopy analysis of hard X-ray emission during solar flares. The method.e., the two-dimensional spatial Fourier transforms of the spectral image) to obtain smoothed (regularized

Piana, Michele

85

APS Upgrade | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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86

X-Ray Observations of Unidentified H.E.S.S. Gamma-Ray Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a survey of the inner part of the Galaxy, performed with the H.E.S.S. Instrument (High energy stereoscopic system) in 2004 and 2005, a large number of new unidentified very high energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray sources above an energy of 100 GeV was discovered. Often the {gamma}-ray spectra in these sources reach energies of up to {approx} 10 TeV. These are the highest energy particles ever attributed to single astrophysical objects. While a few of these sources can be identified at other wavebands, most of these sources remain unidentified so far. A positive identification of these new g-ray sources with a counterpart object at other wavebands requires (a) a positional coincidence between the two sources,( b) a viable {gamma}-ray emission mechanism and (c) a consistent multiwavelength behavior of the two sources. X-ray observations with satellites such as XMM-Newton, Chandra or Suzaku provide one of the best channels to studying these enigmatic {gamma}-ray sources at other wavebands, since they combine high angular resolution and sensitivity with the ability to access non-thermal electrons through their synchrotron emission. We therefore have started a dedicated program to investigate VHE {gamma}-ray sources with high-sensitivity X-ray instruments.

Funk, S.; /SLAC

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

Attosecond Thomson-scattering x-ray source driven by laser-based electron acceleration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of producing attosecond x-rays through Thomson scattering of laser light off laser-driven relativistic electron beams is investigated. For a ?200-as, tens-MeV electron bunch produced with laser ponderomotive-force acceleration in a plasma wire, exceeding 10{sup 6} photons/s in the form of ?160 as pulses in the range of 3300 keV are predicted, with a peak brightness of ?5 10{sup 20} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1% bandwidth). Our study suggests that the physical scheme discussed in this work can be used for an ultrafast (attosecond) x-ray source, which is the most beneficial for time-resolved atomic physics, dubbed attosecond physics..

Luo, W. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China) [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhuo, H. B.; Yu, T. P. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)] [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Ma, Y. Y. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China) [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Song, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. C. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China)] [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China) [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

High brightness--multiple beamlets source for patterned X-ray production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Techniques for controllably directing beamlets to a target substrate are disclosed. The beamlets may be either positive ions or electrons. It has been shown that beamlets may be produced with a diameter of 1 .mu.m, with inter-aperture spacings of 12 .mu.m. An array of such beamlets, may be used for maskless lithography. By step-wise movement of the beamlets relative to the target substrate, individual devices may be directly e-beam written. Ion beams may be directly written as well. Due to the high brightness of the beamlets from extraction from a multicusp source, exposure times for lithographic exposure are thought to be minimized. Alternatively, the beamlets may be electrons striking a high Z material for X-ray production, thereafter collimated to provide patterned X-ray exposures such as those used in CAT scans. Such a device may be used for remote detection of explosives.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ji, Qing (Albany, CA); Barletta, William A. (Oakland, CA); Jiang, Ximan (El Cerrito, CA); Ji, Lili (Albany, CA)

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

Attosecond x-ray source generation from two-color polarized gating plasmonic field enhancement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plasmonic field enhancement from the vicinity of metallic nanostructures as well as the polarization gating technique has been utilized to the generation of the high order harmonic and the single attosecond x-ray source. Through numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrdinger equation, for moderate the inhomogeneity and the polarized angle of the two fields, we find that not only the harmonic plateau has been extended and enhanced but also the single short quantum path has been selected to contribute to the harmonic. As a result, a series of 50 as pulses around the extreme ultraviolet and the x-ray regions have been obtained. Furthermore, by investigating the other parameters effects on the harmonic emission, we find that this two-color polarized gating plasmonic field enhancement scheme can also be achieved by the multi-cycle pulses, which is much better for experimental realization.

Feng, Liqiang [College of Science, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou 121000 (China) [College of Science, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou 121000 (China); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Yuan, Minghu [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Chu, Tianshu [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Institute for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Development of soft X-ray polarized light beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the development of a soft x-ray beamline on a bending magnet source of Indus-2 storage ring (2.5 GeV) and some preliminary results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements using the same. The beamline layout is based on a spherical grating monochromator. The beamline is able to accept synchrotron radiation from the bending magnet port BL-1 of the Indus-2 ring with a wide solid angle. The large horizontal and vertical angular acceptance contributes to high photon flux and selective polarization respectively. The complete beamline is tested for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) ? 10{sup ?10} mbar. First absorption spectrum was obtained on HOPG graphite foil. Our performance test indicates that modest resolving power has been achieved with adequate photon flux to carry out various absorption experiments.

Phase, D. M., E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in; Gupta, Mukul, E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in; Potdar, S., E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in; Behera, L., E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in; Sah, R., E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in; Gupta, Ajay, E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore, 452001 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

91

Missing cosmic metals revealed by X-ray absorption towards distant sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The census of heavy elements (metals) produced by all stars through cosmic times up to present-day is limited to ~50%; of these only half are still found within their parent galaxy. The majority of metals is expelled from galaxies into the circumgalactic (or even more distant, intergalactic) space by powerful galactic winds, leaving unpleasant uncertainty on the amount, thermal properties and distribution of these key chemical species. These dispersed metals unavoidably absorb soft X-ray photons from distant sources. We show that their integrated contribution can be detected in the form of increasing X-ray absorption with distance, for all kinds of high-energy cosmic sources. Based on extensive cosmological simulations, we assess that $\\sim$ 10\\% of all cosmic metals reside in the intergalactic medium. Most of the X-ray absorption arises instead from a few discrete structures along the line of sight. These extended structures, possibly pin-pointing galaxy groups, contain million degree, metal-enriched gas, 10...

Campana, S; Ferrara, A; Pallottini, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Telecentric Zoom Lens Designed for the Cygnus X-Ray Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cygnus is a high-energy radiographic x-ray source. Three large zoom lenses have been assembled to collect images from large scintillators. A large elliptical pellicle (394 280 mm) deflects the scintillator light out of the x-ray path into an eleven-element zoom lens coupled to a CCD camera. The zoom lens and CCD must be as close as possible to the scintillator to maximize light collection. A telecentric lens design minimizes image blur from a volume source. To maximize the resolution of objects of different sizes, the scintillator and zoom lens are translated along the x-ray axis, and the zoom lens magnification changes. Zoom magnification is also changed when different-sized recording cameras are used (50 or 62 mm square format). The LYSO scintillator measures 200 200 mm and is 5 mm thick. The scintillator produces blue light peaking at 435 nm, so special lens materials are required. By swapping out one doublet and allowing all other lenses to be repositioned, the zoom lens can also use a CsI(Tl) scintillator that produces green light centered at 540 nm. All lenses have an anti-reflective coating for both wavelength bands. Two sets of doublets, the stop, the scintillator, and the CCD camera move during zoom operations. One doublet has x?y compensation. Each zoom lens uses 60 lb of glass inside the 425 lb mechanical structure and can be used in either a vertical or horizontal orientation.

Malone, R. M. [NSTec; Baker, S. A. [NSTec; Brown, K. K. [NSTec; Curtis, A. H. [NSTec; Esquibel, D. L. [NSTec; Frayer, D. K. [NSTec; Frogget, B. C. [NSTec; Frogget, K. G. [NSTec; Kaufman, M. I. [NSTec; Smith, A. S. [NSTec; Tibbitts, A. [NSTec; Howe, R. A. [NSTec; Huerta, J. A. [NSTec; McGillivray, K. D. [NSTec; Droemer, D. W. [NSTec; Crain, M. D. [NSTec; Haines, T. J. [LANL; King, S. P. [LANL

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

On the contribution of point sources to the Galactic ridge X-ray emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyzed deep Chandra observations of the Galactic plane region centered at l=28.55, b=-0.03 with the aim to obtain the best possible constraints on the contribution of weak point sources to the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE) in this region. We demonstrate that the vast majority of the detected sources are Galactic in origin and are probably cataclysmic variables and coronally active stars. We use the number-flux function of detected sources to constrain the luminosity function of Galactic X-ray sources in the range 1e30--1e32 erg/s and find good agreement with the luminosity function of sources in the Solar vicinity. The fraction of the total flux at energies 1--7 keV resolved into point sources at the current sensitivity level is ~25%. Excluding the expected contribution of extragalactic sources, ~19% of the GRXE is due to point Galactic sources with interstellar absorption corrected fluxes higher than 1.2e-15 erg/s/cm^2in the energy band 1-7 keV.

M. Revnivtsev; S. Sazonov

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

94

Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten K?{sub 1} line with the energy of 59.3keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

Zhou, Wei [BME Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G., E-mail: brankov@iit.edu [ECE Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

DIFFERENT TYPES OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES IN NGC 4631  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have re-examined the most luminous X-ray sources in the starburst galaxy NGC 4631, using XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT data. The most interesting source is a highly variable supersoft ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX). We suggest that its bolometric luminosity {approx} a few 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} in the high/supersoft state: this is an order of magnitude lower than estimated in previous studies, thus reducing the need for extreme or exotic scenarios. Moreover, we find that this source was in a noncanonical low/soft (kT {approx} 0.1-0.3 keV) state during the Chandra observation. By comparing the high and low state, we argue that the spectral properties may not be consistent with the expected behavior of an accreting intermediate-mass black hole. We suggest that recurrent super-Eddington outbursts with photospheric expansion from a massive white dwarf (M {sub wd} {approx}> 1.3 M {sub sun}), powered by nonsteady nuclear burning, may be a viable possibility, in alternative to the previously proposed scenario of a super-Eddington outflow from an accreting stellar-mass black hole. The long-term average accretion rate required for nuclear burning to power such white-dwarf outbursts in this source and perhaps in other supersoft ULXs is {approx}(5-10) x 10{sup -6} M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}: this is comparable to the thermal-timescale mass transfer rate invoked to explain the most luminous hard-spectrum ULXs (powered by black hole accretion). The other four most luminous X-ray sources in NGC 4631 (three of which can be classified as ULXs) appear to be typical accreting black holes, in four different spectral states: high/soft, convex-spectrum, power-law with soft excess, and simple power-law. None of them require masses {approx}>50 M {sub sun}.

Soria, Roberto [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Ghosh, Kajal K. [Universities Space Research Association, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP62, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)], E-mail: roberto.soria@mssl.ucl.ac.uk

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 ?m. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

Bartels, Matthias; Krenkel, Martin [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Gttingen, Gttingen (Germany)] [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Gttingen, Gttingen (Germany); Hernandez, Victor H. [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Gttingen, Gttingen (Germany) [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Gttingen, Gttingen (Germany); Bernstein Focus for Neurotechnology, University of Gttingen, Gttingen (Germany); Moser, Tobias [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Gttingen, Gttingen (Germany) [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Gttingen, Gttingen (Germany); Bernstein Focus for Neurotechnology, University of Gttingen, Gttingen (Germany); Center for Nanoscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Gttingen (Germany); Salditt, Tim [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Gttingen, Gttingen (Germany) [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Gttingen, Gttingen (Germany); Center for Nanoscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Gttingen (Germany)

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

The BMW (Brera-Multiscale-Wavelet) Catalogue of Serendipitous X-ray Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In collaboration with the Observatories of Palermo and Rome and the SAX-SDC we are constructing a multi-site interactive archive system featuring specific analysis tools. In this context we developed a detection algorithm based on the Wavelet Transform (WT) and performed a systematic analysis of all ROSAT-HRI public data (~3100 observations +1000 to come). The WT is specifically suitable to detect and characterize extended sources while properly detecting point sources in very crowded fields. Moreover, the good angular resolution of HRI images allows the source extension and position to be accurately determined. This effort has produced the BMW (Brera Multiscale Wavelet) catalogue, with more than 19,000 sources detected at the 4.2 sigma level. For each source detection we have information on the X-ray flux and extension, allowing for instance to select complete samples of extended X-ray sources such as candidate clusters of galaxies or SNR's. Here we present an overview of first results from several undergoin...

Lazzati, D; Covino, S; Israel, G L; Guzzo, L; Mignani, R P; Moretti, A; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

The BMW (Brera-Multiscale-Wavelet) Catalogue of Serendipitous X-ray Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In collaboration with the Observatories of Palermo and Rome and the SAX-SDC we are constructing a multi-site interactive archive system featuring specific analysis tools. In this context we developed a detection algorithm based on the Wavelet Transform (WT) and performed a systematic analysis of all ROSAT-HRI public data (~3100 observations +1000 to come). The WT is specifically suitable to detect and characterize extended sources while properly detecting point sources in very crowded fields. Moreover, the good angular resolution of HRI images allows the source extension and position to be accurately determined. This effort has produced the BMW (Brera Multiscale Wavelet) catalogue, with more than 19,000 sources detected at the 4.2 sigma level. For each source detection we have information on the X-ray flux and extension, allowing for instance to select complete samples of extended X-ray sources such as candidate clusters of galaxies or SNR's. Here we present an overview of first results from several undergoing projects which make use of the BMW catalogue.

D. Lazzati; S. Campana; S. Covino; G. L. Israel; L. Guzzo; R. Mignani; A. Moretti; M. R. Panzera; G. Tagliaferri

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

99

X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman,BiosScience (SC)Supply andof SeeingX-Ray Light Sources

100

REVISITING PUTATIVE COOL ACCRETION DISKS IN ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soft, potentially thermal spectral components observed in some ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) can be fit with models for emission from cool, optically thick accretion disks. If that description is correct, the low temperatures that are observed imply accretion onto 'intermediate-mass' black holes. Subsequent work has found that these components may follow an inverse relationship between luminosity and temperature, implying a non-blackbody origin for this emission. We have re-analyzed numerous XMM-Newton spectra of extreme ULXs. Crucially, observations wherein the source fell on a chip gap were excluded owing to their uncertain flux calibration, and the neutral column density along the line of sight to a given source was jointly determined by multiple spectra. The luminosity of the soft component is found to be positively correlated with temperature, and to be broadly consistent with L?T {sup 4} in the measured band pass, as per blackbody emission from a standard thin disk. These results are nominally consistent with accretion onto black holes with masses above the range currently known in Galactic X-ray binaries, though there are important caveats. Emission from inhomogeneous or super-Eddington disks may also be consistent with the data.

Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Reynolds, M. T.; Reis, R. C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Walton, D. J. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Miller, M. C., E-mail: jonmm@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Compact X-ray Source using a High Repetition Rate Laser and Copper Linac  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A design for a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) with flux and brilliance orders of magnitude beyond existing laboratory scale sources is presented. The source is based on inverse Compton scattering of a high brightness electron bunch on a picosecond laser pulse. The accelerator is a novel high-efficiency standing-wave linac and RF photoinjector powered by a single ultrastable RF transmitter at x-band RF frequency. The high efficiency permits operation at repetition rates up to 1 kHz, which is further boosted to 100 kHz by operating with trains of 100 bunches of 100 pC charge, each separated by 5 ns. The 100 kHz repetition rate is orders of magnitude beyond existing high brightness copper linacs. The entire accelerator is approximately 1 meter long and produces hard x-rays tunable over a wide range of photon energies. The colliding laser is a Yb:YAG solid-state amplifier producing 1030 nm, 100 mJ pulses at the same 1 kHz repetition rate as the accelerator. The laser pulse is frequency-doubled and stored for m...

Graves, W S; Brown, P; Carbajo, S; Dolgashev, V; Hong, K -H; Ihloff, E; Khaykovich, B; Lin, H; Murari, K; Nanni, E A; Resta, G; Tantawi, S; Zapata, L E; Krtner, F X; Moncton, D E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Alignment and Testing of a Telecentric Zoom Lens Used for the Cygnus X-ray Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cygnus is a high-energy radiographic x-ray source. Three large zoom lenses have been assembled to collect images from large scintillators. A large elliptical pellicle (394 280 mm) deflects the scintillator light out of the x-ray path into an eleven-element zoom lens coupled to a CCD camera. The zoom lens and CCD must be as close as possible to the scintillator to maximize light collection. A telecentric lens design minimizes image blur from a volume source. To maximize the resolution of objects of different sizes, the scintillator and zoom lens are translated along the x-ray axis, and the zoom lens magnification changes. Zoom magnification is also changed when different-sized recording cameras are used (50 or 62 mm square format). The LYSO scintillator measures 200 200 mm and is 5 mm thick. The scintillator produces blue light peaking at 435 nm, so special lens materials are required. By swapping out one doublet and allowing all other lenses to be repositioned, the zoom lens can also use a CsI(Tl) scintillator that produces green light centered at 540 nm (for future operations). All lenses have an anti-reflective coating for both wavelength bands. Two sets of doublets, the stop, the scintillator, and the CCD camera move during zoom operations. One doublet has x-y compensation. Alignment of the optical elements was accomplished using counter propagating laser beams and monitoring the retro-reflections and steering collections of laser spots. Each zoom lens uses 60 lb of glass inside the 425 lb mechanical structure, and can be used in either vertical or horizontal orientation.

Malone, R. M. [NSTec; Baker, S. A. [NSTec; Brown, K. K. [NSTec; Castaneda, J. J. [NSTec; Curtis, A. H. [NSTec; Danielson, J. [NSTec; Droemer, D. W. [NSTec; Esquibel, D. L. [NSTec; Haines, T. J. [LANL; Hollabaugh, J. S. [NSTec; Howe, R. A. [NSTec; Huerta, J. A. [NSTec; King, N. S. P. [LANL; Lutz, S. S. [NSTec; Kaufman, M. I. [NSTec; McGillivray, K. D. [NSTec; Smith, A. D. [NSTec; Stokes, B. M. [NSTec; Tibbitts, A. [NSTec

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Development of procedures for refurbishing x-ray optics at the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Setting of Bendable Optics for Diffraction- Limitedof Soft X-Rays, Abstract to SPIE Optics and Photonics 2012,Metrology for X-Ray and EUV Optics IV (San Diego, August 12-

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

X-RAY ACTIVE MATRIX PIXEL SENSORS BASEDON J-FET TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED FOR THE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor (XAMPS) is being developed for recording data for the X-ray Pump Probe experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Special attention has to be paid to some technological challenges that this design presents. New processes were developed and refined to address problems encountered during previous productions of XAMPS. The development of these critical steps and corresponding tests results are reported here.

CARINI,G.A.; CHEN, W.; LI, Z.; REHAK, P.; SIDDONS, D.P.

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

Overdensity of X-Ray sources near 3C 295: a candidate filament  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a statistical analysis of the Chandra observation of the source field around the 3C 295 galaxy cluster (z=0.46) aimed at the search for clustering of X-ray sources. Three different methods of analysis, namely a chip by chip logN-logS, a two dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and the angular correlation function (ACF) show a strong overdensity of sources in the North-East of the field. In particular, the ACF shows a clear signal on scales of 0.5 - 5 arcmin. This correlation angle is > 2 times higher than that of a sample of 8 ACIS-I field at the 2.5 sigma confidence level. If this overdensity is spatially associated to the cluster, we are observing a 'filament' of the large scale structure of the Universe. We discuss some first results that seem to indicate such an association.

V. D'Elia; F. Fiore; F. Cocchia

2004-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

106

Solar Hard X-ray Source Sizes in a Beam-Heated and Ionised Chromosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar flare hard X-rays (HXRs) are produced as bremsstrahlung when an accelerated population of electrons interacts with the dense chromospheric plasma. HXR observations presented by using the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) have shown that HXR source sizes are 3-6 times more extended in height than those predicted by the standard collisional thick target model (CTTM). Several possible explanations have been put forward including the multi-threaded nature of flare loops, pitch-angle scattering, and magnetic mirroring. However, the nonuniform ionisation (NUI) structure along the path of the electron beam has not been fully explored as a solution to this problem. Ionised plasma is known to be less effective at producing nonthermal bremsstrahlung HXRs when compared to neutral plasma. If the peak HXR emission was produced in a locally ionised region within the chromosphere, the intensity of emission will be preferentially reduced around this peak, resulting in a more extended source. Due to...

O'Flannagain, A; Gallagher, P T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Accepted by ApJS Preprint typeset using L ATEX style emulateapj v. 10/09/06 THERMONUCLEAR (TYPE-I) X-RAY BURSTS OBSERVED BY THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have assembled a sample of 1187 thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts from observations of 48 accreting neutron stars by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, spanning more than ten years. The sample contains examples of two of the three theoretical ignition regimes (confirmed via comparisons with numerical models) and likely examples of the third. We present a detailed analysis of the variation of the burst profiles, energetics, recurrence times, presence of photospheric radius expansion, and presence of burst oscillations, as a function of accretion rate. We estimated the distance for 35 sources exhibiting radius-expansion bursts, and found that in general the peak flux of such bursts varies typically by 13%, We classified sources into two main groups based on the burst properties: both long and short bursts (indicating mixed H/He accretion), and consistently short bursts (primarily He accretion), and calculated the mean burst rate as a function of accretion rate for the two groups. The decrease in burst rate observed at> 0.06 ? MEdd ( ? 2 10 37 erg s ?1) is associated with a transition in the persistent spectral state and (as has been suggested previously) may be related to the increasing role of steady He-burning. We found many examples of bursts with recurrence times < 30 min, including burst triplets and even quadruplets.

Duncan K. Galloway; Michael P. Muno; Jacob M. Hartman; Dimitrios Psaltis; Deepto Chakrabarty

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Submitted to ApJS Preprint typeset using L ATEX style emulateapj v. 6/22/04 THERMONUCLEAR (TYPE-I) X-RAY BURSTS OBSERVED BY THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a sample of 1035 thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts from observations of 45 accreting neutron stars by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), spanning more than nine years. This sample contains for the first time confirmed examples of burst ignition in each of the three regimes identified theoretically: H-ignition of mixed H/He fuel, He-ignition in pure He, and He-ignition in mixed H/He fuel. We combined bursts from multiple sources to investigate the variation of the burst rate, energetics, and time scale as a function of accretion rate. We found a peak burst rate of 0.20.3 hr ?1 for a normalised peak flux of ? ? 0.020.06, corresponding to a source luminosity of 0.32 10 37 ergs s ?1. For 35 sources with bursts exhibiting photospheric radius-expansion, we estimated the likely distance range arising from the possible range of the Eddington limit. We found that in general the peak flux of radius-expansion bursts from individual sources is not constant, varying with a fractional standard deviation of 14 % in the mean. We also examined the bursts with very short ( ? 30 min) recurrence times. We found evidence for two distinct populations of such bursts, one of faint bursts following a much stronger burst by 618 min, and another with comparable intensity bursts separated by 7 min or more. We describe the properties of bursts observed from 5 new bursters discovered by RXTE, as well as two new transient outbursts of previously known sources. Finally, we searched for burst oscillations at the known oscillation frequencies in 14 sources. We describe the distribution of the oscillation amplitudes as well as the stages of each burst in which the oscillations are detected.

Duncan K. Galloway; Michael P. Muno; Jacob M. Hartman; Pavlin Savov; Dimitrios Psaltis; Deepto Chakrabarty

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Using X-ray observations to identify the particle acceleration mechanisms in VHE SNRs and "dark" VHE sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray observations have proven to be very successful in localizing Galactic acceleration sites of VHE particles. Observations of shell-type supernova remnants have confirmed that particles are accelerated to VHE energies in supernova blast waves; the interpretation of the gamma-ray data in terms of hadronic or leptonic particle components in these objects relies nevertheless strongly on input from X-ray observations. The largest identified Galactic VHE source class consists of pulsar wind nebulae, as detected in X-rays. Many of the remaining VHE sources remain however unidentified until now. With X-ray observations of these enigmatic "dark" objects one hopes to solve the following questions: What is the astrophysical nature of these sources? Are they predominantly electron or hadron accelerators? And what is their contribution to the overall cosmic ray energy budget? The paper aims to provide an overview over the identification status of the Galactic VHE source population.

G. Phlhofer

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Optical Variability of Infrared Power Law-Selected Galaxies & X-ray Sources in the GOODS-South Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the use of optical variability to identify and study Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the GOODS-South field. A sample of 22 mid-infrared power law sources and 102 X-ray sources with optical counterparts in the HST ACS images were selected. Each object is classified with a variability significance value related to the standard deviation of its magnitude in five epochs separated by 45-day intervals. The variability significance is compared to the optical, mid-IR, and X-ray properties of the sources. We find that 26% of all AGN candidates (either X-ray- or mid-IR-selected) are optical variables. The fraction of optical variables increases to 51% when considering sources with soft X-ray band ratios. For the mid-IR AGN candidates which have multiwavelength SEDs, we find optical variability for 64% of those classified with SEDs like Broad Line AGNs. While mostly unobscured AGN appear to have the most significant optical variability, some of the more obscured AGNs are also observed as variables. In particular, we find two mid-IR power law-selected AGN candidates without X-ray emission that display optical variability, confirming their AGN nature.

Alison Klesman; Vicki Sarajedini

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cluster beam targets for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray radiation from an ultra-low debris plasma source are disclosed. Targets are produced by the free jet expansion of various gases through a temperature controlled nozzle to form molecular clusters. These target clusters are subsequently irradiated with commercially available lasers of moderate intensity (10{sup 11}--10{sup 12} watts/cm{sup 2}) to produce a plasma radiating in the region of 0.5 to 100 nanometers. By appropriate adjustment of the experimental conditions the laser focus can be moved 10--30 mm from the nozzle thereby eliminating debris produced by plasma erosion of the nozzle. 5 figs.

Kublak, G.D.; Richardson, M.C.

1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

Cluster beam targets for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for producing extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray radiation from an ultra-low debris plasma source are disclosed. Targets are produced by the free jet expansion of various gases through a temperature controlled nozzle to form molecular clusters. These target clusters are subsequently irradiated with commercially available lasers of moderate intensity (10.sup.11 -10.sup.12 watts/cm.sup.2) to produce a plasma radiating in the region of 0.5 to 100 nanometers. By appropriate adjustment of the experimental conditions the laser focus can be moved 10-30 mm from the nozzle thereby eliminating debris produced by plasma erosion of the nozzle.

Kublak, Glenn D. (124 Turquoise Way, Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Richardson, Martin C. (CREOL

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - anode x-ray source Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from measurements of the kinetic energy and intensity of the photoelectrons emitted... carbon film (conver- ter) illuminated by X-rays emitted by an aluminium- magnesium anode. For...

114

A Curious Source of Extended X-ray Emission in the Outskirts of Globular Cluster GLIMPSE-C01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the discovery of an unusual source of extended X-ray emission CXOU J184846.3-013040 (`The Stem') located on the outskirts of the globular cluster GLIMPSE-C01. No point-like source falls within the extended emission which has an X-ray luminosity L_X =10^{32} ergs/s and a physical size of 0.1 pc at the inferred distance to the cluster. These X-ray properties are consistent with the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) of an unseen pulsar located within the 95-percent confidence error contour of unidentified Fermi gamma-ray source 0FGL J1848.6-0138. However, we cannot exclude an alternative interpretation that postulates X-ray emission associated with a bow shock produced from the interaction of the globular cluster and interstellar gas in the Galactic plane. Analysis of the X-ray data reveals that `The Stem' is most significant in the 2-5 keV band, which suggests that the emission may be dominated by non-thermal bremsstrahlung from suprathermal electrons at the bow shock. If the bow shock interpretation is correc...

Mirabal, N

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

KAPPA DISTRIBUTION MODEL FOR HARD X-RAY CORONAL SOURCES OF SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar flares produce hard X-ray emission, the photon spectrum of which is often represented by a combination of thermal and power-law distributions. However, the estimates of the number and total energy of non-thermal electrons are sensitive to the determination of the power-law cutoff energy. Here, we revisit an 'above-the-loop' coronal source observed by RHESSI on 2007 December 31 and show that a kappa distribution model can also be used to fit its spectrum. Because the kappa distribution has a Maxwellian-like core in addition to a high-energy power-law tail, the emission measure and temperature of the instantaneous electrons can be derived without assuming the cutoff energy. Moreover, the non-thermal fractions of electron number/energy densities can be uniquely estimated because they are functions of only the power-law index. With the kappa distribution model, we estimated that the total electron density of the coronal source region was {approx}2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. We also estimated without assuming the source volume that a moderate fraction ({approx}20%) of electrons in the source region was non-thermal and carried {approx}52% of the total electron energy. The temperature was 28 MK, and the power-law index {delta} of the electron density distribution was -4.3. These results are compared to the conventional power-law models with and without a thermal core component.

Oka, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Krucker, S.; Lin, R. P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley (United States)] [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley (United States)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

116

X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22 Astrostats X-ray Stacking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22 Astrostats X-ray Stacking Tom Aldcroft SAO/CXC #12;X-ray Stacking 2008 analysis for a sample Stacking ­ mean properties of sample Chandra X-ray data (faint point sources) are photon-limited with low background => stacking in X-rays is very effective #12;X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22

Wolfe, Patrick J.

117

Detection of Nuclear X-ray Sources in Nearby Galaxies with Chandra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report preliminary results from an arcsecond-resolution X-ray survey of nearby galaxies using ACIS on board Chandra. The total sample consists of 41 low-luminosity AGNs, including Seyferts, LINERs, and LINER/H II transition objects. In the initial subsample of 24 objects observed thus far, we detect in 62% of the objects a compact, pointlike source astrometrically coincident with either the optical or radio position of the nucleus. The high detection rate strongly suggests that the majority of the objects do contain weakly active, AGN-like cores, presumably powered by central massive black holes. The 2-10 keV luminosities of the nuclear sources range from 10^38 to 10^41 erg/s, with a median value of 2x10^38 erg/s. Our detection limit corresponds to 8x10^37 erg/s for the typical sample distance of 12 Mpc; this limit is two orders of magnitude fainter than the weakest sources of this kind previously studied using ASCA or BeppoSAX. The new data extend toward lower luminosities the known linear correlation bet...

Ho, L C; Townsley, L K; Sambruna, R M; Garmire, G P; Brandt, W N; Filippenko, A V; Griffiths, R E; Ptak, A F; Sargent, W L W; Ho, Luis C.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Ptak, Andrew F.; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/?E of order 10?000 and spatial resolution better than 10 ?m. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

Hill, K. W., E-mail: khill@pppl.gov; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lu, J. [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Upper Limit on Dimming of Cosmological Sources by Intergalactic Grey Dust from the Soft X-ray Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) produce a dominant fraction (~80%) of the Soft X-ray background (SXB) at photon energies 0.5opacity would have produced diffuse X-ray halos around AGN. Taking account of known galaxies and galaxy clusters, only a fraction F_halo opacity to optical/infrared photons from large dust grains (with radii in the range a=0.2-2.0 mum) to a level tau_GDStacking X-ray images of AGN can be used to improve our constraints and diminish the importance of dust as a source of systematic uncertainty for future supernova surveys which aim to improve the precision on measuring the redshift evolution of the dark energy equation-of-state.

Dijkstra, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

National Synchrotron Light Source user`s manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines. Fifth edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source is based, in large part, on the size of the user community and the diversity of the scientific and technical disciplines represented by these users. As evidence of this success, the VUV Ring has just celebrated its 10th anniversary and the X-ray Ring will do the same in 1995. In order to enhance this success, the NSLS User`s Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beamlines - Fifth Edition, is being published. This Manual presents to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture, capabilities and research programs of the various VUV and X-ray beamlines. Also detailed is the research and computer equipment a General User can expect to find and use at each beamline when working at the NSLS. The Manual is updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes on these beamlines.

Gmuer, N.F. [ed.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Ultrafast X-Ray Coherent Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This main purpose of this grant was to develop the nascent #12;eld of ultrafast x-ray science using accelerator-based sources, and originally developed from an idea that a laser could modulate the di#11;racting properties of a x-ray di#11;racting crystal on a fast enough time scale to switch out in time a shorter slice from the already short x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. The research was carried out primarily at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 7 at Argonne National Laboratory and the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at SLAC; in anticipation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser that became operational in 2009 at SLAC (all National User Facilities operated by BES). The research centered on the generation, control and measurement of atomic-scale dynamics in atomic, molecular optical and condensed matter systems with temporal and spatial resolution . It helped develop the ultrafast physics, techniques and scienti#12;c case for using the unprecedented characteristics of the LCLS. The project has been very successful with results have been disseminated widely and in top journals, have been well cited in the #12;eld, and have laid the foundation for many experiments being performed on the LCLS, the world's #12;rst hard x-ray free electron laser.

Reis, David

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

123

An explanation for long flares from extragalactic globular cluster X-ray sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Repeatedly flaring X-ray binaries have recently been discovered in NGC 4697 by Sivakoff and collaborators. We show that these flares can be explained as the result of eccentric binaries in globular clusters which accrete more rapidly at periastron than during the rest of the binary orbit. We show that theoretical timescales for producing eccentricities and circularising the binaries are consistent with what is needed to produce the observed population of flaring sources, although the circularisation timescales are highly uncertain on both observational and theoretical grounds. This model makes two clear theoretical predictions (1) the flares should be seen to be strictly periodic if adequate sampling is provided, and that periodicity should be of approximately 15 hours (2) this class of flaring behaviour should be seen only in globular cluster sources, and predominantly in the densest globular clusters. We also test the model for producing eccentricities through fly-by's of a third star near the binary in a globular cluster against a much larger database of millisecond pulsar observations than has been used in past work, and find that the theoretical cross sections for producing eccentricity in binaries are in reasonable agreement with most of the data, provided that the pulsar ages are about $4\\times10^9$ years.

Thomas J. Maccarone

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

On the variation of solar flare coronal x-ray source sizes with energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations with {\\em RHESSI} have enabled the detailed study of the structure of dense hard X-ray coronal sources in solar flares. The variation of source extent with electron energy has been discussed in the context of streaming of non-thermal particles in a one-dimensional cold-target model, and the results used to constrain both the physical extent of, and density within, the electron acceleration region. Here we extend this investigation to a more physically realistic model of electron transport that takes into account the finite temperature of the ambient plasma, the initial pitch-angle distribution of the accelerated electrons, and the effects of collisional pitch-angle scattering. The finite temperature results in the thermal diffusion of electrons, that leads to the observationally-inferred value of the acceleration region volume being an overestimate of its true value. The different directions of the electron trajectories, a consequence of both the non-zero injection pitch-angle and scattering with...

Jeffrey, Natasha L S; Bian, Nicolas H; Emslie, A Gordon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-RayX-RayX-Ray Light

126

X-Ray Science Division (XSD)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Science Division (XSD) Search Button About Welcome Overview Visiting the APS Mission & Goals Find People Organization Charts Committees Job Openings User Information...

127

Scientific Needs for Future X-ray Sources in the U.S. -- A White Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving heath, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons and spins, x rays have proved especially valuable.

Falcone, Roger; Stohr, Joachim; Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Galayda, John; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hussain, Zahid; Kirz, Janos; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Schoenlein, Bob; Zholents, Alexander

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

128

Scientific Needs for Future X-Ray Sources in the U.S.: A White Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects (Figure 1.1). The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons and spins, x rays have proved especially valuable.

Falcone , Roger; Stohr, Joachim; Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Galayda, John; Hastings, Jerry; Robert Hettel, Zahid Hussain; Kirz, Janos; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Fernando Sannibale, John Seeman; Shen, Z.-X.; Schoenlein, Robert; Zholents, Alexander; /SLAC /LBL, Berkeley

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has...

130

X-ray Studies Key to Nobel Prize Winning Work on Protein Receptors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It was the advent of the first micro X-ray beam for structural biology at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory that enabled the research that earned the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and lays the groundwork for countless new pharmaceuticals. 00:00 Introduction: Brian Stephenson, director Advanced Photon Source 02:50 An overview of the research: Janet Smith, scientific director of the GM/CA beamline at the APS 17:53 How X-rays were used: Robert Fischetti, associate division director for structural biology in Argonne National Laboratory's APS X-ray Science Division

Janet Smith; Robert Fischetti

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

131

A new method of observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method of observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar, for observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager RHESSI. INTRODUCTION The Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, RHESSI,1 is a space-based solar x

California at Berkeley, University of

132

Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ?0.1 mm spatial resolution and ?150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E{sub p} = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ?9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ?1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with the retarding ratio can be well approximated by applying Liouville's theorem of constant emittance to the electron trajectories inside the lens system. The performance of the setup is demonstrated by characterizing the laser fluence-dependent transient surface photovoltage response of a laser-excited Si(100) sample.

Shavorskiy, Andrey; Slaughter, Daniel S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Rude, Bruce S.; Bluhm, Hendrik [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neppl, Stefan; Cryan, James P.; Siefermann, Katrin R.; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P.; Fraund, Matthew W.; Khurmi, Champak; Wright, Travis W.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Gessner, Oliver, E-mail: ogessner@lbl.gov [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Hertlein, Marcus P.; Tyliszczak, Tolek [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Huse, Nils [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of Hamburg and Max-Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high contrast 12.6 keV Kr K{alpha} source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility. The contrast ratio (K{alpha} to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultra short pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10{sup -5}. Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr K{alpha} and K{beta} x-rays are emitted from a roughly 1 x 2 mm emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70 eV (i.e. mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of K{alpha} to K{beta}. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy K{alpha} source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

Kugland, N; Constantin, C G; Niemann, C; Neumayer, P; Chung, H; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Glenzer, S H; Girard, F

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

134

The origins of X-ray emission from the hotspots of FRII radio sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use new and archival Chandra data to investigate the X-ray emission from a large sample of compact hotspots of FRII radio galaxies and quasars from the 3C catalogue. We find that only the most luminous hotspots tend to be in good agreement with the predictions of a synchrotron self-Compton model with equipartition magnetic fields. At low hotspot luminosities inverse-Compton predictions are routinely exceeded by several orders of magnitude, but this is never seen in more luminous hotspots. We argue that an additional synchrotron component of the X-ray emission is present in low-luminosity hotspots, and that the hotspot luminosity controls the ability of a given hotspot to produce synchrotron X-rays, probably by determining the high-energy cutoff of the electron energy spectrum. It remains plausible that all hotspots are close to the equipartition condition.

M. J. Hardcastle; D. E. Harris; D. M. Worrall; M. Birkinshaw

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

135

ANALYSIS OF X-RAY SPECTRA EMITTED FROM THE VENUS ECR ION SOURCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Versatile Electron Cyclotron resonance ion source for Nuclear Science (VENUS), located at Lawrence Berkeley National Labs 88-inch cyclotron, extracts ion beams from a plasma created by ionizing a gas with energetic electrons. Liquid-helium cooled superconducting coils produce magnetic fi elds that confi ne the plasma and high microwave frequencies heat the electrons enough to allow for successive ionizations of the neutral gas atoms. The combination of strong plasma confi nement and high microwave frequencies results in VENUS production of record breaking ion beam currents and high charge state distributions. While in operation, VENUS produces signifi cant quantities of bremsstrahlung, in the form of x-rays, primarily through two processes: 1) electron-ion collisions within the plasma, and 2) electrons are lost from the plasma, collide with the plasma chamber wall, and radiate bremsstrahlung due to their sudden deceleration. The bremsstrahlung deposited into the plasma chamber wall is absorbed by the cold mass used to maintain superconductivity in the magnets and poses an additional heat load on the cryostat. In order for VENUS to reach its maximum operating potential of 10 kW of 28 GHz microwave heating frequency, the heat load posed by the emitted bremsstrahlung must be understood. In addition, studying the bremsstrahlung under various conditions will help further our understanding of the dynamics within the plasma. A code has been written, using the Python programming language, to analyze the recorded bremsstrahlung spectra emitted from the extraction end of VENUS. The code outputs a spectral temperature, which is relatively indicative of the temperature of the hot electrons, and total integrated count number corresponding to each spectra. Bremsstrahlung spectra are analyzed and compared by varying two parameters: 1) the heating frequency, 18 GHz and 28 GHz, and 2) the ratio between the minimum magnetic fi eld and the resonant magnetic fi eld, .44 and .70, at the electron resonant zone.

Benitez, J.; Leitner, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

X-ray imaging with monochromatic and small focal spot size sources  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore thanX-RayX-ray ImagePhase

137

A systematic periodicity and time-variable modulation search in RXTE ASM data : methods, findings, and implications for astrophysical X-ray sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we present the results of a general search for periodicities and for time-variable modulation strength in X-ray sources using data from the All-Sky Monitor onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. New findings, ...

Harris, Robert J., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Production and application of a novel energy-tunable X-ray source at the RPI LINAC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and application of a novel energy-tunable X-ray source at the RPI LINAC Bryndol Sones energy linewidth for example, Si(400) FWHM of 134 eV at 9.0 keV (2%). Per electron, the photon production 17­20 keV. Low Z materials like graphite and LiF were most suitable for PXR production because

Danon, Yaron

139

Quasi-Moseley's law for strong narrow bandwidth soft x-ray sources containing higher charge-state ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bright narrow band emission observed in optically thin plasmas of high-Z elements in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region follows a quasi-Moseley's law. The peak wavelength can be expressed as ?=(21.8612.09)R{sub ?}{sup ?1}(Z?(23.232.87)){sup ?(1.520.12)}, where R{sub ?} is the Rydberg constant. The wavelength varies from 13.5?nm to 4.0?nm as the atomic number, Z, increases from Z?=?50 to Z?=?83. The range of emission wavelengths available from hot optically thin plasmas permits the development of bright laboratory-scale sources for applications including x-ray microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure determination.

Ohashi, Hayato, E-mail: ohashi@eng.u-toyama.ac.jp; Higashiguchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Otani, Yukitoshi; Yatagai, Toyohiko [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Li, Bowen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [HiLASE Project, Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences CR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Tamura, Naoki; Sudo, Shigeru; Suzuki, Chihiro [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Koike, Fumihiro [Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

140

All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey: the environment of X-ray sources at z~1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the environment of z~1 AGN using a sample of 53 spectroscopically identified X-ray sources in the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey. We quantify the local density in the vicinity of an X-ray source by measuring the projected surface density of spectroscopically identified optical galaxies within a radius defined by the 3rd nearest neighbour. Our main result is that X-ray selected AGN at z~1 avoid underdense regions at the 99.89% confidence level. Moreover, although we find that the overall population shares the same (rich) environment with optical galaxies of similar U-B and M_B, there is also tentative evidence (96%) that AGN with blue colors (U-Benvironments compared to optical galaxies. We argue that the results above are a consequence of the whereabouts of massive galaxies, capable of hosting supermassive black holes at their centers, with available cold gas reservoirs, the fuel for AGN activity. At z~1 an increasing fraction of such systems are found in dense regions.

A. Georgakakis; K. Nandra; E. S. Laird; M. C. Cooper; B. F. Gerke; J. A. Newman; D. J. Croton; M. Davis; S. M. Faber; A. L. Coil

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Recollimation boundary layers as X-ray sources in young stellar jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Young stars accrete mass from circumstellar disks and in many cases, the accretion coincides with a phase of massive outflows, which can be highly collimated. Those jets emit predominantly in the optical and IR wavelength range. However, in several cases X-ray and UV observations reveal a weak but highly energetic component in those jets. X-rays are observed both from stationary regions close to the star and from knots in the jet several hundred AU from the star. In this article we show semi-analytically that a fast stellar wind which is recollimated by the pressure from a slower, more massive disk wind can have the right properties to power stationary X-ray emission. The size of the shocked regions is compatible with observational constraints. Our calculations support a wind-wind interaction scenario for the high energy emission near the base of YSO jets. For the specific case of DG Tau, a stellar wind with a mass loss rate of $5\\cdot10^{-10}\\;M_{\\odot}\\;\\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$ and a wind speed of 800 km s$^{-1}$ ...

Gnther, Hans Moritz; Schneider, P C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

APS Document Central | Advanced Photon Source  

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143

APS Floor Coordinators | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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144

APS Map | Overview | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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145

Characterisation of a MeV Bremsstrahlung x-ray source produced from a high intensity laser for high areal density object radiography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of an experiment to characterise a MeV Bremsstrahlung x-ray emission created by a short (<10 ps) pulse, high intensity (1.4 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser are presented. X-ray emission is characterized using several diagnostics; nuclear activation measurements, a calibrated hard x-ray spectrometer, and dosimeters. Results from the reconstructed x-ray energy spectra are consistent with numerical simulations using the PIC and Monte Carlo codes between 0.3 and 30 MeV. The intense Bremsstrahlung x-ray source is used to radiograph an image quality indicator (IQI) heavily filtered with thick tungsten absorbers. Observations suggest that internal features of the IQI can be resolved up to an external areal density of 85 g/cm{sup 2}. The x-ray source size, inferred by the radiography of a thick resolution grid, is estimated to be approximately 400 ?m (full width half maximum of the x-ray source Point Spread Function)

Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Bazzoli, S.; Bourgade, J. L.; Gazave, J.; Lagrange, J. M.; Landoas, O.; Dain, L. Le; Pichoff, N. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Edwards, R.; Aedy, C. [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)] [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Mastrosimone, D.; Pien, G.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past quarter century, light-source user facilities have transformed research in areas ranging from gas-phase chemical dynamics to materials characterization. The ever-improving capabilities of these facilities have revolutionized our ability to study the electronic structure and dynamics of atoms, molecules, and even the most complex new materials, to understand catalytic reactions, to visualize magnetic domains, and to solve protein structures. Yet these outstanding facilities still have limitations well understood by their thousands of users. Accordingly, over the past several years, many proposals and conceptual designs for"next-generation" x-ray light sources have been developed around the world. In order to survey the scientific problems that might be addressed specifically by those new light sources operating below a photon energy of about 3 keV and to identify the scientific requirements that should drive the design of such facilities, a workshop"Science for a New Class of Soft X-Ray Light Sources" was held in Berkeley in October 2007. From an analysisof the most compelling scientific questions that could be identified and the experimental requirements for answering them, we set out to define, without regard to the specific technologies upon which they might be based, the capabilities such light sources would have to deliver in order to dramatically advance the state of research in the areas represented in the programs of the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). This report is based on the workshop presentations and discussions.

Arenholz, Elke; Belkacem, Ali; Cocke, Lew; Corlett, John; Falcone, Roger; Fischer, Peter; Fleming, Graham; Gessner, Oliver; Hasan, M. Zahid; Hussain, Zahid; Kevan, Steve; Kirz, Janos; McCurdy, Bill; Nelson, Keith; Neumark, Dan; Nilsson, Anders; Siegmann, Hans; Stocks, Malcolm; Schafer, Ken; Schoenlein, Robert; Spence, John; Weber, Thorsten

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

147

X-ray Science Division: Mission and Goals | Advanced Photon Source  

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148

X-rays Paint a Picture of Picasso's Pigments | Advanced Photon Source  

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149

All-laser-driven, MeV-energy X-ray source for detection of SNM Sudeep Banerjee, Nathan Powers, Vidya Ramanathan, Nathaniel Cunningham, Nate Chandler-Smith, Shouyuan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All-laser-driven, MeV-energy X-ray source for detection of SNM Sudeep Banerjee, Nathan Powers, MI 48109. A quasi-monoenergetic MeV x-ray source based on laser-driven electron acceleration per laser shot. Characterization of such a high-flux high energy x-ray beam is in progress. Quasi

Umstadter, Donald

150

Nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond based field emitter array for a flat-panel x-ray source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field emission based flat-panel transmission x-ray source is being developed as an alternative for medical and industrial imaging. A field emitter array (FEA) prototype based on nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond film has been fabricated to be used as the electron source of this flat panel x-ray source. The FEA prototype was developed using conventional microfabrication techniques. The field emission characteristics of the FEA prototype were evaluated. Results indicated that emission current densities of the order of 6?mA/cm{sup 2} could be obtained at electric fields as low as 10?V/?m to 20?V/?m. During the prototype microfabrication process, issues such as delamination of the extraction gate and poor etching of the SiO{sub 2} insulating layer located between the emitters and the extraction layer were encountered. Consequently, alternative FEA designs were investigated. Experimental and simulation data from the first FEA prototype were compared and the results were used to evaluate the performance of alternative single and double gate designs that would yield better field emission characteristics compared to the first FEA prototype. The best simulation results are obtained for the double gate FEA design, when the diameter of the collimator gate is around 2.6 times the diameter of the extraction gate.

Posada, Chrystian M.; Grant, Edwin J.; Lee, Hyoung K.; Castao, Carlos H., E-mail: castanoc@mst.edu [Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 220 Fulton Hall, Rolla, Missouri 65401 (United States); Divan, Ralu; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Stan, Liliana [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

National synchrotron light source user's manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines: Third edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on the following topics: A Word on the Writing of Beamline Descriptions; Beamline Equipment Utilization for General Users; the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Storage Ring and Beamlines; VUV Beamline Descriptions--An Explanation; VUV Beamline Descriptions; X-Ray Storage Ring and Beamlines; X-Ray Beamline Descriptions--An Explanation; and X-Ray Beamline Descriptions.

Gmuer, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.; White-DePace, S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

APS News 2007 | Advanced Photon Source  

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153

APS News 2008 | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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154

APS News 2009 | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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155

APS News 2010 | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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156

APS News 2011 | Advanced Photon Source  

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157

APS News 2012 | Advanced Photon Source  

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158

APS News 2013 | Advanced Photon Source  

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159

APS News 2013 | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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160

APS Beamline Questionnaire Form | Advanced Photon Source  

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161

APS Organization Chart | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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162

APS Seminars & Meetings | Advanced Photon Source  

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163

APS User News | Advanced Photon Source  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011AstudiesRing Under Maintenance Upcoming TheAPS User

164

Efficient multi-keV x-ray source generated by nanosecond laser pulse irradiated multi-layer thin foils target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new target configuration is proposed to generate efficient multi-keV x-ray source using multiple thin foils as x-ray emitters. The target was constructed with several layers of thin foils, which were placed with a specific, optimized spacing. The thin foils are burned though one by one by a nanosecond-long laser pulse, which produced a very large, hot, underdense plasma. One-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations show that the emission region and the multi-keV x-ray flux generated by multi-layer thin foil target are similar to that of the low-density gas or foam target, which is currently a bright multi-keV x-ray source generated by laser heating. Detailed analysis of a range of foil thicknesses showed that a layer-thickness of 0.1??m is thin enough to generate an efficient multi-keV x-ray source. Additionally, this type of target can be easily manufactured, compared with the complex techniques for fabrication of low-density foam targets. Our preliminary experimental results also verified that the size of multi-keV x-ray emission region could be enhanced significantly by using a multi-layer Ti thin foil target.

Tu, Shao-yong [Department of Modern Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China) [Department of Modern Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Hu, Guang-yue, E-mail: gyhu@ustc.edu.cn; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian [Department of Modern Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)] [Department of Modern Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Miao, Wen-yong; Yuan, Yong-teng; Zhan, Xia-yu; Hou, Li-fei; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Bright x-ray sources from laser irradiation of foams with high concentration of Ti  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-density foams irradiated by a 20 kJ laser at the Omega laser facility (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY, USA) are shown to convert more than 5% of the laser energy into 4.6 to 6.0?keV x rays. This record efficiency with foam targets is due to novel fabrication techniques based on atomic-layer-deposition of Ti atoms on an aerogel scaffold. A Ti concentration of 33 at.?% was obtained in a foam with a total density of 5?mg/cm{sup 3}. The dynamics of the ionization front through these foams were investigated at the 1 kJ laser of the Gekko XII facility (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan). Hydrodynamic simulations can reproduce the average electron temperature but fail to predict accurately the heat front velocity in the foam. This discrepancy is shown to be unrelated to the possible water adsorbed in the foam but could be attributed to effects of the foam micro-structure.

Prez, F., E-mail: perez75@llnl.gov; Patterson, J. R.; May, M.; Colvin, J. D.; Biener, M. M.; Wittstock, A.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Charnvanichborikarn, S.; Satcher, J. H.; Gammon, S. A.; Poco, J. F.; Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fujioka, S.; Zhang, Z.; Ishihara, K.; Tanaka, N.; Ikenouchi, T.; Nishimura, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

167

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs...

168

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities...

169

X-ray shearing interferometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

Koch, Jeffrey A. (Livermore, CA)

2003-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

170

A compact, sample-in-atmospheric-pressure soft x-ray microscope developed at Pohang Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full-field transmission soft x-ray microscope (TXM) was developed at the Pohang Light Source. With a 2 mm diameter condenser zone plate and a 40 nm outermost-zone-width objective zone plate, the TXM's achieved spatial resolution is better than 50 nm at the photon energy of 500 eV (wavelength: 2.49 nm). The TXM is portable and mounted in tandem with a 7B1 spectroscopy end station. The sample position is outside the vacuum, allowing for quick sample changes and enhanced in situ experimental capability. In addition, the TXM is pinhole-free and easy to align, having commercial mounts located outside the vacuum components.

Lim, Jun; Shin, Hyun-Joon [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Keun Hwa [Materials Science and Technology Research Division, KIST, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chan-Cuk; Hwang, Han-Na [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Chung Ki [Department of Physics, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation damage with ultrafast pulses (2) Three-dimensionalradiation damage with ultrafast pulses Radiation damagebe accomplished with ultrafast soft x-ray pulses. In the

Arenholz, Elke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Phase-sensitive X-ray imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

Baker, Kevin Louis

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

173

A powerful and highly variable off-nuclear X-ray source in the composite starburst/Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4945  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a powerful and variable off-nuclear X-ray source in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 4945. Two ROSAT PSPC observations show the source to brighten in 0.5--2.0 keV flux by a factor of about 9 on a time-scale of 11 months or less. It is seen by ASCA about one month after the second PSPC pointing, and is seen to have dimmed by a factor of > 7 in a ROSAT HRI pointing about one year after the second PSPC pointing. Its maximum observed 0.8--2.5 keV luminosity is about 8E38 erg/s, making it brighter than any known persistent X-ray binary in the Milky Way. Its total X-ray luminosity is probably larger than 1.2E39 erg/s. The observed variability argues against a superbubble interpretation, and the off-nuclear position argues against a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus. The source is therefore probably either an ultra-powerful X-ray binary or an ultra-powerful supernova remnant. Optical monitoring has not identified any supernovae in NGC 4945 during the time of the X-ray observations, and any supernova would have had to have been either very highly absorbed or intrinsically optically faint.

W. N. Brandt; K. Iwasawa; C. S. Reynolds

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

174

Temporal synchronization of GHz repetition rate electron and laser pulses for the optimization of a compact inverse-Compton scattering x-ray source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The operation of an inverse-Compton scattering source of x-rays or gamma-rays requires the precision alignment and synchronization of highly focused electron bunches and laser pulses at the collision point. The arrival times of electron and laser pulses must be synchronized with picosecond precision. We have developed an RF synchronization technique that reduces the initial timing uncertainty from 350 ps to less than 2 ps, greatly reducing the parameter space to be optimized while commissioning the x-ray source. We describe the technique and present measurements of its performance.

Hadmack, Michael R; Madey, John M J; Kowalczyk, Jeremy M D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The ChaMP Extended Stellar Survey (ChESS): Photometric and Spectroscopic Properties of Serendipitously Detected Stellar X-ray Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present 348 X-ray emitting stars identified from correlating the Extended Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP), a serendipitous wide-area X-ray survey, with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use morphological star/galaxy separation, an SDSS quasar catalog, an optical color-magnitude cut, and X-ray data quality tests to create our catalog, the ChaMP Extended Stellar Survey (ChESS), from a sample of 2121 matched ChaMP/SDSS sources. Our cuts retain 92% of the spectroscopically confirmed stars while excluding 99.6% of the 684 spectoscopically confirmed extragalactic sources. Fewer than 3% of the sources in our final catalog are previously identified stellar X-ray emitters; we expect ~10% of the catalog is composed by giants, and identify seven giant stars and three cataclysmic variables. We derive distances, X-ray and bolometric luminosities for these stars, revealing that this catalog fills the gap between the nearby stars identified by the ROSAT All-Sky Survey and the more distant stars detected in deep Chandra and XMM-Newton surveys. For 36 newly identified X-ray emitting M stars we calculate L_(Halpha)/L_(bol). L_(H\\alpha)/L_(bol) and L_(X)/L_(bol) are linearly related below L_(X)/L_(bol) ~ 3 x 10^(-4), while L_(Halpha)/L_(bol) appears to turn over at larger L_(X)/L_(bol) values. Stars with reliable SDSS photometry have an ~0.1 mag blue excess in (u-g), likely due to increased chromospheric continuum emission. Photometric metallicity estimates suggest the sample is split between the young and old disk populations of the Galaxy; the lowest activity sources belong to the old disk population, a clear signature of the decay of magnetic activity with age. Future papers will present analyses of source variability and comparisons of this catalog to models of stellar activity in the Galactic disk.

K. R. Covey; M. A. Agueros; P. J. Green; D. Haggard; W. A. Barkhouse; J. Drake; N. Evans; V. Kashyap; D. -W. Kim; A. Mossman; D. O. Pease; J. D. Silverman

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

November 16, 2006 Spectral properties of X-ray bright variable sources in the Taurus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Code 5247, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027, USA 5 INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri of flares to derive the size of the flaring loops. Results. The light curves of the selected sources show to solar flares, or of slow modulation due e.g. to rotation (Feigelson & Montmerle 1999; Wolk et al. 2005

177

Narrowband inverse Compton scattering x-ray sources at high laser intensities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Narrowband x- and gamma-ray sources based on the inverse Compton scattering of laser pulses suffer from a limitation of the allowed laser intensity due to the onset of nonlinear effects that increase their bandwidth. It has been suggested that laser pulses with a suitable frequency modulation could compensate this ponderomotive broadening and reduce the bandwidth of the spectral lines, which would allow to operate narrowband Compton sources in the high-intensity regime. In this paper we, therefore, present the theory of nonlinear Compton scattering in a frequency modulated intense laser pulse. We systematically derive the optimal frequency modulation of the laser pulse from the scattering matrix element of nonlinear Compton scattering, taking into account the electron spin and recoil. We show that, for some particular scattering angle, an optimized frequency modulation completely cancels the ponderomotive broadening for all harmonics of the backscattered light. We also explore how sensitive this compensation ...

Seipt, D; Surzhykov, A; Fritzsche, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

THE ChaMP EXTENDED STELLAR SURVEY (ChESS): PHOTOMETRIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF SERENDIPITOUSLY DETECTED STELLAR X-RAY SOURCES1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as counterparts to sources in the ROSAT All Sky Survey and the more distant stars detected in deep Chandra and XMM. Silverman9 Received 2008 March 16; accepted 2008 May 15 ABSTRACT We present 348 X-ray-emitting stars identified from correlating the Extended Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP), a wide-area serendipitous

Green, Paul

179

X-ray embedded stars as driving sources of outflow-driven turbulence in OMC1-S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outflows arising from very young stars affect their surroundings and influence the star formation in the parental core. Multiple molecular outflows and Herbig-Haro (HH) objects have been observed in Orion, many of them originating from the embedded massive star-forming region known as OMC1-S. The detection of the outflow driving sources is commonly difficult, because they are still hidden behind large extinction, preventing their direct observation at optical and even near and mid-IR wavelengths. With the aim of improving the identification of the driving sources of the multiple outflows detected in OMC1-S, we used the catalog provided by deep X-ray observations, which have unveiled the very embedded population of pre-main sequence stars. We compared the position of stars observed by the Chandra Orion Ultra Deep project (COUP) in OMC1-S with the morphology of the molecular outflows and the directions of measured proper motions of HH optical objects. We find that 6 out of 7 molecular outflows reported in OMC1-...

Rivilla, V M; Sanz-Forcada, J; Jimenez-Serra, I; Rodriguez-Franco, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

TOWARD IDENTIFYING THE UNASSOCIATED GAMMA-RAY SOURCE 1FGL J1311.7-3429 WITH X-RAY AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present deep optical and X-ray follow-up observations of the bright unassociated Fermi-LAT gamma-ray source 1FGL J1311.7-3429. The source was already known as an unidentified EGRET source (3EG J1314-3431, EGR J1314-3417), hence its nature has remained uncertain for the past two decades. For the putative counterpart, we detected a quasi-sinusoidal optical modulation of {Delta}m {approx} 2 mag with a period of {approx_equal}1.5 hr in the Rc, r', and g' bands. Moreover, we found that the amplitude of the modulation and peak intensity changed by {approx}>1 mag and {approx}0.5 mag, respectively, over our total six nights of observations from 2012 March to May. Combined with Swift UVOT data, the optical-UV spectrum is consistent with a blackbody temperature, kT {approx_equal} 1 eV and the emission volume radius R{sub bb} {approx_equal} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} d{sub kpc} km (d{sub kpc} is the distance to the source in units of 1 kpc). In contrast, deep Suzaku observations conducted in 2009 and 2011 revealed strong X-ray flares with a light curve characterized with a power spectrum density of P(f) {proportional_to} f {sup -2.0{+-}0.4}, but the folded X-ray light curves suggest an orbital modulation also in X-rays. Together with the non-detection of a radio counterpart, and significant curved spectrum and non-detection of variability in gamma-rays, the source may be the second 'radio-quiet' gamma-ray emitting millisecond pulsar candidate after 1FGL J2339.7-0531, although the origin of flaring X-ray and optical variability remains an open question.

Kataoka, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Maeda, K. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yatsu, Y.; Kawai, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ohokayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Urata, Y.; Tsai, A. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Cheung, C. C. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Totani, T.; Makiya, R. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hanayama, H.; Miyaji, T., E-mail: kataoka.jun@waseda.jp [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 1024-1 Arakawa, Ishigaki, Okinawa, 907-0024 (Japan)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Development of extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray multilayer optics for scientific studies with femtosecond/attosecond sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of multilayer optics for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation has led to advancements in many areas of science and technology, including materials studies, EUV lithography, water window microscopy, plasma imaging, and orbiting solar physics imaging. Recent developments in femtosecond and attosecond EUV pulse generation from sources such as high harmonic generation lasers, combined with the elemental and chemical specificity provided by EUV radiation, are opening new opportunities to study fundamental dynamic processes in materials. Critical to these efforts is the design and fabrication of multilayer optics to transport, focus, shape and image these ultra-fast pulses This thesis describes the design, fabrication, characterization, and application of multilayer optics for EUV femtosecond and attosecond scientific studies. Multilayer mirrors for bandwidth control, pulse shaping and compression, tri-material multilayers, and multilayers for polarization control are described. Characterization of multilayer optics, including measurement of material optical constants, reflectivity of multilayer mirrors, and metrology of reflected phases of the multilayer, which is critical to maintaining pulse size and shape, were performed. Two applications of these multilayer mirrors are detailed in the thesis. In the first application, broad bandwidth multilayers were used to characterize and measure sub-100 attosecond pulses from a high harmonic generation source and was performed in collaboration with the Max-Planck institute for Quantum Optics and Ludwig- Maximilians University in Garching, Germany, with Professors Krausz and Kleineberg. In the second application, multilayer mirrors with polarization control are useful to study femtosecond spin dynamics in an ongoing collaboration with the T-REX group of Professor Parmigiani at Elettra in Trieste, Italy. As new ultrafast x-ray sources become available, for example free electron lasers, the multilayer designs described in this thesis can be extended to higher photon energies, and such designs can be used with those sources to enable new scientific studies, such as molecular bonding, phonon, and spin dynamics.

Aquila, Andrew Lee

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

182

X-ray spectroscopy of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I present work spanning a variety of topics relating to neutron star lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and utilize spectral information from X-ray observations to further our understanding of these sources. ...

Krauss, Miriam Ilana

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

On the Nature of the Gamma-ray Source 2FGL J1823.8 4312: The Discovery of a New Class of Extragalactic X-ray Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the unsolved mysteries of gamma-ray astronomy concerns the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Recently, using the Second Fermi LAT source catalog (2FGL) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) archive, we discovered that the WISE counterparts of gamma-ray blazars, a class of active galactic nuclei, delineate a region (the WISE Gamma-ray Strip) in the 3-dimensional infrared color space well separated from the locus of the other astronomical objects. Based on this result, we built an association procedure to recognize if there areWISE blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty region of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Here we report on our analysis of 2FGL J1823.8+4312, a gamma-ray active galactic nucleus of uncertain type associated with the X-ray source 1RXS J182418.7+430954 according to the 2FGL, to verify whether it is a blazar. Applying our association method we found two sources with IR colors typical of gamma-ray blazars, located within the 99.9% confidence region of 2FGL J1823.8+4312: WISE J182352.33+431452.5 and WISE J182409.25+431404.7. Then we searched in the Chandra, NVSS and SDSS archival observations for their counterparts. We discovered that WISE J182352.33+431452.5, our preferred gamma-ray blazar candidate according to our WISE association procedure, is detected in the optical and in the X-rays but not in the radio, making it extremely unusual if it is a blazar. Given its enigmatic spectral energy distribution, we considered the possibility that it is a 'radio faint blazar' or the prototype of a new class of extragalactic sources, our conclusion is independent of whether WISE J182352.33+431452.5 is the actual counterpart of 2FGL J1823.8+4312.

Massaro, Francesco

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

184

X-ray lithography using holographic images  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

Howells, Malcolm R. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

X-ray transmissive debris shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

Spielman, Rick B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

APS Science 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is my pleasure to introduce the 2009 annual report of the Advanced Photon Source. This was a very good year for us. We operated with high reliability and availability, despite growing problems with obsolete systems, and our users produced a record output of publications. The number of user experiments increased by 14% from 2008 to more than 3600. We congratulate the recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry-Venkatraman Ramakrishnan (Cambridge Institute for Medical Research), Thomas Steitz (Yale University), and Ada Yonath (Weizmann Institute) - who did a substantial amount of this work at APS beamlines. Thanks to the efforts of our users and staff, and the ongoing counsel of the APS Scientific Advisory Committee, we made major progress in advancing our planning for the upgrade of the APS (APS-U), producing a proposal that was positively reviewed. We hope to get formal approval in 2010 to begin the upgrade. With advocacy from our users and the support of our sponsor, the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, our operating budgets have grown to the level needed to more adequately staff our beamlines. We were also extremely fortunate to have received $7.9 M in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ('stimulus') funding to acquire new detectors and improve several of our beamlines. The success of the new Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford, the world's first x-ray free-electron laser, made us particularly proud since the undulators were designed and built by the APS. Among other highlights, we note that more than one-quarter of the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers, funded competitively across the U.S. in 2009 by the DOE, included the Advanced Photon Source in their proposed work, which shows that synchrotron radiation, and the APS in particular, are central to energy research. While APS research covers everything from fundamental to applied science (reflected by the highlights in this report), the challenge of sustainable energy provides an opportunity for expanded involvement with industrial research. We were privileged to recruit several outstanding new leaders at the APS. Linda Young, from Argonne's Chemical Sciences Division, became the new Director of the X-ray Science Division (XSD). Chris Jacobsen (from Stony Brook University) has been added to Linda's team as an XSD Associate Division Director, joining George Srajer. Alexander (Sasha) Zholents (formerly of Berkeley Lab) became Director of the Accelerator Systems Division. Sasha is the inventor of the short-pulse x-ray scheme that we plan to implement in the APS-U to obtain very high average brightness, broadband, 1-ps x-ray pulses. Walter Lowe (formerly of Howard University) has taken a new position as senior advisor for outreach and development of the user community. Walter's role is to increase the diversity of the user community (with diversity read broadly to include users, institutions, and technical disciplines that are underrepresented at APS). Walter is also leading an effort to increase access for industrial users. I am confident that we have in place a great team to help our users and the APS take fullest advantage of the APS-U opportunity. In planning with users for the proposed APS-U, we focused on the need to study 'real materials under real conditions in real time' on spatial and temporal scales unavailable today. Only by studying materials as they are made-or as they perform-in difficult environments can we solve the grand challenge of higher-performance, sustainable materials for energy and health. The proposed APS-U will improve the brightness of penetrating x-rays produced by the APS over 100 times, and support our efforts in developing state-of-the-art instruments to address these challenges.

Gibson, J. M; Mills, D. M.; Gerig, R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

X-ray Diffraction (XRD) 1.0 What is X-ray Diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction (XRD) · 1.0 What is X-ray Diffraction · 2.0 Basics of Crystallography · 3.0 Production of X-rays · 4.0 Applications of XRD · 5.0 Instrumental Sources of Error · 6.0 Conclusions #12 why the cleavage faces of crystals appear to reflect X-ray beams at certain angles of incidence (theta

Moeck, Peter

188

XMM-NEWTON X-RAY AND ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS OF THE FAST NOVA V2491 Cyg DURING THE SUPERSOFT SOURCE PHASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two XMM-Newton observations of the fast classical nova V2491 Cyg were carried out in short succession on days 39.93 and 49.62 after discovery, during the supersoft source (SSS) phase, yielding simultaneous X-ray and UV light curves and high-resolution X-ray spectra. The first X-ray light curve is highly variable, showing oscillations with a period of 37.2 minutes after an extended factor of three decline lasting {approx}3 hr, while the second X-ray light curve is less variable. The cause of the dip is currently unexplained and has most likely the same origin as similar events in the early SSS light curves of the novae V4743 Sgr and RS Oph, as it occurred on the same timescale. The oscillations are not present during the dip minimum and also not in the second observation. The UV light curves are variable but contain no dips and no period. High-resolution X-ray spectra are presented for four intervals of differing intensity. All spectra are atmospheric continua with deep absorption lines and absorption edges. Two interstellar lines of O I and N I are clearly seen at their rest wavelengths, while a large number of high-ionization absorption lines are found at blueshifts indicating an expansion velocity of 3000-3400 km s{sup -1}, which does not change significantly during the epochs of observation. Comparisons with the slower nova V4743 Sgr and the symbiotic recurrent nova RS Oph are presented. The SSS spectrum of V4743 Sgr is much softer with broader and more complex photospheric absorption lines. The ejecta are extended, allowing us to view a larger range of the radial velocity profile. Meanwhile, the absorption lines in RS Oph are as narrow as in V2491 Cyg, but they are less blueshifted. A remarkable similarity in the continua of V2491 Cyg and RS Oph is found. The only differences are smaller line shifts and additional emission lines in RS Oph that are related to the presence of a dense stellar wind from the evolved companion. Three unidentified absorption lines are present in the X-ray spectra of all three novae, with projected rest wavelengths 26.05 A, 29.45 A, and 30.0 A. No entirely satisfactory spectral model is currently available for the soft X-ray spectra of novae in outburst, and careful discussion of assumptions is required.

Ness, J.-U. [XMM-Newton Science Operations Centre, ESA, Madrid (Spain); Osborne, J. P.; Page, K. L.; Beardmore, A. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Dobrotka, A. [Department of Physics, Institute of Materials Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, 91724 Trnava (Slovakia); Drake, J. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pinto, C.; Detmers, R. G. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Schwarz, G. [American Astronomical Society, Washington, DC 20009-1231 (United States); Bode, M. F. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Starrfield, S. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Hernanz, M. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Sala, G. [Departament Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, EUETIB (UPC-IEEC), 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Krautter, J. [Landessternwarte Koenigstuhl, Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Woodward, C. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

X-ray populations in galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Today's sensistive, high resolution Chandra X-ray observations allow the study of many populations of X-ray sources. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, and provide the means for classifying the X-ray sources and probing their evolution. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar population, the amount of sources in star-forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Shart-lived, luminous, high mass binaries (HNXBs) dominate these young populations.

G. Fabbiano

2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

190

APS Science 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In my five years as the Director of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), I have been fortunate to see major growth in the scientific impact from the APS. This year I am particularly enthusiastic about prospects for our longer-term future. Every scientific instrument must remain at the cutting edge to flourish. Our plans for the next generation of APS--an APS upgrade--got seriously in gear this year with strong encouragement from our users and sponsors. The most promising avenue that has emerged is the energy-recovery linac (ERL) (see article on page xx), for which we are beginning serious R&D. The ERL{at}APS would offer revolutionary performance, especially for x-ray imaging and ultrafast science, while not seriously disrupting the existing user base. I am very proud of our accelerator physics and engineering staff, who not only keep the current APS at the forefront, but were able to greatly impress our international Machine Advisory Committee with the quality of their work on the possible upgrade option (see page xx). As we prepare for long-term major upgrades, our plans to develop and optimize all the sectors at APS in the near future are advancing. Several new beamlines saw first light this year, including a dedicated powder diffraction beamline (11-BM), two instruments for inelastic x-ray scattering at sector 30, and the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) Nanoprobe beamline at sector 26. Our partnership in the first x-ray free-electron laser (LCLS) to be built at Stanford contributes to revolutionary growth in ultrafast science (see page xx), and we are developing a pulse chirping scheme to get ps pulses at sector 7 of the APS within a year or so. In this report, you will find selected highlights of scientific research at the APS from calendar year 2006. The highlighted work covers diverse disciplines, from fundamental to applied science. In the article on page xx you can see the direct impact of APS research on technology. Several new products have emerged from work at the APS, to complement the tremendous output of work in basic science, which often has payoff in technology but over decades rather than years. Highlights in this report also reflect the relevance of APS work to Department of Energy missions, for example a route to more efficient fuel cells (page xx mr-88-073113) addresses the energy challenge, and natural approaches to cleaning up the environment.

Gibson, J. M.; Fenner, R. B.; Long, G.; Borland, M.; Decker, G.

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

191

Review of Discrete X-Ray Sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud: Summary of the ASCA Results and Implication on the Recent Star Forming Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We made 22 observations on the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and covered full regions by the end of the ASCA mission. We detected 106 discrete sources with a criterion of S/N > 5 and performed systematic analyses on all of the sources. We determined the source positions with an ~40'' error radius (90% confidence) for sources detected in the central 20' radius of the GIS. We detected coherent pulsations from 17 sources. Among them, eight were newly discovered during this study. We classified most of these pulsars as X-ray binary pulsars (XBPs) based on their properties, such as the flux variability and the existence of an optical counterpart. We detected X-ray emission from eight supernova remnants (SNRs). Among them, five SNRs showed emission lines in their spectra, hence we regarded the five as thermal SNRs. We found that XBPs and thermal SNRs in the SMC can be clearly separated by their spectral hardness ratio. Applying this empirical law to faint (thus unclassified) sources, we found 19 XBP candidates and four thermal SNR candidates. We also found several tens of candidates for active galactic nuclei, both from the hardness ratio and the logN--logS relation of extragalactic sources. Based on these ASCA results and further information from other sattelites, we compiled comprehensive catalogues of discrete X-ray sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Using the catalogues, we derived the spatial distributions of XBPs and SNRs. XBPs and SNRs were found to be concentrated in the main body and eastern wing, which resembles the distribution of young stars with ages of ~2e7yr. By comparing the source populations in the SMC and our Galaxy, we suggest that the star-forming rate (per unit mass) in the SMC was much higher than the Galaxy 1e7yr ago. We also discuss the recent change of the star-forming rate in the SMC.

Jun Yokogawa; Kensuke Imanishi; Masahiro Tsujimoto; Katsuji Koyama; Mamiko Nishiuchi

2003-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

192

Controlling X-rays With Light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

193

APS Science 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides research highlights from the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Although these highlights represent less than 10% of the published work from the APS in 2007, they give a flavor of the diversity and impact of user research at the facility. In the strategic planning the aim is to foster the growth of existing user communities and foresee new areas of research. This coming year finds the APS engaged in putting together, along with the users, a blueprint for the next five years, and making the case for a set of prioritized investments in beamlines, the accelerator, and infrastructure, each of which will be transformational in terms of scientific impact. As this is written plans are being formulated for an important user workshop on October 20-21, 2008, to prioritize strategic plans. The fruit from past investments can be seen in this report. Examples include the creation of a dedicated beamline for x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at Sector 8, the evolution of dedicated high-energy x-ray scattering beamlines at sectors 1 and 11, a dedicated imaging beamline at Sector 32, and new beamlines for inelastic scattering and powder diffraction. A single-pulse facility has been built in collaboration with Sector 14 (BioCARS) and Phil Anfinrud at the National Institutes of Health, which will offer exceptionally high flux for single-pulse diffraction. The nanoprobe at Sector 26, built and operated jointly by the Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials and the X-ray Operations and Research (XOR) section of the APS X-ray Science Division, has come on line to define the state of the art in nanoscience.

Not Available

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Total x-ray power measurements in the Sandia LIGA program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total X-ray power measurements using aluminum block calorimetry and other techniques were made at LIGA X-ray scanner synchrotron beamlines located at both the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). This block calorimetry work was initially performed on the LIGA beamline 3.3.1 of the ALS to provide experimental checks of predictions of the LEX-D (LIGA Exposure- Development) code for LIGA X-ray exposures, version 7.56, the version of the code in use at the time calorimetry was done. These experiments showed that it was necessary to use bend magnet field strengths and electron storage ring energies different from the default values originally in the code in order to obtain good agreement between experiment and theory. The results indicated that agreement between LEX-D predictions and experiment could be as good as 5% only if (1) more accurate values of the ring energies, (2) local values of the magnet field at the beamline source point, and (3) the NIST database for X-ray/materials interactions were used as code inputs. These local magnetic field value and accurate ring energies, together with NIST database, are now defaults in the newest release of LEX-D, version 7.61. Three dimensional simulations of the temperature distributions in the aluminum calorimeter block for a typical ALS power measurement were made with the ABAQUS code and found to be in good agreement with the experimental temperature data. As an application of the block calorimetry technique, the X-ray power exiting the mirror in place at a LIGA scanner located at the APS beamline 10 BM was measured with a calorimeter similar to the one used at the ALS. The overall results at the APS demonstrated the utility of calorimetry in helping to characterize the total X-ray power in LIGA beamlines. In addition to the block calorimetry work at the ALS and APS, a preliminary comparison of the use of heat flux sensors, photodiodes and modified beam calorimeters as total X-ray power monitors was made at the ALS, beamline 3.3.1. This work showed that a modification of a commercially available, heat flux sensor could result in a simple, direct reading beam power meter that could be a useful for monitoring total X-ray power in Sandia's LIGA exposure stations at the ALS, APS and Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL).

Malinowski, Michael E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ting, Aili (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

High K-alpha X-ray Conversion Efficiency From Extended Source Gas Jet Targets Irradiated by Ultra Short Laser Pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absolute laser conversion efficiency to K{sub {alpha}}-like inner shell x-rays (integrated from K{sub {alpha}} to K{sub {beta}}) is observed to be an order of magnitude higher in argon gas jets than in solid targets due to enhanced emission from higher ionization stages following ultra short pulse laser irradiation. Excluding the higher ionization stages, the conversion efficiency to near-cold K{sub {alpha}} is the same in gas jets as in solid targets. These results demonstrate that gas jet targets are bright, high conversion efficiency, high repetition rate, debris-free multi-keV x-ray sources for spectrally resolved scattering and backlighting of rapidly evolving dense matter.

Kugland, N L; Constantin, C; Collette, A; Dewald, E; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Niemann, C

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Hard x-ray imaging from explorer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coded aperture X-ray detectors were applied to obtain large increases in sensitivity as well as angular resolution. A hard X-ray coded aperture detector concept is described which enables very high sensitivity studies persistent hard X-ray sources and gamma ray bursts. Coded aperture imaging is employed so that approx. 2 min source locations can be derived within a 3 deg field of view. Gamma bursts were located initially to within approx. 2 deg and X-ray/hard X-ray spectra and timing, as well as precise locations, derived for possible burst afterglow emission. It is suggested that hard X-ray imaging should be conducted from an Explorer mission where long exposure times are possible.

Grindlay, J.E.; Murray, S.S.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Ultrabright multikilovolt x-ray source: saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for the generation of ultrabright multikilovolt x-rays from saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states is described. Conditions for x-ray amplification in this spectral region combine the production of cold, high-Z matter, with the direct, selective multiphoton excitation of hollow atoms from clusters using ultraviolet radiation and a nonlinear mode of confined, self-channeled propagation in plasmas. Data obtained is consistent with the presence of saturated amplification on several transition arrays of the hollow atom Xe(L) spectrum (.lambda..about.2.9 .ANG.). An estimate of the peak brightness achieved is .about.10.sup.29 .gamma..multidot.s.sup.-1.multidot.mm.sup.-2.multidot.mr.sup.-2 (0.1% Bandwidth).sup.-1, that is .about.10.sup.5 -fold higher than presently available synchotron technology.

Rhodes, Charles K.; Boyer, Keith

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

X-RAY AND RADIO FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT BLAZAR CANDIDATES IN THE FERMI-LAT UNASSOCIATED SOURCE POPULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the results of X-ray and radio follow-up observations of two GeV gamma-ray sources 2FGL J0923.5+1508 and 2FGL J1502.1+5548, selected as candidates for high-redshift blazars from unassociated sources in the Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog. We utilize the Suzaku satellite and the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) telescopes for X-ray and radio observations, respectively. For 2FGL J0923.5+1508, a possible radio counterpart NVSS J092357+150518 is found at 1.4 GHz from an existing catalog, but we do not detect any X-ray emission from it and derive a flux upper limit F{sub 2-8{sub keV}} < 1.37 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Radio observations at 6.7 GHz also result in an upper limit of S{sub 6.7{sub GHz}} < 19 mJy, implying a steep radio spectrum that is not expected for a blazar. On the other hand, we detect X-rays from NVSS J150229+555204, the potential 1.4 GHz radio counterpart of 2FGL J1502.1+5548. The X-ray spectrum can be fitted with an absorbed power-law model with a photon index {gamma} = 1.8{sup +0.3}{sub -0.2} and the unabsorbed flux is F{sub 2-8{sub keV}} = 4.3{sup +1.1}{sub -1.0} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Moreover, we detect unresolved radio emission at 6.7 GHz with flux S{sub 6.7{sub GHz}} = 30.1 mJy, indicating a compact, flat-spectrum radio source. If NVSS J150229+555204 is indeed associated with 2FGL J1502.1+5548, then we find that its multiwavelength spectrum is consistent with a blazar at redshift z {approx} 3-4.

Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Maeda, K. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 Japan (Japan); Niinuma, K. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yamaguchi University, Yoshida 1677-1, Yamaguchi 753-8512 (Japan); Honma, M. [Mizusawa VLBI Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Inoue, Y. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Totani, T. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Inoue, S., E-mail: s072803523@akane.waseda.jp [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

199

High speed x-ray beam chopper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

McPherson, Armon (Oswego, IL); Mills, Dennis M. (Naperville, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

X-ray Observations of Mrk 231  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

T. J. Turner

1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

X-ray laser microscope apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

Suckewer, Szymon (Princeton, NJ); DiCicco, Darrell S. (Plainsboro, NJ); Hirschberg, Joseph G. (Coral Gables, FL); Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ); Sathre, Robert (Princeton, NJ); Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A 400 solar mass black hole in the Ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1 accreting close to its Eddington limit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M82 X-1, the brightest X-ray source in the galaxy M82, has been thought to be an intermediate-mass black hole (100 to 10,000 solar masses) because of its extremely high luminosity and variability characteristics, although some models suggest that its mass may be only about 20 solar masses. The previous mass estimates were based on scaling relations that use low-frequency characteristic timescales which have large intrinsic uncertainties. For stellar-mass black holes, we know that the high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (100-450 hertz) in the X-ray emission that occur in a 3:2 frequency ratio are stable and scale in frequency inversely with black hole mass with a reasonably small dispersion. The discovery of such stable oscillations thus potentially offers an alternative and less ambiguous means of mass determination for intermediate-mass black holes, but has hitherto not been realized. Here we report stable, twin-peak (3:2 frequency ratio) X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations from M82 X-1 at frequencies o...

Pasham, Dheeraj R; Mushotzky, Richard F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Use of the high-energy x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source to investigate the interactions between metals and bacteria.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the fate of heavy-metal contaminants in the environment is of fundamental importance in the development and evaluation of effective remediation and sequestration strategies. Among the factors influencing the transport of these contaminants are their chemical separation and the chemical and physical attributes of the surrounding medium. Bacteria and the extracellular material associated with them are thought to play a key role in determining a contaminant's speciation and thus its mobility in the environment. In addition, the microenvironment at and adjacent to actively metabolizing cell surfaces can be significantly different from the bulk environment. Thus, the spatial distribution and chemical separation of contaminants and elements that are key to biological processes must be characterized at micron and submicron resolution in order to understand the microscopic physical, geological, chemical, and biological interfaces that determine a contaminant's macroscopic fate. Hard X-ray microimaging is a powerful technique for the element-specific investigation of complex environmental samples at th needed micron and submicron resolution. An important advantage of this technique results from the large penetration depth of hard X-rays in water. This advantage minimizes the requirements for sample preparation and allows the detailed study of hydrated samples. This paper presents results of studies of the spatial distribution of naturally occurring metals and a heavy-metal contaminant (Cr) in and near hydrated bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) in the early stages of biofilm development, performed at the Advanced Photon Source Sector 2 X-ray microscopy beamline.

Kemner, K. M.; Lai, B.; Maser, J.; Schneegurt, M. A.; Cai, Z.; Ilinski, P. P.; Kulpa, C. F.; Legnini, D. G.; Nealson, K. H.; Pratt, S. T.; Rodrigues, W.; Tischler, M. L.; Yun, W.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

AN X-RAY COOLING-CORE CLUSTER SURROUNDING A LOW-POWER COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCE 1321+045  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discovered an X-ray cluster in a Chandra observation of the compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio source 1321+045 (z = 0.263). CSS sources are thought to be young radio objects at the beginning of their evolution and can potentially test the cluster heating process. 1321+045 is a relatively low-luminosity source and its morphology consists of two radio lobes on the opposite sides of a radio core with no evidence for jets or hotspots. The optical emission line ratios are consistent with an interstellar medium dominated by active galactic nucleus photoionization with a small contribution from star formation, and no contributions from shocks. Based on these ratios, we classify 1321+045 as a low excitation galaxy (LEG) and suggest that its radioactivity is in a coasting phase. The X-ray emission associated with the radio source is detected with 36.1 {+-} 8.3 counts, but the origin of this emission is highly uncertain. The current X-ray image of the cluster does not show any signatures of a radio source impact on the cluster medium. Chandra detects the cluster emission at >3{sigma} level out to {approx}60'' (240 kpc). We obtain the best-fit beta model parameters of the surface brightness profile of {beta} = 0.58 {+-} 0.2 and a core radius of 9.4{sup +1.1}{sub -0.9} arcsec. The average temperature of the cluster is equal to kT = 4.4{sup +0.5}{sub -0.3} keV, with a temperature and cooling profile indicative of a cooling core. We measure the cluster luminosity L{sub (0.5-2{sub keV)}} = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} and mass 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun}.

Kunert-Bajraszewska, M. [Torun Centre for Astronomy, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, NCU, Grudziacka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Siemiginowska, A. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Labiano, A., E-mail: magda@astro.uni.torun.pl [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Carretera de Ajalvir km. 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

Small angle X-ray scattering study of coal soot formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to examine, by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), the formation of soot from individual coal particle combustion in a methane flat flame burner. The SAXS instrument at the Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotron Radiation Center (BESSRC) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can be used to observe both the formation of spherules and clusters since it can access length scales of 6--6000 {angstrom}. The high X-ray flux enables rapid acquisition of scattering data of various regions of the flame. SAXS data reveal particle size, shape, surface areas, and surface roughness.

Winans, R. E.; Parker, J. T.; Seifert, S.; Fletcher, T. H.

2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

206

7 Resolution in Protein 2-Dimentional-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional (2D) crystals in the lipid en- vironment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. X-ray diffraction from individual 2D crystals did not represent a suitable investigation tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs) has now provided a mean to outrun the damage. Here we report on measurements performed at the LCLS X-FEL on bacteriorhodopsin 2D crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merg- ing data from about a dozen of single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 A, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase of resolution. The presented results pave the way to further X-FEL studies on 2D crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Boutet, Sebastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence , John C.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

207

Large-field high-contrast hard x-ray Zernike phase-contrast nano-imaging beamline at Pohang Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed an off-axis-illuminated zone-plate-based hard x-ray Zernike phase-contrast microscope beamline at Pohang Light Source. Owing to condenser optics-free and off-axis illumination, a large field of view was achieved. The pinhole-type Zernike phase plate affords high-contrast images of a cell with minimal artifacts such as the shade-off and halo effects. The setup, including the optics and the alignment, is simple and easy, and allows faster and easier imaging of large bio-samples.

Lim, Jun; Huang, Jung Yun [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Yeong [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Hong-Tae [Department of Anatomy, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu 705-034 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Quantitative Measurements of X-ray Intensity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter describes the characterization of several X-ray sources and their use in calibrating different types of X-ray cameras at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The cameras are employed in experimental plasma studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The sources provide X-rays in the energy range from several hundred eV to 110 keV. The key to this effort is measuring the X-ray beam intensity accurately and traceable to international standards. This is accomplished using photodiodes of several types that are calibrated using radioactive sources and a synchrotron source using methods and materials that are traceable to the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The accreditation procedures are described. The chapter begins with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of X-ray physics. The types of X-ray sources that are used for device calibration are described. The next section describes the photodiode types that are used for measuring X-ray intensity: power measuring photodiodes, energy dispersive photodiodes, and cameras comprising photodiodes as pixel elements. Following their description, the methods used to calibrate the primary detectors, the power measuring photodiodes and the energy dispersive photodiodes, as well as the method used to get traceability to international standards are described. The X-ray source beams can then be measured using the primary detectors. The final section then describes the use of the calibrated X-ray beams to calibrate X-ray cameras. Many of the references are web sites that provide databases, explanations of the data and how it was generated, and data calculations for specific cases. Several general reference books related to the major topics are included. Papers expanding some subjects are cited.

Haugh, M. J., Schneider, M.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12.0.2.2 Citation: J.J. Turner et al., "X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures," Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 033904 (2011). Web: http:prl.aps.orgpdfPRLv107i3e033904...

210

Compound refractive X-ray lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

Nygren, David R. (Berkeley, CA); Cahn, Robert (Walnut Creek, CA); Cederstrom, Bjorn (Traellborg, SE); Danielsson, Mats (Stocksund, SE); Vestlund, Jonas (Stockholm, SE)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

XMM-Newton Observations Reveal the X-ray Counterpart of the Very-high-energy gamma-ray Source HESS J1640-465  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present X-ray observations of the as of yet unidentified very high-energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray source HESS J1640-465 with the aim of establishing a counterpart of this source in the keV energy range, and identifying the mechanism responsible for the VHE emission. The 21.8 ksec XMM-Newton observation of HESS J1640-465 in September 2005 represents a significant improvement in sensitivity and angular resolution over previous ASCA studies in this region. These new data show a hard-spectrum X-ray emitting object at the centroid of the H.E.S.S. source, within the shell of the radio Supernova Remnant (SNR) G338.3-0.0. This object is consistent with the position and flux previously measured by both ASCA and Swift-XRT but is now shown to be significantly extended. We argue that this object is very likely the counterpart to HESS J1640-465 and that both objects may represent the Pulsar Wind Nebula of an as of yet undiscovered pulsar associated with G338.3-0.0.

Funk, S.; Hinton, J.A.; Puhlhofer, G.; Aharonian, F.A.; Hofmann, W.; Reimer, O.; Wagner, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Leeds U. /Dublin Inst. /Stanford U., HEPL; Funk, S.; Hinton, J.A.; Puehlhofer, G.; Aharonian, F.A.; Hofmann, W.; Reimer, O.; Wagner, S.

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

212

X-ray beamsplitter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

1987-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

X-ray beamsplitter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel S. (Mountain View, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Chest x-Rays  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

215

X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the nuclear astrophysics aspects of accreting neutron stars in X-ray binaries. We summarize open astrophysical questions in light of recent observations and their relation to the underlying nuclear physics. Recent progress in the understanding of the nuclear physics, especially of X-ray bursts, is also discussed.

H. Schatz; K. E. Rehm

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R. [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

X-ray views of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A neutron star low-mass X-ray binary is a binary stellar system with a neutron star and a low-mass companion star rotating around each other. In this system the neutron star accretes mass from the companion, and as this matter falls into the deep potential well of the neutron star, the gravitational potential energy is released primarily in the X-ray wavelengths. Such a source was first discovered in X-rays in 1962, and this discovery formally gave birth to the "X-ray astronomy". In the subsequent decades, our knowledge of these sources has increased enormously by the observations with several X-ray space missions. Here we give a brief overview of our current understanding of the X-ray observational aspects of these systems.

Sudip Bhattacharyya

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental Science Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular...

219

Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

Haugh, M. J.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

220

Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Rise time measurement for ultrafast X-ray pulses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Weber, Franz A. (Oakland, CA); Moon, Stephen J. (Tracy, CA)

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

222

Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the availability of the new generation of X-ray sources and the advanced X-ray optics. The advanced X-ray Optics along with novel methodology has made it possible to...

223

DISCOVERY OF A LARGE POPULATION OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES IN THE BULGELESS GALAXIES NGC 337 AND ESO 501-23  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used Chandra observations of eight bulgeless disk galaxies to identify new ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) candidates, study their high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) population, and search for low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We report the discovery of 16 new ULX candidates in our sample of galaxies. Eight of these are found in the star forming galaxy NGC 337, none of which are expected to be background contaminants. The HMXB luminosity function of NGC 337 implies a star formation rate (SFR) of 6.8{sup +4.4}{sub -3.5} M{sub ?} yr{sup 1}, consistent at 1.5? with a recent state of the art SFR determination. We also report the discovery of a bright ULX candidate (X-1) in ESO 501-23. X-1's spectrum is well fit by an absorbed power law with ?= 1.18{sup +0.19}{sub -0.11} and N{sub H} = 1.13{sup +7.07}{sub -1.13}10{sup 20} cm{sup 2}, implying a 0.3-8 keV flux of 1.08{sup +0.05}{sub -0.07}10{sup -12} erg s{sup 1} cm{sup 2}. Its X-ray luminosity (L{sub X} ) is poorly constrained due to uncertainties in the host galaxy's distance, but we argue that its spectrum implies L{sub X} > 10{sup 40} erg s{sup 1}. An optical counterpart to this object may be present in an Hubble Space Telescope image. We also identify ULX candidates in IC 1291, PGC 3853, NGC 5964, and NGC 2805. We find no evidence of nuclear activity in the galaxies in our sample, placing a flux upper limit of 4 10{sup 15} erg s{sup 1} cm{sup 2} on putative AGN. Additionally, the Type II-P supernova SN 2011DQ in NGC 337, which exploded two months before our X-ray observation, is undetected.

Somers, Garrett; Mathur, Smita; Martini, Paul; Grier, Catherine J. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Watson, Linda [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ferrarese, Laura, E-mail: somers@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Hertzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

X-ray laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-9473-8 REVIEW X-ray absorption spectroscopy Junko Yano and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, bothX-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-

Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type: Review X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Junko Yano andPhotosystem II; XAS, X-ray absorption spectroscopy; EXAFS,X-ray absorption fine structure; EPR, electron paramagnetic

Yano, Junko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Long-Term Spectral Variations of Ultraluminous X-ray Sources in the Interacting Galaxy Systems M51 and NGC4490/85  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variable ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), which are considered to be black hole binaries (BHBs), are known to show state transitions similarly to Galactic BHBs. However, the relation between the ULX states and the Galactic BHB states is still unclear primarily due to less well-understood behaviors of ULXs in contrast to the Galactic BHBs. Here, we report a statistical X-ray spectral study of 34 energy spectra from seven bright ULXs in the interacting galaxy systems M51 and NGC4490/85, using archive data from multiple Chandra and XMM-Newton observations spanning for a few years. In order to compare with Galactic BHB states, we applied representative spectral models of BHBs; a power-law (PL), a multi-color disk black body (MCD), and a slim disk model to all the ULX spectra. We found a hint of a bimodal structure in the luminosity distribution of the samples, suggesting that ULXs have two states with typical luminosities of 3-6*10^{39} and 1.5-3*10^{39} ergs/s. Most spectra in the brighter state are explained...

Yoshida, Tessei; Matsushita, Kyoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Indus-2 X-ray lithography beamline for X-ray optics and material science applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray lithography is an ideal technique by which high aspect ratio and high spatial resolution micro/nano structures are fabricated using X-rays from synchrotron radiation source. The technique has been used for fabricating optics (X-ray, visible and infrared), sensors and actuators, fluidics and photonics. A beamline for X-ray lithography is operational on Indus-2. The beamline offers wide lithographic window from 1-40keV photon energy and wide beam for producing microstructures in polymers upto size ?100mm 100mm. X-ray exposures are possible in air, vacuum and He gas environment. The air based exposures enables the X-ray irradiation of resist for lithography and also irradiation of biological and liquid samples.

Dhamgaye, V. P., E-mail: vishal@rrcat.gov.in; Lodha, G. S., E-mail: vishal@rrcat.gov.in [Indus Synchrotrons Utilisation Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

229

THE X-RAY BINARY POPULATION IN M33. II. X-RAY SPECTRA AND VARIABILITY H.-J. Grimm, J. McDowell, A. Zezas, D.-W. Kim, and G. Fabbiano  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE X-RAY BINARY POPULATION IN M33. II. X-RAY SPECTRA AND VARIABILITY H.-J. Grimm, J. McDowell, A the X-ray spectra and X-ray spectral variability of compact X-ray sources for 3 Chandra observations observations shows that X-ray absorption values are consistent with Galactic X-ray binaries and most sources

Kim, Dong-Woo

230

X-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2007; 36: 336342  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Chicago, IL 60637, USA 3 Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source and School of Applied and EngineeringX-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2007; 36: 336­342 Published online in Wiley InterScience (www to establish a breakthrough in high-resolution, simultaneous area mapping of multiple trace elements

Limburg, Karin E.

231

X-Ray Data from the X-Ray Data Booklet Online  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The original X-Ray Data Booklet, published in 1985, became a classic reference source. The online version has been significantly revised and updated to reflect today's science. Hundreds of pages of authoritative data provide the x-ray properties of elements, information on synchrotron radiation, scattering processes, optics and detectors, and other related calculations, formulas, and data tables.

Thompson, Albert C.; Attwood, David T.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Underwood, James H.; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kirz, Janos; Lindau, Ingolf; Pianetta, Piero; Winick, Herman; Williams, Gwyn P.; Scofield, James H.

232

Predicted X-ray backgrounds for the International X-ray Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The background that will be observed by IXO's X-ray detectors naturally separates into two components: (1) a Cosmic X-ray Background (CXB), primarily due to unresolved point sources at high energies (E>2 keV), along with ...

Bautz, Marshall W.

233

X-ray beam finder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

Gilbert, H.W.

1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

234

High-energy x-ray production with pyroelectric crystals Jeffrey A. Geuthera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-energy x-ray production with pyroelectric crystals Jeffrey A. Geuthera and Yaron Danon, the usefulness of an x-ray source is determined by its yield and endpoint energy. In x-ray fluorescence, for example, high-energy sources enable the excitation of the K-shell x-ray peaks for high-Z materials as well

Danon, Yaron

235

X-Ray Observation on the Monoceros R2 Star-Forming Region with the Chandra ACIS-I Array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the results of the Chandra observation on the central region of the Monoceros R2 cloud (Mon R2), a high-mass star-forming region (SFR). With a deep exposure of 100 ks, we detected 368 X-ray sources, 80% of which were identified with the NIR counterparts. We systematically analyzed the spectra and time variability of most of the X-ray emitting sources and provided a comprehensive X-ray source catalog for the first time. Using the J-, H-, and K-band magnitudes of the NIR counterparts, we estimated the evolutionary phase (classical T Tauri stars and weak-lined T Tauri stars) and the mass of the X-ray emitting sources, and analyzed the X-ray properties as a function of the age and mass. We found a marginal hint that classical T Tauri stars have a slightly higher temperature (2.4 keV) than that of weak-lined T Tauri stars (2.0 keV). A significant fraction of the high- and intermediate-mass sources have a time variability and high plasma temperatures (2.7 keV). We performed the same analysis for other SFRs, the Orion Nebula Cluster and Orion Molecular Cloud-2/3, and obtained similar results to Mon R2. This supports the earlier results of this observation obtained by Kohno et al. (2002, ApJ, 567, 423) and Preibisch et al. (2002, A&A, 392, 945) that high- and intermediate- mass young stellar objects emit X-rays via magnetic activity. We also found a significant difference in the spatial distribution between X-ray and NIR sources.

Hiroshi Nakajima; Kensuke Imanishi; Shin-ichiro Takagi; Katsuji Koyama; Masahiro Tsujimoto

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

236

Chandra Survey in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep Field. I. X-ray Data, Point-like Source Catalog, Sensitivity Maps, and Number Counts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present data products from the 300 ks Chandra survey in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) deep field. This field has a unique set of 9-band infrared photometry covering 2-24 micron from the AKARI Infrared Camera, including mid-infrared (MIR) bands not covered by Spitzer. The survey is one of the deepest ever achieved at ~15 micron, and is by far the widest among those with similar depths in the MIR. This makes this field unique for the MIR-selection of AGN at z~1. We design a source detection procedure, which performs joint Maximum Likelihood PSF fits on all of our 15 mosaicked Chandra pointings covering an area of 0.34 square degree. The procedure has been highly optimized and tested by simulations. We provide a point source catalog with photometry and Bayesian-based 90 per cent confidence upper limits in the 0.5-7, 0.5-2, 2-7, 2-4, and 4-7 keV bands. The catalog contains 457 X-ray sources and the spurious fraction is estimated to be ~1.7 per cent. Sensitivity and 90 per cent confidence upper flux limit...

Krumpe, M; Brunner, H; Hanami, H; Ishigaki, T; Takagi, T; Markowitz, A G; Goto, T; Malkan, M A; Matsuhara, H; Pearson, C; Ueda, Y; Wada, T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

ON THE X-RAY EMISSION MECHANISMS OF THE PERSISTENT SOURCE AND VERY LOW FLUENCE BURSTS OF SGR J0501+4516  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present here a detailed spectral study of the X-ray emission of the persistent source and the low-fluence bursts of SGR J0501+4516 observed during a deep XMM-Newton observation near the peak of its 2008 outburst. For the persistent emission, we employ a physically motivated continuum emission model and spectroscopically determine important source properties such as the surface magnetic field strength and the magnetospheric scattering optical depth. We find that the magnetar surface temperature near the peak of its activity is 0.38 keV, corresponding to an emission area of 131 km{sup 2} at a distance of 2 kpc. The surface magnetic field strength determined spectroscopically, B = 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} G, is consistent with the dipole field strength inferred from the source spin and spin-down rate. We fit the stacked spectra of 129 very faint bursts with a modified blackbody model and find a temperature of 1.16 keV, corresponding to an emission area of 93 km{sup 2}. We also find evidence for cooling during the burst decay phase.

Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Guever, Tolga [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Kouveliotou, Chryssa, E-mail: linlin@sabanciuniv.edu [Science and Technology Office, ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

238

Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

Hessler, Jan P.

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Directions to the APS User Office | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocation ofthe APS User Office New users must go directly

240

APS ES&H Committees | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2AP-XPS MeasuresIrradiationAdvancedAPSAPS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Generation of circularly polarized radiation from a compact plasma-based extreme ultraviolet light source for tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generation of circularly polarized light in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (about 25 eV250 eV) is highly desirable for applications in spectroscopy and microscopy but very challenging to achieve in a small-scale laboratory. We present a compact apparatus for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation from a gas-discharge plasma light source between 50 eV and 70 eV photon energy. In this spectral range, the 3p absorption edges of Fe (54 eV), Co (60 eV), and Ni (67 eV) offer a high magnetic contrast often employed for magneto-optical and electron spectroscopy as well as for magnetic imaging. We simulated and designed an instrument for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation and performed polarimetric measurements of the degree of linear and circular polarization. Furthermore, we demonstrate first measurements of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co 3p absorption edge with a plasma-based EUV light source. Our approach opens the door for laboratory-based, element-selective spectroscopy of magnetic materials and spectro-microscopy of ferromagnetic domains.

Wilson, Daniel; Rudolf, Denis, E-mail: d.rudolf@fz-juelich.de; Juschkin, Larissa [RWTH Aachen University, Experimental Physics of EUV, Steinbachstrae 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jlich GmbH, Peter Grnberg Institut (PGI-9), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jlich (Germany); Weier, Christian; Adam, Roman; Schneider, Claus M. [Forschungszentrum Jlich GmbH, Peter Grnberg Institut (PGI-6), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jlich (Germany); Winkler, Gerrit; Frmter, Robert [Institut fr Angewandte Physik, Universitt Hamburg, Jungiusstrae 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Danylyuk, Serhiy [RWTH Aachen University, Chair for Technology of Optical Systems, JARA-FIT, Steinbachstrae 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Bergmann, Klaus [Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology, Steinbachstrasse 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Grtzmacher, Detlev [Forschungszentrum Jlich GmbH, Peter Grnberg Institut (PGI-9), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jlich (Germany)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

LONG-TERM SPECTRAL VARIATIONS OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES IN THE INTERACTING GALAXY SYSTEMS M 51 AND NGC 4490/85  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), which are considered to be black hole binaries (BHBs), are known to show state transitions similar to Galactic BHBs. However, the relation between the ULX states and the Galactic BHB states is still unclear, primarily due to the less well-understood behaviors of ULXs in contrast to the Galactic BHBs. Here, we report a statistical X-ray spectral study of 34 energy spectra from seven bright ULXs in the interacting galaxy systems M 51 and NGC 4490/85, using archive data from multiple Chandra and XMM-Newton observations spanning a few years. In order to compare them with Galactic BHB states, we applied representative spectral models of BHBs-a power-law (PL), a multi-color disk blackbody (MCD), and a slim-disk model-to all the ULX spectra. We found a hint of a bimodal structure in the luminosity distribution of the samples, suggesting that ULXs have two states that respectively have typical luminosities of (3-6)x 10{sup 39} and (1.5-3)x 10{sup 39} ergs s{sup -1}. Most spectra in the brighter state are explained by the MCD or the slim-disk model, whereas those in the fainter state are explained by the PL model. In particular, the slim-disk model successfully explains the observed spectral variations of NGC 4490/85 ULX-6 and ULX-8 by changes of the mass accretion rate to a black hole of an estimated mass of <40 M{sub sun}. From the best-fit model parameters of each state, we speculate that the brighter state in these two ULXs corresponds to the brightest state of Galactic BHBs, which is often called the 'apparently standard state'. The fainter state of the ULXs has a PL-shaped spectrum, but the photon index range is much wider than that seen in any single state of Galactic BHBs. We thus speculate that it is a state unique to ULXs. Some sources show much fainter and steeper spectra than the faint state, which we identified as yet another state.

Yoshida, Tessei; Ebisawa, Ken; Tsujimoto, Masahiro [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Matsushita, Kyoko [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Kawaguchi, Toshihiro, E-mail: yoshida.tessei@ac.jaxa.j [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

243

Modeling of ns and ps laser-induced soft X-ray sources using nitrogen gas puff target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas puff laser plasma is studied as a source of water window radiation with 2.88?nm wavelength, corresponding to quantum transition 1s{sup 2} ? 1s2p of helium-like nitrogen ions. Spatial development of plasma induced by Nd:YAG laser beam is simulated by 2D Radiation-Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic code Z*. The results for nitrogen gas layer (0.72?mm thickness, 1?bar pressure) and two different laser pulses (600 mJ/7?ns and 525 mJ/170 ps), corresponding to the experiments done in Laser Laboratory Gottingen are presented.

Vrba, P., E-mail: vrba@ipp.cas.cz [Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences, Za Slovankou 3, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Vrbova, M. [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Sitna 3105, Kladno 2 (Czech Republic); Zakharov, S. V. [EPPRA sas, Villebon/Yvette (France); Zakharov, V. S. [EPPRA sas, Villebon/Yvette (France); KIAM RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Line X-ray emission from Al targets irradiated by high-intensity, variable-length laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Line X-ray emission from Al targets irradiated by high-intensity, variable-length laser pulses J; the scaling rules for the conversion efficiency of the laser radiation into the line X-ray emission are discussed. Keywords: Laser-produced plasma; Line X-ray emission; X-ray sources; X-ray spectroscopy 1

Limpouch, Jiri

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - alxga1-xas high-energy x-ray Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

All rights reserved. X-ray Diffraction Activity... Background Information The X-ray powder Diffractometer uses different ... Source: Cohen, Itai - Department of Physics, Cornell...

246

X-Ray Observations of Radio Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some of the ways that X-ray observations provide unique information on radio galaxies. Thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission provides detailed data on ambient densities and temperatures. These parameters in turn can be used for pressure balance calculations and can demonstrate how the ambient gas affects radio source structure. Additionally, many signatures of the interaction of radio jets and lobes with the hot gas are found in high resolution X-ray maps. Non-thermal X-ray emission from knots and hotspots of radio jets can give us constraints on the relativistic electron population for energies greater that that normally sampled in the radio (in the case of synchrotron emission) or can give us an independent estimate of the average magnetic field strength (if inverse Compton emission is the origin of the X-rays). From recent ROSAT HRI observations of 3C 390.3 and 3C 120, we show evidence that X-ray emission from knots and hotspots appears to be associated with regions of large gradients in the radio surface brightness; i.e. at the location of powerful shocks.

D. E. Harris

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

(Research at and operation of the material science x-ray absorption beamline (X-11) at the National Synchrotron Light Source)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses three projects at the Material Science X-Ray Absorption Beamline. Topics discussed include: XAFS study of some titanium silicon and germanium compounds; initial XAS results of zirconium/silicon reactions; and low angle electron yield detector.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

[Research at and operation of the material science x-ray absorption beamline (X-11) at the National Synchrotron Light Source]. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses three projects at the Material Science X-Ray Absorption Beamline. Topics discussed include: XAFS study of some titanium silicon and germanium compounds; initial XAS results of zirconium/silicon reactions; and low angle electron yield detector.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

X-ray Diffraction / MSE 603 Spring 2002 Qun Shen / CHESS qs11@cornell.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction / MSE 603 Spring 2002 Qun Shen / CHESS qs11@cornell.edu 1. X-ray production & basic properties ­ common sources for diffraction experiments ­ synchrotron radiation ­ response to x-rays by an electron ­ refraction index ­ total external reflection & evanescent wave, TXRF 2. X-ray scattering basics

Shen, Qun

250

X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies Craig L. Sarazin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies Craig L. Sarazin Department of Astronomy, University show that they are bright x-ray sources, with luminosities of 1043 45 ergs/sec. It is now established the stars in all the galaxies in the cluster. The x-ray spectra of clusters show strong x-ray line emission

Sarazin, Craig

251

X-ray four-wave mixing in molecules Satoshi Tanaka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray four-wave mixing in molecules Satoshi Tanaka Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester radiation intense light sources have opened up a new era in soft x-ray spectroscopy. The dramatic improvements of spectral resolution in x-ray absorption1,2 and x-ray photoemission spectra3 have revealed

Mukamel, Shaul

252

Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency. 2 figures.

Steinmeyer, P.A.

1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

253

Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for minitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency.

Steinmeyer, Peter A. (Arvada, CO)

1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

254

X-ray spectroscopy of warm and hot electron components in the CAPRICE source plasma at EIS testbench at GSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental campaign aiming to detect X radiation emitted by the plasma of the CAPRICE source operating at GSI, Darmstadt has been carried out. Two different detectors (a SDD Silicon Drift Detector and a HpGe hyper-pure Germanium detector) have been used to characterize the warm (230 keV) and hot (30500 keV) electrons in the plasma, collecting the emission intensity and the energy spectra for different pumping wave frequencies and then correlating them with the CSD of the extracted beam measured by means of a bending magnet. A plasma emissivity model has been used to extract the plasma density along the cone of sight of the SDD and HpGe detectors, which have been placed beyond specific collimators developed on purpose. Results show that the tuning of the pumping frequency considerably modifies the plasma density especially in the warm electron population domain, which is the component responsible for ionization processes: a strong variation of the plasma density near axis region has been detected. Potential correlations with the charge state distribution in the plasma are explored.

Mascali, D., E-mail: davidmascali@lns.infn.it; Celona, L.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Neri, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy)] [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Maimone, F.; Maeder, J.; Tinschert, K.; Spaedtke, K. P.; Rossbach, J.; Lang, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)] [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Romano, F. P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy) [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Musumarra, A.; Altana, C.; Caliri, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy) [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universit degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass- radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290 Hz) has been claimed.

Tod E. Strohmayer

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290 Hz) has been claimed.

Tod E. Strohmayer

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

257

X-ray compass for determining device orientation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source.

Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

X-ray compass for determining device orientation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source are disclosed. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. 25 figs.

Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Fitch, J.P.; Everett, M.J.; Colston, B.W.; Stone, G.F.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

X-ray emission properties of galaxies in Abell 3128  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use archival Chandra X-ray Observatory data to investigate X-ray emission from early-type galaxies in the rich z=0.06 cluster Abell 3128. By combining the X-ray count-rates from an input list of optically-selected galaxies, we obtain a statistical detection of X-ray flux, unbiased by X-ray selection limits. Using 87 galaxies with reliable Chandra data, X-ray emission is detected for galaxies down to M_B ~ -19.0, with only an upper limit determined for galaxies at M_B ~ -18.3. The ratio of X-ray to optical luminosities is consistent with recent determinations of the low-mass X-ray binary content of nearby elliptical galaxies. Taken individually, in contrast, we detect significant (3sigma) flux for only six galaxies. Of these, one is a foreground galaxy, while two are optically-faint galaxies with X-ray hardness ratios characteristic of active galactic nuclei. The remaining three detected galaxies are amongst the optically-brightest cluster members, and have softer X-ray spectra. Their X-ray flux is higher than that expected from X-ray binaries, by a factor 2-10; the excess suggests these galaxies have retained their hot gaseous haloes. The source with the highest L_X / L_B ratio is of unusual optical morphology with prominent sharp-edged shells. Notwithstanding these few exceptions, the cluster population overall exhibits X-ray properties consistent with their emission being dominated by X-ray binaries. We conclude that in rich cluster environments, interaction with the ambient intra-cluster medium acts to strip most galaxies of their hot halo gas.

Russell J. Smith

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Yong [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Hutt, Julie A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Padilla, Mabel T. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Gott, Katherine M. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SUZAKU X-RAY IMAGING OF THE EXTENDED LOBE IN THE GIANT RADIO GALAXY NGC 6251 ASSOCIATED WITH THE FERMI-LAT SOURCE 2FGL J1629.4+8236  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the results of a Suzaku X-ray imaging study of NGC 6251, a nearby giant radio galaxy with intermediate FR I/II radio properties. Our pointing direction was centered on the {gamma}-ray emission peak recently discovered with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) around the position of the northwest (NW) radio lobe 15 arcmin offset from the nucleus. After subtracting two 'off-source' pointings adjacent to the radio lobe and removing possible contaminants in the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer field of view, we found significant residual X-ray emission most likely diffuse in nature. The spectrum of the excess X-ray emission is well fitted by a power law with a photon index {Gamma} = 1.90 {+-} 0.15 and a 0.5-8 keV flux of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We interpret this diffuse X-ray emission component as being due to inverse Compton upscattering of the cosmic microwave background photons by ultrarelativistic electrons within the lobe, with only a minor contribution from the beamed emission of the large-scale jet. Utilizing archival radio data for the source, we demonstrate by means of broadband spectral modeling that the {gamma}-ray flux of the Fermi-LAT source 2FGL J1629.4+8236 may well be accounted for by the high-energy tail of the inverse Compton continuum of the lobe. Thus, this claimed association of {gamma}-rays from the NW lobe of NGC 6251, together with the recent Fermi-LAT imaging of the extended lobes of Centaurus A, indicates that particles may be efficiently (re-)accelerated up to ultrarelativistic energies within extended radio lobes of nearby radio galaxies in general.

Takeuchi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Maeda, K.; Nakamori, T. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Stawarz, L.; Tanaka, Y.; Takahashi, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5510 (Japan); Cheung, C. C. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Celotti, A., E-mail: uto_of_take@suou.waseda.jp [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), 34014 Trieste (Italy)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

262

Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm.sup.2. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics.

Hawryluk, Andrew M. (2708 Rembrandt Pl., Modesto, CA 95356); Seppala, Lynn G. (7911 Mines Rd., Livermore, CA 94550)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm[sup 2]. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics. 9 figures.

Hawryluk, A.M.; Seppala, L.G.

1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

264

The X-ray/submillimetre link  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is widely believed that most of the cosmic X-ray background (XRB) is produced by a vast, hitherto undetected population of obscured AGN. Deep X-ray surveys with Chandra and XMM will soon test this hypothesis. Similarly, recent sub-mm surveys with SCUBA have revealed an analogous population of exceptionally luminous, dust-enshrouded {\\em star-forming} galaxies at high redshift. There is now growing evidence for an intimate link between these obscured populations. There are currently large uncertainties in the models, but several independent arguments lead to the conclusion that a significant fraction of the SCUBA sources ($10-30% $) will contain quasars. Recent observational studies of SCUBA survey sources appear to confirm these predictions, although the relative roles of AGN and star-forming activity in heating the dust are unclear. Forthcoming surveys combining X-ray and sub-mm observations will provide a very powerful tool for disentangling these processes.

O. Almaini

2000-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

265

X-ray Pinhole Camera Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of the rod pinch diode [1] has led to high-resolution radiography for dynamic events such as explosive tests. Rod pinch diodes use a small diameter anode rod, which extends through the aperture of a cathode plate. Electrons borne off the aperture surface can self-insulate and pinch onto the tip of the rod, creating an intense, small x-ray source (Primary Pinch). This source has been utilized as the main diagnostic on numerous experiments that include high-value, single-shot events. In such applications there is an emphasis on machine reliability, x-ray reproducibility, and x-ray quality [2]. In tests with the baseline rod pinch diode, we have observed that an additional pinch (Secondary Pinch) occurs at the interface near the anode rod and the rod holder. This suggests that stray electrons exist that are not associated with the Primary Pinch. In this paper we present measurements on both pinches using an x-ray pinhole camera. The camera is placed downstream of the Primary Pinch at an angle of 60 with respect to the diode centerline. This diagnostic will be employed to diagnose x-ray reproducibility and quality. In addition, we will investigate the performance of hybrid diodes relating to the formation of the Primary and Secondary Pinches.

Nelson, D. S. [NSTec; Berninger, M. J. [NSTec; Flores, P. A. [NSTec; Good, D. E. [NSTec; Henderson, D. J. [NSTec; Hogge, K. W. [NSTec; Huber, S. R. [NSTec; Lutz, S. S. [NSTec; Mitchell, S. E. [NSTec; Howe, R. A. [NSTec; Mitton, C. V. [NSTec; Molina, I. [NSTec; Bozman, D. R. [SNL; Cordova, S. R. [SNL; Mitchell, D. R. [SNL; Oliver, B. V. [SNL; Ormond, E. C. [SNL

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha tagged x-ray Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ion -Cu K-alpha imaging system -X-ray... and for the optimisation of high power laser-driven ion and X-ray sources. ... Source: Strathclyde, University of - Department...

267

Advanced Research in Diesel Fuel Sprays Using X-rays from the...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Research in Diesel Fuel Sprays Using X-rays from the Advanced Photon Source Advanced Research in Diesel Fuel Sprays Using X-rays from the Advanced Photon Source 2003 DEER...

268

X-Ray Diagnostics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore than 20X-Ray Diagnostics

269

2011 U.S. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 13th annual U.S. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering was held June 11 to 25, 2011, at both Oak Ridge and Argonne National Laboratories. This school brought together 65 early career graduate students from 56 different universities in the US and provided them with a broad introduction to the techniques available at the major large-scale neutron and synchrotron x-ray facilities. This school is focused primarily on techniques relevant to the physical sciences, but also touches on cross-disciplinary bio-related scattering measurements. During the school, students received lectures by over 30 researchers from academia, industry, and national laboratories and participated in a number of short demonstration experiments at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS) and Oak Ridge's Spallation neutron Source (SNS) and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) facilities to get hands-on experience in using neutron and synchrotron sources. The first week of this year's school was held at Oak Ridge National Lab, where Lab director Thom Mason welcomed the students and provided a shitorical perspective of the neutron and x-ray facilities both at Oak Ridge and Argonne. The first few days of the school were dedicated to lectures laying out the basics of scattering theory and the differences and complementarity between the neutron and x-ray probes given by Sunil Sinha. Jack Carpenter provided an introduction into how neutrons are generated and detected. After this basic introduction, the students received lectures each morning on specific techniques and conducted demonstration experiments each afternoon on one of 15 different instruments at either the SNS or HFIR. Some of the topics covered during this week of the school included inelastic neutron scattering by Bruce Gaulin, x-ray and neutron reflectivity by Chuck Majkrazak, small-angle scattering by Volker Urban, powder diffraction by Ashfia Huq and diffuse scattering by Gene Ice.

Lang, Jonathan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); te Vethuis, Suzanne [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Refractive Optics for Hard X-ray Transmission Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For hard x-ray transmission microscopy at photon energies higher than 15 keV we design refractive condenser and imaging elements to be used with synchrotron light sources as well as with x-ray tube sources. The condenser lenses are optimized for low x-ray attenuation--resulting in apertures greater than 1 mm--and homogeneous intensity distribution on the detector plane, whereas the imaging enables high-resolution (<100 nm) full-field imaging. To obtain high image quality at reasonable exposure times, custom-tailored matched pairs of condenser and imaging lenses are being developed. The imaging lenses (compound refractive lenses, CRLs) are made of SU-8 negative resist by deep x-ray lithography. SU-8 shows high radiation stability. The fabrication technique enables high-quality lens structures regarding surface roughness and arrangement precision with arbitrary 2D geometry. To provide point foci, crossed pairs of lenses are used. Condenser lenses have been made utilizing deep x-ray lithographic patterning of thick SU-8 layers, too, whereas in this case, the aperture is limited due to process restrictions. Thus, in terms of large apertures, condenser lenses made of structured and rolled polyimide film are more attractive. Both condenser types, x-ray mosaic lenses and rolled x-ray prism lenses (RXPLs), are considered to be implemented into a microscope setup. The x-ray optical elements mentioned above are characterized with synchrotron radiation and x-ray laboratory sources, respectively.

Simon, M.; Last, A.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Reznikova, E. [Institute for Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Kaiserstrasse 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ahrens, G.; Voigt, A. [Microresist Technology, Koepenikerstrasse 325, 12555 Berlin (Germany)

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

271

Measurement and characterization of x-ray spot size  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In planning an x-ray imaging experiment one must have an accurate model of the imaging system to obtain optimum results. The blurring caused by the finite size of the x-ray source is often the least understood element in the system. We have developed experimental and analytical methods permitting accurate measurement and modeling of the x-ray source. The model offers a simple and accurate way to optimize the radiographic geometry for any given experimental requirement (i.e., resolution and dose at detector). Any text on radiography will mention the effects of the finite size of the x-ray source on image quality and how one can minimize this influence by the choice of a small radiographic magnification. The film blur (independent of the source blur) is often treated as a single number and combined with an effective blur dimension for the x-ray source to give a total blur on the film. In this paper, we will develop a treatment of x-ray sources based on the modulation transfer function (MTF). This approach allows us to infer the spatial distribution function of the electron beam that produces the bremsstrahlung x-rays and to predict the performance of an x-ray imaging system if we know the MTF of the detector. This treatment is much more accurate than a single number characterization. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Mueller, K.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

X-ray lithography using holographic images  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

Howells, Malcolm S. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

X-ray reflectivity and surface roughness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the advent of high brightness synchrotron radiation sources there has been a phenomenal growth in the use of x-rays as a probe of surface structure. The technique of x-ray reflectivity is particularly relevant to electrochemists since it is capable of probing the structure normal to an electrode surface in situ. In this paper the theoretical framework for x-ray reflectivity is reviewed and the results from previous non-electrochemistry measurements are summarized. These measurements are from the liquid/air interface (CCl/sub 4/), the metal crystal vacuum interface (Au(100)), and from the liquid/solid interface(liquid crystal/silicon). 34 refs., 5 figs.

Ocko, B.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Advanced Power Sources Ltd APS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil Jump to:Iowa ASHRAEAddis, LA)AdobeFuelOffshoreSources Ltd

275

X-ray fluorescence mapping  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biololgical cells, over the measurement of impurities in solar cells, to the rare earth content of geological materials. A somewhat 'typical' layout for a X-ray fluorescence...

276

Beyond hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simultaneous combination with x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful and novel emerging technique for the nondestructive determination of electronic properties and chemical composition of bulk, buried interfaces and surfaces. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons, increasing the information depth up to several tens of nanometers. Complementing HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique (such as x-ray diffraction) opens a new research field with major applications for materials science. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we have developed a novel experimental set-up that combines HAXPES and x-ray diffraction (x-ray reflectivity, surface x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and reciprocal space maps). Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a robust 2S + 3D diffractometer hosting a ultrahigh vacuum chamber equipped with a unique photoelectron spectrometer (few eV < electron kinetic energy < 15 keV), x-ray tube (Mg/Ti), 15 keV electron gun, and auxiliary standard surface facilities (molecular beam epitaxy evaporator, ion gun, low energy electron diffraction, sample heating/cooling system, leak valves, load-lock sample transfer, etc.). This end-station offers the unique possibility of performing simultaneous HAXPES + x-ray diffraction studies. In the present work, we describe the experimental set-up together with two experimental examples that emphasize its outstanding capabilities: (i) nondestructive characterization of the Si/Ge and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interfaces on Ge-based CMOS devices, and (ii) strain study on La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} ultrathin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate.

Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R. [SpLine, Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France) and ICMM-CSIC Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization.

Rhodes, C.K.

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Advanced X-ray Optics Metrology for Nanofocusing and Coherence Preservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

workshop: Advanced X-Ray Optics Metrology for Nano-focusinglight sources if beamline optics wont be available toTitled, Advanced X-Ray Optics Metrology for Nano-focusing

Goldberg, Kenneth A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ultrafast is at the frontier of scientific research. Two x-ray approaches can be used for ultrafast examinations. The first entails developing sources that have short x-ray pulses...

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous x-ray fluorescence Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the emission of a fluorescent X-ray. As a rule of thumb 15... Optimization of X-ray energy resolution from a horizontally focused ... Source: Hendrickson, Wayne A. -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Compression of powerful x-ray pulses to attosecond durations by stimulated Raman backscattering in plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the possibility of using powerful x-ray sources for producing ultrahigh laser intensities. It might clarify how much the emerging mJ x-ray laser technologies 1 could compete with the emerging MJ optical laser the biggest of currently built lasers: Linac Coherent Light Source LCLS 1 in x-ray range and megajoule laser

282

X-ray intensity interferometer for undulator radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensity interferometry is well established with visible light but has never been demonstrated with x-radiation. We propose to measure the transverse coherence of an x-ray beam, for the first time, using the method of Hanbury Brown and Twiss. The x-ray interferometer consists of an array of slits, a grazing incidence reflective beamsplitter, a pair of fast multichannel plate detectors and a broadband, low-noise correlator circuit. The NSLS X1 or X13 soft x-ray undulator will supply the partially coherent x-rays. We are developing this technique to characterize the coherence properties of x-ray beams from high brilliance insertion devices at third-generation synchrotron light facilities such as the Advanced Photon Source and the Advanced Light Source. 17 refs.

Gluskin, E.; McNulty, I.; Viccaro, P.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

X-ray intensity interferometer for undulator radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensity interferometry is well established with visible light but has never been demonstrated with x-radiation. We propose to measure the transverse coherence of an x-ray beam, for the first time, using the method of Hanbury Brown and Twiss. The x-ray interferometer consists of an array of slits, a grazing incidence reflective beamsplitter, a pair of fast multichannel plate detectors and a broadband, low-noise correlator circuit. The NSLS X1 or X13 soft x-ray undulator will supply the partially coherent x-rays. We are developing this technique to characterize the coherence properties of x-ray beams from high brilliance insertion devices at third-generation synchrotron light facilities such as the Advanced Photon Source and the Advanced Light Source. 17 refs.

Gluskin, E.; McNulty, I.; Viccaro, P.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Howells, M.R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A mirror for lab-based quasi-monochromatic parallel x-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multilayered parabolic mirror with six W/Al bilayers was designed and fabricated to generate monochromatic parallel x-rays using a lab-based x-ray source. Using this mirror, curved bright bands were obtained in x-ray images as reflected x-rays. The parallelism of the reflected x-rays was investigated using the shape of the bands. The intensity and monochromatic characteristics of the reflected x-rays were evaluated through measurements of the x-ray spectra in the band. High intensity, nearly monochromatic, and parallel x-rays, which can be used for high resolution x-ray microscopes and local radiation therapy systems, were obtained.

Nguyen, Thanhhai; Lu, Xun; Lee, Chang Jun; Jeon, Insu, E-mail: i-jeon@chonnam.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin-Ho [Pro-optics Co., Ltd., 475 Ami-ri, Bubal-eup, Icheon 467-866 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gye-Hwan [Department of Radiology, Nambu University, 76 Chumdan Jungang 1-ro, Gwangsan-gu, Gwangju 506-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Youb [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

High resolution energy-sensitive digital X-ray  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for detecting an x-ray and for determining the depth of penetration of an x-ray into a semiconductor strip detector. In one embodiment, a semiconductor strip detector formed of semiconductor material is disposed in an edge-on orientation towards an x-ray source such that x-rays From the x-ray source are incident upon and substantially perpendicular to the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector. The semiconductor strip detector is formed of a plurality of segments. The segments are coupled together in a collinear arrangement such that the semiconductor strip detector has a length great enough such that substantially all of the x-rays incident on the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector interact with the semiconductor material which forms the semiconductor strip detector. A plurality of electrodes are connected to the semiconductor strip detect or such that each one of the of semiconductor strip detector segments has at least one of the of electrodes coupled thereto. A signal processor is also coupled to each one of the electrodes. The present detector detects an interaction within the semiconductor strip detector, between an x-ray and the semiconductor material, and also indicates the depth of penetration of the x-ray into the semiconductor strip detector at the time of the interaction.

Nygren, David R. (Berkeley, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Refractive optical elements and optical system for high energy x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In material science, X-ray radiation with photon energies above 25 keV is used because of its penetration into high density materials. Research of the inner structure of novel materials, such as electrodes in high power batteries for engines, require X-ray microscopes operating in the hard X-ray energy range. A flexible X-ray microscope for hard X-rays with photon energies higher than 25 keV will be realized at the synchrotron source ANKA in Karlsruhe, Germany. The device will use refractive X-ray lenses as condenser as well as objective lenses.

Simon, M.; Altapova, V.; Baumbach, T.; Kluge, M.; Last, A.; Marschall, F.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Vogt, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Microstructure Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Laboratory for Applications of Synchrotron Radiation, Engesser Strasse 15, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Microstructure Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

287

Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., q.sub.max /q.sub.min.congruent.100.

Hessler, Jan P. (Downers Grove, IL)

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

An Exact Modeling of Signal Statistics in Energy-integrating X-ray Computed Tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assumption was made that the number of x-ray quanta within an energy interval in the spectrum followsAn Exact Modeling of Signal Statistics in Energy-integrating X-ray Computed Tomography Yi Fan1 School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 ABSTRACT Energy-integrating detection of x-ray sources is widely

289

X-ray radiation effects in multilayer epitaxial graphene Jeremy Hicks1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 X-ray radiation effects in multilayer epitaxial graphene Jeremy Hicks1 , Rajan Arora2 , Eleazar and after exposure to a total ionizing dose (TID) of 12 Mrad(SiO2) using a 10 keV X-ray source. While we are mostly unaffected by radiation exposure. Combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data

290

X-ray bandwidth: Determination by on-edge absorption and effect on various absorption experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray bandwidth: Determination by on-edge absorption and effect on various absorption experiments of an x-ray source is increasingly important in fundamental experi- ments and critical applications. The bandwidth of an x-ray beam, selected from a synchrotron radiation spectrum for example, ultimately defines

Chantler, Christopher T.

291

The X-ray background and the evolution of AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the constraints on the AGN evolution from the cosmic X-ray background and source counts. A synthesis model to fit the X-ray background is presented. In the model, the spectrum of type 2 AGN has been modeled including Compton down--scattering within the absorbing material. Besides, we introduced a dependence on redshift of the relative number of obscured sources and found a decrease of the fraction of type 2 AGN at redshifts larger than 2.

Fulvio Pompilio; Fabio La Franca; Giorgio Matt

1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

292

The colours of the X-ray background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent deep X-ray surveys at both soft (0.5--2 keV) and hard (2--10 keV) energies have greatly extended our knowledge of the X-ray source density and spectral shapes at relatively faint fluxes adding further evidence on the fact that discrete sources, mainly AGNs, are responsible for the X-ray background (XRB) emission over a broad energy range. In addition the first complete optically identified samples of soft X-ray sources are becoming available allowing to test the XRB AGN synthesis models in the light of recent results. In this paper I will briefly compare the model predictions with some new observational data.

A. Comastri

1998-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change and increase in scientific use can be maintained for the synchrotron x-ray source. A short summary of the present state of the synchrotron radiation-induced x-ray emission (SRIXE) method is presented here. Basically, SRIXE experiments can include any that depend on the detection. of characteristic x-rays produced by the incident x-ray beam born the synchrotron source as they interact with a sample. Thus, experiments done to measure elemental composition, chemical state, crystal, structure, and other sample parameters can be considered in a discussion of SRIXE. It is also clear that the experimentalist may well wish to use a variety of complementary techniques for study of a given sample. For this reason, discussion of computed microtomography (CMT) and x-ray diffraction is included here. It is hoped that this present discussion will serve as a succinct introduction to the basic ideas of SRIXE for those not working in the field and possibly help to stimulate new types of work by those starting in the field as well as by experienced practitioners of the art. The topics covered include short descriptions of (1) the properties of synchrotron radiation, (2) a description of facilities used for its production, (3) collimated microprobe, (4) focused microprobes, (5) continuum and monoenergetic excitation, (6) detection limits, (7) quantitation, (8) applications of SRIXE, (9) computed microtomography (CMT), and (10)chemical speciation using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). An effort has been made to cite a wide variety of work from different laboratories to show the vital nature of the field.

Jones, Keith W.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

High resolution x-ray microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present x-ray images of grid meshes and biological material obtained using a microspot x-ray tube with a multilayer optic and a 92-element parabolic compound refractive lens (CRL) made of a plastic containing only hydrogen and carbon. Images obtained using this apparatus are compared with those using an area source with a spherical lens and a spherical lens with multilayer condenser. The authors found the best image quality using the multilayer condenser with a parabolic lens, compared to images with a spherical lens and without the multilayer optics. The resolution was measured using a 155-element parabolic CRL and a multilayer condenser with the microspot tube. The experiment demonstrates about 1.1 {mu}m resolution.

Gary, C. K.; Park, H.; Lombardo, L. W.; Piestrup, M. A.; Cremer, J. T.; Pantell, R. H.; Dudchik, Y. I. [Adelphi Technology, Inc. 981-B Industrial Road, San Carlos, California 94070 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Institute of Applied Physics Problems, Kurchatova 7, Minsk 220064 (Belarus)

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

X-ray radiography for container inspection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Arrangements of X-ray inspection systems are described for inspecting high-z materials in voluminous objects such as containers. Inspection methods may involve generating a radiographic image based on detected attenuation corresponding to a pulsed beams of radiation transmitted through a voluminous object. The pulsed beams of radiation are generated by a high-energy source and transmitted substantially downward along an incident angle, of approximately 1.degree. to 30.degree., to a vertical axis extending through the voluminous object. The generated radiographic image may be analyzed to detect on localized high attenuation representative of high-z materials and to discriminate high-z materials from lower and intermediate-z materials on the basis of the high density and greater attenuation of high-z material for higher energy (3-10 MeV) X-rays, and the compact nature of threatening masses of fissionable materials.

Katz, Jonathan I. (Clayton, MO); Morris, Christopher L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

296

X-Ray Searches for Solar Axions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Axions generated thermally in the solar core can convert nearly directly to X-rays as they pass through the solar atmosphere via interaction with the magnetic field. The result of this conversion process would be a diffuse centrally-concentrated source of few-keV X-rays at disk center; it would have a known dimension, of order 10% of the solar diameter, and a spectral distribution resembling the blackbody spectrum of the solar core. Its spatial structure in detail would depend on the distribution of mass and field in the solar atmosphere. The brightness of the source depends upon these factors as well as the unknown coupling constant and the unknown mass of the axion; this particle is hypothetical and no firm evidence for its existence has been found yet. We describe the solar magnetic environment as an axion/photon converter and discuss the upper limits obtained by existing and dedicated observations from three solar X-ray observatories: Yohkoh, RHESSI, and Hinode

Hugh S. Hudson; L. W. Acton; E. DeLuca; I. G. Hannah; K. Reardon; K. Van Bibber

2012-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

X-ray afterglows from gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider possible interpretations of the recently detected X- ray afterglow from the gamma-ray burst source GRB 970228. Cosmological and Galactic models of gamma-ray bursts predict different flux and spectral evolution of X-ray afterglows. We show that models based on adiabatic expansion of relativistic forward shocks require very efficient particle energization or post-burst re-acceleration during the expansion. Cooling neutron star models predict a very distinctive spectral and flux evolution that can be tested in current X-ray data.

M. Tavani

1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

298

Current Problems for X-ray Emission from Radio Jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A list is presented of known extragalactic radio jets which also have associated X-ray emission. The canonical emission processes for the production of X-rays are reviewed and the sources are categorized on the basis of our current understanding. Although it seems clear that the X-ray emission is non-thermal, the two competing processes, synchrotron and inverse Compton emissions, arise from extremely high energy (synchrotron) or extremely low energy (beaming models with IC emission), relativistic electrons. Only synchrotron self-Compton emission from a few hotspots provides information on the `normal' energy range of the electrons responsible for the observed radio emission.

D. E. Harris

2000-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

299

Characterization of X-ray generator beam profiles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

T to compute the radiography properties of various materials, the flux profiles of X-ray sources must be characterized. This report describes the characterization of X-ray beam profiles from a Kimtron industrial 450 kVp radiography system with a Comet MXC-45 HP/11 bipolar oil-cooled X-ray tube. The empirical method described here uses a detector response function to derive photon flux profiles based on data collected with a small cadmium telluride detector. The flux profiles are then reduced to a simple parametric form that enables computation of beam profiles for arbitrary accelerator energies.

Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Parmeter, John Ethan; Thompson, Kyle Richard

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

X-ray Emission from Massive Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Emission from Massive Stars David Cohen Department of Physics and Astronomy Swarthmore be related to the production of X-rays on massive stars. If so, massive stars' X-rays are much different than those found our own Sun and other cooler stars like the Sun that produce X-rays via magnetic activity

Cohen, David

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301

X-ray Emission from Massive Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Emission from Massive Stars David Cohen Department of Physics and Astronomy Swarthmore #12;What is the mechanism by which massive stars produce x-rays? New results from the Chandra X-ray Observatory ­ high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy: measuring Doppler broadening in emission lines Testing

Cohen, David

302

Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

Guo, J.-H.

2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is found from a mid-infrared protostar L1448 IRS 3(A). The lack of detection of this source in our deep NIR images indicates that this source has a very steep spectral slope of > 3.2 in 2--10 micron.

M. Tsujimoto; N. Kobayashi; Y. Tsuboi

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

304

X-ray generation using carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these sys- tems are illustrated in Figure 2(b) also outlines the principle mode of operation. Here, sealed in an inexpensive and eas- ily fabricated evacuated glass or ceramic envelope, the elec- trons are liberated from a metallic filament, often made... - ment of CNT-based FE sources is provided in [152]. Here we provide a condensed review of the progress, as it pertains to X-ray sources, since then. CNTs have some of the highest attainable aspect ratios, high thermal conductivity, low chemical...

Parmee, Richard J.; Collins, Clare M.; Milne, William I.; Cole, Matthew T.

2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

305

X-ray Free-electron Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

Feldhaus, J.; /DESY; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

306

54X-rays from Hot Gases Near the SN1979C Black Hole The Chandra X-Ray Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is in solar mass units, and R is in kilometers. Problem 1 - Combining these equations using the method-Newton and the German ROSAT observatory revealed a bright source of X-rays that has remained steady for the 12 years, or distribution of X-rays with energy, support the idea that the object in SN 1979C is a black hole being fed

307

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid x-ray crystallography Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

crystallography would you recommend?" Unfortunately... this list when choosing their top ten books to read on the subject of X-ray ... Source: Meagher, Mary - Department of...

308

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectroscopie Electronique, Summary: of an X-ray source from measurements of the kinetic energy and intensity of the photoelectrons emitted... applications in electron probe...

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - angle x-ray sky Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pulsars... you'd . . . Active Galactic . . . X-ray binaries Pulsars and relatives Gamma-ray bursts Gravitational Source: Phinney, E. Sterl - Division of Physics, Mathematics and...

310

X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is fou...

Tsujimoto, M; Tsuboi, Y

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Investigation of the hard x-ray background in backlit pinhole imagers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hard x-rays from laser-produced hot electrons (>10 keV) in backlit pinhole imagers can give rise to a background signal that decreases signal dynamic range in radiographs. Consequently, significant uncertainties are introduced to the measured optical depth of imaged plasmas. Past experiments have demonstrated that hard x-rays are produced when hot electrons interact with the high-Z pinhole substrate used to collimate the softer He-? x-ray source. Results are presented from recent experiments performed on the OMEGA-60 laser to further study the production of hard x-rays in the pinhole substrate and how these x-rays contribute to the background signal in radiographs. Radiographic image plates measured hard x-rays from pinhole imagers with Mo, Sn, and Ta pinhole substrates. The variation in background signal between pinhole substrates provides evidence that much of this background comes from x-rays produced in the pinhole substrate itself. A Monte Carlo electron transport code was used to model x-ray production from hot electrons interacting in the pinhole substrate, as well as to model measurements of x-rays from the irradiated side of the targets, recorded by a bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrometer. Inconsistencies in inferred hot electron distributions between the different pinhole substrate materials demonstrate that additional sources of hot electrons beyond those modeled may produce hard x-rays in the pinhole substrate.

Fein, J. R., E-mail: jrfein@umich.edu; Holloway, J. P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States); Peebles, J. L. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Drake, R. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Quantitative x-ray imager (abstract)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on development of a quantitative x-ray imager (QXI) for the national Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. Included in this development is a study of photocathode response as a function of photon energy, 2--17.5 keV, which is related to diagnostic development on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The QXI is defined as being a quantative imager due to the repeated characterization. This instrument is systematically checked out, electronically as well as its photocathode x-ray response, both on a direct current and pulsed x-ray sources, before and after its use on a shot campaign. The QXI is a gated x-ray imager1 used for a variety of experiments conducted in the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Radiation Physics Program. The camera was assembled in Los Alamos and has been under development since 1997 and has now become the workhorse framing camera by the program. The electronics were built by Grant Applied Physics of San Fransisco, CA.2 The QXI has been used at the LANL Trident, LLNL Nova, and University of Rochester Laboratory OMEGA laser facilities. The camera consists of a grated microchannel plate (MCP), a phosphor coated fiberoptic faceplate coupled to film for data readout, along with high speed electronic pulsers to drive the x-ray detector. The QXI has both a two-strip and a four-strip detection head and has the ability to individually bias the gain of each of the strips. The timing of the QXI was done at the Trident short pulse laboratory, using 211 nm light. Single strip jitter was looked at as well and determined to be <25 ps. Flatfielding of the photocathode across the MCP was done with the Trident main laser with 150 J on a gold disk with a 1 ns. Spatial resolution was determined to be <5 {mu}m by using the same laser conditions as before and a backlit 1000 lp/in. grid. The QXI has been used on cylindrical implosion work at the Nova Laser Facility, and on direct-drive cylinder mix and indirect-drive high convergence implosion experiments at OMEGA. Its two-strip module has provided the capability to look at point backlighters, as part of technique development for experiments on the NIF. Its next use will be in March 2000 with its off axis viewer nose at Omega, providing a perpendicular view of Rayleigh--Taylor spike dissipation.

Evans, Scott C.; Archuleta, Tom N.; Oertel, John A.; Walsh, Peter J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

ON THE X-RAY OUTBURSTS OF TRANSIENT ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the X-ray outburst light curves of four transient anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), namely, XTE J1810-197, SGR 0501+4516, SGR 1627-41, and CXOU J164710.2-455216, can be produced by the fallback disk model that was also applied to the outburst light curves of persistent AXPs and SGRs in our earlier work. The model solves the diffusion equation for the relaxation of a disk that has been pushed back by a soft gamma-ray burst. The sets of main disk parameters used for these transient sources are very similar to each other and to those employed in our earlier models of persistent AXPs and SGRs. There is a characteristic difference between the X-ray outburst light curves of transient and persistent sources. This can be explained by the differences in the disk surface density profiles of the transient and persistent sources in quiescence indicated by their quiescent X-ray luminosities. Our results imply that a viscous disk instability operating at a critical temperature in the range of {approx}1300-2800 K is a common property of all fallback disks around AXPs and SGRs. The effect of the instability is more pronounced and starts earlier for the sources with lower quiescent luminosities, which leads to the observable differences in the X-ray enhancement light curves of transient and persistent sources. A single active disk model with the same basic disk parameters can account for the enhancement phases of both transient and persistent AXPs and SGRs. We also present a detailed parameter study to show the effects of disk parameters on the evolution of the X-ray luminosity of AXPs and SGRs in the X-ray enhancement phases.

Cal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Sirin; Ertan, Uenal [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul, 34956 (Turkey)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

X-ray absorption in distant type II QSOs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of the X-ray spectral analysis of an XMM-Newton-selected type II QSO sample with z>0.5 and 0.5-10 keV flux of 0.3-33 x 10^{-14} erg/s/cm^2. The distribution of absorbing column densities in type II QSOs is investigated and the dependence of absorption on X-ray luminosity and redshift is studied. We inspected 51 spectroscopically classified type II QSO candidates from the XMM-Newton Marano field survey, the XMM-Newton-2dF wide angle survey (XWAS), and the AXIS survey to set-up a well-defined sample with secure optical type II identifications. Fourteen type II QSOs were classified and an X-ray spectral analysis performed. Since most of our sources have only ~40 X-ray counts (PN-detector), we carefully studied the fit results of the simulated X-ray spectra as a function of fit statistic and binning method. We determined that fitting the spectra with the Cash-statistic and a binning of minimum one count per bin recovers the input values of the simulated X-ray spectra best. Above 100 PN coun...

Krumpe, M; Corral, A; Schwope, A D; Carrera, F J; Barcons, X; Page, M; Mateos, S; Tedds, J A; Watson, M G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first self-consistent model for the dynamics and the radiative transfer occurring in bright X-ray pulsar accretion columns, with a special focus on the role of the shock in energizing the emerging X-rays. The pressure inside the accretion column of a luminous X-ray pulsar is dominated by the photons, and consequently the equations describing the coupled radiative-dynamical structure must be solved simultaneously. Spectral formation in these sources is therefore a complex, nonlinear phenomenon. We obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column from the thermal mound located near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to model the X-ray spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons produced in the thermal mound. These photons diffuse through the infalling gas and eventually escape out the walls of the column, forming the observed X-ray spectrum. We show that the resulting column-integrated, phase-averaged spectrum has a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with the observational data for many X-ray pulsars.

Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

316

Microgap x-ray detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

317

Microgap x-ray detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution better than 25 nm. Limiting factors for Stardust STXM analyses were self-imposed limits of photon dose due to radiation damage concerns, and significant attenuation of <1500 eV X-rays by {approx}80{micro}m thick, {approx}25 mg/cm{sup 3} density silica aerogel capture medium. In practice, the ISPE team characterized the major, light elements using STXM (O, Mg, Al, Si) and the heavier minor and trace elements using SXRF. The two data sets overlapped only with minor Fe and Ni ({approx}1% mass abundance), providing few quantitative cross-checks. New improved standards for cross calibration are essential for consortium-based analyses of Stardust interstellar and cometary particles, IDPs. Indeed, they have far reaching application across the whole synchrotron-based analytical community. We have synthesized three ALD multilayers simultaneously on silicon nitride membranes and silicon and characterized them using RBS (on Si), XRF (on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and STXM/XAS (holey Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). The systems we have started to work with are Al-Zn-Fe and Y-Mg-Er. We have found these ALD multi-layers to be uniform at {micro}m- to nm scales, and have found excellent consistency between four analytical techniques so far. The ALD films can also be used as a standard for e-beam instruments, eg., TEM EELS or EDX. After some early issues with the consistency of coatings to the back-side of the membrane windows, we are confident to be able to show multi-analytical agreement to within 10%. As the precision improves, we can use the new standards to verify or improve the tabulated cross-sections.

Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

319

Spectral analysis of X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I present work from three separate research projects associated with observations of X-ray binaries. Two of those revolve around spectral characteristics of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), ...

Fridriksson, Joel Karl

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Water destruction by X-rays in young stellar objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the H2O chemistry in star-forming environments under the influence of a central X-ray source and a central far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation field. The gas-phase water chemistry is modeled as a function of time, hydrogen density and X-ray flux. To cover a wide range of physical environments, densities between n_H = 10^4-10^9 cm^-3 and temperatures between T = 10-1000 K are studied. Three different regimes are found: For T water abundance is of order 10^-7-10^-6 and can be somewhat enhanced or reduced due to X-rays, depending on time and density. For 100 K 10^-3 ergs s-1 cm^-2 (t = 10^4 yrs) and for F_X > 10^-4 ergs s^-1 cm^-2 (t = 10^5 yrs). At higher temperatures (T > 250 K) and hydrogen densities, water can persist with x(H2O) ~ 10^-4 even for high X-ray fluxes. The X-ray and FUV models are applied to envelopes around low-mass Class 0 and I young stellar objects (YSOs). Water is destroyed in both Class 0 and I envelopes on relatively short timescales (t ~ 5000 yrs) for realistic X-ray fluxes, although the effect is less prominent in Class 0 envelopes due to the higher X-ray absorbing densities there. FUV photons from the central source are not effective in destroying water. The average water abundance in Class I sources for L_X > 10^27 ergs s^-1 is predicted to be x(H2O) < 10^-6.

P. Stauber; J. K. Jorgensen; E. F. van Dishoeck; S. D. Doty; A. O. Benz

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 60 Garden St in hot gas about 250 million light years from Earth. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/E.Bulbul, et al-Newton has revealed a mysterious X-ray signal in the data. This signal is represented in the circled data

322

X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Metallobiomolecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/9/07 1 X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Metallobiomolecules The Outskirts of Structural Biology 9, 07] This is a tutorial about the use of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) in biology, RG; Eisenberger, P; Kincaid, BM "X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules" Annu. Rev

Scott, Robert A.

323

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 60 Garden St million light years from Earth. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Wesleyan Univ./R.Kilgard, et al; Optical: NASA with optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope (red, green, and blue). The X-ray data reveal hundreds

324

Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

Le Gros, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Larabell, Carolyn A. (Berkeley, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

325

X-ray Spectroscopy of Cool Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has addressed not only various topics in coronal physics of stars, but has also uncovered important features relevant for our understanding of stellar evolution and the stellar environment. I summarize recent progress in coronal X-ray spectroscopy and in particular also discuss new results from studies of X-rays from pre-main sequence stars.

M. Guedel

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

326

X-Ray Physics Evan Berkowitz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Physics Evan Berkowitz Junior, MIT Department of Physics (Dated: October 25, 2006) We measure a variety of phenomena related to X-Ray absorption and production. We present data which conforms within, as are 22 Na electron-positron annhilation lines. The importance of understanding x-rays is demonstrated

327

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 60 Garden St 200 million light years from Earth. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/UAH/M.Sun et al; Optical: NASA, ESA, & the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Caption: This composite image from the Chandra X-ray Observatory (blue

328

X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Metallobiomolecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9/6/09 1 X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Metallobiomolecules The Outskirts of Structural Biology 6, 09] This is a tutorial about the use of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) in biology, RG; Eisenberger, P; Kincaid, BM "X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules" Annu. Rev

Scott, Robert A.

329

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA http://chandra.harvard.edu Four Supernova Remnants: NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory's Chandra X-ray Observatory, four newly processed images of supernova remnants dramatically illustrate

330

The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC; ,

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

X-ray Properties of Young Stellar Objects in OMC-2 and OMC-3 from the Chandra X-ray Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report X-ray results of the Chandra observation of Orion Molecular Cloud 2 and 3. A deep exposure of \\sim 100 ksec detects \\sim 400 X-ray sources in the field of view of the ACIS array, providing one of the largest X-ray catalogs in a star forming region. Coherent studies of the source detection, time variability, and energy spectra are performed. We classify the X-ray sources into class I, class II, and class III+MS based on the J, H, and K-band colors of their near infrared counterparts and discuss the X-ray properties (temperature, absorption, and time variability) along these evolutionary phases.

M. Tsujimoto; K. Koyama; Y. Tsuboi; M. Goto; N. Kobayashi

2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

332

X-ray spectroscopy of low-mass X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present high-resolution X-ray grating spectroscopy of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) using instruments onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton). The first ...

Juett, Adrienne Marie, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Extending The Methodology Of X-ray Crystallography To Allow X-ray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the radiation damage. While the radiation damage problem can be mitigated somewhat by using cryogenic techniques resolution without serious radiation damage to the specimens. Although X-ray crystallography becomesExtending The Methodology Of X-ray Crystallography To Allow X-ray Microscopy Without X-ray Optics

Miao, Jianwei "John"

334

X-ray Pulsations in the Supersoft X-ray Binary CAL 83  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray data reveal that the supersoft X-ray binary CAL 83 exhibits 38.4 minute pulsations at some epochs. These X-ray variations are similar to those found in some novae and are likely to be caused by nonradial pulsations the white dwarf. This is the first detection of pulsations in a classical supersoft X-ray binary.

P. C. Schmidtke; A. P. Cowley

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

Enhancement of x-ray line emission from plasmas produced by short high-intensity laser double pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhancement of x-ray line emission from plasmas produced by short high-intensity laser double laser-produced plasmas are bright ultrafast line x-ray sources potentially suitable for different onto a solid target into the x-ray emission is significantly enhanced when a laser prepulse precedes

Limpouch, Jiri

336

The X-ray attenuation characteristics and density of human calcaneal marrow do not change significantly during adulthood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The X-ray attenuation characteristics and density of human calcaneal marrow do not change be a significant source of error in measurements of bone density when using X-ray and ultrasound imaging modalities calcanei (28 males, 6 females, ages 17­65 years). The density and energy-dependent linear X-ray attenuation

Stanford University

337

X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

J. R. Peterson; A. C. Fabian

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

Synchronization of x-ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast x-ray facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted fromOF X-RAY PULSES TO THE PUMP LASER IN AN ULTRAFAST X-RAY

Corlett, J.N.; Barry, W.; Byrd, J.M.; Schoenlein, R.; Zholents, A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

X-ray absorption in distant type II QSOs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of the X-ray spectral analysis of an XMM-Newton-selected type II QSO sample with z>0.5 and 0.5-10 keV flux of 0.3-33 x 10^{-14} erg/s/cm^2. The distribution of absorbing column densities in type II QSOs is investigated and the dependence of absorption on X-ray luminosity and redshift is studied. We inspected 51 spectroscopically classified type II QSO candidates from the XMM-Newton Marano field survey, the XMM-Newton-2dF wide angle survey (XWAS), and the AXIS survey to set-up a well-defined sample with secure optical type II identifications. Fourteen type II QSOs were classified and an X-ray spectral analysis performed. Since most of our sources have only ~40 X-ray counts (PN-detector), we carefully studied the fit results of the simulated X-ray spectra as a function of fit statistic and binning method. We determined that fitting the spectra with the Cash-statistic and a binning of minimum one count per bin recovers the input values of the simulated X-ray spectra best. Above 100 PN counts, the free fits of the spectrum's slope and absorbing hydrogen column density are reliable. We find only moderate absorption (N_H=(2-10) x 10^22 cm^-2) and no obvious trends with redshift and intrinsic X-ray luminosity. In a few cases a Compton-thick absorber cannot be excluded. Two type II objects with no X-ray absorption were discovered. We find no evidence for an intrinsic separation between type II AGN and high X-ray luminosity type II QSO in terms of absorption. The stacked X-ray spectrum of our 14 type II QSOs shows no iron K-alpha line. In contrast, the stack of the 8 type II AGN reveals a very prominent iron K-alpha line at an energy of ~ 6.6 keV and an EW ~ 2 keV.

M. Krumpe; G. Lamer; A. Corral; A. D. Schwope; F. J. Carrera; X. Barcons; M. Page; S. Mateos; J. A. Tedds; M. G. Watson

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

340

Automatic detection of bone fragments in poultry using multi-energy x-rays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

At least two linear arrays of x-ray detectors are placed below a conveyor belt in a poultry processing plant. Multiple-energy x-ray sources illuminate the poultry and are detected by the detectors. Laser profilometry is used to measure the poultry thickness as the x-ray data is acquired. The detector readout is processed in real time to detect the presence of small highly attenuating fragments in the poultry, i.e., bone, metal, and cartilage.

Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Mullens, James A. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

X-ray Imaging Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of EnergyX-ray Computed TomographyImaging

342

X-ray fluorescence mapping  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of EnergyX-rayNew Materialsray

343

X-Ray Science Education  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore thanX-Ray Imagingfeed

344

X-Ray Binary Systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the result of a systematic search for spectrally hard and soft X-ray binary systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). This search has been applied to ROSAT PSPC data (0.1-2.4 keV) collected during 9 pointed observations towards this galaxy covering a time span of 2 years from October 91 till October 93. Selection criteria have been defined in order to confine the sample of candidates. Finally 7 spectrally hard and 4 spectrally soft sources were selected from the list as candidates for binaries in the SMC. The sample is luminosity limited (>3.10**35 erg/s). SMC X-1 has been observed during a full binary orbit starting with a low-state covering an X-ray eclipse and emerging into a bright long-duration flare with two short-duration flares separated by 10 hours. The Be type transient SMC X-2 has been redetected with ROSAT. Variability has been found in the sources RX J0051.8-7231 and RX J0052.1-731 already discovered with Einstein. RX J0101.0-7206 has been discovered at the north-eastern boundary of the giant SMC HII region N66 during an X-ray outburst and half a year later during a quiescent phase. A variable source, RX J0049.1-7250, located north-east of the SMC supernova remnant N19 and which may either be an X-ray binary or an AGN turns out to be strongly absorbed. It may be located behind the SMC. If it is an X-ray binary then it radiates at the Eddington limit in the X-ray bright state. Another variable and hard X-ray source RX J0032.9-7348 has been discovered at the south-eastern border of the body of the SMC. A high mass X-ray binary nature is favored for this source. We searched for CAL87 like systems in the SMC catalog and found none. A new candidate supersoft source RX J0103.8-7254 has been detected. We cannot exclude that it is a foreground object.

P. Kahabka; W. Pietsch

1997-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

345

RYLLA. [X-ray transport code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a computer code, RYLLA, which models the deposition of x-rays into thin metal slabs, and transports the resulting photoelectrons, finding the distribution of electrons leaving the slab from both the front and back surfaces. The slab must be homogeneous, but can contain a mixture of up to 5 different elements. Due to the short electron mean free path at low electron energies, RYLLA should be used only for studying thin slabs, roughly < 100 mg/cm/sup 2/ for low Z metals, and < 10 mg/cm/sup 2/ for high Z metals. X-ray energies should be in the range of 1 to 150 keV, as they are deposited only via photoionization and Compton scattering processes. Following photoionization, a hole exists in the electron cloud of the absorbing atom. This fills either by Auger or fluoresence, resulting in lower energy holes which are also filled. Fluoresence photons are transported and absorbed in the same manner as the primary photons, except that they are isotropically produced. Once all photons have been transported and absorbed, and all holes have been filled, a space- and energy-dependent electron source spectrum has been obtained. This is used in a discrete ordinate expansion solution of the 1-D transport equation, which gives the output electron spectra at the two slab surfaces. This paper discusses both the physics and coding of RYLLA. Examples of user input are given, as are some comparisons with other codes.

Hyde, R.A.

1983-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

346

High-Energy X-ray Studies of Real Materials Under Real Conditions and in Real Time  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-energy x-rays from 3rd generation synchrotron sources, including the APS, possess a unique combination of high penetration power and high spatial, reciprocal space, and temporal resolution. These characteristics can be exploited to non-destructively measure phase, texture and strain distributions under extreme environments including thermo-mechanical loading, high-pressure, irradiation and supercritical environments. Over the past several years, the 1-ID beamline has developed a number of programs for these purposes, namely (i) high-energy diffraction microscopy, in which grain and sub-grain volumes are mapped in polycrystalline aggregates, and (ii) combined small-and wide-angle x-ray scattering which permits information over a broad range of length scales to be collected from the same (micron-level) volume. These programs have been increasingly used to test and extend predictive simulations of materials behavior over size scales ranging from nm to mm. Select studies will be presented including nucleation and growth of nanomaterials, void and structural evolution in complex composites under thermo-mechanical and irradiated environments, and microstructural changes in layered systems including thermal-barrier coatings, batteries and fuel cells. Finally, extension of these programs, through the planned APS upgrade, to higher spatio-temporal resolution will be described.

Almer, Jonathan (ANL) [ANL

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Calibration of X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems using NIST traceable sources. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is the key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included the quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, the camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

Haugh, M. J., Charest, M., Ross, P., Lee, J. Schneider, M., Palmer, N., Teruya,

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Techniques for synchronization of X-Ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast X-Ray facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

synchronization of ultrafast x-ray pulses produced in theAccurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted fromOF X-RAY PULSES TO THE PUMP LASER IN AN ULTRAFAST X-RAY

Corlett, J.N.; Doolittle, L.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wilcox, R.; Zholents, A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Optics-free x-ray FEL oscillator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a need for an Optics-Free FEL Oscillators (OFFELO) to further the advantages of free-electron lasers and turning them in fully coherent light sources. While SASE (Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission) FELs demonstrated the capability of providing very high gain and short pulses of radiation and scalability to the X-ray range, the spectra of SASE FELs remains rather wide ({approx}0.5%-1%) compared with typical short wavelengths FEL-oscillators (0.01%-0.0003% in OK-4 FEL). Absence of good optics in VUV and X-ray ranges makes traditional oscillator schemes with very high average and peak spectral brightness either very complex or, strictly speaking, impossible. In this paper, we discuss lattice of the X-ray optics-free FEL oscillator and present results of initial computer simulations of the feedback process and the evolution of FEL spectrum in X-ray OFFELO. We also discuss main limiting factors and feasibility of X-ray OFFELO.

Litvinenko, V.N.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Trbojevic, D.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

Method and apparatus for micromachining using hard X-rays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray source such as a synchrotron which provides a significant spectral content of hard X-rays is used to expose relatively thick photoresist such that the portions of the photoresist at an exit surface receive at least a threshold dose sufficient to render the photoresist susceptible to a developer, while the entrance surface of the photoresist receives an exposure which does not exceed a power limit at which destructive disruption of the photoresist would occur. The X-ray beam is spectrally shaped to substantially eliminate lower energy photons while allowing a substantial flux of higher energy photons to pass through to the photoresist target. Filters and the substrate of the X-ray mask may be used to spectrally shape the X-ray beam. Machining of photoresists such as polymethylmethacrylate to micron tolerances may be obtained to depths of several centimeters, and multiple targets may be exposed simultaneously. The photoresist target may be rotated and/or translated in the beam to form solids of rotation and other complex three-dimensional structures.

Siddons, David Peter (Shoreham, NY); Johnson, Erik D. (Ridge, NY); Guckel, Henry (Madison, WI); Klein, Jonathan L. (Madison, WI)

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Method and apparatus for micromachining using hard X-rays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray source such as a synchrotron which provides a significant spectral content of hard X-rays is used to expose relatively thick photoresist such that the portions of the photoresist at an exit surface receive at least a threshold dose sufficient to render the photoresist susceptible to a developer, while the entrance surface of the photoresist receives an exposure which does not exceed a power limit at which destructive disruption of the photoresist would occur. The X-ray beam is spectrally shaped to substantially eliminate lower energy photons while allowing a substantial flux of higher energy photons to pass through to the photoresist target. Filters and the substrate of the X-ray mask may be used to spectrally shape the X-ray beam. Machining of photoresists such as polymethylmethacrylate to micron tolerances may be obtained to depths of several centimeters, and multiple targets may be exposed simultaneously. The photoresist target may be rotated and/or translated in the beam to form solids of rotation and other complex three-dimensional structures. 21 figs.

Siddons, D.P.; Johnson, E.D.; Guckel, H.; Klein, J.L.

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

Interferometric phase detection at x-ray energies via Fano resonance control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modern x-ray light sources promise access to structure and dynamics of matter in largely unexplored spectral regions. However, the desired information is encoded in the light intensity and phase, whereas detectors register only the intensity. This phase problem is ubiquitous in crystallography and imaging, and impedes the exploration of quantum effects at x-ray energies. Here, we demonstrate phase-sensitive measurements characterizing the quantum state of a nuclear two-level system at hard x-ray energies. The nuclei are initially prepared in a superposition state. Subsequently, the relative phase of this superposition is interferometrically reconstructed from the emitted x-rays. Our results form a first step towards x-ray quantum state tomography, and provide new avenues for structure determination and precision metrology via x-ray Fano interference.

K. P. Heeg; C. Ott; D. Schumacher; H. -C. Wille; R. Rhlsberger; T. Pfeifer; J. Evers

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

353

The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the OMEGA laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 218 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

Prez, F.; Kemp, G. E.; Barrios, M. A.; Pino, J.; Scott, H.; Ayers, S.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B., E-mail: fournier2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Bedzyk, M.; Shoup, M. J.; Agliata, A.; Yaakobi, B.; Marshall, F. J.; Hamilton, R. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Jaquez, J.; Farrell, M.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Confusion of Diffuse Objects in the X-ray Sky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most of the baryons in the present-day universe are thought to reside in intergalactic space at temperatures of 10^5-10^7 K. X-ray emission from these baryons contributes a modest (~10%) fraction of the ~ 1 keV background whose prominence within the large-scale cosmic web depends on the amount of non-gravitational energy injected into intergalactic space by supernovae and AGNs. Here we show that the virialized regions of groups and clusters cover over a third of the sky, creating a source-confusion problem that may hinder X-ray searches for individual intercluster filaments and contaminate observations of distant groups.

G. Mark Voit; August E. Evrard; Greg L. Bryan

2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

355

High-resolution radio observations of X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present an overview of important results obtained using high-resolution very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of X-ray binary systems. These results derive from both astrometric observations and resolved imaging of sources, from black holes to neutron star and even white dwarf systems. I outline a number of upcoming developments in instrumentation, both new facilities and ongoing upgrades to existing VLBI instruments, and I conclude by identifying a number of important areas of investigation where VLBI will be crucial in advancing our understanding of X-ray binaries.

James Miller-Jones

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

CALIBRATION OF X-RAY IMAGING DEVICES FOR ACCURATE INTENSITY MEASUREMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

Haugh, M J; Charest, M R; Ross, P W; Lee, J J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Teruya, A T

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Large Observatory For X-ray Timing: LOFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOFT, the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing, is a new space mission concept devoted to observations of Galactic and extra-Galactic sources in the X-ray domain with the main goals of probing gravity theory in the very strong field environment of black holes and other compact objects, and investigating the state of matter at supra-nuclear densities in neutron stars. The instruments on-board LOFT, the Large area detector and the Wide Field Monitor combine for the first time an unprecedented large effective area (~10 m2 at 8 keV) sensitive to X-ray photons mainly in the 2-30 keV energy range and a spectral resolution approaching that of CCD-based telescopes (down to 200 eV at 6 keV). LOFT is currently competing for a launch of opportunity in 2022 together with the other M3 mission candidates of the ESA Cosmic Vision Program.

Bozzo, E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

359

X-ray radiography with highly charged ions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extremely small (1-250 micron FWHM) beam of slow highly charged ions deexciting on an x-ray production target generates x-ray monochromatic radiation that is passed through a specimen and detected for imaging. The resolution of the x-ray radiograms is improved and such detection is achieved with relatively low dosages of radiation passing through the specimen. An apparatus containing an electron beam ion trap (and modifications thereof) equipped with a focusing column serves as a source of ions that generate radiation projected onto an image detector. Electronic and other detectors are able to detect an increased amount of radiation per pixel than achieved by previous methods and apparati.

Marrs, Roscoe E. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Double K-Vacancy Production by X-Ray Photoionization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Double K-Vacancy Production by X-Ray Photoionization S. H. Southworth£ , R. W. Dunford£ , E. P Photon Source. Double K-vacancy production in Ne was observed by recording the KK-KLL Auger. For Mo, double K-vacancy production was observed by recording the K fluorescence hypersatellite

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

X-ray laser frequency near-doubling and generation of tunable coherent x rays in plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray laser frequency near-doubling and generation of tunable coherent x rays in plasma P. L plasmas in which efficient x-ray laser frequency near-doubling is expected for a number of available x-ray of coherent x rays and tunable optical radiation may result in tunable coherent x-ray radiation powerful

Kaplan, Alexander

362

X-ray Pinhole Camera Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rod pinch diode is made up of a cathode plate and a small diameter anode rod that extends through the cathode hole. The anode is charged positively. The rod tip is made of a high-z material which is chosen for its bremsstrahlung efficiency. When the diode is pulsed it produces an intense x-ray source used for pulsed radiography. The baseline or reference diode consists of a 0.75 mm diameter Tungsten (W) tapered anode rod which extends 10 mm through a 9 mm diameter 3 mm thick aluminum (Al) aperture. The majority of the current in the electron beam is created on the edges of the cathode aperture and when properly configured, the electrons will self insulate, travel down the extension of the rod, and pinch onto the tip of the rod. In this presentation, performance of hybrid diodes will be compared with the baseline diode.

Nelson, D. S. [NSTec; Berninger, M. J. [NSTec; Flores, P. A. [NSTec; Good, D. E. [NSTec; Henderson, D. J. [NSTec; Hogge, K. W. [NSTec; Huber, S. R. [NSTec; Lutz, S. S. [NSTec; Mitchell, S. E. [NSTec; Howe, R. A. [NSTec; Mitton, C. V. [NSTec; Molina, I. [NSTec; Bozman, D. R. [SNL; Cordova, S. R. [SNL; Mitchell, D. R. [SNL; Oliver, B. V. [SNL; Ormond, E. C. [SNL

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

363

X-RAY MICROBEAM SPEECH PRODUCTION DATABASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-RAY MICROBEAM SPEECH PRODUCTION DATABASE USER'S HANDBOOK Version 1.0 (June 1994) prepared by John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Chapter Two: XRMB History

364

In-orbit performance of the XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes: images and spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of the three X-ray telescopes on-board of XMM-Newton is evaluated addressing imaging characteristics and effective collecting area. The agreement with ground calibration data is excellent. The analysis of images and spectra of cosmic X-ray sources, emphazising supernova and supernova remnants, prooves that the telescopes are even better than originally required.

B. Aschenbach

2001-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

365

Advanced Photon Source experimental beamline Safety Assessment Document: Addendum to the Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Safety Assessment Document (APS-3.2.2.1.0)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Safety Assessment Document (SAD) addresses commissioning and operation of the experimental beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Purpose of this document is to identify and describe the hazards associated with commissioning and operation of these beamlines and to document the measures taken to minimize these hazards and mitigate the hazard consequences. The potential hazards associated with the commissioning and operation of the APS facility have been identified and analyzed. Physical and administrative controls mitigate identified hazards. No hazard exists in this facility that has not been previously encountered and successfully mitigated in other accelerator and synchrotron radiation research facilities. This document is an updated version of the APS Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR). During the review of the PSAR in February 1990, the APS was determined to be a Low Hazard Facility. On June 14, 1993, the Acting Director of the Office of Energy Research endorsed the designation of the APS as a Low Hazard Facility, and this Safety Assessment Document supports that designation.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

X-ray pump optical probe cross-correlation study of GaAs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrafast dynamics in atomic, molecular and condensed-matter systems are increasingly being studied using optical-pump, X-ray probe techniques where subpicosecond laser pulses excite the system and X-rays detect changes in absorption spectra and local atomic structure. New opportunities are appearing as a result of improved synchrotron capabilities and the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers. These source improvements also allow for the reverse measurement: X-ray pump followed by optical probe. We describe here how an X-ray pump beam transforms a thin GaAs specimen from a strong absorber into a nearly transparent window in less than 100 ps, for laser photon energies just above the bandgap. We find the opposite effect - X-ray induced optical opacity - for photon energies just below the bandgap. This raises interesting questions about the ultrafast many-body response of semiconductors to X-ray absorption, and provides a new approach for an X-ray/optical cross-correlator for synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser applications.

Durbin, S.M.; Clevenger, T.; Graber, T.; Henning, R. (Purdue); (UC)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization.

Rhodes, C.K.

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

368

Aneta Siemiginowska Chandra X-ray Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ray and gamma-ray · High Energy Sky · Chandra X-ray Observatory · examples of typical X-ray data, · an example of a data analysis process · statistical challenges · what do we learn from the data? #12;What is Astronomy and phenomena do we study and how? Solar System: Sun and sollar wind, planets, moons, asteroids, comets Our

Wolfe, Patrick J.

369

Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

Erin Miller

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Statistical Analysis of X-ray Speckle at the NSLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a statistical analysis of the static speckle produced by illuminating a disordered aerogel sample by a nominally coherent x-ray beam at wiggler beamline X25 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The results of the analysis allow us to determine that the coherence delivered to the X25 hutch is within 35% of what is expected. The rate of coherent photons is approximately two times smaller than expected on the basis of the X25 wiggler source brilliance.

Ophelia K. C. Tsui; S. G. J. Mochrie; L. E. Berman

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

X-Ray Measurements Of A Thermo Scientific P385 DD Neutron Generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory is experimenting with electrical neutron generators, as potential replacements for californium-252 radioisotopic neutron sources in its PINS prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system for the identification of military chemical warfare agents and explosives. In addition to neutron output, we have recently measured the x-ray output of the Thermo Scientific P385 deuterium-deuterium neutron generator. X rays are a normal byproduct from neutron generators, but depending on their intensity and energy, x rays can interfere with gamma rays from the object under test, increase gamma-spectrometer dead time, and reduce PGNAA system throughput. The P385 x-ray energy spectrum was measured with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and a broad peak is evident at about 70 keV. To identify the source of the x rays within the neutron generator assembly, it was scanned by collimated scintillation detectors along its long axis. At the strongest x-ray emission points, the generator also was rotated 60 deg. between measurements. The scans show the primary source of x-ray emission from the P385 neutron generator is an area 60 mm from the neutron production target, in the vicinity of the ion source. Rotation of the neutron generator did not significantly alter the x-ray count rate, and its x-ray emission appears to be axially symmetric. A thin lead shield, 3.2 mm (1/8 inch) thick, reduced the 70-keV generator x rays to negligible levels.

Wharton, C. J.; Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.; Caffrey, A. J. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Avenue, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States); Simpson, J.; Lemchak, M. [Thermo-Fisher Scientific/MF Physics, 5074 List Drive, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80919 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

X-ray Practicals Series 1 Advanced Data Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Practicals Series 1 Advanced Data Reduction Instructor J. Reibenspies, Ph. D. Nattamai Bhuvanesh, Ph.D. Version 1.0.0 #12;X-ray Practicals Series 2 #12;X-ray Practicals Series 3 #12;X-ray is good. The y direction is shifting the most, but the shift is ok #12;X-ray Practicals Series 5 Other

Meagher, Mary

373

X-RAY EMISSION FROM PLANETS AND COMETS: RELATIONSHIP WITH SOLAR X-RAYS AND SOLAR WIND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the occurrence of solar X-ray flare, when light travel time delay is accounted, suggesting that X-rays fromX-RAY EMISSION FROM PLANETS AND COMETS: RELATIONSHIP WITH SOLAR X-RAYS AND SOLAR WIND ANIL BHARDWAJ Flight center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA Scattering of solar X-ray radiation mainly produces the non

?stgaard, Nikolai

374

X-Ray Diffraction The X-Ray Diffraction facility is equipped with state-of-the-art  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Diffraction The X-Ray Diffraction facility is equipped with state-of-the-art diffractometers offering both single crystal and powder X-Ray diffraction. Powder X-Ray Diffraction High resolution data For more details on powder X-Ray analysis contact Dr J Hriljac on 0121 414 4458 or email: j

Birmingham, University of

375

X-Ray Physics in Confinement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-RayX-RayX-Ray

376

Probing bismuth ferrite nanoparticles by hard x-ray photoemission: Anomalous occurrence of metallic bismuth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (?75?nm and ?155?nm) synthesized by a chemical method, using soft X-ray (1253.6?eV) and hard X-ray (3500, 5500, and 7500?eV) photoelectron spectroscopy. This provided an evidence for the variation of chemical state of bismuth in crystalline, phase pure nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis using Mg K? (1253.6?eV) source showed that iron and bismuth were present in both Fe{sup 3+} and Bi{sup 3+} valence states as expected for bismuth ferrite. However, hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles using variable photon energies unexpectedly showed the presence of Bi{sup 0} valence state below the surface region, indicating that bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are chemically inhomogeneous in the radial direction. Consistently, small-angle X-ray scattering reveals a core-shell structure for these radial inhomogeneous nanoparticles.

Chaturvedi, Smita; Rajendra, Ranguwar; Ballav, Nirmalya; Kulkarni, Sulabha, E-mail: s.kulkarni@iiserpune.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411008 (India); Sarkar, Indranil [DESY Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Shirolkar, Mandar M. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Jeng, U-Ser; Yeh, Yi-Qi [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101, Hsin-Ann Road, Science Park, Hsinchu 3007-6, Taiwan (China)

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

377

High power x-ray welding of metal-matrix composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10.sup.4 watts/cm.sup.2 and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

Rosenberg, Richard A. (Naperville, IL); Goeppner, George A. (Orland Park, IL); Noonan, John R. (Naperville, IL); Farrell, William J. (Flossmoor, IL); Ma, Qing (Westmont, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Biologically Relevant Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

308, Messer, B. M. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of AqueousSarcosine via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy 5.1 Introductionwith Carboxylate by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Liquid

Uejio, Janel Sunayo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray...

380

The Swift X-ray monitoring campaign of the center of the Milky Way  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2006 February, shortly after its launch, Swift began monitoring the center of the Milky Way with the onboard X-Ray Telescope using short 1-ks exposures performed every 1-4 days. Between 2006 and 2014, over 1200 observations have been obtained, amounting to ~1.2 Ms of exposure time. This has yielded a wealth of information about the long-term X-ray behavior of the supermassive black hole Sgr A*, and numerous transient X-ray binaries that are located within the 25'x25' region covered by the campaign. In this review we highlight the discoveries made during these first nine years, which includes 1) the detection of seven bright X-ray flares from Sgr A*, 2) the discovery of the magnetar SGR J1745-29, 3) the first systematic analysis of the outburst light curves and energetics of the peculiar class of very-faint X-ray binaries, 4) the discovery of three new transient X-ray sources, 5) exposing low-level accretion in otherwise bright X-ray binaries, and 6) the identification of a candidate X-ray binary/millisecon...

Degenaar, N; Miller, J M; Reynolds, M T; Kennea, J; Gehrels, N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An X-ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, & Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubi\\'nski, & Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the hard X-ray continuum above $\\sim 50$ keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft $\\gamma$-ray telescopes, in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

James Chiang

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

382

The XMM large scale structure survey: optical vs. X-ray classifications of active galactic nuclei and the unified scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our goal is to characterize AGN populations by comparing their X-ray and optical classifications. We present a sample of 99 spectroscopically identified X-ray point sources in the XMM-LSS survey which are significantly detected in the [2-10] keV band, and with more than 80 counts. We performed an X-ray spectral analysis for all of these 99 X-ray sources. Introducing the fourfold point correlation coefficient, we find only a mild correlation between the X-ray and the optical classifications, as up to 30% of the sources have differing X-ray and optical classifications: on one hand, 10% of the type 1 sources present broad emission lines in their optical spectra and strong absorption in the X-rays. These objects are highly luminous AGN lying at high redshift and thus dilution effects are totally ruled out, their discrepant nature being an intrinsic property. Their X-ray luminosities and redshifts distributions are consistent with those of the unabsorbed X-ray sources with broad emission lines. On the other hand, ...

Garcet, O; Gosset, E; Sprimont, P G; Surdej, J; Borkowski, V; Tajer, M; Pacaud, F; Pierre, M; Chiappetti, L; MacCagni, D; Page, M J; Carrera, F J; Tedds, J A; Mateos, S; Krumpe, M; Contini, T; Corral, A; Ebrero, J; Gavignaud, I; Schwope, A; Le Fvre, O; Polletta, M; Rosen, S; Lonsdale, C; Watson, M; Borczyk, W; Visnen, P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Imaging X-ray spectroscopy with micro-X and Chandra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High spectral resolution observations of X-ray phenomena have the potential to uncover new physics. Currently, only point sources can be probed with high resolution spectra, using gratings. Extended objects like supernova ...

Rutherford, John (John Morton)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Absorbed XFEL dose in the components of the LCLS X-Ray Optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We list the materials that are anticipated to be placed into the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) beam line, their positions, and the absorbed dose, and compare this dose with anticipated damage thresholds.

Hau-Riege, S

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced x-ray astrophysics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Most of what we know about such objects comes from the study of X-ray and gamma-ray photons arriving... the properties of the source from the emitted spectrum. We will...

386

A compact x-ray free electron laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a design concept and simulation of the performance of a compact x-ray, free electron laser driven by ultra-high gradient rf-linacs. The accelerator design is based on recent advances in high gradient technology by a LLNL/SLAC/LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be concerted to soft x-rays in the range from 2--10 nm by passage through short period, high fields strength wigglers as are being designed at Rocketdyne. Linear light sources of this type can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitable for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions. 12 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Barletta, W.; Attac, M.; Cline, D.B.; Kolonko, J.; Wang, X.; Bhowmik, A.; Bobbs, B.; Cover, R.A.; Dixon, F.P.; Rakowsky, G.; Gallardo, J.; Pellegrini, C.; Westenskow, G.

1988-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

387

SUPERLUMINOUS X-RAYS FROM A SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery of a population of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), with peak luminosities a factor of {approx}100 brighter than normal supernovae (SNe; typically SLSNe have M{sub V} < -21), has shown an unexpected diversity in core-collapse SN properties. Numerous models have been postulated for the nature of these events, including a strong interaction of the shockwave with a dense circumstellar environment, a re-energizing of the outflow via a central engine, or an origin in the catastrophic destruction of the star following a loss of pressure due to pair production in an extremely massive stellar core (so-called pair instability SNe). Here we consider constraints that can be placed on the explosion mechanism of hydrogen-poor SLSNe (SLSNe-I) via X-ray observations, with XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift, and show that at least one SLSN-I is likely the brightest X-ray SN ever observed, with L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}, {approx}150 days after its initial discovery. This is a luminosity three orders of magnitude higher than seen in other X-ray SNe powered via circumstellar interactions. Such high X-ray luminosities are sufficient to ionize the ejecta and markedly reduce the optical depth, making it possible to see deep into the ejecta and any source of emission that resides there. Alternatively, an engine could have powered a moderately relativistic jet external to the ejecta, similar to those seen in gamma-ray bursts. If the detection of X-rays does require an engine it implies that these SNe do create compact objects, and that the stars are not completely destroyed in a pair instability event. Future observations will determine which, if any, of these mechanisms are at play in SLSNe.

Levan, A. J.; Wheatley, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Read, A. M.; Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Metzger, B. D., E-mail: a.j.levan@warwick.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street, 704 Pupin Hall, MC 5255, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

388

X-ray grid-detector apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

Boone, John M. (Folsom, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

X-ray induced optical reflectivity  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The change in optical reflectivity induced by intense x-ray pulses can now be used to study ultrafast many body responses in solids in the femtosecond time domain. X-ray absorption creates photoelectrons and core level holes subsequently filled by Auger or fluorescence processes, and these excitations ultimately add conduction and valence band carriers that perturb optical reflectivity.Optical absorption associated with band filling and band gap narrowing is shown to explain the basic features found in recent measurements on an insulator (silicon nitride, Si3N4), a semiconductor(gallium arsenide,GaAs), and a metal (gold,Au), obtained with ?100 fs x-ray pulses at 500-2000 eV and probed with 800 nm laser pulses. In particular GaAs exhibits an abrupt drop in reflectivity, persisting only for a time comparable to the x-ray excitation pulse duration, consistent with prompt band gap narrowing.

Durbin, Stephen M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Columbia University X-Ray Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia University X-Ray Measurements of the Levitated Dipole Experiment J. L. Ellsworth, J. Kesner MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center D.T. Garnier, A.K. Hansen, M.E. Mauel Columbia University

391

X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods To be held as part of SPIE. http:spie.orgOP318 August 28-29, 2013; San Diego, California, USA...

392

X-ray Modeling of \\eta\\ Carinae and WR140 from SPH Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The colliding wind binary (CWB) systems \\eta\\ Carinae and WR140 provide unique laboratories for X-ray astrophysics. Their wind-wind collisions produce hard X-rays that have been monitored extensively by several X-ray telescopes, including RXTE. To interpret these RXTE X-ray light curves, we model the wind-wind collision using 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations. Adiabatic simulations that account for the absorption of X-rays from an assumed point source at the apex of the wind-collision shock cone by the distorted winds can closely match the observed 2-10keV RXTE light curves of both \\eta\\ Car and WR140. This point-source model can also explain the early recovery of \\eta\\ Car's X-ray light curve from the 2009.0 minimum by a factor of 2-4 reduction in the mass loss rate of \\eta\\ Car. Our more recent models relax the point-source approximation and account for the spatially extended emission along the wind-wind interaction shock front. For WR140, the computed X-ray light curve again matches the ...

Russell, Christopher M P; Okazaki, Atsuo T; Madura, Thomas I; Owocki, Stanley P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Principles of X-ray Navigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray navigation is a new concept in satellite navigation in which orientation, position and time are measured by observing stellar emissions in x-ray wavelengths. X-ray navigation offers the opportunity for a single instrument to be used to measure these parameters autonomously. Furthermore, this concept is not limited to missions in close proximity to the earth. X-ray navigation can be used on a variety of missions from satellites in low earth orbit to spacecraft on interplanetary missions. In 1997 the Unconventional Stellar Aspect Experiment (USA) will be launched as part of the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). USA will provide the first platform for real-time experimentation in the field of x-ray navigation and also serves as an excellent case study for the design and manufacturing of space qualified systems in small, autonomous groups. Current techniques for determining the orientation of a satellite rely on observations of the earth, sun and stars in infrared, visible or ultraviolet wavelengths. It is possible to use x-ray imaging devices to provide arcsecond level measurement of attitude based on star patterns in the x-ray sky. This technique is explored with a simple simulation. Collimated x-ray detectors can be used on spinning satellites to provide a cheap and reliable measure of orientation. This is demonstrated using observations of the Crab Pulsar taken by the high Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) in 1977. A single instrument concept is shown to be effective, but dependent on an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity and thus susceptible to errors in that estimate. A star scanner based on a differential measurement from two x-ray detectors eliminates the need for an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity. A first order model and a second order model of the two star scanner concepts are considered. Many of the stars that emit in the x-ray regime are also x-ray pulsars with frequency stability approaching a part in 10{sup 9}. By observing these pulsations, a satellite can keep accurate time autonomously. They have demonstrated the acquisition and tracking of the Crab nebula pulsar by simulating the operation of a phase-locked loop.

Hanson, John Eric; /SLAC

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Materials. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell...

395

Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for a Berea Sandstone: Resolution Effect. Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for...

396

LONG-TERM X-RAY SPECTRAL VARIABILITY OF THE NUCLEUS OF M81 V. La Parola,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) spectral analyses of the nuclear X-ray source show, in addition to the power-law component (? $ 1:85), a 6 ABSTRACT We have analyzed the soft X-ray emission from the nuclear source of the nearby spiral galaxy M81 by rapid flares. After ac- counting for the extended component resolved by Chandra, the nuclear soft X

Kim, Dong-Woo

397

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 17 JANUARY 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1506 High-reflectivity high-resolution X-ray crystal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of X-ray free-electron laser oscillators (XFELOs), next-generation hard-X-ray sources of the highest-resolution X-ray crystal optics with diamonds Yuri V. Shvyd'ko1 *, Stanislav Stoupin1 , Alessandro Cunsolo1,2 , Ayman H. Said1 and Xianrong Huang2 Owing to the depth to which hard X-rays penetrate into most materials

Loss, Daniel

398

X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WEAK-LINED T TAURI BINARY SYSTEM KH 15D William Herbst and Edward C. Moran  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WEAK-LINED T TAURI BINARY SYSTEM KH 15D William Herbst and Edward C. Moran 15D has been detected as an X-ray source in a 95.7 ks exposure from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory archives. A maximum X-ray luminosity of 1:5; 1029 ergs s?1 is derived in the 0.5­8 keV band, corresponding

Royer, Dana

399

X-ray Emission Processes in Radio Jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emission processes responsible for the observed X-rays from radio jets are commonly believed to be non-thermal, but in any particular case, it is unclear if synchrotron emission or one or more varieties of inverse Compton emission predominates. We present a formulation of inverse Compton emission from a relativistically moving jet (``IC/beaming'') which relies on radio emitting synchrotron sources for which the energy densities in particles and fields are comparable. We include the non-isotropic nature of inverse Compton scattering of the relativistic electrons on photons of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and provide beaming parameters for a number of jets. A list of X-ray emitting jets is given and the jets are classified on the basis of their morphology and spectral energy distribution to determine their likely emission process. We conclude that these jets have significant bulk relativistic velocities on kpc scales; that higher redshift sources require less beaming because the energy density of the CMB is significantly greater than locally; and that for some nearby sources, synchrotron X-ray emission predominates because the jet makes a large angle to the line of sight.

D. E. Harris; H. Krawczynski

2001-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

HARD X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF A JET AND ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN THE CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first hard X-ray observation of a solar jet on the limb with flare footpoints occulted, so that faint emission from accelerated electrons in the corona can be studied in detail. In this event on 2003 August 21, RHESSI observed a double coronal hard X-ray source in the pre-impulsive phase at both thermal and nonthermal energies. In the impulsive phase, the first of two hard X-ray bursts consists of a single thermal/nonthermal source coinciding with the lower of the two earlier sources, and the second burst shows an additional nonthermal, elongated source, spatially and temporally coincident with the coronal jet. Analysis of the jet hard X-ray source shows that collisional losses by accelerated electrons can deposit enough energy to generate the jet. The hard X-ray time profile above 20 keV matches that of the accompanying Type III and broadband gyrosynchrotron radio emission, indicating both accelerated electrons escaping outward along the jet path and electrons trapped in the flare loop. The double coronal hard X-ray source, the open field lines indicated by Type III bursts, and the presence of a small post-flare loop are consistent with significant electron acceleration in an interchange reconnection geometry.

Glesener, Lindsay; Lin, R. P.; Krucker, Saem, E-mail: glesener@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science Laboratory, UC Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

X-ray Detection from Bona-fide and Candidate Brown Dwarfs in the Rho Ophiuchi Cloud with Chandra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of an X-ray search from bona-fide and candidate brown dwarfs in the Rho Ophiuchi cloud cores with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The selected areas are two fields near the cloud center and are observed with the ACIS-I array of a 17'x17' size and a ~100 ks exposure. Among 18 bona-fide and candidate brown dwarfs listed by the infrared spectroscopy, we find X-ray emission from 7 sources above 99.9% confidence level. Therefore ~40% of the infrared-selected brown dwarfs in this cloud emit X-rays. For the brightest 4 sources, the X-ray spectra are made and are fitted with a thin-thermal plasma model of a temperature 1-2.5 keV. The X-rays are also time variable with rapid flares from 2 of the brown dwarfs. Assuming 2 keV temperature and using the empirical relation of Av vs. NH, we estimate the X-ray luminosity or its upper limit of the other faint or non-X-ray sources. The X-ray luminosity (Lx) of the X-ray-detected sources is in the range of 0.3-90x10^28 ergs s^-1, while the luminosity ratio of X-ray to bolometric (Lx/Lbol) is 10^-3 - 10^-5, similar to those of low-mass pre-main-sequence and dMe stars. All these results suggest that the X-ray origin of brown dwarfs is the same as low-mass stars; strong magnetic activity at the stellar surface.

Kensuke Imanishi; Masahiro Tsujimoto; Katsuji Koyama

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

402

Advanced Photon Source (APS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

403

STATE-DEPENDENT ORBITAL MODULATION OF X-RAYS IN CYG X-3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze all of the available RXTE observations of Cyg X-3 in order to investigate the connection between the central X-ray source and its surrounding environment. The hardness-intensity diagram of Cyg X-3 displays a 'shoe' shape rather than the Q-type shape commonly seen in other black hole X-ray binary, and exhibits no apparent hysteresis effect. During the {gamma}-ray outbursts, no existing data are located in the hard and intermediate states, which suggest the absence of a significant population of non-thermal electrons when the source is in these states. For the first time, we present the orbital modulation of the X-ray light curve (LC) of all five states. The different energy band LCs are in phase with each other in all five states, and the modulation amplitude of both soft and hard X-ray LCs monotonously increases with decreasing hardness from hard to soft non-thermal states. We confirm that the modulation depth decreases with increasing energy in the hard, intermediate, and very high states, as originally reported by Zdziarski et al. However, in the soft non-thermal state, the hard X-ray modulation strength significantly increases and is even larger than the soft X-ray one. Our results rule out both wind absorption and jet origins of the hard X-ray LC modulation in the soft non-thermal state, and challenge our understanding of the states of Cyg X-3.

Weng, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Ge, Ming-Yu; Li, Jian; Zhang, Shu, E-mail: zhangsn@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: wengss@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Modeling of X-ray beamlines and devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray beamlines on synchrotron sources are similar in size and complexity to beamlines at state-of-the-art neutron sources. The design principles, tools, and optimization strategies for synchrotron beamlines are also similar to those of neutron beamlines. The authors describe existing design tools for modeling synchrotron radiation beamlines and describe how these tools have evolved over the last two decades. The development of increasingly powerful modeling tools has been driven by the escalating cost and sophistication of state-of-the-art beamlines and by a world-wide race to exploit advanced synchrotron radiation sources.

Ice, G.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Segmentation of x-ray images using Probabilistic Relaxation Labeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Segmentation is a process of separating objects of interest from their background or from other objects in an image. Without a suitable segmentation scheme, it is very difficult to detect contraband in X-rays images. In this paper, a Probabilistic Relaxation Labeling (PRL) segmentation scheme is presented and compared with other segmentation methods. PRL segmentation is an interative algorithm that labels each pixel in an image by cooperative use of two information sources: the pixel probability and the degree of certainty of its probability supported by the neighboring pixels. The practical implementation and results of the PRL segmentation on X-ray baggage images are also discussed and compared with other segmentation methods. 13 refs., 12 figs.

Thai, T.Q.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hard X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomographic Nanoimaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron-based full-field tomographic microscopy established itself as a tool for noninvasive investigations. Many beamlines worldwide routinely achieve micrometer spatial resolution while the isotropic 100-nm barrier is reached and trespassed only by few instruments, mainly in the soft x-ray regime. We present an x-ray, full-field microscope with tomographic capabilities operating at 10 keV and with a 3D isotropic resolution of 144 nm recently installed at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source. Custom optical components, including a beam-shaping condenser and phase-shifting dot arrays, were used to obtain an ideal, aperture-matched sample illumination and very sensitive phase-contrast imaging. The instrument has been successfully used for the nondestructive, volumetric investigation of single, unstained cells.

Stampanoni, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zuerich, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Marone, F.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gorelick, S.; David, C.; Mokso, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Trtik, P.; Jefimovs, K. [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

407

Water Window Ptychographic Imaging with Characterized Coherent X-rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a ptychographical coherent diffractive imaging experiment in the water window with focused soft X-rays at $500~\\mathrm{eV}$. An X-ray beam with high degree of coherence was selected for ptychography at the P04 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron radiation source. We measured the beam coherence with the newly developed non-redundant array method. A pinhole $2.6~\\mathrm{\\mu m}$ in size selected the coherent part of the beam and was used for ptychographic measurements of a lithographically manufactured test sample and fossil diatom. The achieved resolution was $53~\\mathrm{nm}$ for the test sample and only limited by the size of the detector. The diatom was imaged at a resolution better than $90~\\mathrm{nm}$.

Rose, Max; Dzhigaev, Dmitry; Gorobtsov, Oleg; Senkbeil, Tobias; von Gundlach, Andreas; Gorniak, Thomas; Shabalin, Anatoly; Viefhaus, Jens; Rosenhahn, Axel; Vartanyants, Ivan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Diffuse X-rays from the Arches and Quintuplet clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The origin and initial mass function of young stellar clusters near the Galactic center are still poorly understood. Two of the more prominent ones, the Arches and Quintuplet clusters, may have formed from a shock-induced burst of star formation, given their similar age and proximity to each other. Their unusual mass distribution, however, may be evidence of a contributing role played by other factors, such as stellar capture from regions outside the clusters themselves. Diffuse X-ray emission from these sources provides us with a valuable, albeit indirect, measure of the stellar mass-loss rate from their constituents. Using recent data acquired with Chandra, we can study the nature and properties of the outflow to not only probe the pertinent physical conditions, such as high metallicity, the magnetic field, and so forth, but also to better constrain the stellar distribution within the clusters, in order to identify their formative history. In this paper, we present a set of three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the wind-wind interactions in both the Arches and Quintuplet clusters. We are guided primarily by the currently known properties of the constituent stars, though we vary the mass-loss rates in order to ascertain the dependence of the measured X-ray flux on the assumed stellar characteristics. Our results are compared with the latest observations of the Arches cluster. Our analysis of the Quintuplet cluster may be used as a basis for comparison with future X-ray observations of this source.

Gabriel Rockefeller; Chris L. Fryer; Fulvio Melia; Q. Daniel Wang

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

409

X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

On-orbit calibration of soft X-ray detector on Chang'E-2 satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray spectrometer is one of the satellite payloads on Chang'E-2 satellite. The soft X-ray detector is one of the device on X-ray spectrometer which is designed to detect the major rock-forming elements within 0.5-10keV range on lunar surface. In this paper, energy linearity and energy resolution calibration is done using a weak Fe55 source, while temperature and time effect is considered not take big error. The total uncertainty is estimated to be within 5% after correction.

Hong Xiao; Wenxi Penga; Huanyu Wang; Xingzhu Cui; Dongya Guo

2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

411

On-orbit calibration of soft X-ray detector on Chang'E-2 satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray spectrometer is one of the satellite payloads on Chang'E-2 satellite. The soft X-ray detector is one of the device on X-ray spectrometer which is designed to detect the major rock-forming elements within 0.5-10keV range on lunar surface. In this paper, energy linearity and energy resolution calibration is done using a weak Fe55 source, while temperature and time effect is considered not take big error. The total uncertainty is estimated to be within 5% after correction.

Xiao, Hong; Wang, Huanyu; Cui, Xingzhu; Guo, Dongya

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Hard X-ray observations of Cygnus X-1 with the Miso telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 was observed in the hard X-ray - soft gamma-ray energy range by the Miso telescope on two different occasions: in September 1979 and May 1980. Two hard X-ray states of the source have beem measured: in 1979 the observed spectrum confirms the superlow state measured in the same period by the HEAO-3 satellite, while in 1980 the Miso X-ray data are consistent with the so-called low state of Cygnus X-1. In both occasions, no gamma-ray excess has been observed above 200 keV. 9 references.

Perotti, F.; Della Ventura, A.; Villa, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The XMM large scale structure survey: optical vs. X-ray classifications of active galactic nuclei and the unified scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our goal is to characterize AGN populations by comparing their X-ray and optical classifications. We present a sample of 99 spectroscopically identified X-ray point sources in the XMM-LSS survey which are significantly detected in the [2-10] keV band, and with more than 80 counts. We performed an X-ray spectral analysis for all of these 99 X-ray sources. Introducing the fourfold point correlation coefficient, we find only a mild correlation between the X-ray and the optical classifications, as up to 30% of the sources have differing X-ray and optical classifications: on one hand, 10% of the type 1 sources present broad emission lines in their optical spectra and strong absorption in the X-rays. These objects are highly luminous AGN lying at high redshift and thus dilution effects are totally ruled out, their discrepant nature being an intrinsic property. Their X-ray luminosities and redshifts distributions are consistent with those of the unabsorbed X-ray sources with broad emission lines. On the other hand, 25/32 are moderate luminosity AGN, which are both unabsorbed in the X-rays and only present narrow emission lines in their optical spectra. The majority of them have an optical spectrum which is representative of the host galaxy. We finally infer that dilution of the AGN by the host galaxy seems to account for their nature. 5/25 have been defined as Seyfert 2. In conclusion, most of these 32 discrepant cases can be accounted for by the standard AGN unified scheme, as its predictions are not met for only 12% of the 99 X-ray sources. ABRIDGED

O. Garcet; P. Gandhi; E. Gosset; P. G. Sprimont; J. Surdej; V. Borkowski; M. Tajer; F. Pacaud; M. Pierre; L. Chiappetti; D. Maccagni; M. J. Page; F. J. Carrera; J. A. Tedds; S. Mateos; M. Krumpe; T. Contini; A. Corral; J. Ebrero; I. Gavignaud; A. Schwope; O. Le Fevre; M. Polletta; S. Rosen; C. Lonsdale; M. Watson; W. Borczyk; P. Vaisanen

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

414

Optical Observations of Quasar X-ray Jets J.M. Gelbord, H.L. Marshall, B. Miller (MIT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Observations of Quasar X-ray Jets J.M. Gelbord, H.L. Marshall, B. Miller (MIT) D in roughly 2/3 of our sample (13 out of 20; Marshall et al. 2003, in prep.). We are now beginning to analyze161; Marshall et al. 2001, ApJL 549, L167; Marshall et al. 2002, ApJ 564, 683; Sambruna et al. 2002

Gelbord, Jonathan

415

Nonlinear X-ray Compton Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered...

Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, P H; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B; Reis, David A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

Suckewer, Szymon (Princeton, NJ); Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Rosser, Roy (Princeton, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries Johanna Information ABSTRACT: Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high of these batteries for commercial use. The two primary obstacles are the solubility of long chain lithium

Cui, Yi

419

X-ray tomographic image magnification process, system and apparatus therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A computerized three-dimensional x-ray tomographic microscopy system is disclosed, comprising: a) source means for providing a source of parallel x-ray beams, b) staging means for staging and sequentially rotating a sample to be positioned in the path of the c) x-ray image magnifier means positioned in the path of the beams downstream from the sample, d) detecting means for detecting the beams after being passed through and magnified by the image magnifier means, and e) computing means for analyzing values received from the detecting means, and converting the values into three-dimensional representations. Also disclosed is a process for magnifying an x-ray image, and apparatus therefor.

Kinney, John H. (Danville, CA); Bonse, Ulrich K. (Dortmund, DE); Johnson, Quintin C. (Livermore, CA); Nichols, Monte C. (Livermore, CA); Saroyan, Ralph A. (Livermore, CA); Massey, Warren N. (Livermore, CA); Nusshardt, Rudolph (Waltrop, DE)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Characteristic x-ray emission from undermines plasmas irradiated by ultra-intense lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between FY09 and FY11 we have conducted more than a dozen three-week experimental campaigns at high-power laser facilities around the world to investigate laser-channeling through x-ray and optical imaging and the conversion from laser-energy to xrays. We have performed simultaneous two-wavelength x-ray imaging (K-alpha and He-alpha) to distinguish the hot-plasma region (hot-spot) from the laser-produced electrons (K-alpha). In addition, we have initiated a new collaboration with SNL and have performed first shots on the 100 TW beamlet chamber to commission a fast x-ray streak camera to be used to investigate the temporal evolution of our K-alpha sources. We also collaborated on campaigns at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) and the LANL Trident laser to employ laser produced x-ray sources for Thomson scattering off dense matter.

Niemann, Christoph

2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

X-ray tomographic image magnification process, system and apparatus therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A computerized three-dimensional x-ray tomographic microscopy system is disclosed, comprising: (a) source means for providing a source of parallel x-ray beams, (b) staging means for staging and sequentially rotating a sample to be positioned in the path of the (c) x-ray image magnifier means positioned in the path of the beams downstream from the sample, (d) detecting means for detecting the beams after being passed through and magnified by the image magnifier means, and (e) computing means for analyzing values received from the detecting means, and converting the values into three-dimensional representations. Also disclosed is a process for magnifying an x-ray image, and apparatus therefor. 25 figures.

Kinney, J.H.; Bonse, U.K.; Johnson, Q.C.; Nichols, M.C.; Saroyan, R.A.; Massey, W.N.; Nusshardt, R.

1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

422

X-ray standing waves and surface EXAFS studies of electrochemical interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of their penetrative power, X-rays are ideally suited for in-situ studies of interfaces in general and solid/liquid interfaces in particular. The recent advent of powerful X-ray synchrotron sources has made experiments of this type feasible. Synchrotron sources offer a broad spectral range of polarized, highly collimated X-rays with intensities that are 10{sup 3}-10{sup 6} higher than those of conventional sources. Moreover, third-generation synchrotron sources, with their projected increase in brightness on the order of 10{sup 4}, will allow for new types of experiments, including the study of dynamic processes in real time. There are a number of X-ray-based surface-sensitive techniques that can be employed in the study of solid/liquid interfaces, including surface EXAFS, X-ray standing waves (XSW), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD), and others. In this Account the authors focus on the use of XSW and surface EXAFS. The authors begin with a brief theoretical description followed by experimental aspects of these techniques. The authors then discuss specific examples with emphasis on the underpotential deposition of copper on platinum in the presence and absence of coadsorbates, the potential dependent distribution of interfacial species, and potential dependent structural changes of a redox-active self-assembling monolayer. 33 refs., 7 figs.

Abruna, H.D.; Bommarito, G.M.; Yee, H.S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Double-Layer Silicon PIN Photodiode X-Ray Detector for a Future X-ray Timing Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A double-layer silicon detector consisting of two 500micron-thick silicon PIN photodiodes with independent readouts was mounted in a vacuum chamber and tested with X-ray sources. The detector is sensitive from 1-30 keV with an effective area of 6 mm^2. The detector performs best at -35 C with an energy resolution of 220 eV (FWHM, full width at half maximum) at 5.9 keV, and is able to operate at room temperature, +25 C, with moderate resolution around 760 eV (FWHM). The response of the top layer sensor is highly uniform across the sensitive area. This large-format silicon detector is appropriate for future X-ray timing missions.

Hua Feng; Philip Kaaret; Hans Andersson

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Cessation of X-ray Pulsation of GX 1+4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report results from our weekly monitoring campaign on the X-ray pulsar GX 1+4 with the {\\em Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer} satellite. The spin-down trend of GX 1+4 was continuing, with the pulsar being at its longest period ever measured (about 138.7 s). At the late stage of the campaign, the source entered an extended faint state, when its X-ray (2-60 keV) flux decreased significantly to an average level of $\\sim 3 \\times 10^{-10} ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1}$. It was highly variable in the faint state; the flux dropped to as low as $\\sim 3 \\times 10^{-11} ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1}$. In several observations during this period, the X-ray pulsation became undetectable. We can, therefore, conclude conservatively that the pulsed fraction, which is normally $\\gtrsim$ 70% (peak-to-peak), must have decreased drastically in those cases. This is very similar to what was observed of GX 1+4 in 1996 when it became similarly faint in X-ray. In fact, the flux at which the cessation of X-ray pulsation first occurred is nearly the same as it was in 1996. We suggest that we have, once again, observed the propeller effect in GX 1+4, a phenomenon that is predicted by theoretical models of accreting X-ray pulsars.

Wei Cui; Benjamin Smith

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

Evidence Against BALS in the X-ray Bright QSO PG1416-129  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent results from the ROSAT All Sky Survey, and from deep ROSAT pointings reveal that broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) are weak in the soft X-ray bandpass (with optical-to-X-ray spectral slope alpha_{ox}>1.8) in comparison to QSOs with normal OUV spectra (mean alpha_{ox}=1.4). One glaring exception appeared to be the nearby BALQSO PG1416-129, which is a bright ROSAT source showing no evidence for intrinsic soft X-ray absorption. We present here our new HST FOS spectrum of PG1416-129, in which we find no evidence for BALs. We show that the features resulting in the original BAL classification, based on IUE spectra, were probably spurious. On the basis of UV, X-ray and optical evidence, we conclude that PG1416-129, is not now, and has never been a BALQSO. Our result suggests that weak soft X-ray emission is a defining characteristic of true BALQSOs. If BALQSOs indeed harbor normal intrinsic spectral energy distributions, their observed soft X-ray weakness is most likely the result of absorption. The ubiquitous occurrence of weak soft X-ray emission with UV absorption (BALs) thus suggests absorbers in each energy regime that are physically associated, if not identical.

Paul J. Green; Thomas L. Aldcroft; Smita Mathur; Norbert Schartel

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

426

GIANT H II REGIONS IN M101. I. X-RAY ANALYSIS OF HOT GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed a Chandra X-ray study of three giant H II regions (GHRs), NGC 5461, NGC 5462, and NGC 5471, in the spiral galaxy M101. The X-ray spectra of the three GHRs all contain a prominent thermal component with a temperature of {approx}0.2 keV. In NGC 5461, the spatial distribution of the soft (<1.5 keV) X-ray emission is generally in agreement with the extent of H1105, the most luminous H II region therein, but extends beyond its southern boundary, which could be attributed to outflows from the star cloud between H1105 and H1098. In NGC 5462, the X-ray emission is displaced from the H II regions and a ridge of blue stars; the H{alpha} filaments extending from the ridge of star cloud to the diffuse X-rays suggest that hot gas outflows have occurred. The X-rays from NGC 5471 are concentrated at the B-knot, a 'hypernova remnant' candidate. Assuming a Sedov-Taylor evolution, the derived explosion energy, on the order of 10{sup 52} erg, is consistent with a hypernova origin. In addition, a bright source in the field of NGC 5462 has been identified as a background active galactic nucleus, instead of a black hole X-ray binary in M101.

Sun Wei; Chen Yang; Feng Li [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chu, You-Hua [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chen, C.-H. Rosie [Max Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Wang, Q. Daniel [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Li Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics, Nanjing University, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

X-ray variability in M87  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the evidence for X-ray variability from the core and from knot A in the M87 jet based on data from two observations with the Einstein Observatory High Resolution Imager (HRI) and three observations with the ROSAT HRI. The core intensity showed a 16% increase in 17 months ('79-'80); a 12% increase in the 3 years '92 to '95; and a 17% drop in the last half of 1995. The intensity of knot A appears to have decreased by 16% between 92Jun and 95Dec. Although the core variability is consistent with general expectations for AGN nuclei, the changes in knot A provide constraints on the x-ray emission process and geometry. Thus we predict that the x-ray morphology of knot A will differ significantly from the radio and optical structure.

D. E. Harris; J. A. Biretta; W. Junor

1996-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

428

Combined microstructure x-ray optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multilayers are man-made microstructures which vary in depth and are now of sufficient quality to be used as x-ray, soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet optics. Gratings are man-made in plane microstructures which have been used as optic elements for most of this century. Joining of these two optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical elements has the potential for greatly enhancing both the throughput and the resolution attainable in these spectral ranges. The characteristics of these new optic elements will be presented and compared to experiment with emphasis on the unique properties of these combined microstructures. These results reported are general in nature and not limited to the soft x-ray or extreme ultraviolet spectral domains and also apply to neutrons. 19 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Barbee, T.W. Jr.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean./Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

Dihlmann, W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

X-ray focal spot locating apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

Gilbert, Hubert W. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

X-ray and Radio Observations of the Massive Star Forming Region IRAS 20126+4104  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of Chandra ACIS-I and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) 6 cm continuum observations of the IRAS 20126+4104 massive star forming region. We detect 150 X-ray sources within the 17 arcmin x 17 arcmin ACIS-I field, and a total of 13 radio sources within the 9'.2 primary beam at 4.9 GHz. Among these are the first 6 cm detections of the central sources reported by Hofner et al. (2007), namely I20N1, I20S, and I20var. A new variable radio sources is also reported. Searching the 2MASS archive we identified 88 NIR counterparts to the X-ray sources. Only 4 of the X-ray sources had 6 cm counterparts. Based on an NIR color-color analysis, and on the Besancon simulation of Galactic stellar populations (Robin et al. 2003), we estimate that about 90 X-ray sources are associated with this massive star forming region. We detect an increasing surface density of X-ray sources toward the massive protostar and infer the presence of a cluster of at least 46 YSOs within a distance of 1.2 pc from the massive p...

Montes, Virginie A; Anderson, Crystal; Rosero, Viviana

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced.

Rhodes, Charles K. (Chicago, IL); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM); Solem, Johndale C. (Los Alamos, NM); Haddad, Waleed S. (Chicago, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced. 7 figs.

Rhodes, C.K.; Boyer, K.; Solem, J.C.; Haddad, W.S.

1990-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

434

Energy resolved X-ray grating interferometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although compatible with polychromatic radiation, the sensitivity in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is strongly dependent on the X-ray spectrum. We used an energy resolving detector to quantitatively investigate the dependency of the noise from the spectral bandwidth and to consequently optimize the system-by selecting the best energy band matching the experimental conditions-with respect to sensitivity maximization and, eventually, dose. Further, since theoretical calculations of the spectrum are usually limited due to non-ideal conditions, an energy resolving detector accurately quantifies the spectral changes induced by the interferometer including flux reduction and beam hardening.

Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland) [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Barber, W. C.; Iwanczyk, J. S. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)] [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States); Seo, Y.; Alhassen, F. [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)] [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

Time-resolved x-ray diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Techniques for time-resolved x-ray diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on systems utilizing x-ray diodes or scintillators. System design concerns for high-bandwidth (> 1 GHz) diagnostics will be emphasized. The limitations of a coaxial cable system and a technique for equalizing to improve bandwidth of such a system will be reviewed. Characteristics of new multi-GHz amplifiers will be presented. An example of a complete operational system on the Los Alamos Helios laser will be presented which has a bandwidth near 3 GHz over 38 m of coax. The system includes the cable, an amplifier, an oscilloscope, and a digital camera readout.

Lyons, P.B.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H NLensless X-RayLensless X-Ray

437

Theoretical standards in x-ray spectroscopies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose to extend our state-of-the-art, ab initio XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) codes, FEFF. Our current work has been highly successful in achieving accurate, user-friendly XAFS standards, exceeding the performance of both tabulated standards and other codes by a considerable margin. We now propose to add the capability to treat more complex materials. This includes multiple-scattering, polarization dependence, an approximate treatment of XANES (x-ray absorption near edge structure), and other improvements. We also plan to adapt FEFF to other spectroscopies, e.g. photoelectron diffraction (PD) and diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS).

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore thanX-Ray Imaging ofX-Ray

439

X-ray Computed Tomography | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore thanX-Ray ImagingfeedX-ray

440

THE CHANDRA MULTI-WAVELENGTH PROJECT: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND THE BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED AGNs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic ...

Trichas, Markos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

COUP census of X-ray stars in BN-KL and OMC-1S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a study of the X-ray sources detected in the vicinity of two density peaks in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1 (OMC-1) behind the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), as seen in the exceptionally deep (~10 days) exposure of the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP). We focus on a 40"*50" region around the Becklin-Neugebauer object and Kleinmann-Low nebula (collectively BN-KL) and a 60"*75" region around OMC-1S, a secondary star-forming peak some 90" south of BN-KL. Forty-three and sixty X-ray sources were detected in BN-KL and OMC-1S, respectively, of which half and one-third, respectively, were found to be foreground members of the ONC, while the remaining sources are identified as obscured X-ray sources with column densities 22stars rather than wind emission from massive stars, suggesting that the X-ray emission may be arising from companions. The X-ray light curve of the X-ray source close to BN shows a periodicity of ~8.3 days and from an X-ray image deconvolution of the region around BN, we conclude that either BN itself or a low mass companion with a projected separation of ~200 AU was detected. On the other hand, no emission is seen from the bright radio Source I, held by some to be the main source of luminosity in BN-KL. In OMC-1S, Chandra unveils a new subcluster of seven YSOs without infrared counterparts (abridged).

N. Grosso; E. D. Feigelson; K. V. Getman; L. Townsley; P. Broos; E. Flaccomio; M. J. McCaughrean; G. Micela; S. Sciortino; J. Bally; N. Smith; A. A. Muench; G. P. Garmire; F. Palla

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

442

On the Frequency Evolution of X-ray Brightness Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: Evidence for Coherent Oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the time dependence of the frequency of X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear bursts from several neutron star low mass X-ray binaries. We find that the oscillation frequencies in the cooling tails of X-ray bursts from 4U 1702-429 and 4U 1728-34 are well described by an exponential "chirp" model. With this model we demonstrate that the pulse trains in the cooling tails of many bursts are highly phase coherent, having oscillation quality factors as high as Q ~ 4000. We use this model of the frequency evolution to search sensitively for significant power at the harmonics and first sub-harmonic of the 330 and 363 Hz signals in bursts from 4U 1702-429 and 4U 1728-34, respectively, but find not evidence for significant power at any harmonic or the sub-harmonic. We argue that the high coherence favors stellar rotation as the source of the oscillations. We briefly discuss the frequency evolution in terms of rotational motion of an angular momentum conserving thermonuclear shell. we discuss how the limits on harmonic content can be used to infer properties of the neutron star.

Tod E. Strohmayer; Craig B. Markwardt

1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

443

SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

444

X-ray spectroscopy of manganese clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much of this thesis represents the groundwork necessary in order to probe Mn clusters more productively than with conventional Mn K-edge XAS and is presented in Part 1. Part 2 contains the application of x-ray techniques to Mn metalloproteins and includes a prognosis at the end of each chapter. Individual Mn oxidation states are more readily distinguishable in Mn L-edge spectra. An empirical mixed valence simulation routine for determining the average Mn oxidation state has been developed. The first Mn L-edge spectra of a metalloprotein were measured and interpreted. The energy of Mn K{beta} emission is strongly correlated with average Mn oxidation state. K{beta} results support oxidation states of Mn(III){sub 2}(IV){sub 2} for the S{sub 1} state of Photosystem II chemical chemically reduced preparations contain predominantly Mn(II). A strength and limitation of XAS is that it probes all of the species of a particular element in a sample. It would often be advantageous to selectively probe different forms of the same element. The first demonstration that chemical shifts in x-ray fluorescence energies can be used to obtain oxidation state-selective x-ray absorption spectra is presented. Spin-dependent spectra can also be used to obtain a more simplified picture of local structure. The first spin-polarized extended x-ray absorption fine structure using Mn K{beta} fluorescence detection is shown.

Grush, M.M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z