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1

A Record Run for the APS X-ray Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

light source facilities such as the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory to carry out world-class...

2

APS Bending Magnet X-rays and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets with Irradiation of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets with APS Bending Magnet X-rays and 60 Co γ-rays J. Alderman and P.K. Job APS Operations Division Advanced Photon Source J. Puhl Ionizing Radiation Division National Institute of Standards and Technology June 2000 Table of Contents Introduction Radiation-Induced Demagnetization of Permanent Magnets Resources Required γ-ray Irradiation Results and Analysis of γ-ray Irradiation X-ray Irradiation Results and Analysis of X-ray Irradiation Summary and Conclusions Acknowledgements References Tables and Figures Introduction The Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as other third-generation synchrotron light sources, uses permanent magnets in the insertion devices to produce x-rays for scientific

3

X-ray lithography source  

SciTech Connect

A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

X-ray lithography source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Miniature x-ray source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

APS X-ray Optics Fabrication and Characterization Facility  

SciTech Connect

The APS is in the process of assembling an X-ray Optics Fabrication and characterization Facility. This report will describe its current (as of February 1993) design.

Davey, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Miniature x-ray source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

A preliminary comparison of beam instabilities among ESRF, APS, and spring-8 x-ray storage ring light sources.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A collaboration has been established among the three highest energy storage ring synchrotron light sources: European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) (6 GeV), Advanced Photon Source (APS) (7 GeV), and Super Photon Ring (SPring-8) (8 GeV). The goal is to enhance understanding of impedance and beam instability characteristics for present performance and future machine development. In this paper, we compare the beam instability characteristics of the three rings and present a preliminary discussion of the similarities and differences. Topics for future, in-depth study, such as comparing the effect on the beam of in-vacuum insertion devices (IDs) and small-gap chambers, will be described.

Harkay, K.; Nagaoka, R.; Revol, J.-L.; Nakamura, T.

2002-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

9

APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Lights the Way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel The APS and the 2012 Argonne Energy Showcase DCS and APS Sign MOU Argonne Acoustic Levitation Video Goes Viral "Inside the Advanced...

10

APS 7-BM Beamline: X-Ray Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Useful Websites Useful Websites X-Ray Interactions with Matter from CRXO at LBNL. Intuitive interface for x-ray transmission and reflectivity for a wide range of materials. X-Ray Data Booklet from LBNL. Slightly outdated in places, but many useful tables of edge energies, fluorescence lines, and crystal lattice spacings. NIST XCOM Database. Powerful database of photoelectric absorption, elastic scattering, and Compton scattering cross-sections for a wide range of materials. X-Ray Server. Maintained by Sergey Stepanov at GMCA at the APS, this website has several powerful calculators for simulating x-ray reflection and diffraction. Software X-Ray Oriented Programs (XOP). This program, written by scientists at the ESRF and APS, is widely used in the synchrotron research community.

11

Compact x-ray source and panel  

SciTech Connect

A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

Tunable X-ray source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

13

Short Pulse X-rays at the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Short Pulse X-rays at the APS Workshop Summary Friday, May 9, 2008 Building 401, Room A5000 Organizers: Jin Wang (Argonne National Laboratory), Lin Chen (Argonne National Laboratory), David Reis ( University of Michigan ), Paul Evans ( University of Wisconsin ), Ali Nassiri (Argonne National Laboratory), and Linda Young ( Argonne National Laboratory) Agenda Registration - complete the visitor registration form. For "purpose of visit," please enter "APS SPX Workshop" https://www.aps.anl.gov/About/Visiting/visitor_registration.php On-site lodging is at the Argonne Guest House http://www.anlgh.org/ Travel to Argonne National Laboratory http://www.aps.anl.gov/About/Visiting/Directions/ Fees There is no charge for this workshop. Since the 2004 Lake Geneva Workshop, the APS has performed three years of

14

X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

Cominsky, L

2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

15

Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source  

SciTech Connect

A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source  

SciTech Connect

A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

High-speed X-ray Full-field Imaging Applications at the APS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, High-speed X-ray Full-field Imaging Applications at the APS ... Advances in Orientation Imaging Microscopy in Transmission Electron...

18

APS Upgrade | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop on new science opportunities provided by a multi-bend achromat lattice at the APS APS-U MBA Lattice Workshop Registration is now closed. Please contact Diane Wilkinson ext. 7810 or a member of the Workshop Organizing Committee for changes or modifications to your registration. Submit Comments, Suggestions, and Ideas for MBA Lattice Workshop October 21-22 Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Lab The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade is focused on delivering a powerful, versatile facility for science using high-brightness, high-energy X-rays. At APS, and around the light source community, scientists have been developing storage ring designs that push closer to the ultimate diffraction limit for X-ray sources. A recent report by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, which advises the Director of the U.S.

19

Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners Scientists Close-In on Artificial Spider Silk Ekiert Earns 2012 APSUO Franklin Award for Studies of Influenza Virus Clever Apes on WBEZ: Breaking the Fossil Record Gerig to Chair Particle Accelerator School Board APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray Technology and Research JUNE 18, 2012 Bookmark and Share The interiors of the Canadian Light Source (top) and Advanced Photon Source experiment halls. (CLS photo courtesy of Canadian Light Source) Seeking to solve some of today's greatest global problems, scientists using x-ray light source facilities at national research laboratories in

20

Multilayers for next generation x-ray sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multilayers are artificially layered structures that can be used to create optics and optical elements for a broad range of x-ray wavelengths, or can be optimized for other applications. The development of next generation x-ray sources (synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers) requires advances in x-ray optics. Newly developed multilayer-based mirrors and optical elements enabled efficient band-pass filtering, focusing and time resolved measurements in recent FLASH (Free Electron LASer in Hamburg) experiments. These experiments are providing invaluable feedback on the response of the multilayer structures to high intensity, short pulsed x-ray sources. This information is crucial to design optics for future x-ray free electron lasers and to benchmark computer codes that simulate damage processes.

Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Hau-Riege, S; Alameda, J; Nelson, A J; Walton, C C; Kjornrattanawanich, B; Aquila, A; Dollar, F; Gullikson, E; Tarrio, C

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

APS News 2011 | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moffat Appointed Senior Advisor for Life Sciences at the APS Moffat Appointed Senior Advisor for Life Sciences at the APS Moffat Appointed Senior Advisor for Life Sciences at the APS November 30, 2011 Prof. Keith Moffat of the University of Chicago has been appointed Senior Advisor for Life Sciences at the APS to provide a stronger linkage between the Advanced Photon Source and the life sciences community. Gluskin of ASD Elected to AAAS Fellowship Gluskin of ASD Elected to AAAS Fellowship December 2, 2011 Efim Gluskin of the Argonne Accelerator Systems Division has been elected to Fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science "for leadership in the development of ultra-bright x-ray sources utilized at third generation synchrotron sources and x-ray lasers." Jacobsen of XSD Elected to American Physical Society Fellowship

22

APS News 2012 | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stephen Southworth Elected to APS Fellowship Stephen Southworth Elected to APS Fellowship Stephen Southworth Elected to APS Fellowship December 19, 2012 Argonne Senior Scientist Stephen Southworth has been named a Fellow of the American Physical Society for "pioneering the development of atomic and molecular spectroscopies with third- and fourth-generation light sources..." American Physical Society Honors Decker American Physical Society Honors Decker November 19, 2012 Senior Scientist Glenn Decker has been named a fellow of the American Physical Society, an honor limited to no more than one-half of one percent of the society's membership of more than 50,000. APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret October 15, 2012 The Illinois Institute of Technology, in conjunction with

23

APS Upgrade | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS APS View Larger The brightness and energy of x-ray beams are critical properties for research. Higher brightness means more x-rays can be focused onto a smaller, laser-like spot, allowing researchers to gather more data in greater detail in less time. Higher energies allow x-rays to penetrate deeper inside materials to reveal crucial information about a material's structure and function. The combination of high brightness and high energy allows the observation and imaging - in real time - of fast and ultrafast technologically important processes, including fuel sprays, magnetic switching, and biological processes in living organisms. The APS Upgrade project will increase the brightness of the APS high-energy (hard) x-ray beams. This will equip researchers for the groundbreaking

24

X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Beamline and exposure station for deep x-ray lithography at the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

APS is a third-generation synchrotron radiation source. With an x-ray energy of 19.5 keV and highly collimated beam ( 1 mm) using deep x-ray lithography (DXRL). The 2-BM beamline was constructed and will be used for DXRL at APS. Selection of appropriate x-ray energy range is done through a variable-angle mirror and various filters in the beamline. At the exposure station, the beam size will be 100(H) x 5(V) mm{sup 2}. Uniform exposure will be achieved by a high-speed (100 mm/sec) vertical scanner, which allows precise angular ({approximately}0.1 mrad) and positional (conicals and other profiles. For 1-mm-thick PMMA, a 100 x 25 mm{sup 2} area can be fully exposed in about 1/2 hr, while even 10-mm-thick PMMA will require only 2-3 hours.

Lai, B.; Mancini, D.C.; Yun, W.; Gluskin, E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Angular Correlations of the X-Ray Background and Clustering of Extragalactic X-Ray Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The information content of the autocorrelation function (ACF) of intensity fluctuations of the X-ray background (XRB) is analyzed. The tight upper limits set by ROSAT deep survey data on the ACF at arcmin scales imply strong constraints on clustering properties of X-ray sources at cosmological distances and on their contribution to the soft XRB. If quasars have a clustering radius r_0=12-20 Mpc (H_0=50), and their two point correlation function, is constant in comoving coordinates as indicated by optical data, they cannot make up more 40-50% of the soft XRB (the maximum contribution may reach 80% in the case of stable clustering, epsilon=0). Active Star-forming (ASF) galaxies clustered like normal galaxies, with r_0=10-12 Mpc can yield up to 20% or up to 40% of the soft XRB for epsilon=-1.2 or epsilon=0, respectively. The ACF on degree scales essentially reflects the clustering properties of local sources and is proportional to their volume emissivity. The upper limits on scales of a few degrees imply that hard X-ray selected AGNs have r_06 deg, if real, may be due to AGNs with r_0=20 Mpc; the contribution from clusters of galaxies with r_0~50 Mpc is a factor 2 lower.

L. Danese; L. Toffolatti; A. Franceschini; J. M. Martin-Mirones; G. De Zotti

1993-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

X-ray source safety shutter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is provided for controlling the activation of a high energy radiation source having a shutter. The apparatus includes magnets and magnetically responsive switches appropriately placed and interconnected so that only with the shutter and other parts of the source in proper position can safe emission of radiation out an open shutter occur.

Robinet, McLouis (Oak Park, IL)

1977-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

X-ray Holograms Expose Secret Magnetism | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Dissolved Metal Ions Interact in Solution How Dissolved Metal Ions Interact in Solution One Giant Leap for Radiation Biology? What's in the Cage Matters in Iron Antimonide Thermoelectric Materials Novel Experiments on Cement Yield Concrete Results Watching a Glycine Riboswitch "Switch" Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed X-ray Holograms Expose Secret Magnetism MAY 11, 2007 Bookmark and Share By observing changes in coherent x-ray speckle pattern, such as the one shown above, researchers are able for the first time to investigate nanoscale dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls, and observe a cross over from classical to quantum behavior. (Credit: O. Shpyrko)

29

Microscale X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy on the GSECARS Sector 13 at the APS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) is a national user facility for frontier research in the earth sciences using synchrotrons radiation at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. GSECARS provides earth scientists with access to the high-brilliance hard x-rays from this third-generation synchrotrons light source. The research conducted at this facility will advance our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials, the processes they control and the processes that produce them. All principal synchrotron-based analytical techniques in demand by earth scientists are being brought to bear on earth science problems: (1) high-pressure/high-temperature crystallography and spectroscopy using the diamond anvil cell; (2) high-pressure/high-temperature crystallography using the large-volume press; (3) powder, single crystal and interface diffraction; (4) x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy; (5) x-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis and microspectroscopy; and (6) mic...

Stephen-Sutto

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Beamline and exposure station for deep x-ray lithography at the Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect

APS is a third-generation synchrotron radiation source. With an x-ray energy of 19.5 keV and highly collimated beam (<0.1 mrad), APS is well suited for producing high-aspect-ratio microstructures in thick resist films (> 1 mm) using deep x-ray lithography (DXRL). The 2-BM beamline was constructed and will be used for DXRL at APS. Selection of appropriate x-ray energy range is done through a variable-angle mirror and various filters in the beamline. At the exposure station, the beam size will be 100(H) x 5(V) mm{sup 2}. Uniform exposure will be achieved by a high-speed (100 mm/sec) vertical scanner, which allows precise angular ({approximately}0.1 mrad) and positional (< 1 {mu}m) control of the sample, allowing full use of the highly collimated beam for lateral accuracy and control of sidewall slopes during exposure of thick resists, as well as generation of conicals and other profiles. For 1-mm-thick PMMA, a 100 x 25 mm{sup 2} area can be fully exposed in about 1/2 hr, while even 10-mm-thick PMMA will require only 2-3 hours.

Lai, B.; Mancini, D.C.; Yun, W.; Gluskin, E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Kinematics of Compton backscattering x-ray source for angiography  

SciTech Connect

Calculations of X-Ray production rates, energy spread, and spectrum of Compton-backscattered photons from a Free Electron Laser on an electron beam in a low energy (136-MeV) compact (8.5-m circumference) storage ring indicate that an X-Ray intensity of 34.6 10{sup 7} X-Ray photons per 0.5-mm {times} 0.5-mm pixel for Coronary Angiography near the 33.169-keV iodine K-absorption edge can be achieved in a 4-msec pulse within a scattering cone of 1-mrad half angle. This intensity, at 10-m from the photon-electron interaction point to the patient is about a factor of 10 larger than presently achieved from a 4.5-T superconducting wiggler source in the NSLS 2.5-GeV storage ring and over an area about 5 times larger. The 2.2-keV energy spread of the Compton-backscattered beam is, however, much larger than the 70-eV spread presently attained form the wiggler source and use of a monochromator. The beam spot at the 10-m interaction point-to-patient distance is 20-mm diameter; larger spots are attainable at larger distances but with a corresponding reduction in X-Ray flux. Such a facility could be an inexpensive clinical alternative to present methods of non-invasive Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), small enough to be deployed in an urban medical center, and could have other medical, industrial and aerospace applications. Problems with the Compton backscattering source include laser beam heating of the mirror in the FEL oscillator optical cavity, achieving a large enough X-Ray beam spot at the patient, and obtaining radiation damping of the transverse oscillations and longitudinal emittance dilution of the storage ring electron beam resulting from photon-electron collisions without going to higher electron energy where the X-Ray energy spread becomes excessive for DSA. 38 refs.

Blumberg, L.N.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

LUX - A design study for a linac/laser-based ultrafast X-ray source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparable to third generation light sources, to multipleexisting third generation light sources. The x-ray pulseof existing 3 rd generation light sources. The position of

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Sapphire - A High Peak Brightness X-Ray Source as a Possible Option for a Next Generation UK Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sapphire - A High Peak Brightness X-Ray Source as a Possible Option for a Next Generation UK Light Source

Walker, R P; Christou, C; Han, J H; Kay, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source  

SciTech Connect

The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 ?m square pixels, and 15 ?m thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/?E?10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within 1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager.

M. J. Haugh and M. B. Schneider

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography.

Schulze, D. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA)); Anderson, S. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (USA)); Mattigod, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Microstructural Mapping Using High-Energy X-Ray Scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Advanced characterization methods at the APS permit unique in- situ ... The combination of an undulator source, brilliance preserving optics and focusing .... Ultra-Small-Angle X-Ray ScatteringX-Ray Photon Correlation...

38

Soft x-ray undulator for the Siam Photon Source  

SciTech Connect

An undulator for production of intense soft x-rays has been designed for the Siam Photon Source. The construction of the undulator has been completed. It is now being characterized and prepared for installation. The device, named U60, is a pure permanent magnet planar undulator, consisting of 41 magnetic periods, with 60 mm period length. Utilization of the undulator radiation in the photon energy range of 30 - 900 eV is expected. The design studies of the magnetic structure, including investigation of perturbations arising from the magnetic field of the device, their effects on the SPS storage ring and compensation schemes are described. A magnetic measurement system has been constructed for magnetic characterization of the device. Partial results of magnetic measurements are presented.

Rugmai, S. [National Synchrotron Research Center, P.O. Box 93, Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, 111 University Avenue, Muang Distrct, Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); Dasri, T. [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, 111 University Avenue, Muang Distrct, Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); Prawanta, S.; Siriwattanapaitoon, S.; Kwankasem, A.; Sooksrimuang, V.; Chachai, W.; Suradet, N.; Juthong, N.; Tancharakorn, S. [National Synchrotron Research Center, P.O. Box 93, Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

39

OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS OF THE NEAREST ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

We present a photometric survey of the optical counterparts of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in nearby ({approx}<5 Mpc) galaxies. Of the 33 ULXs with HST and Chandra data, 9 have no visible counterpart, placing limits on their M{sub V} of {approx} -4 to -9, enabling us to rule out O-type companions in 4 cases. The refined positions of two ULXs place them in the nucleus of their host galaxy. They are removed from our sample. Of the 22 remaining ULXs, 13 have one possible optical counterpart, while multiple are visible within the error regions of other ULXs. By calculating the number of chance coincidences, we estimate that 13 {+-} 5 are the true counterparts. We attempt to constrain the nature of the companions by fitting the spectral energy distribution and M{sub V} to obtain candidate spectral types. We can rule out O-type companions in 20 cases, while we find that one ULX (NGC 253 ULX2) excludes all OB-type companions. Fitting with X-ray irradiated models provides constraints on the donor star mass and radius. For seven ULXs, we are able to impose inclination-dependent upper and/or lower limits on the black holes' mass, if the extinction to the assumed companion star is not larger than the Galactic column. These are NGC 55 ULX1, NGC 253 ULX1, NGC 253 ULX2, NGC 253 XMM6, Ho IX X-1, IC342 X-1, and NGC 5204 X-1. This suggests that 10 ULXs do not have O companions, while none of the 18 fitted rule out B-type companions.

Gladstone, Jeanette C.; Heinke, Craig O.; Cartwright, Taylor F. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Copperwheat, Chris [Department of Physics, Liverpool John Moores University, Wirral CH41 1LD (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, Liverpool John Moores University, Wirral CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Roberts, Timothy P. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Levan, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7VL (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7VL (United Kingdom); Goad, Mike R., E-mail: j.c.gladstone@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7AL (United Kingdom)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Superconducting x-ray lithography source Phase 1 (XLS) safety analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses safety aspects associated with the superconducting x-ray lithography source. The policy, building systems safety and storage ring systems safety are specifically addressed. (LSP)

Blumberg, L. (ed.)

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

APS Upgrade | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop on new science opportunities provided by a multi-bend achromat lattice at the APS October 21-22 Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Lab To prepare for the workshop...

42

Advanced Photon Source (APS) Colloquium Series Video Collection from 2010  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a DOE Scientific User Facility located at Argonne National Laboratory. It provides this nation's most brilliant x-ray beams for research in almost all scientific disciplines. The monthly APS Colloquium series brings distinguished scientists from around the world to lecture on topics of general interest. Some of these presentations are available as integrated video and slides. The 2010 multimedia presentations available on this website are: 1) Fermilab: Present and Future, Young-kee Kim; 2) Science Opportunities at ORNL's Neutron Sources, Ian Anderson; 3) What is the Arm Climate Research Facility: Is Global Warming a Real Bias or a Statistical Anomaly? Douglas L. Sisterson; 4) Magnetic Recording Media Technology for the Tb/In2 Era, Gerardo Bertero (Wester Digital); 5) History and Solution of the Phase Problem in the Theory of Structure Determination of Crystals from X-ray Diffraction Experiments, Emil Wolf (University of Rochester); 6) Dynamical Studies Using Coherent X-rays: A Short Review and Prospects for the Future, Sunil K. Sinha (University of California, San Diego); 7) Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues, John W. Bickman (Purdue University); 8) Experimental Discovery of Topological Insulators and Related Superconductors, M. Zahid Hasan (Princeton University); 9) LCLS - The X-ray Laser Has Turned On, Uwe Bergmann; 10) Small Angle X-ray Scattering from Biological Macromolecules and Nanoparticles, Dimitri Svergun (European Molecular Biology Laboratory).

43

DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

Sterling Backus

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

Spectral unfolds of PITHON Flash X-ray source.  

SciTech Connect

Using a differential absorption spectrometer we obtained experimental spectral information for the PITHON Flash X-ray Machine located in San Leandro, California at L-3 Communications. Spectral information we obtained pertained to the 200 keV to 800 keV endpoint operation of PITHON. We also obtained data on the temporal behavior of high energy and low energy spectral content.

Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Riordan, John C. (L-3 Pulse Sciences)

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

APS News | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS News Archives: APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed APS News Kim of ASD Awarded 2014 Wilson Prize for Achievement in Physics of Particle Accelerators Kim of ASD Awarded 2014 Wilson Prize for Achievement in Physics of Particle Accelerators January 7, 2014 Kwang-Je Kim of the Advanced Photon Source has been named the recipient of the 2014 Robert R. Wilson Prize for Achievement in the Physics of Particle Accelerators, Harkay of ASD Elected to Fellowship in the American Physical Society Harkay of ASD Elected to Fellowship in the American Physical Society December 18, 2013 Katherine Harkay of the Accelerator Systems Division has been elected to Fellowship in the American Physical Society for

46

A Superbend X-Ray Microdiffraction Beamline at the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Canadian Light Source (with groups at the APS and NSLS, the ALS has pioneered some

Tamura, N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Optimal focusing for a linac-based hard x-ray source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In spite of having a small average beam current limit, a linac can have features that make it attractive as an x-ray source: high energy, ultralow emittance and energy spread, and flexible beamline optics. Unlike a storage ring, in which an (undulator) radiation source is necessarily short and positioned at an electron beam waist, in a linac the undulator can be long and the electron beam can be adjusted to have a (virtual) waist far downstream toward the x-ray target. Using a planned CEBAF beamline as an example, this paper shows that a factor of 2000 in beam current can be overcome to produce a monochromatic hard x-ray source comparable with, or even exceeding, the performance of an x-ray line at a third generation storage ring. Optimal electron beam focusing conditions for x-ray flux density and brilliance are derived, and are verified by simulations using the SRW code.

Liu, C.; Krafft, G.; Talman, R.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Carbon nanotube based microfocus field emission x-ray source for microcomputed tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microcomputed tomography is now widely used for in vivo small animal imaging for cancer studies. Achieving high imaging quality of live objects requires the x-ray source to have both high spatial and temporal resolutions. Preliminary studies have shown that carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source has significant intrinsic advantages over the conventional thermionic x-ray tube including better temporal resolution and programmability. Here we report the design and characterization of a CNT based field emission x-ray source that also affords a high spatial resolution. The device uses modified asymmetric Einzel lenses for electron focusing and an elliptical shaped CNT cathode patterned by photolithography. Stable and small isotropic x-ray focal spot sizes were obtained.

Liu Zejian; Yang Guang; Lee, Yueh Z.; Bordelon, David; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

A fine-focusing x-ray source using carbon-nanofiber field emitter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fine-focusing x-ray source has been constructed employing a field electron emitter prepared by growing carbon-nanofibers (CNFs) on a metal tip. The x-ray source is composed of a CNF field electron emitter, an electrostatic lens, two magnetic lenses, and a W-target for generating x-rays by electron impact. The CNFs provided field electrons with a current density of J{approx}5x10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2}, which was evaluated with the aid of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron beam extracted from the CNF emitter was accelerated to the energies of E=10-25 keV, and then focused by the lenses. By recording the x-ray images of test charts, the optimum resolution of the x-ray source was estimated to be approximately D{sub x}=0.5 {mu}m.

Sugimoto, W.; Sugita, S.; Sakai, Y.; Goto, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohga, Y.; Kita, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Ohara, T. [Topcon Corporation, 75-1 Hasunuma-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 174-8580 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Development and characterization of a novel compact x-ray source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For elemental analysis, x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) is a rapid and simple method of analysis, which provides both quantitative and qualitative information. In general, most XRF instruments are not suited for use as portable field instruments. Most commercial XRF spectrometers require cooling units for the anode, large power supplies and, in some cases, liquid nitrogen to cool the x-ray detectors. Alternative x-ray sources using radioactive isotopes have been considered for portable XRF, but safety regulations and public concerns have hampered their usage. An x-ray source has been developed which uses a solid state electron multiplier to enhance the electron gain from a simple filament. The overall gain from the electron multiplier is sufficient to generate x-rays. However, the novel source produces less heating of the anode, eliminating the cooling unit requirement. This feature along with the small size of the electron multiplier, allows for a compact design, which lends itself to portability. An additional feature is that the power consumption of the system is lower than a typical xray tube system. Initial studies have shown that the system behaves similar to a conventional x-ray tube. Increasing anode voltage (electron energy) causes improved yield of the higher energy x-rays. Also, increasing the electron multiplier voltage (electron intensity) increases overall intensity of the x-ray output. Using the new source for XRF studies, the limits of detection were comparable with values reported in the literature. It was necessary, however, to prepare the samples using single elements to reduce matrix affects and lessen effects of overlapping peaks. In general the x-ray source shows potential as a portable x-ray source that may be used in the field.

Woo, Ronald Yut

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

X-Ray Light Sources X-Ray Light Sources Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers Electron-Beam Microcharacterization Centers Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This activity supports the operation of five DOE light sources. The unique properties of synchrotron radiation include its continuous spectrum, high flux and brightness, and in the case of the Linac Coherent Light Source, high coherence, which makes it an indispensable tool in the exploration of matter. The wavelengths of the emitted photons span a range of dimensions

52

The Wakefield Effects of Pulsed Crab Cavities at the Advanced Photon Source for Short-X-ray Pulse Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wakefield Effects of Pulsed Crab Cavities at the Advanced Photon Source for Short-X-ray Pulse Generation

Chae, Y C; Dolgashev, V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Advanced Photon Source (APS) Colloquium Series Video Collection from 2011  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory allows scientists to pursue new knowledge in many different scientific disciplines. The monthly APS Colloquium series brings these distinguished scientists to Illinois from all around the world to lecture on topics of general interest. Some of these presentations are available as integrated video and slides. The 2011 talks are posted on the APS website after their presentation dates. Titles include: 1) Atomic Resolution Coherent Diffractive Imaging and Ultrafast Science, Jian-min Zuo (University of Illinois); 2) Opportunties for X-ray Science in Future Computing Architectures, Ian Foster (ANL); 3) Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources, Claudio Pellegrini (UCLA); 4) Observing Structure and Motion in Molecules with Ultrafast Strong Field and Short Wavelength Laser Radiation, Philip H. Bucksbaum (National Academy of Sciences); 5) The Cambrian Evolutionary Explosion: Novel Evidence from Fossils Studied by X-ray Tomography, Jun-Yuan Chen (Nanjing University, China); 6) Emerging Properties of Quantum Matter: Case Studies of Topological and Superconducting Phases, Zhi-Xun Shen (Stanford University); 7) X-ray Imaging Based on Compton Scattering, Joseph Callerame (American Scient and Engineering, Inc.); 8) Using Synchrotron Radiation and Electron Microscopy to Map the Huge Structural Changes that Occur in Viruses During Their Life Cycle, Michael Rossman (Purdue University); 9) Coherent Control of Quantum Matter, Andrea Cavalleri (Max Planck Institute); 10) Gravitational-Wave Detectors: First, Second, and Third Generation, Vuk Mandic (University of Minnesota).

54

Fresnel zone plates for Achromatic Imaging Survey of X-ray sources  

SciTech Connect

A telescope with Fresnel Zone Plates has been contemplated to be an excellent imaging mask in X-rays and gamma-rays for quite some time. With a proper choice of zone plate material, spacing and an appropriate readout system it is possible to achieve any theoretical angular resolution. We provide the results of numerical simulations of how a large number of X-ray sources could be imaged at a high resolution. We believe that such an imager would be an excellent tool for a future survey mission for X-ray and gamma-ray sources which we propose.

Palit, Sourav [Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP), Chalantika 43, Garia Station Rd., Kolkata, 700084 (India); Chakrabarti, S. K. [S. N. Bose National Center for Basic Sciences, JD-Block, Salt Lake, Kolkata, 700098 (India); Debnath, D. [Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP), Chalantika 43, Garia Station Road Kolkata 700084 (India); Yadav, Vipin; Nandi, Anuj [Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP), Chalantika 43, Garia Station Road Kolkata 700084 (India); On deputation from Indian Space Research Organization HQ, Bangalore 560 231 (India)

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

55

Advanced Photon Source (APS) Colloquium Series Video Collection from 2007  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory provides this nation's most brilliant x-ray beams for research, enabling scientists to pursue new knowledge across many scientific disciplines. The monthly APS Colloquium series brings these distinguished scientists to lecture on topics of general interest. Some of these presentations are available as integrated video and slides. The 2007 multimedia presentations available on this website are: 1) Shedding Synchrotron Light on a Puzzle of Glasses, Aleksandr Chumakov; 2) The Phase Problem: Related Computational Challenges, Veit Elser, Cornell University; 3) The Quantum Information Revolution: 101 Uses for Schodinger's Cat, Paul G. Kwait, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; 4) High-Resolution Spectroscopy with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Claude R Canizares, MIT; 5) Photonic Crystals from Order to Disorder, Steven G. Johnson, Assist. Professor, Applied Mathematics, MIT; 6) Light's Darkness, Miles Padgett, University of Glasgow; 7) X-rays at Solid-Liquid Surfaces, Helmut Dosch, Max Planck Institute for Metals Research; 8) Synchrotron Probes of Emergent Electronic States of Matter in Solids, J. W. Allen, University of Michigan; 9) The Whys and How of Ultrafast X-ray Science, Jerome Hastings, SLAC.

56

Design of a compact high-output monochromatic x-ray source for radiography applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distinct advantages of monochromatic x rays in medical imaging, especially in computed tomography (CT) and radiography with contrast agents (e.g. angiography), provide a great incentive for developing compact sources of monochromatic, or nearly monochromatic, ...

Tigran Bacarian / F. A. Dilmanian

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5x10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

Wang Sigen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Calderon, Xiomara; Peng Rui [Curriculum of Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Schreiber, Eric C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhou, Otto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum of Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

58

Development of a Novel Tunable X-Ray Source for the RPI-LINAC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of a three year effort to develop a parametric x-ray (PXR) source. The emphasis of this research was to demonstrate production of high yield monoenergetic x-rays. Production of PXR is accomplished by placing a crystal in a relativistic electron beam. The process was first demonstrated in 1985 in Russia. Numerous papers were written about the characteristics of PXR from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. The advantage of PXR over other monoenergetic x-ray sources is that it is produced at large angle relative to the electron beam and at high intensity. None of the previous work described in the literature capitalized on this effect to study what is required in order to generate an effective monoenergetic x-ray source that can be used for practical applications. The work summarized here describes the process done in order to optimize the PXR production process by selecting an appropriate crystal and the optimal conditions. The research focused on production of 18 keV x-rays which are suitable for mammography however the results are not limited to this application or energy range. We are the first group to demonstrate x-ray imaging using PXR. Such sources can improve current medical imaging modalities. More research is required in order to design a prototype of a compact source.

Y. Danon; R.C. Block

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

A CATALOG OF CHANDRA X-RAY SOURCES IN THE CARINA NEBULA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a catalog of {approx}14,000 X-ray sources observed by the ACIS instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory within a 1.42 deg{sup 2} survey of the Great Nebula in Carina, known as the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP). This study appears in a special issue devoted to the CCCP. Here, we describe the data reduction and analysis procedures performed on the X-ray observations, including calibration and cleaning of the X-ray event data, point-source detection, and source extraction. The catalog appears to be complete across most of the field to an absorption-corrected total-band luminosity of {approx}10{sup 30.7} erg s{sup -1} for a typical low-mass pre-main-sequence star. Counterparts to the X-ray sources are identified in a variety of visual, near-infrared, and mid-infrared surveys. The X-ray and infrared source properties presented here form the basis of many CCCP studies of the young stellar populations in Carina.

Broos, Patrick S.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Garmire, Gordon P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Preibisch, Thomas [Universitaets-Sternwarte, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679 Muenchen (Germany); Smith, Nathan [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Babler, Brian L.; Meade, Marilyn R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hodgkin, Simon; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, Jim [Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit, Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 (United Kingdom); Indebetouw, Remy; Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); King, Robert R.; McCaughrean, Mark J. [Astrophysics Group, College of Engineering, Mathematics, and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Zinnecker, Hans, E-mail: patb@astro.psu.edu [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Heimann, P. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Krupin, O. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kelez, N. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W. [Institute for Experimental Physics and CFEL, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Advanced Photon Source (APS) Colloquium Series Video Collection from 2008  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory is the home of this nation's most brilliant x-ray beams for research in almost all scientific disciplines. The monthly APS Colloquium series brings distinguished scientists from all over the country and abroad to lecture on topics of general interest. Some of these presentations are available as integrated video and slides. The 2008 multimedia presentations available on this website are: 1) Modern Optical Diagnostics for Technical Combustion Research, Alfred Leipertz, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies; 2) Exploiting Photo-induced Reactions in Polymer Blends to Create Hierarchically Ordered, Defect-free Materials, Anna Balazs, University of Pittsburgh; 3) New Composite Thermoelectric Materials for Macro-size Applications, Mildred Dresselhaus, MIT; 4) Trends and Opportunities at the Interface of Experiment and Simulation in Micromechanics of Polycrystalline Solids, Paul Dawson, Cornell University; 5) Biomedical Imaging with Partially Coherent, Laser-Driven Plasma X-Ray Sources, Christoph Rose-Petruck, Brown University; 6) Secrets in the Ancient Goatskins: X-Rays Reveal Archimedes' Oldest Writings, Uwe Bergmann, SLAC; 7) Crystallography Without Crystals: Determining the Structure of Individual Biological Molecules and Nanoparticles, Abbas Ourmazd, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

62

Advanced Photon Source (APS) Colloquium Series Video Collection from 2004  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory provides this nation's (in fact, this hemisphere's) most brilliant x-ray beams for research in almost all scientific disciplines. These x-rays allow scientists to pursue new knowledge about the structure and function of materials in the center of the Earth and in outer space, and all points in between. The monthly APS Colloquium series brings distinguished scientists in all disciplines to lecture on topics of general interest. Some of these presentations are available as integrated video and slides. The 2004 multimedia presentations available on this website are: Seeing Stripes: Competition and Complexity in High-Temperature Superconductors, John Tranquada The Interface of Art and Science in the Museum: Disclosing a 4th Dimension of Art Preservation and Connoisseurship, Franceska Casadio, Art Institute of Chicago Microscopy with slow electrons: from LEEM to XPEEM, Ernst Bauer, Arizona State University The Hafnium saga: Can radioactive decay be usefully controlled, Dr. John Schiffer The Abnormal Normal State of the High-Tc Superconductors... or Undressing Electrons with Nearly a Million Gauss, Greg Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory The major steps in the development of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction: from early days to modern times, Andre Authier, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris The Theory of High-Tc Superconductivity in Layered Cuprates, Alexei Abrikosov.

63

Argonne TDC: Advanced Photon Source's Hard X-Ray Scanning ...  

... zinc proteins or enzymes, copper in chromatin, iron in macrophages) or from an external source (e.g., in anticancer drugs such as cisplatin, ...

64

Cavity Design and Beam Simulations for the APS RF Gun Advanced Photon Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

presented an outline of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL), emphasizing their more. SSRL $21.OM B. NSLS $33.8M ($3M increase) C. APS $84.7M D. 4th Generation X-ray Source R&D $3.OM The SSRL and APS figures are the FY98 DOE requests. The NSLS figure is increased by $3.OM above the FY98

Kemner, Ken

65

Developing small vacuum spark as an x-ray source for calibration of an x-ray focusing crystal spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

A new technique of x-ray focusing crystal spectrometers' calibration is the desired result. For this purpose the spectrometer is designed to register radiated copper K{alpha} and K{beta} lines by using a flat {alpha}-quartz crystal. This experiment uses pre-breakdown x-ray emissions in low vacuum of about 2.5-3 mbar. At this pressure the pinch will not form so the plasma will not radiate. The anode material is copper and the capacity of the capacitor bank is 22.6 nF. This experiment designed and mounted a repetitive triggering system to save the operator time making hundreds of shots. This emission amount is good for calibration and geometrical adjustment of an optical crystal x-ray focusing spectrometer.

Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd [Photonic Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Karami, Mohammad [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

National School on Neutron and X-Ray Scattering Held at APS&IPNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science and Chemistry Divisions but also from several Collaborative Access Teams (CATS) and the Spallation Neutron Source generously provided their time and expertise. We are...

67

IDENTIFICATION OF GALACTIC BULGE SURVEY X-RAY SOURCES WITH TYCHO-2 STARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We identify 69 X-ray sources discovered by the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) that are coincident with or very close to bright stars in the Tycho-2 catalog. Additionally, two other GBS sources are resolved binary companions to Tycho-2 stars where both components are separately detected in X-rays. Most of these are likely to be real matches, but we identify nine objects with large and significant X-ray-to-optical offsets as either detections of resolved binary companions or chance alignments. We collate known spectral types for these objects, and also examine Two Micron All Sky Survey colors, variability information from the All-Sky Automated Survey, and X-ray hardness ratios for the brightest objects. Nearly a third of the stars are found to be optically variable, divided roughly evenly between irregular variations and periodic modulations. All fall among the softest objects identified by the GBS. The sample forms a very mixed selection, ranging in spectral class from O9 to M3. In some cases, the X-ray emission appears consistent with normal coronal emission from late-type stars, or wind emission from early-types, but the sample also includes one known Algol, one W UMa system, two Be stars, and several X-ray bright objects likely to be coronally active stars or binaries. Surprisingly, a substantial fraction of the spectroscopically classified, non-coincidental sample (12 out of 38 objects) have late B or A type counterparts. Many of these exhibit redder near-IR colors than expected for their spectral type and/or variability, and it is likely that the X-rays originate from a late-type companion star in most or all of these objects.

Hynes, Robert I.; Britt, C. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Wright, N. J.; Jonker, P. G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Maccarone, T. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Greiss, S. [Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Nelemans, G., E-mail: rih@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525-AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

68

Soft x-ray spectromicroscopy development for materials science at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several third generation synchrotron radiation facilities are now operational and the high brightness of these photon sources offers new opportunities for x-ray microscopy. Well developed synchrotron radiation spectroscopy techniques are being applied in new instruments capable of imaging the surface of a material with a spatial resolution smaller than one micron. There are two aspects to this. One is to further the field of surface science by exploring the effects of spatial variations across a surface on a scale not previously accessible to x-ray measurements. The other is to open up new analytical techniques in materials science using x-rays, on a spatial scale comparable to that of the processes or devices to be studied. The development of the spectromicroscopy program at the Advanced Light Source will employ a variety of instruments, some are already operational. Their development and use will be discussed, and recent results will be presented to illustrate their capabilities.

Warwick, T.; Padmore, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Ade, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Hitchcock, A.P. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Rightor, E.G. [Dow Texas Polymer Center, Freeport, TX (United States); Tonner, B.P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

X-Ray Sources Overdensity Around 3C 295  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a statistical analysis of the Chandra observation of the source field around the 3C 295 galaxy cluster ($z=0.46$). Three different methods of analysis, namely a chip by chip logN-logS, a two dimentional Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test, and the angular correlation function (ACF) show a strong overdensity of sources in the North-East of the field, that may indicate a filament of the large scale structure of the Universe toward 3C 295.

V. D'Elia; F. Fiore; M. Elvis; M. Cappi; S. Mathur; P. Mazzotta; E. Falco

2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

70

High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 x 2 detector binning, the projection resolution along the scanning direction increased from 4.0 cycles/mm [at 10% modulation-transfer-function (MTF)] in DBT to 5.1 cycles/mm in s-DBT at magnification factor of 1.08. The improvement is more pronounced for faster scanning speeds, wider angular coverage, and smaller detector pixel sizes. The scanning speed depends on the detector, the number of views, and the imaging dose. With 240 ms detector readout time, the s-DBT system scanning time is 6.3 s for a 15-view, 100 mAs scan regardless of the angular coverage. The scanning speed can be reduced to less than 4 s when detectors become faster. Initial phantom studies showed good quality reconstructed images. Conclusions: A prototype s-DBT scanner has been developed and evaluated by retrofitting the Selenia rotating gantry DBT scanner with a spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array. Preliminary results show that it improves system spatial resolution substantially by eliminating image blur due to x-ray focal spot motion. The scanner speed of s-DBT system is independent of angular coverage and can be increased with faster detector without image degration. The accelerated lifetime measurement demonstrated the long term stability of CNT x-ray source array with typical clinical operation lifetime over 3 years.

Qian Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan Jing; Yang Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing Zhenxue [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); XinRay Systems, Inc., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Hologic, Inc., Bedford, Massachusetts 01730 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Synchrotron Radiation as X-Ray Source for EXAFS Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Synchrotron radiation sources...Tokyo, Japan 0.40 250 1.1 0.13 Dedicated SURF II Washington, DC 0.25 25 0.84 0.041 Dedicated Tantalus I Wisconsin 0.24 200 0.64 0.048 Dedicated PTB Braunschweig, Germany 0.14 150 0.46 0.013 Dedicated N-100 Karkhov, Soviet Union 0.10 25 0.50 0.004 ? Photon factory Tsukuba, Japan 2.5 500 8.33 4.16 Dedicated ?...

72

Electron beam-based sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of various methods for generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses using relativistic electron beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons is considered. The importance of the time-resolved studies of matter at picosecond (ps), femtosecond (fs), and atttosecond (as) time scales using x-rays has been widely recognized including by award of a Nobel Prize in 1999 [Zewa]. Extensive reviews of scientific drivers can be found in [BES1, BES2, BES3, Lawr, Whit]. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas [Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp], high-order harmonic generation [Schn, Rund, Wang, Arpi], and laser-driven anode sources [Ande]. In addition, ultrafast streak-camera detectors have been applied at synchrotron sources to achieve temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale [Wulf, Lind1]. In this paper, we focus on a different group of techniques that are based on the use of the relativistic electron beam produced in conventional accelerators. In the first part we review several techniques that utilize spontaneous emission of electrons and show how solitary sub-ps x-ray pulses can be obtained at existing storage ring based synchrotron light sources and linacs. In the second part we consider coherent emission of electrons in the free-electron lasers (FELs) and review several techniques for a generation of solitary sub-fs x-ray pulses. Remarkably, the x-ray pulses that can be obtained with the FELs are not only significantly shorter than the ones considered in Part 1, but also carry more photons per pulse by many orders of magnitude.

Zholents, A.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

Applications and source development for high-repetition rate x-ray lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many applications in material science, chemistry, and atomic physics require an x-ray source that has a repetition rate of 1 Hz to a few kHz. In these fields, a very wide range of photon energies is of interest. One application is time-resolved surface photoelectron spectroscopy and microscopy where low energy (energies below 100 eV are very good with higher energy capabilities expected in the future. In addition, prospects of table-top size x-ray lasers with kHz repetition rates are presented.

Eder, D.C.; Amendt, P.; Bolton, P.R. [and others

1993-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

A bright point source of ultrashort hard x-rays from laser bioplasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro and nano structures scatter light and amplify local electric fields very effectively. Energy incident as intense ultrashort laser pulses can be converted to x-rays and hot electrons more efficiently with a substrate that suitably modifies the local fields. Here we demonstrate that coating a plain glass surface with a few micron thick layer of an ubiquitous microbe, {\\it Escherichia coli}, catapults the brightness of hard x-ray bremsstrahlung emission (up to 300 keV) by more than two orders of magnitude at an incident laser intensity of 10$^{16}$ W cm$^{-2}$. This increased yield is attributed to the local enhancement of electric fields around individual {\\it E. coli} cells and is reproduced by detailed particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This combination of laser plasmas and biological targets can lead to turnkey, multi-kilohertz and environmentally safe sources of hard x-rays.

Krishnamurthy, M; Lad, Amit D; Ahmad, Saima; Narayanan, V; Rajeev, R; Kundu, M; Kumar, G Ravindra; Ray, Krishanu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

APS Upgrade: News | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superconducting Undulator January 21, 2013 More than eight years of effort by Advanced Photon Source (APS) physicists, engineers, and technicians culminated on January 21, 2013,...

76

Phase I, study of a miniature X-ray source for interstitial radiotherapy of brain metastases  

SciTech Connect

Despite a variety of stereotactic techniques used to increase intracranical local control, dose escalation strategies remain controversial, with respect to therapeutric gain, convenience, and cost effectiveness, in the setting of brain metastases. In this report, we summarize our experience with the safety and efficacy of a new miniature X-ray device for interstitial radiosurgical treatment of intracranial metastatic neoplasms. Although the role of surgical resection of solitary metastases is established, aggressive treatment with proton, gamma knife, and linac radiation therapy for these lesions is under investigation. The new miniature X-ray device offers a very localized, convenient, time and cost efficient means of delivering radiotherapy to these lesions, with lower normal tissue exposure than gamma knife or proton beam techniques. Retreatment of previously irradiated areas are also now under investigation as part of a Phase II trial. The photon radiosurgery system is a miniature battery operated 40 kV x-ray device designed by the Photoelectron Corporation for use in the interstitial treatment of small tumors ({ge}3 cm in diameter) in humans. This 10 cm long, low current, high voltage X-ray generator is easily mounted in a stereotactic frame and produces low energy (10-20 KeV) x-rays to be emitted from the 10 cm long, 3.2 mm diameter probe, after stereotactic insertion into the tumor. Two scintillation detectors positioned on the stereotactic frame near the patient`s scalp monitor radiation. The spherical X-ray beam behaves essentially as a point source, with dose rate nominally 150 cGy/min. at a distance of 10mm, for a beam current of 40 {mu}A and a voltage of 40 kv.

Douglas, R.M.; Beatty, J.; Biggs, P. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others] [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CHROMOSPHERIC HARD X-RAY SOURCE SIZES IN SOLAR FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray observations are a powerful diagnostic tool for transport, acceleration, and heating of electrons in solar flares. Height and size measurements of X-ray footpoint sources can be used to determine the chromospheric density and constrain the parameters of magnetic field convergence and electron pitch-angle evolution. We investigate the influence of the chromospheric density, magnetic mirroring, and collisional pitch-angle scattering on the size of X-ray sources. The time-independent Fokker-Planck equation for electron transport is solved numerically and analytically to find the electron distribution as a function of height above the photosphere. From this distribution, the expected X-ray flux as a function of height, its peak height, and full width at half-maximum are calculated and compared with RHESSI observations. A purely instrumental explanation for the observed source size was ruled out by using simulated RHESSI images. We find that magnetic mirroring and collisional pitch-angle scattering tend to change the electron flux such that electrons are stopped higher in the atmosphere compared with the simple case with collisional energy loss only. However, the resulting X-ray flux is dominated by the density structure in the chromosphere and only marginal increases in source width are found. Very high loop densities (>10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) could explain the observed sizes at higher energies, but are unrealistic and would result in no footpoint emission below about 40 keV, contrary to observations. We conclude that within a monolithic density model the vertical sizes are given mostly by the density scale height and are predicted smaller than the RHESSI results show.

Battaglia, M.; Kontar, E. P.; Fletcher, L.; MacKinnon, A. L., E-mail: marina.battaglia@fhnw.ch [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

78

Design and Assembly of a Telecentric Zoom Lens for the Cygnus X-ray Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cygnus is a high-energy radiographic x-ray source. The rod-pinch x-ray diode produces a point source measuring 1 mm diameter. The target object is placed 1.5 m from the x-ray source, with a large LYSO scintillator at 2.4 m. Different-sized objects are imploded within a containment vessel. A large pellicle deflects the scintillator light out of the x-ray path into an 11-element zoom lens coupled to a CCD camera. The zoom lens and CCD must be as close as possible to the scintillator to maximize light collection. A telecentric lens design minimizes image blur from a volume source. To maximize the resolution of test objects of different sizes, the scintillator and zoom lens can be translated along the x-ray axis. Zoom lens magnifications are changed when different-sized scintillators and recording cameras are used (50 or 62 mm square format). The LYSO scintillator measures 200 200 mm and is 5 mm thick. The scintillator produces blue light peaking at 435 nm, so special lens materials are required. By swapping out one lens element and allowing all lenses to move, the zoom lens can also use a CsI(Tl) scintillator that produces green light centered at 550 nm. All lenses are coated with anti-reflective coating for both wavelength bands. Two sets of doublets, the stop, and the CCD camera move during zoom operations. One doublet has XY compensation. The first three lenses use fused silica for radiation damage control. The 60 lb of glass inside the 340 lb mechanical structure is oriented vertically.

Malone, R M; Brown, K K; Curtis, A H; Esquibel, D L; Frayer, D K; Frogget, B C; Furlanetto, M R; Garten, J R; Haines, T J; Howe, R A; Huerta, J A; Kaufman, M I; King, N.S. P; Lutz, S S; McGillivray, K D

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

High-power Waveguide Dampers for the Short-Pulse X-Ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-power waveguide dampers have been designed and prototyped for the Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) cavities at the Advanced Photon Source. The cavities will operate at 2.815 GHz and utilize the TM110 dipole mode. As a result, higher-order (HOM) and lower-order mode (LOM) in-vacuum dampers have been designed to satisfy the demanding broadband damping requirements in the APS storage ring. The SPX single-cell cavity consists of two WR284 waveguides for damping the HOMs and one WR284 waveguide for primarily damping the LOM where up to 2kW will be dissipated in the damping material. The damper designs and high-power experimental results will be discussed in this paper.

Waldschmidt, G J; Liu, J; Middendorf, M E; Nassiri, A; Smith, T L; Wu, G; Henry, J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

X-ray Microscopy and Imaging (XSD-XMI)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imaging (XMI) Imaging (XMI) About XMI Science and Research Beamlines Highlights Software and Tools Intranet Search APS... Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Contacts FAQs Beamlines News Publications APS Email Portal APS Intranet APS Phonebook APS Quick Links for Users APS Safety and Training Welcome to the X-ray Microscopy and Imaging group (XMI)! X-ray Microscopy and Imaging is part of the X-ray Science Division at the Advanced Photon Source. We develop and support a diverse and multidisciplinary user research program at Sectors 2 and 32 of the APS, with the overall goal to image and study materials structures at spatial and temporal resolutions that are most scientifically relevant to the cutting-edge advances in materials, biological, environmental, and biomedical sciences. To achieve this goal, we actively engage in various research activities including

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81

Workshops on Science Enabled by a Coherent, CW, Synchrotron X-ray Source, June 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June of 2011 we held six two-day workshops called "XDL-2011: Science at the Hard X-ray Diffraction Limit". The six workshops covered (1) Diffraction-based imaging techniques, (2) Biomolecular structure from non-crystalline materials, (3) Ultra-fast science, (4) High-pressure science, (5) Materials research with nano-beams and (6) X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), In each workshop, invited speaker from around the world presented examples of novel experiments that require a CW, diffraction-limited source. During the workshop, each invited speaker provided a one-page description of the experiment and an illustrative graphic. The experiments identified by the workshops demonstrate the broad and deep scientific case for a CW coherent synchrotron x-ray source. The next step is to perform detailed simulations of the best of these ideas to test them quantitatively and to guide detailed x-ray beam-line designs. These designs are the first step toward developing detailed facility designs and cost estimates.

Brock, Joel

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

82

Advanced Photon Source (APS) Colloquium Series Video Collection from 2005  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a DOE National Scientific User Facility providing x-ray beams for research in almost all scientific disciplines. These x-rays allow scientists to pursue new knowledge about the structure and function of materials in the center of the Earth and in outer space, and all points in between. The monthly APS Colloquium series brings distinguished scientists in all disciplines to lecture on topics of general interest. Some of these presentations are available as integrated video and slides. The 2005 multimedia presentations available on this website are: 1) The Swiss Light Source, J. Friso van der Veen, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen and ETH-Zurich; 2) The Silicon Route to a New Kilogram, Peter Becker, Physicalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt; 3) Metal Cycling by Bacteria: Moving Electrons Around, Ken Nealson, USC; 4) The Structure of Liquid Surfaces, Peter S. Pershan; 5) Science and Engineering of an Operational Tsunami Forecasting System, Frank Gonzalez, NOAA; 6) Glass Formation by a Nucleation and Growth Process as in a First-order Transition, John W. Cahn, NIST; 7) Biomedical Applications of Microprobe Analysis, Peter Ingram, Duke University Medical Center.

83

High-brightness beamline for X-ray spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard-x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order-of-magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new ''Cowan type'' double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (US); Lindle, D.W. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (US). Dept. of Chemistry

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Continuum Power Spectrum Components in X-Ray Sources: Detailed Modelling and Search for Coherent Periodicities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarises two recently developed techniques in power spectral analysis and their application to a sample of X-ray light curves of accreting collapsed objects in active galactic nuclei and X-ray binaries. The first technique is designed to carry out detailed model fitting of continuum power spectrum components arising from noise variability by using maximum likelihood methods. The technique is applied to the light curves of a number of highly variable AGNs observed with EXOSAT. Substantially steeper logarithmic power spectrum slopes are obtained than previously estimated with standard methods. The second technique was devised in order to reveal coherent periodicities in the presence of ``coloured" (i.e. non--white) noise variability components from the source. To this aim the power spectra are searched for significant narrow peaks superposed on the ``coloured" continuum components. We present the results of a search for an orbital modulation in the light curves of a sample of 25 low mass X--ray binaries (LMXRBs), for which the orbital period is either unknown or detected only at optical wavelengths. This led to the discovery of a significant X--ray orbital modulation at the few percent level in the burster MXB1636-539.

L. Stella; E. Arlandi; G. Tagliaferri; G. L. Israel

1994-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

85

X-ray Science Division: Mission and Goals | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-ray Science Division: Mission and Goals The mission of the X-ray Science Division (XSD) is to enable and perform world class research using x-rays. This mission is accomplished...

86

High brightness--multiple beamlets source for patterned X-ray production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Techniques for controllably directing beamlets to a target substrate are disclosed. The beamlets may be either positive ions or electrons. It has been shown that beamlets may be produced with a diameter of 1 .mu.m, with inter-aperture spacings of 12 .mu.m. An array of such beamlets, may be used for maskless lithography. By step-wise movement of the beamlets relative to the target substrate, individual devices may be directly e-beam written. Ion beams may be directly written as well. Due to the high brightness of the beamlets from extraction from a multicusp source, exposure times for lithographic exposure are thought to be minimized. Alternatively, the beamlets may be electrons striking a high Z material for X-ray production, thereafter collimated to provide patterned X-ray exposures such as those used in CAT scans. Such a device may be used for remote detection of explosives.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ji, Qing (Albany, CA); Barletta, William A. (Oakland, CA); Jiang, Ximan (El Cerrito, CA); Ji, Lili (Albany, CA)

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

Recent Measurements And Plans for the SLAC Compton X-Ray Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact source of monoenergetic X-rays, generated via Compton backscattering, has been developed in a collaboration between U.C Davis and SLAC. The source consists of a 5.5 cell X-band photoinjector, a 1.05 m long high gradient accelerator structure and an interaction chamber where a high power (TW), short pulse (sub-ps) infrared laser beam is brought into a nearly head-on collision with a high quality focused electron beam. Successful completion of this project will result in the capability of generating a monoenergetic X-ray beam, continuously tunable from 20 - 85 keV. We have completed a series of measurements leading up to the generation of monoenergetic X-rays. Measurements of essential electron beam parameters and the techniques used in establishing electron/photon collisions will be presented. We discuss the design of an improved interaction chamber, future electro-optic experiments using this chamber and plans for expanding the overall program to the generation of Terahertz radiation.

Vlieks, A.E.; Akre, R.; Caryotakis, G.; DeStefano, C.; Frederick, W.J.; Heritage, J.P.; Luhmann, N.C.; Martin, D.; Pellegrini, C.; /SLAC /UC, Davis /UCLA

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

CHANDRA ACIS SURVEY OF X-RAY POINT SOURCES IN 383 NEARBY GALAXIES. I. THE SOURCE CATALOG  

SciTech Connect

The Chandra data archive is a treasure for various studies, and in this paper we exploit this valuable resource to study the X-ray point source populations in nearby galaxies. By 2007 December 14, 383 galaxies within 40 Mpc with isophotal major axis above 1 arcmin had been observed by 626 public ACIS observations, most of which were for the first time analyzed by this survey to study the X-ray point sources. Uniform data analysis procedures are applied to the 626 ACIS observations and lead to the detection of 28,099 point sources, which belong to 17,599 independent sources. These include 8700 sources observed twice or more and 1000 sources observed 10 times or more, providing us a wealth of data to study the long-term variability of these X-ray sources. Cross-correlation of these sources with galaxy isophotes led to 8519 sources within the D{sub 25} isophotes of 351 galaxies, 3305 sources between the D{sub 25} and 2D{sub 25} isophotes of 309 galaxies, and additionally 5735 sources outside 2D{sub 25} isophotes of galaxies. This survey has produced a uniform catalog, by far the largest, of 11,824 X-ray point sources within 2D{sub 25} isophotes of 380 galaxies. Contamination analysis using the log N-log S relation shows that 74% of sources within 2D{sub 25} isophotes above 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}, 71% of sources above 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}, 63% of sources above 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}, and 56% of all sources are truly associated with galaxies. Meticulous efforts have identified 234 X-ray sources with galactic nuclei of nearby galaxies. This archival survey leads to 300 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with L{sub X} (0.3-8 keV) {>=} 2 x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}within D{sub 25} isophotes, 179 ULXs between D{sub 25} and 2D{sub 25} isophotes, and a total of 479 ULXs within 188 host galaxies, with about 324 ULXs truly associated with host galaxies based on the contamination analysis. About 4% of the sources exhibited at least one supersoft phase, and 70 sources are classified as ultraluminous supersoft sources with L{sub X} (0.3-8 keV) {>=} 2 x 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}. With a uniform data set and good statistics, this survey enables future works on various topics, such as X-ray luminosity functions for the ordinary X-ray binary populations in different types of galaxies, and X-ray properties of galactic nuclei.

Liu Jifeng [National Astronomical Observatories of China, 20 Datun Rd, Chaoyang, Beijing 100012 (China); Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

The APS and You | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The APS and You One-page articles that describe highlights of research at the Advanced Photon Source and how that research can have far-reaching impact on nearly every aspect of...

90

Effect of plasma density scale length on the properties of bremsstrahlung x-ray sources created by picosecond laser pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of an experimental study of multi-MeV bremsstrahlung x-ray sources created by picosecond laser pulses are presented. The x-ray source is created by focusing the short pulse in an expanding plasma obtained by heating a solid target with a time-delayed nanosecond laser beam. The high-energy part of the x-ray spectrum and emission lobe are inferred from photonuclear activation techniques. The x-ray dose is measured with silicon diodes. Two-dimensional images of the source are reconstructed from a penumbral imaging technique. These results indicate the creation of a relatively small source, below 200 {mu}m diameter, delivering doses up to 12 mrad in air at 1 m with x-ray temperature up to 2.8 MeV. The diagnostics used give access to a whole set of coherent experimental results on the x-ray source properties which are compared to extensive numerical simulations. X-ray intensity and temperature are found to increase with the size of the preplasma.

Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Landoas, O.; Lidove, G.; Meot, V.; Morel, P.; Nuter, R.; Lefebvre, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Boscheron, A.; Grenier, J. [CEA, DAM, CESTA, F-33114 Le Barp (France); Aleonard, M. M.; Gerbaux, M.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Malka, G.; Scheurer, J. N.; Tarisien, M. [Universite de Bordeaux, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797 CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan F-33175 (France)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Multi-keV x-ray sources from metal-lined cylindrical hohlraums  

SciTech Connect

As multi-keV x-ray sources, plastic hohlraums with inner walls coated with titanium, copper, and germanium have been fired on Omega in September 2009. For all the targets, the measured and calculated multi-keV x-ray power time histories are in a good qualitative agreement. In the same irradiation conditions, measured multi-keV x-ray conversion rates are {approx}6%-8% for titanium, {approx}2% for copper, and {approx}0.5% for germanium. For titanium and copper hohlraums, the measured conversion rates are about two times higher than those given by hydroradiative computations. Conversely, for the germanium hohlraum, a rather good agreement is found between measured and computed conversion rates. To explain these findings, multi-keV integrated emissivities calculated with RADIOM [M. Busquet, Phys. Fluids 85, 4191 (1993)], the nonlocal-thermal-equilibrium atomic physics model used in our computations, have been compared to emissivities obtained from different other models. These comparisons provide an attractive way to explain the discrepancies between experimental and calculated quantitative results.

Jacquet, L.; Girard, F.; Primout, M.; Villette, B.; Stemmler, Ph. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

Boutet, Sebastien

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

93

APS News 2007 | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Albert Macrander named American Physical Society Fellow Albert Macrander named American Physical Society Fellow Albert Macrander named American Physical Society Fellow December 10, 2007 Albert Macrander of the Argonne X-ray Science Division (XSD) has been elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society. Michael Borland named American Physical Society Fellow Michael Borland named American Physical Society Fellow December 4, 2007 Michael Borland of the Argonne Accelerator Systems Division has been elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society. Grad student is officially a GEMS Grad student is officially a GEMS October 18, 2007 Tao Sun (Northwestern University), who is currently doing his thesis research at the APS, has been awarded one of three Graduate Excellence in Materials Science Diamond awards by the Basic Science

94

A kpc-scale X-ray jet in the BL Lac source S5 2007+777  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray jets in AGN are commonly observed in FRII and FRI radio-galaxies, but rarely in BL Lacs, most probably due to their orientation close to the line of sight and the ensuing foreshortening effects. Only three BL Lacs are known so far to contain a kpc-scale X-ray jet. In this paper, we present the evidence for the existence of a fourth extended X-ray jet in the classical radio-selected source S5 2007+777, which for its hybrid FRI/II radio morphology has been classified as a HYMOR (HYbrid MOrphology Radio source). Our Chandra ACIS-S observations of this source revealed an X-ray counterpart to the 19"-long radio jet. Interestingly, the X-ray properties of the kpc-scale jet in S5 2007+777 are very similar to those observed in FRII jets. First, the X-ray morphology closely mirrors the radio one, with the X-rays being concentrated in the discrete radio knots. Second, the X-ray continuum of the jet/brightest knot is described by a very hard power law, with photon index Gamma_x~1, although the uncertainties are large. Third, the optical upper limit from archival HST data implies a concave radio-to-X-ray SED. If the X-ray emission is attributed to IC/CMB with equipartition, strong beaming (delta=13) is required, implying a very large scale (Mpc) jet. The beaming requirement can be somewhat relaxed assuming a magnetic field lower than equipartition. Alternatively, synchrotron emission from a second population of very high-energy electrons is viable. Comparison to other HYMOR jets detected with Chandra is discussed, as well as general implications for the origin of the FRI/II division.

Rita M. Sambruna; Davide Donato; C. C. Cheung; F. Tavecchio; L. Maraschi

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

X-ray Sources by Energy Recovered Linacs and Their Needed R&D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we review the current state of research on energy recovered linacs as drivers for future X-ray sources. For many types of user experiments, such sources may have substantial advantages compared to the workhorse sources of the present: high energy storage rings. Energy recovered linacs need to be improved beyond present experience in both energy and average current to support this application. To build an energy recovered linac based X-ray user facility presents many interesting challenges. We present summaries on the Research and Development (R&D) topics needed for full development of such a source, including the discussion at the Future Light Sources Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland on September 15- 17, 2009. A #12;rst iteration of an R&D plan is presented that is founded on the notion of building a set of succeedingly larger test accelerators exploring cathode physics, high average current injector physics, and beam recirculation and beam energy recovery at high average current. Our basic conclusion is that a reviewable design of such a source can be developed after an R&D period of #12;ve to ten years.

Benson, Stephen; Douglas, David; Dowell, David; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Kayran, D; Krafft, Geoffrey; Legg, Robert; Moog, E; Obina, T; Rimmer, Robert

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

APS News 2010 | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lahsen Assoufid Named Fellow of the Optical Society Lahsen Assoufid Named Fellow of the Optical Society Lahsen Assoufid Named Fellow of the Optical Society December 16, 2010 Lahsen Assoufid of the Argonne X-ray Science Division has been made a Fellow of the Optical Society "For contributions and leadership in x-ray optics, metrology, and nanofocusing optics development." George Srajer and Jin Wang Elected Fellows of the American Physical Society George Srajer and Jin Wang Elected Fellows of the American Physical Society December 16, 2010 George Srajer and Jin Wang, both of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, have been elected Fellows of the American Physical Society. Argonne-U. of C. Collaborative Seed Grant to Fund Novel PET System Argonne-U. of C. Collaborative Seed Grant to Fund Novel PET System

97

No periodicity revealed for an "eclipsing" ultraluminous supersoft X-ray source in M81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Luminous supersoft X-ray sources found in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds are likely white dwarfs that steadily or cyclically burn accreted matter on their surface, which are promising type Ia supernova progenitors. Observations of distant galaxies with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revealed supersoft sources that are generally hotter and more luminous, including some ultraluminous supersoft sources (ULSs) that are possibly intermediate mass black holes of a few thousand solar masses. In this paper we report our X-ray spectral and timing analysis for M81-ULS1, an ultraluminous supersoft source in the nearby spiral galaxy M81. M81-ULS1 has been persistently supersoft in 17 Chandra ACIS observations spanning six years, and its spectrum can be described by either a $kT_{bb}\\approx70$ eV blackbody for a $\\sim1.2M_\\odot$ white dwarf, or a $kT_{in} \\approx 80$ eV multicolor accretion disk for a $\\gtrsim10^3M_\\odot$ intermediate mass black hole. In two observations, the light curves exhibited dramatic flux drop/rise on time scales of $10^3$ seconds, reminiscent of eclipse ingress/egress in eclipsing X-ray binaries. However, the exhaustive search for periodicity in the reasonable range of 50 ksec to 50 days failed to reveal an orbital period. The failure to reveal any periodicity is consistent with the long period ($\\ge30$ yrs) predicted for this system given the optical identification of the secondary with an asymptotic giant star. Also, the eclipse-like dramatic flux changes in hours are hard to explain under the white dwarf model, but can in principle be explained by disk temperature changes induced by accretion rate variations under the intermediate mass black hole model.

Jifeng Liu

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

Using computational grid capabilities to enhance the capability of an X-ray source for structural biology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory enables structural biologists to perform state-of-the-art crystallography diffraction experiments with high-intensity X-rays. The data gathered during such experiments is used to ...

Gregor von Laszewski; Mary L. Westbrook; Craig Barnes; Ian Foster; Edwin M. Westbrook

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE MONITORING OF FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES OF INTEREST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a long-term Swift monitoring program of Fermi gamma-ray sources, particularly the 23 gamma-ray ''sources of interest''.We present a systematic analysis of the Swift X-Ray Telescope light curves and hardness ratios of these sources, and we calculate excess variability. We present data for the time interval of 2004 December 22 through 2012 August 31. We describe the analysis methods used to produce these data products, and we discuss the availability of these data in an online repository, which continues to grow from more data on these sources and from a growing list of additional sources. This database should be of use to the broad astronomical community for long-term studies of the variability of these objects and for inclusion in multiwavelength studies.

Stroh, Michael C.; Falcone, Abe D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

XMM-Newton Observations of NGC 247 and a Supersoft Ultraluminous X-ray Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a new XMM-Newton observation of NGC 247 from December 2009. The galaxy contains a supersoft, ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) whose spectrum consists of a thermal component with a temperature about 0.1 keV and a power-law tail with a photon index around 2.5. The thermal emission is absolutely the dominant component, contributing 96% of the total luminosity in the 0.3-10 keV band. Variability is detected at timescales of 100 s and longer with a $\

Jin, Jing; Kaaret, Philip; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

X-Ray and Neutron Diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010 ... Advanced X-Ray Scattering Techniques for Multi-Length Scale ... ?-Ti using the 3DXRD station 34-ID-E at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. ... Research at APS 34-ID-E, partly funded by BES/DOE.

102

X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified VHE gamma-ray sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large fraction of the recently discovered Galactic Very High Energy (VHE) source population remains unidentified to date. VHE gamma-ray emission traces high energy particles in these sources, but for example in case of hadronic processes also the gas density at the emission site. Moreover, the particles have sufficiently long lifetimes to be able to escape from their acceleration sites. Therefore, the gamma-ray sources or at least the areas of maximum surface brightness are in many cases spatially offset from the actual accelerators. A promising way to identify the objects in which the particles are accelerated seems to be to search for emission signatures of the acceleration process (like emission from shock-heated plasma). Also the particles themselves (through primary or secondary synchrotron emission) can be traced in lower wavebands. Those signatures are best visible in the X-ray band, and current X-ray observatories are well suited to conduct such follow-up observations. Some aspects of the current status of these investigations are reviewed.

Gerd Phlhofer

2008-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

103

Overdensity of X-Ray sources near 3C 295: a candidate filament  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a statistical analysis of the Chandra observation of the source field around the 3C 295 galaxy cluster (z=0.46) aimed at the search for clustering of X-ray sources. Three different methods of analysis, namely a chip by chip logN-logS, a two dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and the angular correlation function (ACF) show a strong overdensity of sources in the North-East of the field. In particular, the ACF shows a clear signal on scales of 0.5 - 5 arcmin. This correlation angle is > 2 times higher than that of a sample of 8 ACIS-I field at the 2.5 sigma confidence level. If this overdensity is spatially associated to the cluster, we are observing a 'filament' of the large scale structure of the Universe. We discuss some first results that seem to indicate such an association.

V. D'Elia; F. Fiore; F. Cocchia

2004-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

104

Direct and bulk-scattered forward-shock emissions: sources of X-ray afterglow diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I describe the modifications to the standard forward-shock model required to account for the X-ray light-curve features discovered by Swift in the early afterglow emission and propose that a delayed, pair-enriched, and highly relativistic outflow, which bulk-scatters the forward-shock synchrotron emission, yields sometimes a brighter X-ray emission, producing short-lived X-ray flares, X-ray light-curve plateaus ending with chromatic breaks, and fast post-plateau X-ray decays.

A. Panaitescu

2008-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

105

Using the EXIST Active Shields for Earth Occultation Observations of X-ray Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The EXIST active shields, planned for the main detectors of the coded aperture telescope, will have approximately 15 times the area of the BATSE detectors, and they will have a good geometry on the spacecraft for viewing both the leading and trailing Earths limb for occultation observations. These occultation observations will complement the imaging observations of EXIST and can extend them to higher energies. Earth occultation observations of the hard X-ray sky with BATSE on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory developed and demonstrated the capabilities of large, flat, uncollimated detectors for applying this observation method. With BATSE, a catalog of 179 X-ray sources was monitored twice every spacecraft orbit for 9 years at energies above about 25 keV, resulting in 83 definite detections and 36 possible detections with 5 ? detection sensitivities of 3.5-20 mcrab (20-430 keV) depending on the sky location. This catalog included four transients discovered with this technique and many variable objects (galactic and extragalactic.) This poster describes the Earth occultation technique, summarizes the BATSE occultation observations, and compares the basic observational parameters of the occultation detector elements of BATSE and EXIST. 1.

Colleen A. Wilson; G. J. Fishman; J. -s. Hong; J. E. Grindlay; H. Krawczynski

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Using the EXIST Active Shields for Earth Occultation Observations of X-ray Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The EXIST active shields, planned for the main detectors of the coded aperture telescope, will have approximately 15 times the area of the BATSE detectors, and they will have a good geometry on the spacecraft for viewing both the leading and trailing Earth's limb for occultation observations. These occultation observations will complement the imaging observations of EXIST and can extend them to higher energies. Earth occultation observations of the hard X-ray sky with BATSE on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory developed and demonstrated the capabilities of large, flat, uncollimated detectors for applying this observation method. With BATSE, a catalog of 179 X-ray sources was monitored twice every spacecraft orbit for 9 years at energies above about 25 keV, resulting in 83 definite detections and 36 possible detections with 5 sigma detection sensitivities of 3.5-20 mcrab (20-430 keV) depending on the sky location. This catalog included four transients discovered with this technique and many variable objects (galactic and extragalactic.) This poster describes the Earth occultation technique, summarizes the BATSE occultation observations, and compares the basic observational parameters of the occultation detector elements of BATSE and EXIST.

Colleen A. Wilson; G. J. Fishman; J. -S. Hong; J. E. Grindlay; H. Krawczynski

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Using the EXIST Active Shields for Earth Occultation Observations of X-ray Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The EXIST active shields, planned for the main detectors of the coded aperture telescope, will have approximately 15 times the area of the BATSE detectors, and they will have a good geometry on the spacecraft for viewing both the leading and trailing Earth's limb for occultation observations. These occultation observations will complement the imaging observations of EXIST and can extend them to higher energies. Earth occultation observations of the hard X-ray sky with BATSE on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory developed and demonstrated the capabilities of large, flat, uncollimated detectors for applying this observation method. With BATSE, a catalog of 179 X-ray sources was monitored twice every spacecraft orbit for 9 years at energies above about 25 keV, resulting in 83 definite detections and 36 possible detections with 5 sigma detection sensitivities of 3.5-20 mcrab (20-430 keV) depending on the sky location. This catalog included four transients discovered with this technique and many variable objects (g...

Wilson, C A; Hong, J S; Grindlay, J E; Krawczynski, H; Wilson, Colleen A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Diagnostics of underwater electrical wire explosion through a time- and space-resolved hard x-ray source  

SciTech Connect

A time- and space-resolved hard x-ray source was developed as a diagnostic tool for imaging underwater exploding wires. A {approx}4 ns width pulse of hard x-rays with energies of up to 100 keV was obtained from the discharge in a vacuum diode consisting of point-shaped tungsten electrodes. To improve contrast and image quality, an external pulsed magnetic field produced by Helmholtz coils was used. High resolution x-ray images of an underwater exploding wire were obtained using a sensitive x-ray CCD detector, and were compared to optical fast framing images. Future developments and application of this diagnostic technique are discussed.

Sheftman, D.; Shafer, D.; Efimov, S.; Gruzinsky, K.; Gleizer, S.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Advanced Photon Source (APS) Colloquium Series Video Collection from 2006  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory invites scientists from nearly all disciplines to present their research to the general public in the monthly APS Colloquia. Some of these presentations are available as integrated video and slides. The 2006 multimedia presentations available on this website are: 1) Quantum Control of Light: From Slow Light and Fast Cars to Nuclear Gamma Ray Spectroscopy, Marlan O. Scully, Texas A&M University and Princeton University; 2) Nanotubes, Fullerenes, and the Beijing SRF, Ziyu Wu, Beijing SRF; 3) The Equation That Couldn't Be Solved, Mario Livio, Hubble Space Telescope Science Institute; 4) Functional Complexity in Soft Electronic Matter, Alan Bishop; 5) Data Driven Discovery in Imaging and Spectroscopy, Krishna Rajan, Iowa State University; 6) Extraterrestrial Materials: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation Analyses in the Study of Our Solar System, Stephen R. Sutton, University of Chicago; 7) Boosting the Light: X-ray Physics in Confinement, Ralf Rhlsberger, HASYLAB/DESY; 8) Seeing the Real Atomic Correlation in Matter, Takeshi Egami, University of Tennessee and ORNL.

110

APS News 2008 | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From: Nature Research Highlights From: Nature Research Highlights From: Nature Research Highlights DECEMBER 1, 2008 APS Renewal White Paper APS Renewal White Paper November 21, 2008 The white paper prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences by the management and users of the Advanced Photon Source to set the foundation for renewal of this vital national research facility is now available in PDF format. Winner of AAAS Science Education Prize Visits Argonne Winner of AAAS Science Education Prize Visits Argonne October 23, 2008 Diane Riendeau, winner of the 2008 American Association for the Advancement of Science Leadership in Science Education Prize for High School Teachers, paid a visit to Argonne National Laboratory. SESAME and the APS: Opening Doors Helps the Light Shine In

111

Performance of the Phase 1 superconducting x-ray lithography source (SXLS) at BNL  

SciTech Connect

The Phase I SXLS electron storage ring has a circumference of 8.5 meters, it uses conventional dipole magnets, B {le} 1.1 T and p = 60 cm, and it is capable of operating in the range of 50--250 MeV. It is the forerunner of the Phase II SXLS ring which will operate at 700 MeV and will make use of superconducting dipoles, B{sub o} = 3.87 Tesla, as a source of {lambda}{sub c} = 10 angstrom x-rays for proximity printing lithography. The Phase I storage ring has been successfully commissioned; stored currents in excess of one ampere have been achieved. A report on the performance of the machine is presented.

Murphy, J.B.; Biscardi, R.; Halama, H.; Heese, R.; Kramer, S.; Nawrocky, R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Krishnaswamy, J. [Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Performance of the Phase 1 superconducting x-ray lithography source (SXLS) at BNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Phase I SXLS electron storage ring has a circumference of 8.5 meters, it uses conventional dipole magnets, B {le} 1.1 T and p = 60 cm, and it is capable of operating in the range of 50--250 MeV. It is the forerunner of the Phase II SXLS ring which will operate at 700 MeV and will make use of superconducting dipoles, B{sub o} = 3.87 Tesla, as a source of {lambda}{sub c} = 10 angstrom x-rays for proximity printing lithography. The Phase I storage ring has been successfully commissioned; stored currents in excess of one ampere have been achieved. A report on the performance of the machine is presented.

Murphy, J.B.; Biscardi, R.; Halama, H.; Heese, R.; Kramer, S.; Nawrocky, R. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Krishnaswamy, J. (Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Exploring the powering source of the TeV X-ray binary LS 5039  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LS 5039 is one of the four TeV emitting X-ray binaries detected up to now. The powering source of its multi-wavelength emission can be accretion in a microquasar scenario or wind interaction in a young non-accreting pulsar scenario. These two scenarios predict different morphologic and peak position changes along the orbital cycle of 3.9 days, which can be tested at milliarcsecond scales using VLBI techniques. Here we present a campaign of 5 GHz VLBA observations conducted in June 2000 (2 runs five days apart). The results show a core component with a constant flux density, and a fast change in the morphology and the position angle of the elongated extended emission, but maintaining a stable flux density. These results are difficult to fit comfortably within a microquasar scenario, whereas they appear to be compatible with the predicted behavior for a non-accreting pulsar.

J. Moldon; M. Ribo; Josep M. Paredes; J. Marti; M. Massi

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cluster beam targets for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray radiation from an ultra-low debris plasma source are disclosed. Targets are produced by the free jet expansion of various gases through a temperature controlled nozzle to form molecular clusters. These target clusters are subsequently irradiated with commercially available lasers of moderate intensity (10{sup 11}--10{sup 12} watts/cm{sup 2}) to produce a plasma radiating in the region of 0.5 to 100 nanometers. By appropriate adjustment of the experimental conditions the laser focus can be moved 10--30 mm from the nozzle thereby eliminating debris produced by plasma erosion of the nozzle. 5 figs.

Kublak, G.D.; Richardson, M.C.

1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

115

Cluster beam targets for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for producing extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray radiation from an ultra-low debris plasma source are disclosed. Targets are produced by the free jet expansion of various gases through a temperature controlled nozzle to form molecular clusters. These target clusters are subsequently irradiated with commercially available lasers of moderate intensity (10.sup.11 -10.sup.12 watts/cm.sup.2) to produce a plasma radiating in the region of 0.5 to 100 nanometers. By appropriate adjustment of the experimental conditions the laser focus can be moved 10-30 mm from the nozzle thereby eliminating debris produced by plasma erosion of the nozzle.

Kublak, Glenn D. (124 Turquoise Way, Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Richardson, Martin C. (CREOL

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Design and assembly of a telecentric zoom lens for the Cygnus x-ray source  

SciTech Connect

Our goal is to collect x-ray images of different sized targets, which are positioned inside a containment vessel, onto different sized CCD cameras.

Malone, R M; Brown, K K; Curtis, A H; Esquibel, D L; Frayer, D K; Frogget, B C; Garten, J R; Howe, R A; Huerta, J A; Kaufman, M I; Lutz, S S; McGillivray, K D; Smith, S S; Furlanetto, M R; Haines, T J

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

117

Design and characterization of a spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray source for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a limited angle computed tomography technique that can distinguish tumors from its overlying breast tissues and has potentials for detection of cancers at a smaller size and earlier stage. Current prototype DBT scanners are based on the regular full-field digital mammography systems and require partial isocentric motion of an x-ray tube over certain angular range to record the projection views. This prolongs the scanning time and, in turn, degrades the imaging quality due to motion blur. To mitigate the above limitations, the concept of a stationary DBT (s-DBT) scanner has been recently proposed based on the newly developed spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technique using the carbon nanotube. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the performance of the 25-beam MBFEX source array that has been designed and fabricated for the s-DBT system. The s-DBT system records all the projection images by electronically activating the multiple x-ray beams from different viewing angles without any mechanical motion. The configuration of the MBFEX source is close to the published values from the Siemens Mammomat system. The key issues including the x-ray flux, focal spot size, spatial resolution, scanning time, beam-to-beam consistency, and reliability are evaluated using the standard procedures. In this article, the authors describe the design and performance of a distributed x-ray source array specifically designed for the s-DBT system. They evaluate the emission current, current variation, lifetime, and focal spot sizes of the source array. An emission current of up to 18 mA was obtained at 0.5x0.3 mm effective focal spot size. The experimentally measured focal spot sizes are comparable to that of a typical commercial mammography tube without motion blurring. Trade-off between the system spatial resolution, x-ray flux, and scanning time are also discussed. Projection images of a breast phantom were collected using the x-ray source array from 25 different viewing angles without motion. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed s-DBT scanner. The technology has the potential to increase the resolution and reduce the imaging time for DBT. With the present design of 25 views, they demonstrated experimentally the feasibility of achieving 11 s scanning time at full detector resolution with 0.5x0.3 mm source resolution without motion blur. The flexibility in configuration of the x-ray source array will also allow system designers to consider imaging geometries that are difficult to achieve with the conventional single-source rotating approach.

Qian Xin; Rajaram, Ramya; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Yang Guang; Phan, Tuyen; Lalush, David S.; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27659 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources  

SciTech Connect

High brightness electron sources are at the heart of anew generation of x-ray sources based on the Free ElectronLaser (FEL) as well as in Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) sources.The source of electrons consists of a photoinjector, comprised of a laser-driven photocathode in a high gradient electric field produced by an rf cavity. The function of the rf cavity is to provide a field sufficient for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocity over a small distance, thus minimizing effects of the space-charge. Even so, the dense electron beam required for high brightness suffers from a space charge field that chirps and reshapes the electron pulse increasing beam emittance and thus reducing the overall brightness. This emittance growth can be avoided if the initial distribution of electrons is pancake shaped, with a semicircular transverse intensity profile. In this case, the electron distribution develops under its space charge field from a pancake into a uniformly filled ellipsoidal beam. This condition, referred to as the blowout regime, requires ultrashort pulses less than 100 fs long and has been successfully demonstrated recently in a high gradient photoinjector.

Polyakov, Aleksandr; Senft, Christoph; Thompson, K. F.; Feng, J.; Cabrini, S.; Schuck, P. J.; Padmore, Howard; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hess, Wayne P.

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

119

A setup for resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources  

SciTech Connect

We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak fluences which currently sets a limit to maximum attainable count rate at FELs. The setup presented here opens up new possibilities to study the structure and dynamics in liquids.

Kunnus, Kristjan; Schreck, Simon; Foehlisch, Alexander [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Rajkovic, Ivan; Quevedo, Wilson; Gruebel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko [IFG Structural Dynamics of (Bio)chemical Systems, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37070 Goettingen (Germany); Eckert, Sebastian; Beye, Martin; Suljoti, Edlira; Weniger, Christian; Wernet, Philippe [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kalus, Christian [Abteilung Betrieb Beschleuniger BESSYII, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J. [PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kennedy, Brian [MAX-lab, PO Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); and others

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Biomolecular solution X-ray scattering at the National Synchrotron Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years there has been a growing interest in the application of X-ray scattering techniques to biomolecules in solution. At NSLS, a new undulatorbased beamline, X9, has been constructed to address the oversubscribed user demand for X-ray scattering. Beamline X9 has the capability to perform small/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) all in one single instrument. This is accomplished by utilizing a vacuum sample/detector chamber that is an integral part of the SAXS scattering flight path. This vacuum chamber allows a WAXS detector to be positioned at a close distance from the sample, while not interfering with scattered X-rays at small angles from reaching the SAXS detector. A regular training program, the X9 workbench, has also been established to allow users to become familiar with beamline X9 for solution X-ray scattering. Keywords: SAXS; WAXS; beamline; proteins; DNA/RNA. 1.

Marc Allaire; Lin Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Design and Application of CVD Diamond Windows for X-Rays at the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of directly cooled, 0.2-mm-thick, 8-mm-diameter clear aperture CVD diamond windows have been designed and successfully fabricated by two different vendors for use at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Both windows contain a direct braze joint between the diamond and the cooled OFHC copper. These windows can be used to replace the front-end beryllium windows in high-heat-load applications and can be used as white beam windows in the beamlines. This paper presents the detailed design of the diamond windows, the thermal analysis of the diamond window under different thermal load configurations, as well as a complete list of the existing APS front-end beryllium window configurations and replacement scenarios. Small-angle scattering experiments have been conducted on both diamond windows and a polished beryllium window, and the results are presented.

Jaski, Yifei [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Bldg 401, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cookson, David [University of Chicago, CARS, APS Sector 15, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Bldg. 434D, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

122

Design and application of CVD diamond windows for x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of directly cooled, 0.2-mm-thick, 8-mm-diameter clear aperture CVD diamond windows have been designed and successfully fabricated by two different vendors for use at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Both windows contain a direct braze joint between the diamond and the cooled OFHC copper. These windows can be used to replace the front-end beryllium windows in high-heat-load applications and can be used as white beam windows in the beamlines. This paper presents the detailed design of the diamond windows, the thermal analysis of the diamond window under different thermal load configurations, as well as a complete list of the existing APS front-end beryllium window configurations and replacement scenarios. Small-angle scattering experiments have been conducted on both diamond windows and a polished beryllium window, and the results are presented.

Jaski, Y.; Cookson, D.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); Univ. of Chicago

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A new bend magnet beam line for scanning transmission x-ray microscopy at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high brightness of the bend magnets at the Advanced Light Source has been exploited to illuminate a Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM). This is the first diffraction-limited scanning x-ray microscope to operate with useful count rate on a synchrotron bend magnet source. A simple, dedicated beam line has been built covering the range of photon energy from 250 eV to 600 eV. Ease of use and operational availability are radically improved compared to previous installations using undulator beams. This facility provides radiation for C 1s, N 1s and O 1s near edge x-ray absorption spectro-microscopy with a spectral resolution up to about 1:5000 and with STXM count rates in excess of 1 MHz.

Warwick, Tony; Ade, Harald; Kilcoyne, A.L. David; Kritscher, Michael; Tylisczcak, Tolek; Fakra, Sirine; Hitchcock, Adam P.; Hitchcock, Peter; Padmore, Howard A.

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

124

Different types of ultraluminous X-ray sources in NGC 4631  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have re-examined the most luminous X-ray sources in the starburst galaxy NGC 4631, using XMM-Newton, Chandra and ROSAT data. The most interesting source is a highly variable supersoft ULX. We suggest that its bolometric luminosity ~ a few 10^{39} erg/s in the high/supersoft state: this is an order of magnitude lower than estimated in previous studies, thus reducing the need for extreme or exotic scenarios. Moreover, we find that this source was in a non-canonical low/soft (kT ~ 0.1-0.3 keV) state during the Chandra observation. By comparing the high and low state, we argue that the spectral properties may not be consistent with the expected behaviour of an accreting intermediate-mass black hole. We suggest that recurrent super-Eddington outbursts with photospheric expansion from a massive white dwarf (M_{wd} >~ 1.3 M_{sun}), powered by non-steady nuclear burning, may be a viable possibility, in alternative to the previously proposed scenario of a super-Eddington outflow from an accreting stellar-mass black...

Soria, Roberto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

High-Energy Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction for In-Situ Study of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the APS high-energy x-ray beamline 11-ID-C, we have employed 115 keV ... ( Use of the Advanced Photon Source was supported by the U. S. Department of...

126

In-situ Studies with X-ray / Synchrotron / Neutron Techniques - Part I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012... x-ray diffraction at beamline 11-ID-C of Advanced Photon Source at ... Experiments were performed at the 16-BM-B at the HPCAT at the APS.

127

APS Wins Three R&D 100 Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3rd, 2000 APS Wins Three R&D 100 Awards X-Ray Scanning Microprobe Three technologies developed for use at the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne...

128

LUX - A design study for a linac/laser-based ultrafast X-ray source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the start as a user facility for femtosecond x-rayusers simultaneously, while the whole spectrum of already-available x-ray determinations, long a staple at existing synchrotron facilities,

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Scientific Needs for Future X-ray Sources in the U.S. -- A White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scientific user program at LCLS, the first x-ray laser, toERL SPring-8 Ring ELETTRA LCLS II & III Ring Upgrade SDL SRFERMI FEL ALS Ring Ring FEL LCLS SPARC Upgrade SSRF FEL PAL-

Falcone, Roger

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Efficient multi?keV x?ray sources from Ti?doped aerogel targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have measured the production of hv ? 4.7 keV x?rays from low?density Ti?doped aerogel (? ? 3 mg/cc) targets at the OMEGA laser facility (University of Rochester)

K. B. Fournier; C. Constantin; G. Gregori; M. C. Miller; C. A. Back; L. J. Suter; J. Davis; J. Grun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The faint X-ray Source Population near 3C 295  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a statistical analysis of the Chandra observation of the source field around the 3C 295 galaxy cluster (z=0.46) aimed at the search for clustering of X-ray sources. We applied three different methods of analysis, all suggesting a strong clustering in the field on scales of a few arcmin. In particular 1) the logN-logS computed separately for the four ACIS-I chips reveals that there is a significant (3.2 sigma in the 0.5-2 keV, 3.3 sigma in the 2-10 keV and 4.0 sigma in the 0.5-10 keV band) excess of sources to the North-North East and a void to the South of the central cluster. 2) the two point, two-dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test, shows the probability that the sources are uniformly distributed is only a few percent. 3) a strong spatial correlation emerges from the study of the angular correlation function of the field: the angular correlation function (ACF) shows a clear signal on scales of 0.5 - 5 arcmin, correlation angle in the 0.5-7 keV band theta = 8.5^{+6.5}_{-4.5}, 90% confidence limit (assuming a power law ACF with slope gamma=1.8). This correlation angle is 2 times higher than that of a sample of 8 ACIS-I field at the 2.5 sigma confidence level. The above scales translate to 0.2 - 2 Mpc at the cluster redshift, higher than the typical cluster core radius, and more similar to the size of a ``filament'' of the large scale structure.

Valerio D'Elia; Fabrizio Fiore; Martin Elvis; Massimo Cappi; Smita Mathur; Pasquale Mazzotta; Emilio Falco; Filomena Cocchia

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

APS Upgrade: Documents | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MBAL Preliminary Expected Performance Characteristics of an APS Multi-Bend Achromat Lattice (download the PDF) APS-U PDR Preliminary Design Report (PDR) (Read-only) Preliminary...

133

APS Map | Overview | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Systems Map There are 5 main components that make up the APS technical facility: the linear accelerator, the booster synchrotron, the electron storage ring, insertion devices,...

134

Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect

The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Scientific Needs for Future X-Ray Sources in the U.S.: A White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects (Figure 1.1). The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons and spins, x rays have proved especially valuable.

Falcone , Roger; Stohr, Joachim; Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Galayda, John; Hastings, Jerry; Robert Hettel, Zahid Hussain; Kirz, Janos; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Fernando Sannibale, John Seeman; Shen, Z.-X.; Schoenlein, Robert; Zholents, Alexander; /SLAC /LBL, Berkeley

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

136

Scientific Needs for Future X-ray Sources in the U.S. -- A White Paper  

SciTech Connect

Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving heath, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons and spins, x rays have proved especially valuable.

Falcone, Roger; Stohr, Joachim; Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Galayda, John; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hussain, Zahid; Kirz, Janos; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Schoenlein, Bob; Zholents, Alexander

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

137

Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton{sup Registered-Sign} windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Maendl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung e. V., Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

R and D toward a compact high-brilliance X-ray source based on channeling radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-rays have been valuable to a large number of fields including Science, Medicine, and Security. Yet, the availability of a compact high-spectral brilliance X-ray sources is limited. A technique to produce X-rays with spectral brilliance B{approx} 10{sup 12} photons.(mm-mrd){sup -2}. (0.1% BW){sup -1}.s{sup -1} is discussed. The method is based on the generation and acceleration of a low-emittance field-emitted electron bunches. The bunches are then focused on a diamond crystal thereby producing channeling radiation. In this paper, after presenting the overarching concept, we discuss the generation, acceleration and transport of the low-emittance bunches with parameters consistent with the production of high-brilliance X-rays through channeling radiation. We especially consider the example of the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) currently in construction at Fermilab where a proof-of-principle experiment is in preparation.

Piot, P.; Brau, C. A.; Gabella, W. E.; Choi, B. K.; Jarvis, J. D.; Lewellen, J. W.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Mihalcea, D. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States) and Accelerator Physics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States) and Vanderbilt Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Physics Department and Combat Systems, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

139

Argonne CNM Highlight: World?s Most Precise ?Hard X-Ray?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

World's Most Precise "Hard X-Ray" Nanoprobe Activated X-rays from an APS undulator exiting the front end window of the nanoprobe beamline. X-rays from an APS undulator exiting the...

140

Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

APS Visitor Registration Form | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Visitor Registration Form APS Visitor Registration Form To request access as a visitor who will not do hands-on work, please complete this form. For assistance, contact the APS User Office by phone at (630) 252-9090 or by email at apsuser@aps.anl.gov. Please request access directly by contacting the APS User Office by phone at (630) 252-9090 or by email at apsuser@aps.anl.gov. If you are concerned about sending your passport and visa information, leave those fields blank and fax a letter to (630) 252-9250. To Request APS Visitor Registration, please enter the following: * indicates required field First Name*: Middle Initial/Name*: Last Name*: Title: Organization*: Department: Address 1*: Address 2: City*: State*: Zip Code*: Country: Phone*: Fax: E-mail Address*: Gender*: Female

142

Advanced Power Sources Ltd APS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search Name Advanced Power Sources Ltd (APS) Place United Kingdom Product UK R&D company based at Loughborough University focusing on fuel cells. References Advanced...

143

Microstructure of B2 CoTi and CoZr Determined by 3D X-Ray ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials VI: Centennial and ... was used at the 1-ID beamline of APS, Argonne National Laboratory to extract the ... Materials Science Enabled by the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade.

144

EVIDENCE FOR POLAR X-RAY JETS AS SOURCES OF MICROSTREAM PEAKS IN THE SOLAR WIND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is proposed that the interplanetary manifestations of X-ray jets observed in solar polar coronal holes during periods of low solar activity are the peaks of the so-called microstreams observed in the fast polar solar wind. These microstreams exhibit velocity fluctuations of {+-}35 km s{sup -1}, higher kinetic temperatures, slightly higher proton fluxes, and slightly higher abundances of the low-first-ionization-potential element iron relative to oxygen ions than the average polar wind. Those properties can all be explained if the fast microstreams result from the magnetic reconnection of bright-point loops, which leads to X-ray jets which, in turn, result in solar polar plumes. Because most of the microstream peaks are bounded by discontinuities of solar origin, jets are favored over plumes for the majority of the microstream peaks.

Neugebauer, Marcia, E-mail: mneugeb@lpl.arizona.edu [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

High?resolution x?ray microscopy using an undulator source, photoelectron studies with MAXIMUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first results of high?spatial resolution x?ray imaging studies with an upgraded version of the scanning photoemission multiple application x?ray imaging undulator microscope. The microscope is a multilayercoated Schwarzschild objective that focuses undulator radiation onto the sample. The recent upgrade improved the spatial resolution by a factor six reaching a full width at half maximum value of 0.5 ?m. Highly polished mirrors reduced the diffuse background by almost two orders of magnitude and drastically improved the contrast. The improved microscope was used to perform a series of tests on microgrids and reverse Fresnel zone plates. The microscope capability to detect chemical and topological contrast was verified by using patterned metal overlayers on Si and GaAs substrates. Further improvements to increase the flux and the spatial resolution are underway; this includes the installation of a new undulator beamline.

C. Capasso; A. K. Ray?Chaudhuri; W. Ng; S. Liang; R. K. Cole; J. Wallace; F. Cerrina; G. Margaritondo; J. H. Underwood; J. B. Kortright; R. C. C. Perera

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aluminum z-pinch plasma with tungsten backlighter planar wire array source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorption features from K-shell aluminum z-pinch plasmas have recently been studied on Zebra, the 1.7 MA pulse power generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. In particular, tungsten plasma has been used as a semi-backlighter source in the generation of aluminum K-shell absorption spectra by placing a single Al wire at or near the end of a single planar W array. All spectroscopic experimental results were recorded using a time-integrated, spatially resolved convex potassium hydrogen phthalate (KAP) crystal spectrometer. Other diagnostics used to study these plasmas included x-ray detectors, optical imaging, laser shadowgraphy, and time-gated and time-integrated x-ray pinhole imagers. Through comparisons with previous publications, Al K-shell absorption lines are shown to be from much lower electron temperature ({approx}10-40 eV) plasmas than emission spectra ({approx}350-500 eV).

Osborne, G. C.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Weller, M. E.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyaptseva, V. V. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Ouart, N. D. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Residual stress measurement with high energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source.  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary measurements with high energy x-rays from the SRI CAT 1-ID beam line at the Advanced Photon show great promise for the measurement of stress and strain using diffraction. Comparisons are made with neutron measurements. Measurements of strains in a 2 mm thick 304 stainless steel weld show that excellent strain and spatial resolutions are possible. With 200 {micro}m slits, strain resolutions of 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} were achieved.

Winholtz, R. A.; Haeffner, D. R.; Green, R.E.L.; Varma, R.; Hammond, D.

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

A Chandra/ACIS Study of 30 Doradus II. X-ray Point Sources in the Massive Star Cluster R136 and Beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied the X-ray point source population of the 30 Doradus star-forming complex in the Large Magellanic Cloud using high-spatial-resolution X-ray images and spatially-resolved spectra obtained with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Here we describe the X-ray sources in a 17 ? 17 ? field centered on R136, the massive star cluster at the center of the main 30 Dor nebula. We detect 20 of the 32 Wolf-Rayet stars in the ACIS field. R136 is resolved at the subarcsecond level into almost 100 X-ray sources, including many typical O3O5 stars as well as a few bright X-ray sources previously reported. Over two orders of magnitude of scatter in LX is seen among R136 O stars, suggesting that X-ray emission in the most massive stars depends critically on the details of wind properties and binarity of each system, rather than reflecting the widely-reported characteristic value LX/Lbol ? 10 ?7. Such a canonical ratio may exist for single massive stars in R136, but our data are too shallow to confirm this relationship. Through this and future X-ray studies of 30 Doradus, the complete life cycle of a massive stellar cluster can be revealed. Subject headings: HII regions ? Magellanic Clouds ? open clusters and associations: individual (R 136) ? X-rays: individual (30 Doradus) ?stars: Wolf-Rayet ? X-rays: stars 1.

Leisa K. Townsley; Patrick S. Broos; Eric D. Feigelson; Gordon P. Garmire; Konstantin V

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Conceptual design study of an intense x-ray source for coronary angiography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations are presented for several 1.4 GeV electron storage ring designs which, with an ultra-high field (80 kG) superconducting wiggler magnet and beam current I = 400 mA, will generate a 33.16 keV x-ray beam at 20 m from the wiggler of adequate intensity (6 10{sup 9}/mm{sup {minus}2} sec{sup {minus}1}) and areal size for iodine K-edge coronary dichromography in humans.

Blumberg, L.N.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Scanning x-ray microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scanning x-ray microscope is described including: an x-ray source capable of emitting a beam of x-rays; a collimator positioned to receive the beam of x-rays and to collimate this beam, a focusing cone means to focus the beam of x-rays, directed by the collimator, onto a focal plane, a specimen mount for supporting a specimen in the focal plane to receive the focused beam of x-rays, and x-ray beam scanning means to relatively move the specimen and the focusing cone means and collimator to scan the focused x-ray beam across the specimen. A detector is disposed adjacent the specimen to detect flourescent photons emitted by the specimen upon exposure to the focused beam of x-rays to provide an electrical output representative of this detection. Means are included for displaying and/or recording the information provided by the output from the detector, as are means for providing information to the recording and/or display means representative of the scan rate and position of the focused x-ray beam relative to the specimen whereby the recording and/or display means can correlate the information received to record and/or display quantitive and distributive information as to the quantity and distribution of elements detected in the specimen. Preferably there is provided an x-ray beam modulation means upstream, relative to the direction of emission of the xray beam, of the focusing cone means.

Wang, C.

1982-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

151

Gas gun shock experiments with single-pulse x-ray phase contrast imaging and diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The highly transient nature of shock loading and pronounced microstructure effects on dynamic materials response call for in situ, temporally and spatially resolved, x-ray-based diagnostics. Third-generation synchrotron x-ray sources are advantageous for x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) and diffraction under dynamic loading, due to their high photon fluxes, high coherency, and high pulse repetition rates. The feasibility of bulk-scale gas gun shock experiments with dynamic x-ray PCI and diffraction measurements was investigated at the beamline 32ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. The x-ray beam characteristics, experimental setup, x-ray diagnostics, and static and dynamic test results are described. We demonstrate ultrafast, multiframe, single-pulse PCI measurements with unprecedented temporal (dynamic Laue diffraction. The results not only substantiate the potential of synchrotron-based experiments for addressing a variety of shock physics problems, but also allow us to identify the technical challenges related to image detection, x-ray source, and dynamic loading.

Luo, S. N.; Jensen, B. J.; Hooks, D. E.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Shimada, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Fezzaa, K. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Thermal and structural behavior of filters and windows for synchrotron x-ray sources  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the following discussions: Introduction: Use of filters and windows in the front end designs; An interactive code for 3D graphic viewing of absorbed power in filters/windows and a new heat load generation algorithm for the finite element analysis; Failure criteria and analysis methods for the filter and window assembly; Comparison with test data and existing devices in HASYLAB; Cooling the filter: Radiation cooling or conduction cooling?; Consideration of window and filter thickness: Thicker or thinner?; Material selection criteria for filters/windows; Photon transmission through filters/windows; Window and filter design for APS undulators; Window and filter design for APS wigglers; and Window design for APS bending magnet front ends.

Wang, Z.; Hahn, U.; Dejus, R.; Kuzay, T.

1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

153

Computer analysis of four channel x-ray microscopy images to obtain source and spectral emission data on laser fusion  

SciTech Connect

It is possible to analyze the images obtained from the four- channel x- ray microscope to obtain reasonable estimates of source spatial and energy emission. The technique shown here is particularly useful when relative comparisons are desired in which, from shot to shot, few parameters are changed. These data are of use in fuel pellet design and in checking design code predictions. The technique should also apply to pinhole camera data. Largest uncertainties appear to be due to film energy/handling calibration and mirror efficiency measurements. (auth)

Harper, T.L.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

X-ray-optical cross-correlator for gas-phase experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray-optical pump-probe experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have so far been limited to a time resolution of 280 fs fwhm due to timing jitter between the accelerator-based free-electron laser (FEL) and optical lasers. We have implemented a single-shot cross-correlator for femtosecond x-ray and infrared pulses. A reference experiment relying only on the pulse arrival time information from the cross-correlator shows a time resolution better than 50 fs fwhm (22 fs rms) and also yields a direct measurement of the maximal x-ray pulse length. The improved time resolution enables ultrafast pump-probe experiments with x-ray pulses from LCLS and other FEL sources.

Schorb, S.; Cryan, J. P.; Glownia, J. M.; Bionta, M. R.; Coffee, R. N.; Swiggers, M.; Carron, S.; Castagna, J.-C.; Bozek, J. D.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schlotter, W. F.; Bostedt, C. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 20450, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Gorkhover, T. [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Erk, B.; Boll, R.; Schmidt, C.; Rudenko, A. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rolles, D. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. med. Forschung, Jahnstr. 29, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rouzee, A. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

Advanced Research in Diesel Fuel Sprays Using X-rays From The Advanced Photon Source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fuel distribution and degree of atomization in the combustion chamber is a primary factor in the formation of emissions in diesel engines. A number of diagnostics to study sprays have been developed over the last twenty years; these are primarily based on visible light measurement techniques. However, visible light scatters strongly from fuel droplets surrounding the spray, which prevents penetration of the light. This has made quantitative measurements of the spray core very difficult, particularly in the relatively dense near- nozzle region [1-3]. For this reason we developed the x-ray technique to study the properties of fuel sprays in a quantitative way [4]. The x-ray technique is not limited by scattering, which allows it to be used to make quantitative measurements of the fuel distribution. These measurements are particularly effective in the region near the nozzle where other techniques fail. This technique has led to a number of new insights into the structure of fuel sprays, including the discovery and quantitative measurement of shock waves generated under some conditions by high-pressure diesel sprays [5]. We also performed the first-ever quantitative measurements of the time-resolved mass distribution in the near-nozzle region, which demonstrated that the spray is atomized only a few nozzle diameters from the orifice [6]. Our recent work has focused on efforts to make measurements under pressurized ambient conditions. We have recently completed a series of measurements at pressures up to 5 bar and are looking at the effect of ambient pressure on the structure of the spray. The enclosed figure shows the mass distributions measured for 1,2, and 5 bar ambient pressures. As expected, the penetration decreases as the pressure increases. This leads to changes in the measured mass distribution, including an increase in the density at the leading edge of the spray. We have also observed a narrowing in the cone angle of the spray core as the pressure increases. This is counter to visible light spray measurements, and current work is underway in an effort to understand this effect.

Powell, C

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

156

Scientific Needs for Future X-ray Sources in the U.S. -- A White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

knowledge about next-generation sources based on thex-ray beams of a new generation source. Another approach isa number of new third-generation sources, in the upgrade and

Falcone, Roger

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

APS Beamline Questionnaire Form | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Beamline Motor Drive Questionnaire Form APS Beamline Motor Drive Questionnaire Form * indicates required field Please send a separate email to Thomas Barkalow with an attached beamline drawing or sketch showing where the groups are located and the distances they are apart. First Name*: Middle Initial/Name: Last Name*: Beamline Designation*: What is the total number of driver units with makes and models?: How are driver units grouped together and each group's location within the beamline?: What number of driver units are in use simultaneously for each group?: What is the maximum amperage setting actually used for each unit?: What is the number of groups in use simultaneously and which groups are they?: Verification: We need to make sure you are a human. Please solve the challenge below, and click the I'm a Human button to get a confirmation code. To make this

158

APS101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Photon Source User Orientation (APS101) View or print an APS101 study guide (PDF) Take the APS101 Course and Exam Now Take the APS...

159

THE ROLE OF INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING IN SOLAR CORONAL HARD X-RAY AND {gamma}-RAY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

Coronal hard X-ray (HXR) and continuum {gamma}-ray sources associated with the impulsive phase of solar flares have been the subject of renewed interest in recent years. They have been interpreted in terms of thin-target, non-thermal bremsstrahlung emission. This interpretation has led to rather extreme physical requirements in some cases. For example, in one case, essentially all of the electrons in the source must be accelerated to non-thermal energies to account for the coronal HXR source. In other cases, the extremely hard photon spectra of the coronal continuum {gamma}-ray emission suggest that the low-energy cutoff of the electron energy distribution lies in the MeV energy range. Here, we consider the role of inverse Compton scattering (ICS) as an alternate emission mechanism in both the ultra- and mildly relativistic regimes. It is known that relativistic electrons are produced during powerful flares; these are capable of upscattering soft photospheric photons to HXR and {gamma}-ray energies. Previously overlooked is the fact that mildly relativistic electrons, generally produced in much greater numbers in flares of all sizes, can upscatter extreme-ultraviolet/soft X-ray photons to HXR energies. We also explore ICS on anisotropic electron distributions and show that the resulting emission can be significantly enhanced over an isotropic electron distribution for favorable viewing geometries. We briefly review results from bremsstrahlung emission and reconsider circumstances under which non-thermal bremsstrahlung or ICS would be favored. Finally, we consider a selection of coronal HXR and {gamma}-ray events and find that in some cases the ICS is a viable alternative emission mechanism.

Chen Bin [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Bastian, T. S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A compact, sample-in-atmospheric-pressure soft x-ray microscope developed at Pohang Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A full-field transmission soft x-ray microscope (TXM) was developed at the Pohang Light Source. With a 2 mm diameter condenser zone plate and a 40 nm outermost-zone-width objective zone plate, the TXM's achieved spatial resolution is better than 50 nm at the photon energy of 500 eV (wavelength: 2.49 nm). The TXM is portable and mounted in tandem with a 7B1 spectroscopy end station. The sample position is outside the vacuum, allowing for quick sample changes and enhanced in situ experimental capability. In addition, the TXM is pinhole-free and easy to align, having commercial mounts located outside the vacuum components.

Lim, Jun; Shin, Hyun-Joon [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Keun Hwa [Materials Science and Technology Research Division, KIST, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chan-Cuk; Hwang, Han-Na [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Chung Ki [Department of Physics, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

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161

IMPULSIVE PHASE CORONAL HARD X-RAY SOURCES IN AN X3.9 CLASS SOLAR FLARE  

SciTech Connect

We present the analysis of a pair of unusually energetic coronal hard X-ray (HXR) sources detected by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager during the impulsive phase of an X3.9 class solar flare on 2003 November 3, which simultaneously shows two intense footpoint (FP) sources. A distinct loop top (LT) coronal source is detected up to {approx}150 keV and a second (upper) coronal source up to {approx}80 keV. These photon energies, which were not fully investigated in earlier analysis of this flare, are much higher than commonly observed in coronal sources and pose grave modeling challenges. The LT source in general appears higher in altitude with increasing energy and exhibits a more limited motion compared to the expansion of the thermal loop. The high-energy LT source shows an impulsive time profile and its nonthermal power-law spectrum exhibits soft-hard-soft evolution during the impulsive phase, similar to the FP sources. The upper coronal source exhibits an opposite spatial gradient and a similar spectral slope compared to the LT source. These properties are consistent with the model of stochastic acceleration of electrons by plasma waves or turbulence. However, the LT and FP spectral index difference (varying from {approx}0 to 1) is much smaller than commonly measured and than that expected from a simple stochastic acceleration model. Additional confinement or trapping mechanisms of high-energy electrons in the corona are required. Comprehensive modeling including both kinetic effects and the macroscopic flare structure may shed light on this behavior. These results highlight the importance of imaging spectroscopic observations of the LT and FP sources up to high energies in understanding electron acceleration in solar flares. Finally, we show that the electrons producing the upper coronal HXR source may very likely be responsible for the type III radio bursts at the decimetric/metric wavelength observed during the impulsive phase of this flare.

Chen Qingrong; Petrosian, Vahe, E-mail: qrchen@gmail.com, E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu [Department of Physics and KIPAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

162

Development of extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray multilayer optics for scientific studies with femtosecond/attosecond sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

132] J. Arthur. Status of the LCLS x-ray FEL program. Reviewelectron lasers(such as LCLS at Stanford[132]) are expected

Aquila, Andrew Lee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The Role of Inverse Compton Scattering in Solar Coronal Hard X-ray and Gamma-ray Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the role of inverse Compton scattering (ICS) as a means of producing coronal hard X-ray (HXR) and continuum gamma-ray sources during solar flares. Coronal HXR and continuum gamma-ray emission observed during solar flares has been interpreted in terms of thin-target bremsstrahlung emission. In one case, this interpretation leads to the conclusion that the number of energetic electrons required to account for the coronal HXR source must be large, implying that essentially all electrons in the source must be accelerated to energies >~ 16 keV. In other cases, the spectral index of the photon spectrum of gamma-ray sources approaches the theoretical limit for bremsstrahlung emission (alpha ~ 1.5 - 2). Here we investigate ICS in both the fully relativistic and mildly relativistic regimes as an alternative to non-thermal bremsstrahlung. It is known that relativistic electrons are produced during powerful flares; these are capable of up-scattering soft photospheric photons to HXR energies. Previously overl...

Chen, Bin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Toward Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/lcls/papers/syncpanel.pdf. M.F.Coherent Light Source 5 (LCLS) in the United States andwww-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/lcls/ Accelerator 6 (TESLA) in

Chong, Henry Herng Wei

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Schmahl, Kirz Receive Compton Award for Contributions to X-ray Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schmahl, Kirz Received Compton Award for Contributions to X-ray Microscopy Schmahl, Kirz Received Compton Award for Contributions to X-ray Microscopy Image of Compton Award The Advanced Photon Source (APS) and APS Users Organization (APSUO) are very pleased to announce that the 2005 Arthur H. Compton Award was given to Günter Schmahl and Janos Kirz for pioneering and developing the field of x-ray microscopy using Fresnel zone plates. Because of their leadership over the last 30 years, x-ray microscopy has evolved into a powerful method for the study of nanoscale structures and phenomena in many areas of science. Their achievements have opened up productive research avenues in biology, polymers, electronic nanostructures, magnetic materials, meteoritics, and environmental sciences. " Günter Schmahl and Janos Kirz have created a

166

Staff at sector 30, inelastic x-ray scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status and Schedule Safety and Training Divisions APS Engineering Support Division AES Groups Accelerator Systems Division ASD Groups X-ray Science Division XSD Groups...

167

RF and Beam Diagnostic Instrumentation at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linear Accelerator (Linac)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RF and Beam Diagnostic Instrumentation at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linear Accelerator (Linac)

Grelick, A E; Arnold, N; White, M

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Construction, Commissioning and Operational Experience of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linear Accelerator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Construction, Commissioning and Operational Experience of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linear Accelerator

White, M; Berg, W; Cours, A; Fuja, R; Grelick, A E; Ko, K; Qian, Y L; Russell, T; Sereno, N S; Wesolowski, W

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hard Extended X-ray Source in the IC 443 SNR Resolved by Chandra: A Fast Ejecta Fragment or a New Pulsar Wind Nebula?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Chandra observation of the isolated hard X-ray source XMMU J061804.3+222732, located in the region of apparent interaction of the supernova remnant IC 443 with a molecular cloud, resolved the complex structure of the source in a few bright clumps embedded in an extended emission of a ~ 30 arcsec size. The X-ray spectra of the clumps and the extended emission are dominated by a hard power-law component with a photon index of 1.2--1.4. In addition, we see some indications of an optically thin thermal plasma of a ~ 0.3 keV temperature. The observed X-ray morphology and spectra are consistent with those expected for an isolated supernova ejecta fragment interacting with a dense ambient medium. A possible alternative interpretation is a pulsar wind nebula associated with either IC 443 or another SNR, G189.6+3.3.

A. M. Bykov; F. Bocchino; G. G. Pavlov

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Hard Extended X-ray Source in the IC 443 SNR Resolved by Chandra: A Fast Ejecta Fragment or a New Pulsar Wind Nebula?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Chandra observation of the isolated hard X-ray source XMMU J061804.3+222732, located in the region of apparent interaction of the supernova remnant IC 443 with a molecular cloud, resolved the complex structure of the source in a few bright clumps embedded in an extended emission of a ~ 30 arcsec size. The X-ray spectra of the clumps and the extended emission are dominated by a hard power-law component with a photon index of 1.2--1.4. In addition, we see some indications of an optically thin thermal plasma of a ~ 0.3 keV temperature. The observed X-ray morphology and spectra are consistent with those expected for an isolated supernova ejecta fragment interacting with a dense ambient medium. A possible alternative interpretation is a pulsar wind nebula associated with either IC 443 or another SNR, G189.6+3.3.

Bykov, A M; Pavlov, G G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Model for the Origin of High Density in Loop-top X-ray Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Super-hot looptop sources, detected in some large solar flares, are compact sources of HXR emission with spectra matching thermal electron populations exceeding 30 megakelvins. High observed emission measure, as well as inference of electron thermalization within the small source region, both provide evidence of high densities at the looptop; typically more than an order of magnitude above ambient. Where some investigators have suggested such density enhancement results from a rapid enhancement in the magnetic field strength, we propose an alternative model, based on Petschek reconnection, whereby looptop plasma is heated and compressed by slow magnetosonic shocks generated self-consistently through flux retraction following reconnection. Under steady conditions such shocks can enhance density by no more than a factor of four. These steady shock relations (Rankine-Hugoniot relations) turn out to be inapplicable to Petschek's model owing to transient effects of thermal conduction. The actual density enhancemen...

Longcope, D W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Faint X-ray Source Population Near the 3C 295 cluster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a statistical analysis of the Chandra observation of the source field around the 3C 295 galaxy cluster (z=0.46). Three different methods of analysis, namely a chip by chip logN-logS, a two dimentional Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test, and the angular correlation function (ACF) show a strong overdensity of sources in the North-East of the field, that may indicate a filament of the large scale structure of the Universe toward 3C 295.

V. D'Elia; F. Fiore; M. Elvis; M. Cappi; S. Mathur; P. Mazzotta; E. Falco; F. Cocchia

2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beamlines Divisions Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering The Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering group...

174

Single shot spatial and temporal coherence properties of the SLAC linac coherent light source in the hard x-ray regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We measured the transverse and longitudinal coherence properties of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC in the hard x-ray regime at 9 keV photon energy on a single shot basis. Speckle patterns recorded in the forward direction from colloidal nanoparticles yielded the transverse coherence properties of the focused LCLS beam. Speckle patterns from a gold nanopowder recorded with atomic resolution allowed us to measure the shot-to-shot variations of the spectral properties of the x-ray beam. The focused beam is in the transverse direction fully coherent with a mode number close to 1. The average number of longitudinal modes behind the Si(111) monochromator is about 14.5 and the average coherence time {tau}{sub c} = (2.0 {+-} 1.0) fs. The data suggest a mean x-ray pulse duration of (29 {+-} 14) fs behind the monochromator for (100 {+-} 14) fs long electron pulses.

Gutt, C.; Wochner, P.; Fischer, B.; Conrad, H.; Castro-Colin, M.; Lee, S.; Lehmkuhler, F.; Steinke, I.; Sprung, M.; Roseker, W.; Zhu, D.; Lemke, H.; Bogle, S.; Fuoss, P. H.; Stephenson, G. B.; Cammarata, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Robert, A.; Grubel, G. (Materials Science Division); (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron); (Max-Planck-Institut fur Intelligene Systeme); (LCLS, SLAC Nat. Accelerator Lab.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

TOWARD IDENTIFYING THE UNASSOCIATED GAMMA-RAY SOURCE 1FGL J1311.7-3429 WITH X-RAY AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present deep optical and X-ray follow-up observations of the bright unassociated Fermi-LAT gamma-ray source 1FGL J1311.7-3429. The source was already known as an unidentified EGRET source (3EG J1314-3431, EGR J1314-3417), hence its nature has remained uncertain for the past two decades. For the putative counterpart, we detected a quasi-sinusoidal optical modulation of {Delta}m {approx} 2 mag with a period of {approx_equal}1.5 hr in the Rc, r', and g' bands. Moreover, we found that the amplitude of the modulation and peak intensity changed by {approx}>1 mag and {approx}0.5 mag, respectively, over our total six nights of observations from 2012 March to May. Combined with Swift UVOT data, the optical-UV spectrum is consistent with a blackbody temperature, kT {approx_equal} 1 eV and the emission volume radius R{sub bb} {approx_equal} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} d{sub kpc} km (d{sub kpc} is the distance to the source in units of 1 kpc). In contrast, deep Suzaku observations conducted in 2009 and 2011 revealed strong X-ray flares with a light curve characterized with a power spectrum density of P(f) {proportional_to} f {sup -2.0{+-}0.4}, but the folded X-ray light curves suggest an orbital modulation also in X-rays. Together with the non-detection of a radio counterpart, and significant curved spectrum and non-detection of variability in gamma-rays, the source may be the second 'radio-quiet' gamma-ray emitting millisecond pulsar candidate after 1FGL J2339.7-0531, although the origin of flaring X-ray and optical variability remains an open question.

Kataoka, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Maeda, K. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yatsu, Y.; Kawai, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ohokayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Urata, Y.; Tsai, A. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Cheung, C. C. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Totani, T.; Makiya, R. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hanayama, H.; Miyaji, T., E-mail: kataoka.jun@waseda.jp [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 1024-1 Arakawa, Ishigaki, Okinawa, 907-0024 (Japan)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fermi acceleration at fast shock in a solar flare and impulsive loop-top hard X-ray source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose that non-thermal electrons are efficiently accelerated by first-order Fermi process at the fast shock, as a natural consequence of the new magnetohydrodynamic picture of the flaring region revealed with Yohkoh. An oblique fast shock is naturally formed below the reconnection site, and boosts the acceleration to significantly decrease the injection energy. The slow shocks attached to the reconnection X-point heat the plasma up to 10--20 MK, exceeding the injection energy. The combination of the oblique shock configuration and the pre-heating by the slow shock allows bulk electron acceleration from the thermal pool. The accelerated electrons are trapped between the two slow shocks due to the magnetic mirror downstream of the fast shock, thus explaining the impulsive loop-top hard X-ray source discovered with Yohkoh. Acceleration time scale is ~ 0.3--0.6 s, which is consistent with the time scale of impulsive bursts. When these electrons stream away from the region enclosed by the fast shock and the s...

Tsuneta, S; Tsuneta, Saku; Naito, Tsuguya

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

X-ray spectroscopy of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I present work spanning a variety of topics relating to neutron star lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and utilize spectral information from X-ray observations to further our understanding of these sources. ...

Krauss, Miriam Ilana

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

COMPTONIZED PHOTON SPECTRA OF SUPERCRITICAL BLACK HOLE ACCRETION FLOWS WITH APPLICATION TO ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation spectra of supercritical black hole accretion flows are computed using a Monte Carlo method by post-processing the results of axisymmetric radiation hydrodynamic simulations. We take into account thermal/bulk Comptonization, free-free absorption, and photon trapping. We found that a shock-heated region ({approx}10{sup 8} K) appears at the funnel wall near the black hole where the supersonic inflow is reflected by the centrifugal barrier of the potential. Both thermal and bulk Comptonization significantly harden photon spectra although most of the photons upscattered above 40 keV are swallowed by the black hole due to the photon trapping. When the accretion rate onto the black hole is M-dot Almost-Equal-To 200L{sub E}/c{sup 2}, where L{sub E} is the Eddington luminosity, the spectrum has a power-law component which extends up to {approx}10 keV by upscattering of photons in the shock-heated region. In higher mass accretion rates, the spectra roll over around 5 keV due to downscattering of the photons by cool electrons in the dense outflow surrounding the jet. Our results are consistent with the spectral features of ultraluminous X-ray sources, which typically show either a hard power-law component extending up to 10 keV or a rollover around 5 keV. We found that the spectrum of NGC 1313 X-2 is quite similar to the spectrum numerically obtained for high accretion rate (M-dot {approx} 1000L{sub E}/c{sup 2}) source observed with low viewing angle (i = 10 Degree-Sign -20 Degree-Sign ). Our numerical results also demonstrate that the face-on luminosity of supercritically accreting stellar mass black holes (10 M{sub Sun }) can significantly exceed 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}.

Kawashima, T.; Matsumoto, R. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Ohsuga, K. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Mineshige, S.; Yoshida, T.; Heinzeller, D., E-mail: kawashima-t@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

On the Nature of the Gamma-ray Source 2FGL J1823.8 4312: The Discovery of a New Class of Extragalactic X-ray Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the unsolved mysteries of gamma-ray astronomy concerns the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Recently, using the Second Fermi LAT source catalog (2FGL) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) archive, we discovered that the WISE counterparts of gamma-ray blazars, a class of active galactic nuclei, delineate a region (the WISE Gamma-ray Strip) in the 3-dimensional infrared color space well separated from the locus of the other astronomical objects. Based on this result, we built an association procedure to recognize if there areWISE blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty region of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Here we report on our analysis of 2FGL J1823.8+4312, a gamma-ray active galactic nucleus of uncertain type associated with the X-ray source 1RXS J182418.7+430954 according to the 2FGL, to verify whether it is a blazar. Applying our association method we found two sources with IR colors typical of gamma-ray blazars, located within the 99.9% confidence region of 2FGL J1823.8+4312: WISE J182352.33+431452.5 and WISE J182409.25+431404.7. Then we searched in the Chandra, NVSS and SDSS archival observations for their counterparts. We discovered that WISE J182352.33+431452.5, our preferred gamma-ray blazar candidate according to our WISE association procedure, is detected in the optical and in the X-rays but not in the radio, making it extremely unusual if it is a blazar. Given its enigmatic spectral energy distribution, we considered the possibility that it is a 'radio faint blazar' or the prototype of a new class of extragalactic sources, our conclusion is independent of whether WISE J182352.33+431452.5 is the actual counterpart of 2FGL J1823.8+4312.

Massaro, Francesco

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

A robot-based detector manipulator system for a hard x-ray nanoprobe instrument.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the design of a robot-based detector manipulator for microdiffraction applications with a hard X-ray nanoprobe instrument system being constructed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) for the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) being constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Applications for detectors weighing from 1.5 to 100 kg were discussed in three configurations.

Shu, D., Maser, J., Holt, M. , Winarski, R., Preissner, C.,Lai, B., Vogt, S., Stephenson, G.B.

2007-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

X-ray Imaging Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory October 8-9, 2002 Organizers: John Miao & Keith Hodgson A workshop on "X-ray Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future" was held on October 8-9, 2002. This workshop, organized by John Miao (SSRL) and Keith Hodgson (SSRL) provided a forum to discuss the scientific applications of a variety of imaging and spectro-microscopic techniques, including photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), coherent diffraction imaging, x-ray microscopy, micro-tomography, holographic imaging, and x-ray micro-probe. Twelve invited speakers discussed the important scientific applications of these techniques, and also predicted the future scientific directions with the advance of instrumentation and x-ray sources. The workshop was well attended with over fifty registered attendees.

182

X-ray transmissive debris shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

Spielman, R.B.

1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

183

X-ray transmissive debris shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

Spielman, Rick B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

IXS-CDT, APS Sign Memorandum of Understanding for Sector 30  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

27th, 2003 27th, 2003 IXS-CDT, APS Sign Memorandum of Understanding for Sector 30 With strokes from four ceremonial pens, the Inelastic X-ray Scattering Collaborative Development Team (IXS-CDT) became the twenty-second research group to sign up for construction of x-ray beamlines at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source (APS). As the diagram below shows, only 5 of a possible 35 pairs of APS x-ray beamlines remain uncommitted. The September 15, 2003, Memorandum of Understanding signing ceremony formalized the relationship between IXS-CDT and the APS. APS staff will construct the IXS-CDT beamline at sector 30 on the APS experiment hall floor. The IXS sector aims to be the best in the world for inelastic x-ray scattering, a very important application that takes full-advantage of the

185

X-ray Line Profile Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Magnetic Composite Materials X-Ray Studies of Structural Effects Induced by Pulsed (30 Tesla), High Magnetic Fields at the Advanced Photon Source...

186

In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" SESS 2007: The School for Environmental Sciences with Synchrotrons Art and Science A Breakthrough in Interface Science APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots MARCH 11, 2008 Bookmark and Share Research and Design Magazine "The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory has been kept busy of late." That's the first sentence of R&D Magazine's recent overview of research results from the APS. The article highlights "a new ultrafast synchrotron x-ray full-field phase contrast imaging technique and used it to reveal

187

In-line phase-contrast imaging of a biological specimen using a compact laser-Compton scattering-based x-ray source  

SciTech Connect

Laser-Compton scattering (LCS) x-ray sources have recently attracted much attention for their potential use at local medical facilities because they can produce ultrashort pulsed, high-brilliance, and quasimonochromatic hard x rays with a small source size. The feasibility of in-line phase-contrast imaging for a 'thick' biological specimens of rat lumbar vertebrae using the developed compact LCS-X in AIST was investigated for the promotion of clinical imaging. In the higher-quality images, anatomical details of the spinous processes of the vertebrae are more clearly observable than with conventional absorption radiography. The results demonstrate that phase-contrast radiography can be performed using LCS-X.

Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2-5, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Sakai, F. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI), 2-1-1, Yatocho, Nishitokyo, Tokyo 188-8585 (Japan); Mori, K.; Maruyama, K. [Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2, Ami, Inashiki, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Oka, H.; Kimata, T. [St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1, Sugao, Miyamae-ku, Kawasaki City 216-8512 (Japan)

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

X-ray Method Shows How Frog Embryos Could Help Thwart Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanocrystals Grow from Liquid Interface Nanocrystals Grow from Liquid Interface Eleventh Arthur H. Compton Award Announced Borland Awarded ACFA-IPAC'13 Prize for Accelerator Science President Obama at the Advanced Photon Source Von Dreele Receives Hanawalt Award APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed X-ray Method Shows How Frog Embryos Could Help Thwart Disease MAY 20, 2013 Bookmark and Share X-ray phase-contrast tomography: Early frog embryo in cellular resolution (left) and cell and tissue motion captured and visualized using flow analysis (right). Image: Alexey Ershov/KIT From R&D Magazine online: An international team of scientists using a new X-ray method recorded the internal structure and cell movement inside a living frog embryo in greater

189

Soft x-ray scattering facility at the Advanced Light Source with real-time data processing and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the development and characterization of a dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering facility. Capable of operation over a wide energy range, the beamline and endstation are primarily used for scattering from soft matter systems around the carbon K-edge ({approx}285 eV). We describe the specialized design of the instrument and characteristics of the beamline. Operational characteristics of immediate interest to users such as polarization control, degree of higher harmonic spectral contamination, and detector noise are delineated. Of special interest is the development of a higher harmonic rejection system that improves the spectral purity of the x-ray beam. Special software and a user-friendly interface have been implemented to allow real-time data processing and preliminary data analysis simultaneous with data acquisition.

Gann, E.; Collins, B. A.; Ade, H. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Young, A. T.; Nasiatka, J.; Padmore, H. A.; Hexemer, A.; Wang, C. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Yan, H. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Operation of beam line facilities for real-time x-ray studies at Sector 7 of the advanced photon source. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report documents the research accomplishments achieved in the first phase of operations of a new Advanced Photon Source beam line (7-ID MHATT-CAT) dedicated to real-time x-ray studies. The period covered by this report covers the establishment of a world-class facility for time-dependent x-ray studies of materials. During this period many new and innovative research programs were initiated at Sector 7 with support of this grant, most notably using a combination of ultrafast lasers and pulsed synchrotron radiation. This work initiated a new frontier of materials research: namely, the study of the dynamics of materials under extreme conditions of high intensity impulsive laser irradiation.

Clarke, Roy

2003-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

192

APS Director Stephenson Named Argonne Distinguished Fellow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray Technology and Research Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners Scientists Close-In on Artificial Spider Silk Ekiert Earns 2012 APSUO Franklin Award for Studies of Influenza Virus Clever Apes on WBEZ: Breaking the Fossil Record APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed APS Director Stephenson Named Argonne Distinguished Fellow JULY 19, 2012 Bookmark and Share Brian Stephenson Brian Stephenson has been named one of five Argonne National Laboratory Distinguished Fellows for 2012. Stephenson is the Argonne Associate Laboratory Director for Photon Sciences and Director of the U.S. Department

193

A dual-channel, curved-crystal spectrograph for petawatt laser, x-ray backlighter source studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dual-channel, curved-crystal spectrograph was designed to measure time-integrated x-ray spectra in the {approx}1.5 to 2 keV range (6.2-8.2 A wavelength) from small-mass, thin-foil targets irradiated by the VULCAN petawatt laser focused up to 4x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. The spectrograph consists of two cylindrically curved potassium-acid-phthalate crystals bent in the meridional plane to increase the spectral range by a factor of {approx}10 compared to a flat crystal. The device acquires single-shot x-ray spectra with good signal-to-background ratios in the hard x-ray background environment of petawatt laser-plasma interactions. The peak spectral energies of the aluminum He{sub {alpha}} and Ly{sub {alpha}} resonance lines were {approx}1.8 and {approx}1.0 mJ/eV sr ({approx}0.4 and 0.25 J/A sr), respectively, for 220 J, 10 ps laser irradiation.

Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Nilson, P. M.; Storm, M.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Hey, D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Shepherd, R.; Snavely, R. A.; Key, M. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States); King, J. A.; Zhang, B. [Department of Applied Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Stephens, R. B.; Akli, K. U. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Highbarger, K.; Daskalova, R. L. [College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); and others

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

X-ray data booklet. Revision  

SciTech Connect

A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

Vaughan, D. (ed.)

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Initial diagnostics commissioning results for the Advanced Photon Source (APS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Principal diagnostics systems have been installed and nearly all have been commissioned on the subsystems of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) facility. Data have been obtained on beam position, beam profile, current, beam loss rate, and synchrotron radiation monitors on both injector rings and most recently the main 7-GeV storage ring. Results for the 150- to 450-MeV electron beams in the accumulator ring, up to 7 GeV in the injector synchrotron, and 4.5 to 7 GeV in the SR will be presented.

Lumpkin, A.; Patterson, D.; Wang, X. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Total x-ray power measurements in the Sandia LIGA program.  

SciTech Connect

Total X-ray power measurements using aluminum block calorimetry and other techniques were made at LIGA X-ray scanner synchrotron beamlines located at both the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). This block calorimetry work was initially performed on the LIGA beamline 3.3.1 of the ALS to provide experimental checks of predictions of the LEX-D (LIGA Exposure- Development) code for LIGA X-ray exposures, version 7.56, the version of the code in use at the time calorimetry was done. These experiments showed that it was necessary to use bend magnet field strengths and electron storage ring energies different from the default values originally in the code in order to obtain good agreement between experiment and theory. The results indicated that agreement between LEX-D predictions and experiment could be as good as 5% only if (1) more accurate values of the ring energies, (2) local values of the magnet field at the beamline source point, and (3) the NIST database for X-ray/materials interactions were used as code inputs. These local magnetic field value and accurate ring energies, together with NIST database, are now defaults in the newest release of LEX-D, version 7.61. Three dimensional simulations of the temperature distributions in the aluminum calorimeter block for a typical ALS power measurement were made with the ABAQUS code and found to be in good agreement with the experimental temperature data. As an application of the block calorimetry technique, the X-ray power exiting the mirror in place at a LIGA scanner located at the APS beamline 10 BM was measured with a calorimeter similar to the one used at the ALS. The overall results at the APS demonstrated the utility of calorimetry in helping to characterize the total X-ray power in LIGA beamlines. In addition to the block calorimetry work at the ALS and APS, a preliminary comparison of the use of heat flux sensors, photodiodes and modified beam calorimeters as total X-ray power monitors was made at the ALS, beamline 3.3.1. This work showed that a modification of a commercially available, heat flux sensor could result in a simple, direct reading beam power meter that could be a useful for monitoring total X-ray power in Sandia's LIGA exposure stations at the ALS, APS and Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL).

Malinowski, Michael E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ting, Aili (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

2009 Chemistry Nobel to APS Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The First Experiment at the LCLS The First Experiment at the LCLS Linda Young Named to Head X-ray Science Division $7.9 M in ARRA Funding Brings New Instrumentation to the APS Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Earns an R&D 100 Award Winans of XSD Elected to ACS Fellowship APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed 2009 Chemistry Nobel to APS Users OCTOBER 7, 2009 Bookmark and Share Clockwise from top left: Ada Yonath, Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, and Thomas Steitz. All three recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry published papers on their award-winning work based on data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Between them, biochemists Thomas Steitz of Yale University, Ada Yonath of

198

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HARD X-RAY PULSE TIMINGS AND THE LOCATIONS OF FOOTPOINT SOURCES DURING SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

The cause of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares remains the subject of debate. Recently, Nakariakov and Zimovets proposed a new model suggesting that, in two-ribbon flares, such pulsations could be explained by propagating slow waves. These waves may travel obliquely to the magnetic field, reflect in the chromosphere, and constructively interfere at a spatially separate site in the corona, leading to quasi-periodic reconnection events progressing along the flaring arcade. Such a slow wave regime would have certain observational characteristics. We search for evidence of this phenomenon during a selection of two-ribbon flares observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer; the flares of 2002 November 9, 2005 January 19, and 2005 August 22. We were not able to observe a clear correlation between hard X-ray footpoint separations and pulse timings during these events. Also, the motion of hard X-ray footpoints is shown to be continuous within the observational error, whereas a discontinuous motion might be anticipated in the slow wave model. Finally, we find that for a preferential slow wave propagation angle of 25 Degree-Sign -28 Degree-Sign that is expected for the fastest waves, the velocities of the hard X-ray footpoints lead to estimated pulse periods and ribbon lengths significantly larger than the measured values. Hence, for the three events studied, we conclude that the observational characteristics cannot be easily explained via the Nakariakov and Zimovets propagating slow wave model when only angles of 25 Degree-Sign -28 Degree-Sign are considered. We provide suggested flare parameters to optimize future studies of this kind.

Inglis, A. R.; Dennis, B. R. [Solar Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

APS Science 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In my five years as the Director of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), I have been fortunate to see major growth in the scientific impact from the APS. This year I am particularly enthusiastic about prospects for our longer-term future. Every scientific instrument must remain at the cutting edge to flourish. Our plans for the next generation of APS--an APS upgrade--got seriously in gear this year with strong encouragement from our users and sponsors. The most promising avenue that has emerged is the energy-recovery linac (ERL) (see article on page xx), for which we are beginning serious R&D. The ERL{at}APS would offer revolutionary performance, especially for x-ray imaging and ultrafast science, while not seriously disrupting the existing user base. I am very proud of our accelerator physics and engineering staff, who not only keep the current APS at the forefront, but were able to greatly impress our international Machine Advisory Committee with the quality of their work on the possible upgrade option (see page xx). As we prepare for long-term major upgrades, our plans to develop and optimize all the sectors at APS in the near future are advancing. Several new beamlines saw first light this year, including a dedicated powder diffraction beamline (11-BM), two instruments for inelastic x-ray scattering at sector 30, and the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) Nanoprobe beamline at sector 26. Our partnership in the first x-ray free-electron laser (LCLS) to be built at Stanford contributes to revolutionary growth in ultrafast science (see page xx), and we are developing a pulse chirping scheme to get ps pulses at sector 7 of the APS within a year or so. In this report, you will find selected highlights of scientific research at the APS from calendar year 2006. The highlighted work covers diverse disciplines, from fundamental to applied science. In the article on page xx you can see the direct impact of APS research on technology. Several new products have emerged from work at the APS, to complement the tremendous output of work in basic science, which often has payoff in technology but over decades rather than years. Highlights in this report also reflect the relevance of APS work to Department of Energy missions, for example a route to more efficient fuel cells (page xx mr-88-073113) addresses the energy challenge, and natural approaches to cleaning up the environment.

Gibson, J. M.; Fenner, R. B.; Long, G.; Borland, M.; Decker, G.

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

200

X-Ray Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 17, 2009 ... Stress Mapping Analysis by Ray Tracing (SMART): A New Technique ... technique of synchrotron X-ray topography, where a grid made out of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

APS Science 2007.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides research highlights from the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Although these highlights represent less than 10% of the published work from the APS in 2007, they give a flavor of the diversity and impact of user research at the facility. In the strategic planning the aim is to foster the growth of existing user communities and foresee new areas of research. This coming year finds the APS engaged in putting together, along with the users, a blueprint for the next five years, and making the case for a set of prioritized investments in beamlines, the accelerator, and infrastructure, each of which will be transformational in terms of scientific impact. As this is written plans are being formulated for an important user workshop on October 20-21, 2008, to prioritize strategic plans. The fruit from past investments can be seen in this report. Examples include the creation of a dedicated beamline for x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at Sector 8, the evolution of dedicated high-energy x-ray scattering beamlines at sectors 1 and 11, a dedicated imaging beamline at Sector 32, and new beamlines for inelastic scattering and powder diffraction. A single-pulse facility has been built in collaboration with Sector 14 (BioCARS) and Phil Anfinrud at the National Institutes of Health, which will offer exceptionally high flux for single-pulse diffraction. The nanoprobe at Sector 26, built and operated jointly by the Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials and the X-ray Operations and Research (XOR) section of the APS X-ray Science Division, has come on line to define the state of the art in nanoscience.

Not Available

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

X-ray beamsplitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel S. (Mountain View, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Advanced Photon Source (APS) Colloquium Series Video Collection from 2009  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory enables scientists to pursue new knowledge about the structure and function of materials in the center of the Earth and in outer space, and all points in between. The monthly APS Colloquium series brings distinguished scientists in all disciplines to lecture on topics of general interest. Some of these presentations are available as integrated video and slides. The 2009 multimedia presentations available on this website are: 1) Imaging Nano Porous Gold with 2 and 3 Dimensions, David C. Dunand, Northwestern University; 2) Fast Crystals and Strong Glasses, David Weitz, Harvard University; 3) Physical Principles of Skeletal Minerals Revealed with Spectromicroscopy, Pupa Gilbert, University of Wisconsin-Madison; 4) MBE Growth of Ferromagnetic Metal/Compound Semiconductor Heterostructures for Spintronics, Chris Palmstrom, UCLA, Santa Barbara; 5) Searching for Sustainable and "Greener" Li-ion Batteries, Jean-Marie Tarascon, University of Picardie (Aimens) France; 6) Oxide Surfaces, Dr. Laurence Marks, Northwestern University; 7) Spinal Injury: Regeneration, Recovery, and a Possible New Approach, Dr. Avis Cohen, University of Maryland, Department of Biology.

204

X-ray generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

Dawson, John M. (Los Angeles, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Final Report: X-ray Studies of Materials Dynamics at MHATT-CAT Sector 7 , Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report describes the scientific accomplishments that have been achieved with support from grant DE-FG02-03ER46023 during the period 12/01/02 ? 11/30/05. The funding supported a vigorous scientific program allowing the PI to achieve leadership in a number of important areas. In particular, research carried out during this period has opened way to ultrafast dynamics studies of materials by combining the capabilities of synchrotron radiation with those of ultrafast lasers. This enables the initiation of laser-induced excitations and studies of their subsequent dynamics using laser-pump/x-ray probe techniques. Examples of such excitations include phonons, shock waves, excitons, spin-waves, and polaritons. The breadth of phenomena that can now be studied in the time-domain is very broad, revealing new phenomena and mechanisms that are critical to many applications of materials.

Roy Clarke

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

206

Active pixel sensors for X-ray astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An active pixel sensor array, APS-1, has been fabricated for the purpose of scientific x-ray detection. This thesis presents the results of testing the device. Alternate design architectures are explored. Recommendations ...

Cohen, Matthew (Matthew L.)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Linda Young Named to Head X-ray Science Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the APS Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Earns an R&D 100 Award Winans of XSD Elected to ACS Fellowship Gluskin of Photon Sciences named Argonne Distinguished Fellow UChicago...

208

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - SLAC's X-ray Laser Explores...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-ray Laser Explores Big Data Frontier By Glenn Roberts Jr. June 12, 2013 It's no surprise that the data systems for SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser have drawn...

209

Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics  

SciTech Connect

Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R. [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

APS-based Technologies Garner Three R&D-100 Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D logo APS-based Technologies Garner Three R&D-100 Awards R&D logo APS-based Technologies Garner Three R&D-100 Awards Three technologies developed for use at the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory have won R&D 100 awards. The awards are given annually by R&D Magazine to the 100 most significant technical products of the year. X-RAY SCANNING MICROPROBE The hard x-ray scanning microprobe is a noninvasive tool that provides spatial resolution previously unavailable with x-rays, thereby expanding the potential of traditional x-ray techniques. It was developed by Barry Lai, Zhonghou Cai, Jörg Maser, Dan Legnini and Peter Ilinski of the APS Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Collaborative Access Team. Wenbing Yun of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory contributed to the technology.

211

MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH ENERGY COMPONENT OF THE X-RAY SPECTRA IN THE VENUS ECR ION SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be worse for 4 th generation sources using microwaveof next generation superconducting ECR ion sources using

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Rise time measurement for ultrafast X-ray pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Weber, Franz A. (Oakland, CA); Moon, Stephen J. (Tracy, CA)

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

213

Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

214

Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

Haugh, M. J.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

215

Optical systems for synchrotron radiation: lecture 4. Soft x-ray imaging systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The history and present techniques of soft x-ray imaging are reviewed briefly. The physics of x-ray imaging is described, including the temporal and spatial coherence of x-ray sources. Particular technologies described are: contact x-ray microscopy, zone plate imaging, scanned image zone plate microscopy, scanned image reflection microscopy, and soft x-ray holography and diffraction. (LEW)

Howells, M.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Stephen Southworth Elected to APS Fellowship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Physical Society Honors Decker American Physical Society Honors Decker APS Lights the Way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret DCS and APS Sign MOU The APS and the 2012 Argonne Energy Showcase APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Stephen Southworth Elected to APS Fellowship DECEMBER 19, 2012 Bookmark and Share Stephen Southworth Argonne Senior Scientist Stephen Southworth has been named a Fellow of the American Physical Society, an honor limited to no more than one-half of one percent of the society's membership of more than 50,000. He is recognized for "pioneering the development of atomic and molecular spectroscopies with third- and fourth-generation light sources including

217

A High-Throughput 3-D X-ray Microtomography System with Real-Time 3-D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Throughput 3-D X-ray Microtomography System with Real-Time 3-D Throughput 3-D X-ray Microtomography System with Real-Time 3-D Reconstruction A high-throughput x-ray microtomography system (XMS) that can acquire, reconstruct, and interactively display rendered 3-D images of a sample at micrometer-scale resolution within minutes has been developed at Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline 2-BM, which is managed by the Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Collaborative Access Team (SRI-CAT). This system could bring better understanding of an array of scientific and technological problems, ranging from failure in microelectronic devices to structures in biological samples. A rendered image from a three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of a cricket, obtained with the x-ray microtomography system. The image has been digitally cut at different planes to show the internal structures of the cricket's head.

218

Status of the advanced photon source  

SciTech Connect

This report presents general information on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) and then breaks down the APS project into three categories: accelerator systems, experimental facilities, and conventional facilities. The accelerator systems consist of the 7 GeV APS positron storage ring and a 7 GeV positron injector. The experimental facilities include 20 undulator radiation sources and the x-ray beamline components necessary to transport their extraordinarily intense x-ray beams outside the accelerator enclosure. Also included are x-ray beamline components for 20 bending magnet radiation sources. The conventional facilities consist of the accelerator enclosures, a 35,300 m{sup 2} experimental hall to house the x-ray beamlines, an office building for the APS staff and lab/office facilities for the research groups which will construct and operate the first 40 beamlines. APS users are described, and the properties of synchrotron radiation are discussed.

Galayda, J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Gamma Radiation & X-Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays 1. Gamma radiation and X-rays are electromagnetic radiation like visible light, radio waves, and ultraviolet light. These electromagnetic radiations...

220

High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In support of these efforts, we also maintain laboratory x-ray sources from 1 keV to 300 keV, energy and intensity calibration facilities, and a vacuum ...

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

APS: Lighting up the future  

SciTech Connect

Work on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) involves the construction and supporting research and development for a national user facility for synchrotron radiation research in the x-ray region. The facility, when operational in 1997, will provide super-intense x-ray beams for many areas of basic research and will serve the entire US x-ray research community of several thousand users. This paper describes the pertinent features of the design, construction and planned operation of the facility; and the impact quality has had in these areas. In addition, the introduction of several quality management techniques such as total quality management, reliability/availability planning, and user interface are discussed concerning their status and success.

Potent, V.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

X-ray flashes and X-ray rich gamma ray bursts. Memorie della Societa Astronomica Italiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. X-ray flashes are detected in the Wide Field Cameras on BeppoSAX in the energy range 2-25 keV as bright X-ray sources lasting of the order of minutes, but remaining undetected in the Gamma Ray Bursts Monitor on BeppoSAX. They have properties very similar to the x-ray counterparts of GRBs and account for some of the Fast X-ray Transient events seen in almost every x-ray satellite. We review their X-ray properties and show that x-ray flashes are in fact very soft, x-ray rich, untriggered gamma ray bursts, in which the peak energy in 2-10 keV x-rays could be up to a factor of 100 larger than the peak energy in the 50-300 keV gamma ray range. The frequency is ? 100 yr ?1. 1 Fast X-ray Transients/High-latitude X-ray Transients Fast X-ray Transients have been observed with many x-ray satellites. In particular they are seen with x-ray instruments that scan the entire sky on a regular basis. Such events are detected in one sky scan and disappeared in the next, typically limiting the duration to be longer than a minute and shorter than a few hours. For this reason they are called Fast Transients. The first transients

John Heise; Jean In t Z; Peter M. Woods

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The XMM-Newton wide-field survey in the COSMOS field: V. Angular Clustering of the X-ray Point Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first results of the measurements of angular auto-correlation functions (ACFs) of X-ray point sources detected in the XMM-Newton observations of the 2 deg2 COSMOS field (XMM-COSMOS). A significant positive signals have been detected in the 0.5-2 (SFT) band, in the angle range of 0.5-24 arcminutes, while the positive signals were at the 2 and 3 sigma levels in the 2-4.5 (MED) and 4.5-10 (UHD) keV bands respectively. Correctly taking integral constraints into account is a major limitation in interpreting our results. With power-law fits to the ACFs without the integral constraint term, we find correlation lengths of theta_c=1.9+-0.3, 0.8+0.5-0.4 and 6+-2 arcseconds for the SFT, MED, and UHD bands respectively for gamma=1.8. The inferred comoving correlation lengths, also taking into account the bias by the source merging due to XMM-Newton PSF, are 9.8+-0.7, 5.8+1.4-1.7 and 12+-2 h-1 Mpc at the effective redshifts of 1.1, 0.9, and 0.6 for the SFT, MED, and UHD bands respectively. If we include the integral constraint term in the fitting process,assuming that the power-law extends to the scale length of the entire XMM-COSMOSfield, the correlation lengths become larger by 20%-90%. Comparing the inferred rms fluctuations of the spatial distribution of AGNs with those of the underlying mass, the bias parameters of the X-ray source clustering at these effective redshifts are in the range b(AGN)=1.5-4. (Edited to simple ascii.)

Takamitsu Miyaji; Giovanni Zamorani; Nico Cappelluti; Roberto Gilli; Richard E. Griffiths; Andrea Comastri; Guenther Hasinger; Marcella Brusa; Fabrizio Fiore; Simonetta Puccetti; Luigi Guzzo; Alexis Finoguenov

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

224

The XMM-Newton wide-field survey in the COSMOS field: V. Angular Clustering of the X-ray Point Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first results of the measurements of angular auto-correlation functions (ACFs) of X-ray point sources detected in the XMM-Newton observations of the ? 2 deg2 COSMOS field (XMM-COSMOS). A significant positive signals have been detected in the 0.5-2 (SFT) band, in the angle range of 0.5-24 arcminutes, while the positive signals were at the ?2 and ? 3? levels in the 2-4.5 (MED) and 4.5-10 (UHD) keV bands respectively. Correctly taking integral constraints into account is a major limitation in interpreting our results. With power-law fits to the ACFs without the integral constraint term, we find correlation lengths of ?c = 1. ? ? 9 0. ? ? 3, 0. ? ? 8 +0.? ? 5 ?0. ? ? 4 and 6 ? ? 2 ? ? for the SFT, MED, and UHD bands respectively for ? = 1.8. The inferred comoving correlation lengths, also taking into account the bias by the source merging due to XMM-Newton PSF, are rc ? 9.8 0.7, 5.8 +1.4 ?1.7 and 12 2 h?1 Mpc at the effective redshifts of zeff ? 1.1, 0.9, and 0.6 for the SFT, MED, and UHD bands respectively. If we include the integral constraint term in the fitting process, assuming that the power-law extends to the scale length of the entire XMM-COSMOS field, the correlation lengths become larger by ? 20%90%. Comparing the inferred rms fluctuations of the spatial distribution of AGNs ?8,AGN with those of the underlying mass, the bias parameters of the X-ray source clustering at these effective redshifts are in the range bAGN = 1.5 ? 4.

Takamitsu Miyaji; Giovanni Zamorani; Roberto Gilli; Richard E; Andrea Comastri; Gnther Hasinger; Marcella Brusa; Simonetta Puccetti; Luigi Guzzo; Alexis Finoguenov

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Making Silicon Melt in Reverse | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at two U.S. Department of Energy synchrotron x-ray light sources, including the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, has found that silicon, the most...

226

arXiv:1211.0988v1[astro-ph.HE]5Nov2012 On the X-ray emission mechanisms of the persistent source and very  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Subject headings: pulsars: individual (SGR J0501+4516) ­ stars: neutron ­ X-rays: bursts 1. Introduction a narrow range of 2 - 12 s), rapid spin-down rates (5 ? 10-13 - 10-10 s s-1), and intense X-ray bursts) and Mereghetti (2008). Both persistent X-ray emission and bursts are attributed to the decay of extremely strong

Yanikoglu, Berrin

227

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

228

X-Ray Data from the X-Ray Data Booklet Online  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The original X-Ray Data Booklet, published in 1985, became a classic reference source. The online version has been significantly revised and updated to reflect today's science. Hundreds of pages of authoritative data provide the x-ray properties of elements, information on synchrotron radiation, scattering processes, optics and detectors, and other related calculations, formulas, and data tables.

Thompson, Albert C.; Attwood, David T.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Underwood, James H.; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kirz, Janos; Lindau, Ingolf; Pianetta, Piero; Winick, Herman; Williams, Gwyn P.; Scofield, James H.

229

Long-term stability of the APS storage ring  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation synchrotron light source, was commissioned in 1995 at Argonne National Laboratory and has been fully operational for beamline users since 1997. The APS storage ring can accommodate up to 68 user beamlines; about 70% of the available beamlines are currently in use by various collaborative access teams (CATs). The 7-GeV synchrotron light source produces light in the soft to hard x-ray range that is used for research in such areas as x-ray instrumentation; material, chemical and atomic sciences; biology; and geo/soil/environmental sciences. For the successful operation of an x-ray light source such as the Advanced Photon Source, the long-term stability of the concrete floor supporting the beam components and user beamlines is crucial. Settlements impact the orbit and location of the x-ray source points as well as the position of the x-ray beamlines. This paper compares the results of two successive resurveys of the APS accelerator components performed in 1995 and 1998.

Friedsam, H.; Penicka, M.; Error, J.

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Long-term stability of the APS storage ring  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation synchrotrons light source, was commissioned in 1995 at Argonne ''National Laboratory and has been fully-operational for beamline users since 1997. The APS storage ring can accommodate up to 68 user beamlines; about 70% of the available beamlines are currently in use by various collaborative access teams (CATS). The 7-GeV synchrotrons light source produces light in the soft to hard x-ray range that is used for research in such areas as x-ray instrumentation; material, chemical and atomic sciences; biology; and geo/soil/ environmental sciences. For the successful operation of an x-ray light source such as the Advanced Photon Source, the long-term stability of the concrete floor supporting the beam components and user beamlines is crucial. Settlements impact the orbit and location of the x-ray source points as well as the position of the x-ray beamlines. This paper compares the results of two successive resurveys of the APS accelerator components performed in 1995 and 1998.

Friedsam, H.; Penicka, M.; Error, J.

1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

APS Research Fuels Engineering Interest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5th, 2003 5th, 2003 APS Research Fuels Engineering Interest Award-winning research on the characteristics of fuel sprays from injectors is one of the featured articles in the May 2003 issue of Mechanical Engineering and on the Web site of that magazine. The studies, carried out at APS's X-ray Operation and Research beamline 1-BM and the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, revealed startling new information about fuel sprays, including the presence of a shockwave as the spray leaves the injector nozzle. Entitled "Penetrating Vision," the article in Mechanical Engineering, by associate editor John DeGaspari, notes that "an investigative technique using x-rays is causing engine designers to sit up and take notice." In the article, Scott Parrish, General Motors R&D senior research engineer, notes

232

X-ray microtomography  

SciTech Connect

In this tutorial, we describe X-ray microtomography as a technique to nondestructively characterize material microstructure in three dimensions at a micron level spatial resolution. While commercially available laboratory scale instrumentation is available, we focus our attention on synchrotron-based systems, where we can exploit a high flux, monochromatic X-ray beam to produce high fidelity three-dimensional images. A brief description of the physics and the mathematical analysis behind the technique is followed by example applications to specific materials characterization problems, with a particular focus on the utilization of three-dimensional image processing that can be used to extract a wide range of useful information.

Landis, Eric N., E-mail: landis@maine.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maine, 5711 Boardman Hall, Orono, Maine 04469 (United States); Keane, Denis T., E-mail: dtkeane@northwestern.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University (United States); DND-CAT, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Bldg. 432/A002, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

century, light-source user facilities have transformedagreement that a new user facility that provides an array ofon which large-scale user facilities in this domain might be

Arenholz, Elke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Charge-coupled-device/fiberoptic taper array X-ray detector for protein crystallography  

SciTech Connect

A large area, charge-couple-device (CCD) based fiberoptic taper array detector (APS-1) has been installed at the insertion-device beamline of the Structural Biology Center at the ANL Advanced Photon Source. The detector is used in protein crystallography diffraction experiments, where the objective is to measure the position and intensity of X-ray Bragg peaks in diffraction images. Large imaging area, very high spatial resolution, high X-ray sensitivity, good detective quantum efficiency, low noise, wide dynamic range, excellent stability and short readout time are all fundamental requirements in this application. The APS-1 detector converts the two-dimensional X-ray patterns to a visible light images by a thin layer of X-ray sensitive phosphor. The phosphor coating is directly deposited on the large ends of nine fiberoptic tapers arranged in a 3x3 array. Nine, thermoelectrically cooled 1024 x 1024 pixel CCD`s image the patterns, demagnified by the tapers. After geometrical and uniformity corrections, the nine areas give a continuous image of the detector face with virtually no gaps between the individual tapers. The 18 parallel analog signal-processing channels and analog-to-digital converters assure short readout time and low readout noise.

Naday, I.; Ross, S.; Westbrook, E.M.; Zentai, G.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The APS and the 2012 Argonne Energy Showcase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Acoustic Levitation Video Goes Viral Argonne Acoustic Levitation Video Goes Viral "Inside the Advanced Photon Source" Inside the latest Argonne Now APS Director Stephenson Named Argonne Distinguished Fellow Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray Technology and Research Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed The APS and the 2012 Argonne Energy Showcase OCTOBER 1, 2012 Bookmark and Share Francesco De Carlo (at right in blue t-shirt) delighted visitors to the APS Energy Showecase by demonstrating three-dimensional tomography used by researchers at the APS in the search for new, energy-efficient materials.

236

Challenge Met as APS Sends Final Chambers to LCLS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Marriage of Hardware and Hard Work A Marriage of Hardware and Hard Work Shaken but Not Stirred 2008 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award The 2008 3-Way Meeting In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Challenge Met as APS Sends Final Chambers to LCLS MAY 21, 2008 Bookmark and Share The final five (of 40) extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) undulator system have been shipped from Argonne National Laboratory - where the chambers were designed and assembled - to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, where the LCLS "will be the world's first x-ray free electron laser when it becomes operational in 2009. Pulses of x-ray laser light from LCLS will be many

237

ON THE X-RAY EMISSION MECHANISMS OF THE PERSISTENT SOURCE AND VERY LOW FLUENCE BURSTS OF SGR J0501+4516  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here a detailed spectral study of the X-ray emission of the persistent source and the low-fluence bursts of SGR J0501+4516 observed during a deep XMM-Newton observation near the peak of its 2008 outburst. For the persistent emission, we employ a physically motivated continuum emission model and spectroscopically determine important source properties such as the surface magnetic field strength and the magnetospheric scattering optical depth. We find that the magnetar surface temperature near the peak of its activity is 0.38 keV, corresponding to an emission area of 131 km{sup 2} at a distance of 2 kpc. The surface magnetic field strength determined spectroscopically, B = 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} G, is consistent with the dipole field strength inferred from the source spin and spin-down rate. We fit the stacked spectra of 129 very faint bursts with a modified blackbody model and find a temperature of 1.16 keV, corresponding to an emission area of 93 km{sup 2}. We also find evidence for cooling during the burst decay phase.

Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Guever, Tolga [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Kouveliotou, Chryssa, E-mail: linlin@sabanciuniv.edu [Science and Technology Office, ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

238

Kaonic Atom X?ray Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In kaonic atoms energy displacement and broadening of states result from the strong interaction. The most simple kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen and deuterium open the possibility to measure this strong interaction induced shift and width by x?ray spectroscopy. In the SIDDHARTA experiment al LNF (Frascati) the DA?NE electron?positron collider delivers nearly mono?energetic negatively charged kaons from ? meson decay. This unique kaon source is used to form kaonic atoms. New high performance x?ray detectors (silicon drift detectors) arranged in an array allow x?ray spectroscopy with high energy resolution combined with timing capability. High precision x?ray measurements like SIDDHARTA at LNF will open the way to study the low energy regime of the strong force in the antikaon?nucleon interaction. The experiment and its current status is presented in this talk.

J. Marton; on behalf of the SIDDHARTA Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

APS User News-at-a-Glance, Issue 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5; March 1, 2001 5; March 1, 2001 Contents: 1. APS Deputy Director John Galayda Accepts Top LCLS Post Applications Being Taken for Third Neutron and X-ray Summer School APS User Re-training Begins Weekly User Science Seminars Begin March 23 Wanted: APS User Activity Report 2000 Submissions 1. APS Deputy Director John Galayda Accepts Top LCLS Post (Contact: rt@aps.anl.gov) In a February 23, 2001, memo to APS staff, David Moncton announced with "great regret, but also with great expectations" that he had accepted John Galayda's resignation from the APS to take a position as director of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Moncton wrote that "John has made an extraordinary contribution to the APS and to Argonne National

240

Frontiers in X-Ray Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The year 2010 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the optical laser and the first anniversary of the world's first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. This exciting, new accelerator-based source of x-rays provides peak brilliances roughly a billion times greater than currently available from synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, and thus explores a qualitatively different parameter space. This talk will describe the first experiments at the LCLS aimed at understanding the nature of high intensity x-ray interactions, related applications in ultrafast imaging on the atomic scale and sketch nascent plans for the extension of both linac and storage-ring based photon sources.

Linda Young

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

242

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

243

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

244

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

245

ANL/APS/LS-309 Design Calculations for the Advanced Photon Source Safety Shutters P. K. Job, Advanced Photon Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A safety shutter at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a remotely actuated device that prevents a photon beam from traveling down a beamline into an experimental enclosure. All APS safety shutters are designed to be redundant. When the shutter is closed, two shielding blocks are positioned to stop bremsstrahlung and the synchrotron

B. J. Micklich; Intense Pulsed; Neutron Source

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to organize a seven-session Symposium on Neutron and X-Ray ... the advent of new powerful neutron sources such as the Spallation Neutron...

247

X RAY TU E WITH MAGNETI ELE TRON STEERING  

Sandia National Laboratories has created an improved efficiency compact X-ray source to address a wide range ... escape the anode and cause electron h ...

248

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - X-ray Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy technologies. SLAC's unique X-ray facilities - the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) - attract thousands of...

249

[Research at and operation of the material science x-ray absorption beamline (X-11) at the National Synchrotron Light Source]. Progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses three projects at the Material Science X-Ray Absorption Beamline. Topics discussed include: XAFS study of some titanium silicon and germanium compounds; initial XAS results of zirconium/silicon reactions; and low angle electron yield detector.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

(Research at and operation of the material science x-ray absorption beamline (X-11) at the National Synchrotron Light Source)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses three projects at the Material Science X-Ray Absorption Beamline. Topics discussed include: XAFS study of some titanium silicon and germanium compounds; initial XAS results of zirconium/silicon reactions; and low angle electron yield detector.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Directions to the APS User Office | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Directions to the APS User Office Directions to the APS User Office New users must go directly to the User Office when they arrive for their first visit. Current users who have any change in affiliation, visa status, etc., should also check in with the User Office to update their files. From the Argonne Main Gate: Ask for a map at the Main Gate or the Argonne Information Center when you arrive. Follow the signs to the Argonne Guest House. From the Guest House, Building 401 is visible about 0.3 miles (0.5 km) to the southeast. Enter Building 401 by the main steps. In the atrium of Building 401, turn to the left and look for the signs directing you to the User Office (on the first floor). Hours The User Office is open 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday (other times by arrangement in exceptional circumstances).

252

X-ray Security Screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National and International Standards for X-ray Security Screening Applications. Summary: The primary objective of this ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

253

Radiographic X-Ray Pulse Jitter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources. Major components of the machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 60-ns. Each source has the following x-ray parameters: 1-mm-diameter spot size, 4-rad at 1 m, 50-ns full width half max. The x-ray pulse is measured with PIN diode detectors. The sources were developed to produce high resolution images on single-shot, high-value experiments. For this application it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. X-ray pulse jitter is a key metric for analysis of reproducibility. We will give measurements of x-ray jitter for each machine. It is expected that x-ray pulse jitter is predominantly due to PFL switch jitter, and therefore a correlation of the two will be discussed.

Mitton, C. V., Good, D. E., Henderson, D. J., Hogge, K. W.

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Multi-epoch Timing and Spectral Study of the Ultraluminous X-Ray Source NGC 5408 X-1 with XMM-Newton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results of new XMM-Newton observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5408 X-1, one of the few ULXs to show quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO). We detect QPOs in each of four new (~ 100 ks) pointings, expanding the range of frequencies observed from 10 - 40 mHz. We compare our results with the timing and spectral correlations seen in stellar-mass black hole systems, and find that the qualitative nature of the timing and spectral behavior of NGC 5408 X-1 is similar to systems in the steep power-law state exhibiting Type-C QPOs. However, in order for this analogy to quantitatively hold we must only be seeing the so-called saturated portion of the QPO frequency - photon index (or disk flux) relation. Assuming this to be the case, we place a lower limit on the mass of NGC 5408 X-1 of > 800 solar masses. Alternatively, the QPO frequency is largely independent of the spectral parameters, in which case a close analogy with the Type-C QPOs in stellar systems is problematic. Measurement of the s...

Pasham, Dheeraj R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

X-ray chemistry in envelopes around young stellar objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present chemical models of the envelope of a young stellar object (YSO) exposed to a central X-ray source. The models are applied to the massive star-forming region AFGL 2591 for different X-ray fluxes. The total X-ray ionization rate is dominated by the `secondary' ionization rate of H2 resulting from fast electrons. The carbon, sulphur and nitrogen chemistries are discussed. It is found that He+ and H3+ are enhanced and trigger a peculiar chemistry. Several molecular X-ray tracers are found and compared to tracers of the far ultraviolet (FUV) field. Like ultraviolet radiation fields, X-rays enhance simple hydrides, ions and radicals. In contrast to ultraviolet photons, X-rays can penetrate deep into the envelope and affect the chemistry even at large distances from the source. Whereas the FUV enhanced species cover a region of 200-300 AU, the region enhanced by X-rays is >1000 AU. Best-fit models for AFGL 2591 predict an X-ray luminosity LX > 1e+31 ergs/s with a hard X-ray spectrum TX > 3e+07 K. Furthermore, we find LX/Lbol ~ 1e-6. The chemistry of the bulk of the envelope mass is dominated by cosmic-ray induced reactions rather than by X-ray induced ionization for X-ray luminosities LX < 1e+33 ergs/s. The calculated line intensities of HCO+ and HCS+ show that high-J lines are more affected than lower J lines by the presence of X-rays due to their higher critical densities, and that such differences are detectable even with large aperture single-dish telescopes. Future instruments such as Herschel-HIFI or SOFIA will be able to observe X-ray enhanced hydrides whereas the sensitivity and spatial resolution of ALMA is well-suited to measure the size and geometry of the region affected by X-rays.

P. Staeuber; S. D. Doty; E. F. van Dishoeck; A. O. Benz

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Apparatus for monitoring x-ray beam alignment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an x-ray beam in an instrument employing an x-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of x-ray beam intensities from the x-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low x-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high x-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of x-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to x-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the x-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the x-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency.

Steinmeyer, P.A.

1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

257

Engineering, design and construction of the MHATT-CAT Sector at the APS. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

In general the primary mission of MHATT-CAT is to exploit the extraordinary promise of the APS for real-time x-ray studies. Key to this mission is the high brilliance of x-ray beams from APS insertion devices at this third-generation source coupled with its favorable time-structure. Key to this mission also is the rapidly evolving CCD x-ray area and linear detectors. MHATT-CAT scientists have pioneered techniques in real-time x-ray studies using existing synchrotron radiation sources and CCD detectors. Sector 7 (the MHATT-CAT Sector) has been instrumented for time resolved studies and studies in related areas. The plan and elevation views of the optical design of the MHATT-CAT beamlines are detailed in this document.

Lowe, Walter P.

2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

258

Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Yong [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Hutt, Julie A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Padilla, Mabel T. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Gott, Katherine M. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

X-ray compass for determining device orientation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source are disclosed. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. 25 figs.

Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Fitch, J.P.; Everett, M.J.; Colston, B.W.; Stone, G.F.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

X-ray compass for determining device orientation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source.

Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Overview | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Overview: APS Overview: Introduction APS Systems Map LINAC Booster Synchrotron Storage Ring Insertion Devices Experiment Hall LOMs & Beamlines Overview of the APS The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory provides this nation's (in fact, this hemisphere's) brightest storage ring-generated x-ray beams for research in almost all scientific disciplines. Photo: Aerial Photo of APS Aerial photo of the Advanced Photon Source These x-rays allow scientists to pursue new knowledge about the structure and function of materials in the center of the Earth and in outer space, and all points in between. The knowledge gained from this research can impact the evolution of combustion engines and microcircuits, aid in the development of new pharmaceuticals, and pioneer nanotechnologies whose

262

Artifacts of Life to be Studied at the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jeffrey T. Miller Wins Award for Excellence in Catalysis Jeffrey T. Miller Wins Award for Excellence in Catalysis van Veenendaal of X-ray Science Division wins 2009 NIU Presidential Research Professorship 2009 APSUO Compton Award to Grübel, Mochrie, and Sutton New Era of Research Begins as World's First Hard X-ray Laser Achieves "First Light" Unique Uranium Source in Naturally Bioreduced Sediment APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Artifacts of Life to be Studied at the APS JUNE 24, 2009 Bookmark and Share These "duck-billed" axe heads from the late Bronze Age (1500-1200 B.C.), found in the Levant, are among the items that will be studied at the APS. University of Southern California (USC) researchers traveling to the U.S.

263

Video Library | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Media Center: Media Center: Calendar of Events APS News User News Article Archives APS Brochure Annual Reports Posters Podcasts Image Gallery external site Video Library Syndicated Feeds (RSS) Featured Videos: Introduction to the Advanced Photon Source The Advanced Photon Source An introduction and overview of the technology that produces the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those x-rays. Timelapse of the APS construction Building the APS A timelapse video from 1990-1995 that shows the Advanced Photon Source rising from an empty field to become the site of a national synchrotron x-ray research facility. Physics of the Blues Physics of the Blues In looking at commonalities between music and science, former PSC Director

264

Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists Close-In on Artificial Spider Silk Scientists Close-In on Artificial Spider Silk Ekiert Earns 2012 APSUO Franklin Award for Studies of Influenza Virus Clever Apes on WBEZ: Breaking the Fossil Record Gerig to Chair Particle Accelerator School Board A Record Run for the APS X-ray Source APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners MAY 16, 2012 Bookmark and Share Volker Rose with the prototype high-resolution microscope at the nanoprobe beamline on APS Sector 26. Volker Rose, assistant physicist with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science's Advanced Photon Source X-ray Science Division (XSD) and Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) at Argonne National Laboratory is

265

Refractive Optics for Hard X-ray Transmission Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For hard x-ray transmission microscopy at photon energies higher than 15 keV we design refractive condenser and imaging elements to be used with synchrotron light sources as well as with x-ray tube sources. The condenser lenses are optimized for low x-ray attenuation--resulting in apertures greater than 1 mm--and homogeneous intensity distribution on the detector plane, whereas the imaging enables high-resolution (condenser and imaging lenses are being developed. The imaging lenses (compound refractive lenses, CRLs) are made of SU-8 negative resist by deep x-ray lithography. SU-8 shows high radiation stability. The fabrication technique enables high-quality lens structures regarding surface roughness and arrangement precision with arbitrary 2D geometry. To provide point foci, crossed pairs of lenses are used. Condenser lenses have been made utilizing deep x-ray lithographic patterning of thick SU-8 layers, too, whereas in this case, the aperture is limited due to process restrictions. Thus, in terms of large apertures, condenser lenses made of structured and rolled polyimide film are more attractive. Both condenser types, x-ray mosaic lenses and rolled x-ray prism lenses (RXPLs), are considered to be implemented into a microscope setup. The x-ray optical elements mentioned above are characterized with synchrotron radiation and x-ray laboratory sources, respectively.

Simon, M.; Last, A.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Reznikova, E. [Institute for Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Kaiserstrasse 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ahrens, G.; Voigt, A. [Microresist Technology, Koepenikerstrasse 325, 12555 Berlin (Germany)

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

266

High-energy x-ray production with pyroelectric crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The invention of pyroelectric x-ray generator technology has enabled researchers to develop ultraportable, low-power x-ray sources for use in imaging, materials analysis, and other applications. For many applications, the usefulness of an x-ray source is determined by its yield and endpoint energy. In x-ray fluorescence, for example, high-energy sources enable the excitation of the K-shell x-ray peaks for high-Z materials as well as the lower-energy L-shell peaks, allowing more positive sample identification. This report shows how a paired-crystal pyroelectric source can be used to approximately double the endpoint x-ray energy, in addition to doubling the x-ray yield, versus a single-crystal source. As an example of the advantage of a paired-crystal system, we present a spectrum showing the fluorescence of the K shell of thorium using a pyroelectric source, as well as a spectrum showing the fluorescence of the K shell of lead. Also shown is an x-ray spectrum with an endpoint energy of 215 keV.

Geuther, Jeffrey A.; Danon, Yaron [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

2011 U.S. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 13th annual U.S. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering was held June 11 to 25, 2011, at both Oak Ridge and Argonne National Laboratories. This school brought together 65 early career graduate students from 56 different universities in the US and provided them with a broad introduction to the techniques available at the major large-scale neutron and synchrotron x-ray facilities. This school is focused primarily on techniques relevant to the physical sciences, but also touches on cross-disciplinary bio-related scattering measurements. During the school, students received lectures by over 30 researchers from academia, industry, and national laboratories and participated in a number of short demonstration experiments at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS) and Oak Ridge's Spallation neutron Source (SNS) and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) facilities to get hands-on experience in using neutron and synchrotron sources. The first week of this year's school was held at Oak Ridge National Lab, where Lab director Thom Mason welcomed the students and provided a shitorical perspective of the neutron and x-ray facilities both at Oak Ridge and Argonne. The first few days of the school were dedicated to lectures laying out the basics of scattering theory and the differences and complementarity between the neutron and x-ray probes given by Sunil Sinha. Jack Carpenter provided an introduction into how neutrons are generated and detected. After this basic introduction, the students received lectures each morning on specific techniques and conducted demonstration experiments each afternoon on one of 15 different instruments at either the SNS or HFIR. Some of the topics covered during this week of the school included inelastic neutron scattering by Bruce Gaulin, x-ray and neutron reflectivity by Chuck Majkrazak, small-angle scattering by Volker Urban, powder diffraction by Ashfia Huq and diffuse scattering by Gene Ice.

Lang, Jonathan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); te Vethuis, Suzanne [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Synchrotron X-ray Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy; (3) variable kinetic energy X-ray ... advanced materials is critical to the development and optimization of products ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

269

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

270

aps_news_template.qxd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has yet to achieve has yet to achieve the alchemist's dream of turn- ing lead into gold. But a group of researchers using the GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSE- CARS) and High-Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HP-CAT) facilities at the Depar tment of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, may have found a way to tur n ordinar y soft graphite (source of the "lead" found in pencils) into a new, super-hard material that "looks" just like diamond. Using the high-brilliance x-ray beams from the APS, the group discovered that, under extreme pressure, graphite (among the softest of materials and the source of the lead found in pencils) becomes as hard as diamond, the hardest known material. What's more, the new super-hard material can be induced to return to its previous soft state.

271

Temporal multiplexing radiography for dynamic x-ray imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All current x-ray imaging devices acquire images sequentially, one at a time. Using a spatially distributed multibeam x-ray source we recently demonstrated the feasibility for multiplexing x-ray imaging, which can significantly increase the data collection speed. Here we present a general methodology for dynamic x-ray imaging of an object in cyclic motion with temporal multiplexing. Compared to the conventional sequential imaging technique, where 2N-1 phase images are required and N exposures are needed for a single phase image, a temporal multiplexing of dimension 2N-1 can reduce the imaging time by a factor of N while maintaining the temporal resolution.

Cao Guohua [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhang Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhou, Otto; Lu Jianping [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 27599 (United States)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Welcome | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome Aerial view of APS Aerial view of the APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Whether you are a current or potential scientific user of our unique facility or are simply interested in learning more about the APS, we are delighted that you are visiting our website. The APS is funded by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy. We operate a National User Facility that is open to everyone who has a need for extremely brilliant x-ray photon beams. The APS is one of the most technologically complex machines in the world. This premier national research facility provides the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere to more than 5,000 (and growing) scientists from

273

FPGA-based compression of streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data acquisition system to perform real-time background subtraction and lower-level-discrimination-based compression of streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) data from a fast charge-coupled device (CCD) area detector has been built and put into service at the Advanced Photon source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. A commercial frame grabber with on-board field-programmable gate array (FPGA) was used in the design, and continuously processes 60 frames per second each consisting of 1,024 x 1,024 pixels with up to 64512 photon hits per frame.

Madden, Timothy; Jemian, Peter; Narayanan, Surcsh; Sandy, Alec; Sikorski, Marcin; Sprung, Michael; Weizeorick, John

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

274

High-efficiency high-energy Ka source for the critically-required maximum illumination of x-ray optics on Z using Z-petawatt-driven laser-breakout-afterburner accelerated ultrarelativistic electrons LDRD .  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the Science of Extreme Environments LDRD program, a <2 year theoretical- and computational-physics study was performed (LDRD Project 130805) by Guy R Bennett (formally in Center-01600) and Adam B. Sefkow (Center-01600): To investigate novel target designs by which a short-pulse, PW-class beam could create a brighter K{alpha} x-ray source than by simple, direct-laser-irradiation of a flat foil; Direct-Foil-Irradiation (DFI). The computational studies - which are still ongoing at this writing - were performed primarily on the RedStorm supercomputer at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque site. The motivation for a higher efficiency K{alpha} emitter was very clear: as the backlighter flux for any x-ray imaging technique on the Z accelerator increases, the signal-to-noise and signal-to-background ratios improve. This ultimately allows the imaging system to reach its full quantitative potential as a diagnostic. Depending on the particular application/experiment this would imply, for example, that the system would have reached its full design spatial resolution and thus the capability to see features that might otherwise be indiscernible with a traditional DFI-like x-ray source. This LDRD began FY09 and ended FY10.

Sefkow, Adam B.; Bennett, Guy R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

APS Colloquium 2001  

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1 1 The monthly APS Colloquium series is intended for the benefit of the Advanced Photon Source community as well as the Argonne community by bringing distinguished scientists in all disciplines to lecture on topics of general interest. Objectives include the cross-fertilization of research initiatives at various institutions and the identification of possible uses of the Advanced Photon Source. The lecturer is also invited to spend an additional day visiting with scientists at Argonne. LIGO and the Search for Gravitational Waves (Dec. 5) Barry Barish, California Institute of Technology (pdf) Chirped Hard X-ray Pulses and the Frontiers of Ultrafast, Time-Resolved, Macromolecular Crystallography (Nov. 7) Keith Moffat, The University of Chicago (pdf) Proteins Connect Biology, Chemistry, and Physics (Oct. 3)

276

Advanced Photon Source Industrial Liaison Office | Advanced Photon Source  

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Industrial Liaison Office Industrial Liaison Office registration page New to Synchrotron Radiation New to the APS Already a User Advanced Photon Source Industrial Liaison Office APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. We are one of five synchrotron radiation light sources operated as national user facilities by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. The APS is open to everyone who can utilize extremely bright x-ray photon beams for high-value research. This premier national research facility provides these x-ray beams to more than 5,000 scientists from all 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and several foreign countries. These scientists come to the APS from industry, universities,

277

Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications in  

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Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications in Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications in Material Science Thursday, September 6, 2012 - 10:45am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Yijin Liu Seminar There was a revolutionary development of X-ray imaging over the past few decades. The most substantial advancements in this field are closely related to the availability of the new generation of X-ray sources and the advanced X-ray optics. The advanced X-ray Optics along with novel methodology has made it possible to extract information that is related to different interactions between the X-rays and the specimen at very fine spatial resolution. The energy tunability of the X-rays has made it possible to combine the energy scan with imaging technique. And the brilliance of the X-ray source has made it practical for many sophisticated

278

Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of current third generation sources where due to themagnet source at a third generation X-ray synchrotron such

Fischer, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

APS User News, Issue 80  

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Current APS Job Openings -- LSXS 2012, the School on Liquid Surface X-ray Scattering: Theory and Experimental Methods--Deadline August 3 -- HPCAT Workshop on Advances in Matter...

280

Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

few decades. The most substantial advancements in this field are closely related to the availability of the new generation of X-ray sources and the advanced X-ray optics. The...

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Bendable X-ray Optics at the ALS: Design, Tuning, Performance and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-RAY OPTICS AT THE ALS: DESIGN, TUNING, PERFORMANCE ANDat the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of bendable x- ray opticsof a bendable optic used at ALS beamline 5.0.2. The mirror

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

APS User News-at-a-Glance, Issue 37  

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7: June 14, 2006 7: June 14, 2006 Advanced Photon Source www.aps.anl.gov ============================================ CONTENTS MESSAGE FROM MURRAY: APS Upgrade Proposal To Be Completed October 31 SCIENCE NEWS 1 . Featured Organization: Synchrotron-Related Theory Group, X-ray Science Division 2 . Research Highlights FACILITY NEWS 3. Update on XOR Beamline Upgrades: Sectors 1, 11, 12, and 32 4. Reorganization Centralizes Support for User Science 5 . Eighteen Beamlines Open to Partner Users: Proposals Due July 14 6 . Four Join APS Users Organization Steering Committee OPERATIONS NEWS 7 . Fall Schedule Features New Lattice 8 . Electrical Safety Requirements Prompt New Training, Inspections PEOPLE NEWS --Wendy L. Mao, 2006 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award --Gabrielle Long, Division Director, X-ray Science Division

283

Moffat Appointed Senior Advisor for Life Sciences at the APS  

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Gluskin of ASD Elected to AAAS Fellowship Gluskin of ASD Elected to AAAS Fellowship Jacobsen of XSD Elected to American Physical Society Fellowship Chapman of XSD Wins Oxford Cryosystems Poster Prize Office of Science Approves Critical Decision 1 for APS Upgrade Project Argonne Breaks Ground on $34.5M MX Research Facility APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Moffat Appointed Senior Advisor for Life Sciences at the APS NOVEMBER 30, 2011 Bookmark and Share Keith Moffat The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is the Western Hemisphere's most powerful source of x-rays for research. It attracts more than 4,000 users from academia, industry, and government laboratories around the world each year for research in all fields of science. In particular, almost half of

284

Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

Hessler, Jan P.

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

X-Ray Microtomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... generated at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) located at Brookhaven National Laboratory using Exxon's microtomography scanner ...

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Refractive optical elements and optical system for high energy x-ray microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In material science, X-ray radiation with photon energies above 25 keV is used because of its penetration into high density materials. Research of the inner structure of novel materials, such as electrodes in high power batteries for engines, require X-ray microscopes operating in the hard X-ray energy range. A flexible X-ray microscope for hard X-rays with photon energies higher than 25 keV will be realized at the synchrotron source ANKA in Karlsruhe, Germany. The device will use refractive X-ray lenses as condenser as well as objective lenses.

Simon, M.; Altapova, V.; Baumbach, T.; Kluge, M.; Last, A.; Marschall, F.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Vogt, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Microstructure Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Laboratory for Applications of Synchrotron Radiation, Engesser Strasse 15, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Microstructure Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

287

http://www.aps.anl.gov/aps/news/20030616.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Supports SSRL Sub-Picosecond Particle Source Technology Supports SSRL Sub-Picosecond Particle Source The SPPS multilayer monochromator designed and fabricated at the APS. (Courtesy of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory) A new photon source, the Sub-Picosecond Particle Source (SPPS), that promises to image the movement of objects down to the atomic level in subpicosecond time scales will benefit from the contributions of the Advanced Photon Source, the Optics Fabrication and Metrology Group of Argonne's Experimental Facilities Division (XFD), and BioCARS (The University of Chicago). The SPPS is being constructed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL), part of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California. According to the article on the SSRL Web site, the SPPS "will produce and deliver x-rays from bright electron beam pulses. This project provides a fast, relatively inexpensive way to

288

APS News 2005  

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5 5 Physicists describe strange new fluid-like state of matter University of Chicago physicists have created a novel state of matter using nothing more than a container of loosely packed sand and a falling marble. They have found that the impacting marble produces a jet of sand grains that briefly behaves like a special type of dense fluid.Needing very fast, non-invasive tracking of the interior of the sand, the group used used high-speed x-ray radiography taken at 5,000 frames per second, the fastest ever at the Advanced Photon Source. (html) Grants fund collaborations by Argonne and U. of C. scientists using the APS Photo: UofC_logo The University of Chicago's Board of Governors for Argonne National Laboratory has selected seven proposals for 2005 Collaborative Research Seed Grants. Several of these proposals will utilize

289

Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/..delta..E is greater than 10/sup 4/ and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally.

Hill, K.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.; Johnson, L.C.; Liew, S.L.; McGuire, K.; Pare, V.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

APS User News, Special Issue 72  

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SPECIAL ISSUE 72, September 8, 2011 SPECIAL ISSUE 72, September 8, 2011 Message from Eric Isaacs: Stephenson Named APS Director To the APS User Community, I'm extremely pleased to announce that Brian Stephenson has been appointed Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Photon Sciences, effective September 1, 2011. The directorate comprises three research and support divisions centered on Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS). As you know, Brian has been interim ALD for Photon Sciences since October 2010, proving his abilities to lead both the directorate and the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project effort. He is a recognized and widely known world leader in X-ray science with vast knowledge and expertise in synchrotrons, beamlines, and instrumentation. He received an R&D 100 award

291

X-ray Transition Energies Search Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

[skip navigation] X-ray Transition Energies Database Main Page Search for X-ray transition energies by element(s), transition ...

292

ANL/APS/TB-17  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 1 Undulator A Characteristics and Specifications: Enhanced Capabilities Roger J. Dejus, Barry Lai, Elizabeth R. Moog, and Efim Gluskin Introduction The undulator A for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a planar insertion device that will generate high-intensity x-ray radiation in the spectral range 3.2 keV to 45 keV by using the first, third, and fifth harmonics of radiation. The device has been optimized for the APS so that the variation in brilliance is small when tuning from one harmonic energy to the next. This has been achieved by an increase of the magnetic field for a given gap and by allowing a smaller minimum gap when installed in the storage ring. This document describes the modification of the magnetic structure and the enhanced on- axis magnetic fields. The enhanced spectral performance is discussed and illustrated in tuning

293

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - X-ray Vision Exposes Aerosol...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

up exciting possibilities in the study of aerosol dynamics using highly focused X-ray lasers, such as SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). "Our study shows that LCLS can...

294

Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray)...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for General Radiation Safety Installations Using Non-Medical X-Ray and Sealed Gamma-Ray Sources, Energies up to 10 MEV, ANSI Standard N43.3, American National Standards...

295

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - X-ray Laser Takes Aim...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Takes Aim at Cosmic Mystery December 12, 2012 Menlo Park, Calif. - Scientists have used powerful X-rays from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the U.S. Department of...

296

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - X-ray Laser Brings Cellular...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a March experiment indicates it has, for the first time, used an X-ray free-electron laser - SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source - to reconstitute the structure of a G...

297

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - X-ray Laser Research Ranks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

selected science "Breakthrough of the Year": the discovery of what appears to be the Higgs boson. Scientists aimed the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser at thousands of tiny...

298

APS User News-at-a-Glance, Issue 6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6; March 22, 2001 6; March 22, 2001 Contents: 1. Moncton to Lead Argonne's Fourth-Generation Sources Initiative April Shutdown Activities Web-based Graphics Gallery: Resource for Users New User Support Facility Opens One Month Left to Submit User Activity Reports 1. Moncton to Lead Argonne's Fourth-Generation Sources Initiative (Contact: rt@aps.anl.gov) In a memo last Friday to APS employees and the user community, David Moncton announced that he has accepted a position at Argonne National Laboratory as Senior Scientist and Advisor to the Laboratory Director. In this position, he will lead Argonne's Fourth-Generation Source initiative, advise the Laboratory Director on APS issues, and resume his x-ray research career. Consequently, he will be stepping aside as Associate Laboratory Director for the APS on May 1, 2001,

299

Experiment Hazard Class 8.3 - X-Ray Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 - X-Ray Generators 3 - X-Ray Generators Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of X-Ray Generators (other than the APS storage ring). As specified in LMS-PROC-109 a Radiation Generating Device (RGD) must be registered with the Argonne RGD Safety Officer using the ANL-847 form. The RGD will be assigned an inventory number, hazard class, RWP requirement, and inspection and survey frequencies. Experiment Category Experiments the Experiment Hazard Class are always categorized as High Risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - As determined in LMS-PROC-109. Samples chambers and all beam paths are fully enclosed by barriers. Class 2 and higher RGDs require an interlock to fail-safe beam shutter/beam stop or radiation

300

X-ray Based Techniques I - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory we have developed measurement methods and computational...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

HIGH BRILLIANCE X-RAY SCATTERING FOR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BRILLIANCE X-RAY SCATTERING FOR BRILLIANCE X-RAY SCATTERING FOR LIFE SCIENCES (LIX) Group Leader: Lin Yang Proposal Team: O. Bilsel 1 , B. Hsiao 2 , H. Huang 3 , T. Irving 4 , A. Menzel 5 , L. Pollack 6 , C. Riekel 7 , J. Rubert 8 , H. Tsuruta 9 , L. Yang 10 1 University of Massachusetts, 2 Stony Brook University, 3 Rice University, 4 IIT, 5SLS, 6 Cornell University, 7 European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 8 NEU, 9 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, 10 Brookhaven National Laboratory TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES APPLICATIONS ADDITIONAL INFORMATION * Energy range 2-20keV using undulator source. Simultaneous SAXS/WAXS to cover 0.003-3Å -1 at 12keV with 1 micron spot size * Time-resolved solution scattering with resolution of (1) microseconds to milliseconds using continuous-flow mixing (5µm x 10µm spot size) and (2) milliseconds using stopped-

302

High resolution x-ray microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present x-ray images of grid meshes and biological material obtained using a microspot x-ray tube with a multilayer optic and a 92-element parabolic compound refractive lens (CRL) made of a plastic containing only hydrogen and carbon. Images obtained using this apparatus are compared with those using an area source with a spherical lens and a spherical lens with multilayer condenser. The authors found the best image quality using the multilayer condenser with a parabolic lens, compared to images with a spherical lens and without the multilayer optics. The resolution was measured using a 155-element parabolic CRL and a multilayer condenser with the microspot tube. The experiment demonstrates about 1.1 {mu}m resolution.

Gary, C. K.; Park, H.; Lombardo, L. W.; Piestrup, M. A.; Cremer, J. T.; Pantell, R. H.; Dudchik, Y. I. [Adelphi Technology, Inc. 981-B Industrial Road, San Carlos, California 94070 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Institute of Applied Physics Problems, Kurchatova 7, Minsk 220064 (Belarus)

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

Lessening X-ray damage is healthy for protein discovery data too | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The brightness and energy of X-ray beams are critical properties for The brightness and energy of X-ray beams are critical properties for research. The APS Upgrade will make our X-ray beams brighter, meaning more X-rays can be focused onto a smaller, laser-like spot, allowing researchers to gather more data in greater detail in less time. Lessening X-ray damage is healthy for protein discovery data too December 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint New recommendations for using X-rays promise to speed investigations aimed at understanding the structure and function of biologically important proteins - information critical to the development of new drugs. Scientists from two U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories, Argonne and Brookhaven, and the University of Washington, Seattle, evaluated options to remedy problems affecting data collection in their new

304

APS User News-at-a-Glance, Issue 19  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Committee Completes First Meeting 4. Introducing X-ray Operations and Research: "The CAT Formerly Known as SRI" 5. BESSRC Operations Group Joins APS Staff 6. Twelfth User...

305

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Advanced Photon Source 0 Advanced Photon Source A U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences national synchrotron x-ray research facility Search Button About Welcome Overview Visiting the APS Mission & Goals Find People Organization Charts Committees Job Openings User Information Prospective Users New Users Current Users APS User Portal Macromolecular Crystallographers Administrators Find a Beamline Apply for Beam Time Contacts Calendars Community Scientific Access Site Access Training Science & Education Science & Research Highlights Conferences Seminars Publications Annual Reports APS Upgrade Courses and Schools Graduate Programs Scientific Software Media Center Calendar of Events APS News User News Argonne/APS Press Releases Argonne/APS Feature Stories Argonne/APS In The News

306

X-ray afterglows from gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider possible interpretations of the recently detected X- ray afterglow from the gamma-ray burst source GRB 970228. Cosmological and Galactic models of gamma-ray bursts predict different flux and spectral evolution of X-ray afterglows. We show that models based on adiabatic expansion of relativistic forward shocks require very efficient particle energization or post-burst re-acceleration during the expansion. Cooling neutron star models predict a very distinctive spectral and flux evolution that can be tested in current X-ray data.

M. Tavani

1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

307

Direct three-dimensional coherently scattered x-ray microtomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: It has been shown that coherently scattered x rays can be used to discriminate and identify specific components in a mixture of low atomic weight materials. The authors demonstrated a new method of doing coherently scattered x-ray tomography with a thin sheet of x ray. Methods: A collimated x-ray fan-beam, a parallel polycapillary collimator, and a phantom consisting of several biocompatible materials of low attenuation-based contrast were used to investigate the feasibility of the method. Because of the particular experimental setup, only the phantom translation perpendicular to the x-ray beam is needed and, thus, there is no need of Radon-type tomographic reconstruction, except for the correction of the attenuation to the primary and scattered x rays, which was performed by using a conventional attenuation-based tomographic image data set. The coherent scatter image contrast changes with momentum transfer among component materials in the specimen were investigated with multiple x-ray sources with narrow bandwidth spectra generated with anode and filter combinations of Cu/Ni (8 keV), Mo/Zr (18 keV), and Ag/Pd (22 keV) and at multiple scatter angles by orienting the detector and polycapillary collimator at different angles to the illuminating x ray. Results: The contrast among different materials changes with the x-ray source energy and the angle at which the image was measured. The coherent scatter profiles obtained from the coherent scatter images are consistent with the published results. Conclusions: This method can be used to directly generate the three-dimensional coherent scatter images of small animal, biopsies, or other small objects with low atomic weight biological or similar synthetic materials with low attenuation contrast. With equipment optimized, submillimeter spatial resolution may be achieved.

Cui Congwu; Jorgensen, Steven M.; Eaker, Diane R.; Ritman, Erik L. [Department of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Alfred Building 2-409, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Novel Insertion Devices at the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agenda Insertion Device Workshop Thursday 5 Dec. 2002. Bldg. 402 E1100/1200 Click on link to see presentation slides. 8:50 .... Welcome J. Murray Gibson 9:00 .... Current APS Insertion Devices Roger Dejus 9:35 .... New Possibilities for IDs at the APS Shigemi Sasaki 10:10 .... Superconductiong Undulator Possibilities Bob Kustom . 10:30 .... Break . . 10:55 Superconductive cryogen-free in-vacuo undulators for storage rings Robert Rossmanith 11:10 .... A novel type of undulator Gopal Shenoy 11:30 .... APS storage ring considerations Nick Sereno/Glenn Decker . 12:00 .... Lunch . .... . Insertion Devices at other Sources 1:30 .... IDs elsewere I: ESRF Joel Chavanne 2:15 .... IDs elsewhere II: ELETTRA Bruno Diviacco . 3:00 .... Break . . .... . User Requirements and Desires 3:30 .... E. E. Alp (Inelastic X-ray scattering)

309

Synchrotron X-ray Applications Toward an Understanding of Elastic Anisotropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wang at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne NationalID-B (HPCAT) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at ArgonneLight Source (ALS) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Swiss Light

Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hard X-ray Variability of AGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims: Active Galactic Nuclei are known to be variable throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. An energy domain poorly studied in this respect is the hard X-ray range above 20 keV. Methods: The first 9 months of the Swift/BAT all-sky survey are used to study the 14 - 195 keV variability of the 44 brightest AGN. The sources have been selected due to their detection significance of >10 sigma. We tested the variability using a maximum likelihood estimator and by analysing the structure function. Results: Probing different time scales, it appears that the absorbed AGN are more variable than the unabsorbed ones. The same applies for the comparison of Seyfert 2 and Seyfert 1 objects. As expected the blazars show stronger variability. 15% of the non-blazar AGN show variability of >20% compared to the average flux on time scales of 20 days, and 30% show at least 10% flux variation. All the non-blazar AGN which show strong variability are low-luminosity objects with L(14-195 keV) < 1E44 erg/sec. Conclusions: Concerning the variability pattern, there is a tendency of unabsorbed or type 1 galaxies being less variable than the absorbed or type 2 objects at hardest X-rays. A more solid anti-correlation is found between variability and luminosity, which has been previously observed in soft X-rays, in the UV, and in the optical domain.

V. Beckmann; S. D. Barthelmy; T. J. -L. Courvoisier; N. Gehrels; S. Soldi; J. Tueller; G. Wendt

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Kinoform optics applied to X-ray photon correlation specroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moderate-demagnification higher-order silicon kinoform focusing lenses have been fabricated to facilitate small-angle X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) experiments. The geometric properties of such lenses, their focusing performance and their applicability for XPCS measurements are described. It is concluded that one-dimensional vertical X-ray focusing via silicon kinoform lenses significantly increases the usable coherent flux from third-generation storage-ring light sources for small-angle XPCS experiments.

Sandy, A.R.; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Narayanan, S.; Sprung, M.; Su, J.D; Isakovic, A.F.; Stein, A.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of phase transitions and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline materials at high pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unlike the Advanced Photon Source (APS) or the StanfordReport ANL/APS/TB-30, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne

Prilliman, Gerald Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

APS Beamline 6-ID-B,C  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B,C Home B,C Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info Beamline 6-ID-B,C Beamline 6-ID-B,C is operated by the Magnetic Materials Group in the X-ray Science Division (XSD) of the Advanced Photon Source. Research on this beamline centers on general x-ray scattering studies of materials. The beamline has 2 end-stations: 6-ID-B: Psi -Diffractomter & In-Field Studies 6-ID-C: UHV in-situ growth Recent Research Highlights LSMO pictures Searching for Next-Generation Electronic Materials December 14, 2009 A new class of layered oxide materials discovered thanks to research at the beamline 6-ID-B offers scientists unprecedented opportunities for creating the next generation of electronic devices. Local Contact: Phil Ryan Local Contacts: Philip Ryan (Surface Diffraction) 630.252.0252 ryan@aps.anl.gov

314

APS Beamline 6-ID-D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MM-Group Home MM-Group Home MMG Advisory Committees 6-ID-D Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info Beamline 6-ID-D Beamline 6-ID-D is operated by the Magnetic Materials Group in the X-ray Science Division (XSD) of the Advanced Photon Source. This is a high energy (50 - 130 keV) beamline used for structural studies primarily on single crystal materials. Recent Research Highlights LuFeO Unlikely route to ferroelectricity May 16, 2012 A new type of ferroelectric, LuO2Fe4, has been investigated at the APS by a research team from Julich research center. XAS & XMCD studies on beamline 4-ID-C determined the Fe magnetism and valence, while single crystal x-ray scattering measurements at 6-ID-B & 6-ID-D probed the associated structural and charge ordering.

315

Photon Sciences | Beamlines | SRX: Submicron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRX: Submicron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy SRX: Submicron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy Poster | Fact Sheet | Preliminary Design Report Scientific Scope Scientific communities such as environmental sciences, life sciences, and material sciences have identified the need to develop analytical resources to advance the understanding of complex natural and engineered systems that are heterogeneous on the micron to nanometer scale. These needs for high intensity x-ray nanoprobes resulted in the commitment of the NSLS-II Project to build the Submicron Resolution X-ray (SRX) Spectroscopy beamline showing a unique combination of high spectral resolution over a very broad energy range and very high beam intensity in a sub-micrometer spot. NSLS-II will provide one of the best sources in the world for such an instrument.

316

Three Dimensional X-Ray Scanning Micro/Nano-Diffraction Probe ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Magnetic Composite Materials X-Ray Studies of Structural Effects Induced by Pulsed (30 Tesla), High Magnetic Fields at the Advanced Photon Source...

317

Using High Energy X-ray Experiments and Crystal-Based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Magnetic Composite Materials X-Ray Studies of Structural Effects Induced by Pulsed (30 Tesla), High Magnetic Fields at the Advanced Photon Source...

318

Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by an intense ultrashort laser pulse, Science, vol. 298,generated from intense laser-plasma interactions, Appl.monochromatic x-rays in the laser synchrotron source

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Stress Management: X-Rays Reveal Si Thin-Film Defects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stress Management: X-Rays Reveal Si Thin-Film Defects. ... Advanced Photon Source, and supported in part by the Department of Energy. ...

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

320

Advanced Data Analysis Tools for World-Wide X-ray ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of ifeffit, a multi-platform, open-source XAS data analysis software ... The energy dependent interaction of the intense synchrotron X-ray beam with ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Microgap x-ray detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Chest x-Rays | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chest x-Rays Chest x-Rays Chest x-Rays Chest X-ray B-Reading The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica. The B-reading is considered a special reading because doctors who are certified by NIOSH to perform B-readings use a specific protocol to read and record the findings as developed by the International Labour Organization (ILO). The ILO's protocol provides rules for systematically examining the x-ray in a step-by-step method and recording certain abnormalities or changes on the chest x-ray that can be attributable to

323

Spectral analysis of X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I present work from three separate research projects associated with observations of X-ray binaries. Two of those revolve around spectral characteristics of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), ...

Fridriksson, Joel Karl

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

ON THE X-RAY OUTBURSTS OF TRANSIENT ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS  

SciTech Connect

We show that the X-ray outburst light curves of four transient anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), namely, XTE J1810-197, SGR 0501+4516, SGR 1627-41, and CXOU J164710.2-455216, can be produced by the fallback disk model that was also applied to the outburst light curves of persistent AXPs and SGRs in our earlier work. The model solves the diffusion equation for the relaxation of a disk that has been pushed back by a soft gamma-ray burst. The sets of main disk parameters used for these transient sources are very similar to each other and to those employed in our earlier models of persistent AXPs and SGRs. There is a characteristic difference between the X-ray outburst light curves of transient and persistent sources. This can be explained by the differences in the disk surface density profiles of the transient and persistent sources in quiescence indicated by their quiescent X-ray luminosities. Our results imply that a viscous disk instability operating at a critical temperature in the range of {approx}1300-2800 K is a common property of all fallback disks around AXPs and SGRs. The effect of the instability is more pronounced and starts earlier for the sources with lower quiescent luminosities, which leads to the observable differences in the X-ray enhancement light curves of transient and persistent sources. A single active disk model with the same basic disk parameters can account for the enhancement phases of both transient and persistent AXPs and SGRs. We also present a detailed parameter study to show the effects of disk parameters on the evolution of the X-ray luminosity of AXPs and SGRs in the X-ray enhancement phases.

Cal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Sirin; Ertan, Uenal [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul, 34956 (Turkey)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

325

X-ray scattering studies of structure and dynamics of surfaces and interfaces of polymeric liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8-ID at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National8-ID-I at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National

Jiang, Zhang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light. However, it has been unclear whether similar optical control schemes could be used to modify how x rays interact with matter. In a dramatic breakthrough demonstration at the ALS, a Berkeley Lab-Argonne National Laboratory group has now used powerful visible-light lasers to render a nominally opaque material transparent to x rays. While x-ray transparency will have immediate applications at x-ray light sources, the important result is that the findings lay a foundation for a broader spectrum of applications.

327

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light. However, it has been unclear whether similar optical control schemes could be used to modify how x rays interact with matter. In a dramatic breakthrough demonstration at the ALS, a Berkeley Lab-Argonne National Laboratory group has now used powerful visible-light lasers to render a nominally opaque material transparent to x rays. While x-ray transparency will have immediate applications at x-ray light sources, the important result is that the findings lay a foundation for a broader spectrum of applications.

328

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light. However, it has been unclear whether similar optical control schemes could be used to modify how x rays interact with matter. In a dramatic breakthrough demonstration at the ALS, a Berkeley Lab-Argonne National Laboratory group has now used powerful visible-light lasers to render a nominally opaque material transparent to x rays. While x-ray transparency will have immediate applications at x-ray light sources, the important result is that the findings lay a foundation for a broader spectrum of applications.

329

Low dose hard x-ray contact microscopy assisted by a photoelectric conversion layer  

SciTech Connect

Hard x-ray contact microscopy provides images of dense samples at resolutions of tens of nanometers. However, the required beam intensity can only be delivered by synchrotron sources. We report on the use of a gold photoelectric conversion layer to lower the exposure dose by a factor of 40 to 50, allowing hard x-ray contact microscopy to be performed with a compact x-ray tube. We demonstrate the method in imaging the transmission pattern of a type of hard x-ray grating that cannot be fitted into conventional x-ray microscopes due to its size and shape. Generally the method is easy to implement and can record images of samples in the hard x-ray region over a large area in a single exposure, without some of the geometric constraints associated with x-ray microscopes based on zone-plate or other magnifying optics.

Gomella, Andrew; Martin, Eric W.; Lynch, Susanna K.; Wen, Han [Imaging Physics Laboratory, Biophysics and Biochemistry Center, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892 (United States); Morgan, Nicole Y. [Intramural Research Programs, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

Le Gros, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Larabell, Carolyn A. (Berkeley, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

331

Water destruction by X-rays in young stellar objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the H2O chemistry in star-forming environments under the influence of a central X-ray source and a central far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation field. The gas-phase water chemistry is modeled as a function of time, hydrogen density and X-ray flux. To cover a wide range of physical environments, densities between n_H = 10^4-10^9 cm^-3 and temperatures between T = 10-1000 K are studied. Three different regimes are found: For T water abundance is of order 10^-7-10^-6 and can be somewhat enhanced or reduced due to X-rays, depending on time and density. For 100 K 10^-3 ergs s-1 cm^-2 (t = 10^4 yrs) and for F_X > 10^-4 ergs s^-1 cm^-2 (t = 10^5 yrs). At higher temperatures (T > 250 K) and hydrogen densities, water can persist with x(H2O) ~ 10^-4 even for high X-ray fluxes. The X-ray and FUV models are applied to envelopes around low-mass Class 0 and I young stellar objects (YSOs). Water is destroyed in both Class 0 and I envelopes on relatively short timescales (t ~ 5000 yrs) for realistic X-ray fluxes, although the effect is less prominent in Class 0 envelopes due to the higher X-ray absorbing densities there. FUV photons from the central source are not effective in destroying water. The average water abundance in Class I sources for L_X > 10^27 ergs s^-1 is predicted to be x(H2O) < 10^-6.

P. Stauber; J. K. Jorgensen; E. F. van Dishoeck; S. D. Doty; A. O. Benz

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

332

MBA-SourceProperties.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

source change my x-ray beam Jonathan L ang Advanced P hoton S ource APS Upgrade - MBA Lattice * What i s e mi7ance? * I d on't n eed a s mall b eam a ll t he me ( the b eam w...

333

APS News Articles 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Physicists Challenge Reports of Accelerated Decay of Nuclear Excited State (Aug. 17) Using the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, which has more than 100,000 times higher X-ray...

334

http://www.aps.anl.gov/aps/news/20030605b.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Fuels Engineering Interest Research Fuels Engineering Interest Award-winning research on the characteristics of fuel sprays from injectors is one of the featured articles in the May 2003 issue of Mechanical Engineering and on the Web site of that magazine. The studies, carried out at APS's X-ray Operation and Research beamline 1-BM and the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, revealed startling new information about fuel sprays, including the presence of a shockwave as the spray leaves the injector nozzle. Entitled "Penetrating Vision," the article in Mechanical Engineering, by associate editor John DeGaspari, notes that "an investigative technique using x-rays is causing engine designers to sit up and take notice." In the article, Scott Parrish, General Motors R&D senior research engineer, notes that "Many applications that

335

New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution better than 25 nm. Limiting factors for Stardust STXM analyses were self-imposed limits of photon dose due to radiation damage concerns, and significant attenuation of <1500 eV X-rays by {approx}80{micro}m thick, {approx}25 mg/cm{sup 3} density silica aerogel capture medium. In practice, the ISPE team characterized the major, light elements using STXM (O, Mg, Al, Si) and the heavier minor and trace elements using SXRF. The two data sets overlapped only with minor Fe and Ni ({approx}1% mass abundance), providing few quantitative cross-checks. New improved standards for cross calibration are essential for consortium-based analyses of Stardust interstellar and cometary particles, IDPs. Indeed, they have far reaching application across the whole synchrotron-based analytical community. We have synthesized three ALD multilayers simultaneously on silicon nitride membranes and silicon and characterized them using RBS (on Si), XRF (on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and STXM/XAS (holey Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). The systems we have started to work with are Al-Zn-Fe and Y-Mg-Er. We have found these ALD multi-layers to be uniform at {micro}m- to nm scales, and have found excellent consistency between four analytical techniques so far. The ALD films can also be used as a standard for e-beam instruments, eg., TEM EELS or EDX. After some early issues with the consistency of coatings to the back-side of the membrane windows, we are confident to be able to show multi-analytical agreement to within 10%. As the precision improves, we can use the new standards to verify or improve the tabulated cross-sections.

Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

336

Secretary Chu Dedicates World's Most Powerful X-ray Laser | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dedicates World's Most Powerful X-ray Laser Dedicates World's Most Powerful X-ray Laser Secretary Chu Dedicates World's Most Powerful X-ray Laser August 16, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today dedicated the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first and most powerful X-ray laser, at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The LCLS will play an essential role in addressing the scientific needs of the 21st century by exploring new ways to create better energy sources and enabling advances in a range of scientific fields. The LCLS produces pulses of X-rays more than a billion times brighter than the most powerful existing sources. The ultrafast X-ray pulses are used much like flashes from a high-speed strobe light, enabling scientists to take

337

Formation and destruction of jets in X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron-star and black-hole X-ray binaries (XRBs) exhibit radio jets, whose properties depend on the X-ray spectral state and history of the source. In particular, black-hole XRBs emit compact, steady radio jets when they are in the so-called hard state, the jets become eruptive as the sources move toward the soft state, disappear in the soft state, and re-appear when the sources return to the hard state. On the other hand, jets from neutron-star X-ray binaries are typically weaker radio emitters than the black-hole ones at the same X-ray luminosity and in some cases radio emission is detected in the soft state. Significant phenomenology has been accumulated so far regarding the spectral states of neutron-star and black-hole XRBs, and there is general agreement about the type of the accretion disk around the compact object in the various spectral states. Our aim is to investigate whether the phenomenology regarding the X-ray emission on one hand and the jet appearance and disappearance on the other can be put...

Kylafis, N D; Kazanas, D; Christodoulou, D M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Tokamak physics studies using x-ray diagnostic methods  

SciTech Connect

X-ray diagnostic measurements have been used in a number of experiments to improve our understanding of important tokamak physics issues. The impurity content in TFTR plasmas, its sources and control have been clarified through soft x-ray pulse-height analysis (PHA) measurements. The dependence of intrinsic impurity concentrations and Z/sub eff/ on electron density, plasma current, limiter material and conditioning, and neutral-beam power have shown that the limiter is an important source of metal impurities. Neoclassical-like impurity peaking following hydrogen pellet injection into Alcator C and a strong effect of impurities on sawtooth behavior were demonstrated by x-ray imaging (XIS) measurements. Rapid inward motion of impurities and continuation of m = 1 activity following an internal disruption were demonstrated with XIS measurements on PLT using injected aluminum to enhance the signals. Ion temperatures up to 12 keV and a toroidal plasma rotation velocity up to 6 x 10/sup 5/ m/s have been measured by an x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) with up to 13 MW of 85-keV neutral-beam injection in TFTR. Precise wavelengths and relative intensities of x-ray lines in several helium-like ions and neon-like ions of silver have been measured in TFTR and PLT by the XCS. The data help to identify the important excitation processes predicted in atomic physics. Wavelengths of n = 3 to 2 silver lines of interest for x-ray lasers were measured, and precise instrument calibration techniques were developed. Electron thermal conductivity and sawtooth dynamics have been studied through XIS measurements on TFTR of heat-pulse propagation and compound sawteeth. A non-Maxwellian electron distribution function has been measured, and evidence of the Parail-Pogutse instability identified by hard x-ray PHA measurements on PLT during lower-hybrid current-drive experiments.

Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Fredrickson, E.; Hsuan, H.; McGuire, K.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Sesnic, S.; Stevens, J.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Workshop on Time Domain Science Using X-ray Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Resolved Beamlines Time-Resolved Beamlines Advisory Committee Workshop Home Workshop Chairs: Lin Chen (Argonne National Laboratory) Steve Milton (Advanced Photon Source) David Reis (University of Michigan) Linda Young (Argonne National Laboratory) Workshop on Time Domain Science Using X-ray Techniques August 29 September 1, 2004, The Abbey, Fontana, Lake Geneva Area, Wisconsin A workshop on "Time Domain Science Using X-ray Techniques" was held from August 29 September 1, 2004 , welcoming both experts and beginners in the field. This is one of the concurrently held workshops in the series on "Future Scientific Directions for the Advanced Photon Source." The goal of the workshop was to identify future directions in scientific research using time resolved x-ray techniques and to address possiblities to produce ps

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Combining High-Energy X-Ray Tomography and Diffraction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent developments at the 1-ID beamline of the Advanced Photon Source will be ... Use of the APS was supported by the DOE/BES under Contract No.

342

3-D Materials Science using Polychromatic Synchrotron X-Ray ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... beamline with submicron spatial resolution at the Advanced Photon Source. ... Sciences and Engineering Division; UNI-XOR support at APS by DOE-BES.

343

Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment marks the basic unit for magnetic properties of matter. Magnetism, in particular ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism is described by a collective order of these spins, where the interaction between individual spins reflects a competition between exchange, anisotropy and dipolar energy terms. As a result the energetically favored ground state of a ferromagnetic system is a rather complex spin configuration, the magnetic domain structure. Magnetism is one of the eldest scientific phenomena, yet it is one of the most powerful and versatile utilized physical effects in modern technologies, such as in magnetic storage and sensor devices. To achieve highest storage density, the relevant length scales, such as the bit size in disk drives is now approaching the nanoscale and as such further developments have to deal with nanoscience phenomena. Advanced characterization tools are required to fully understand the underlying physical principles. Magnetic microscopes using polarized soft X-rays offer a close-up view into magnetism with unique features, these include elemental sensitivity due to X-ray magnetic dichroism effects as contrast mechanism, high spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art X-ray optics and fast time resolution limited by the inherent time structure of current X-ray sources, which will be overcome with the introduction of ultrafast and high brilliant X-ray sources.

Fischer, Peter

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Neutron and X-Ray Scattering - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home Neutron and X-Ray Scattering Neutron and X-ray Scattering Science Recent advances in neutron and x-ray scattering instrumentation at major DOE facilities such as the Spallation Neutron Source and Advanced Photon Source provide unprecedented insights into complex phenomena in bulk and interfacial materials. The vision of our group is to harness the complementarity of neutrons and x-rays to study how materials respond on a range of length and time scales to phase competition, so that we can learn to control emergent behavior and generate functional properties in energy-related materials. We use neutrons and x-rays to investigate the structure and dynamics of bulk and interfacial materials with properties that are useful for energy applications, such as superconductivity, magnetism and thermoelectricity. Phase competition can generate or enhance such properties, but it is extremely challenging to characterize fluctuations in the competing order, whether in bulk disordered materials, or artificial heterostructures. Our goal is to utilize efficient techniques that we have been developing for measuring nanoscale phase fluctuations, both static and dynamic, to enable the rational design of new materials for energy within MSD.

345

Fast synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the rod packing structures  

SciTech Connect

We present a fast synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the packing structures of rods under tapping. Utilizing the high flux of the X-rays generated from the third-generation synchrotron source, we can complete a tomography scan within several seconds, after which the three-dimensional (3D) packing structure can be obtained for the subsequent structural analysis. Due to the high-energy nature of the X-ray beam, special image processing steps including image phase-retrieval has been implemented. Overall, this study suggests the possibility of acquiring statistically significant static packing structures within a reasonable time scale using high-intensity X-ray sources.

Zhang Xiaodan; Xia Chengjie; Sun Haohua; Wang Yujie [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

346

**TITLE** ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, **PUBLICATION YEAR** **EDITORS** X-ray Transients from X-ray Binaries to Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We discuss three classes of x-ray transients to highlight three new types of transients found with the Wide Field Cameras onboard BeppoSAX. First there are the transients related to Low Mass X-ray Binaries in outburst, typically lasting weeks to months and reaching luminosities of the Eddington limit for a few solar masses. Recently another subclass of outbursts in such binaries has been discovered, which are an order of magnitude fainter and last shorter than typical hours to days. We discuss whether they constitute a separate subset of x-ray binaries. A second class of x-ray transients are the x-ray bursts. Thermonuclear explosions on a neutron star (type I x-ray bursts) usually last of order minutes or less. We discovered a second type (called super x-ray bursts) with a duration of several hours. They relate to thermonuclear detonations much deeper in the neutron star atmosphere, possibly burning on the nuclear ashes of normal x-ray bursts. The third class are the enigmatic Fast X-ray Transients occurring at all galactic latitudes. We found that the bright ones are of two types only: either nearby coronal sources (lasting hours) or the socalled x-ray flashes (lasting minutes). The new class, the X-ray flashes, may be a new type of cosmic explosion, intermediate between supernovae and gamma ray bursts, or they may be highly redshifted gamma ray bursts. It thus appears that the three classes of x-ray transients each come in two flavors: long and short. 1.

John Heise; Jean In t Z

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

X-ray Image Bank Open for Business - NERSC Center News, Feb 22, 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-ray Image Bank Open X-ray Image Bank Open for Business X-ray Image Bank Open for Business February 22, 2011 Filipe Maia is building a data bank where scientists from around the world can deposit and share images generated by coherent x-ray light sources. A post-doctoral researcher with the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), Maia hopes the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank, or CXIDB (http://www.cxidb.org) can help researchers make the most of their valuable data. Scientists use light sources to shoot intense x-ray beams into molecules, such as proteins, in order to understand their shapes and structures. The resulting diffraction patterns are painstakingly reconstructed to deduce an image. "It kind of works like a microscope, but it has no lens," Maia says.

348

Identification of A Population of X-ray-emitting Massive Stars in the Galactic Plane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present X-ray, infrared, optical, and radio observations of four previously unidentified Galactic plane X-ray sources: AX J163252-4746, AX J184738-0156, AX J144701-5919, and AX J144547-5931. Detection of each source ...

Anderson, Gemma E.

349

YOHKOH remnants: partially occulted flares in hard X-rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flares being partially occulted by the solar limb, are the best reservoir of our knowledge about hard X-ray loop-top sources. Recently, the survey of partially occulted flares observed by the RHESSI has been published (Krucker & Lin 2008). The extensive YOHKOH database still awaits such activities. This work is an attempt to fill this gap. Among from 1286 flares in the YOHKOH Hard X-ray Telescope Flare Catalogue, for which the hard X-ray images had been enclosed, we identified 98 events that occurred behind the solar limb. We investigated their hard X-ray spectra and spatial structure. We found that in most cases the hard X-ray spectrum of partially occulted flares consists of two components, non-thermal and thermal, which are co-spatial. The photon energy spectra of the partially occulted flares are systematically steeper than spectra of the non-occulted flares. Such a difference we explain as a consequence of intrinsically dissimilar conditions ruling in coronal parts of flares, in comparison with the f...

Tomczak, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Method and apparatus for micromachining using hard X-rays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An X-ray source such as a synchrotron which provides a significant spectral content of hard X-rays is used to expose relatively thick photoresist such that the portions of the photoresist at an exit surface receive at least a threshold dose sufficient to render the photoresist susceptible to a developer, while the entrance surface of the photoresist receives an exposure which does not exceed a power limit at which destructive disruption of the photoresist would occur. The X-ray beam is spectrally shaped to substantially eliminate lower energy photons while allowing a substantial flux of higher energy photons to pass through to the photoresist target. Filters and the substrate of the X-ray mask may be used to spectrally shape the X-ray beam. Machining of photoresists such as polymethylmethacrylate to micron tolerances may be obtained to depths of several centimeters, and multiple targets may be exposed simultaneously. The photoresist target may be rotated and/or translated in the beam to form solids of rotation and other complex three-dimensional structures.

Siddons, David Peter (Shoreham, NY); Johnson, Erik D. (Ridge, NY); Guckel, Henry (Madison, WI); Klein, Jonathan L. (Madison, WI)

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Method and apparatus for micromachining using hard X-rays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An X-ray source such as a synchrotron which provides a significant spectral content of hard X-rays is used to expose relatively thick photoresist such that the portions of the photoresist at an exit surface receive at least a threshold dose sufficient to render the photoresist susceptible to a developer, while the entrance surface of the photoresist receives an exposure which does not exceed a power limit at which destructive disruption of the photoresist would occur. The X-ray beam is spectrally shaped to substantially eliminate lower energy photons while allowing a substantial flux of higher energy photons to pass through to the photoresist target. Filters and the substrate of the X-ray mask may be used to spectrally shape the X-ray beam. Machining of photoresists such as polymethylmethacrylate to micron tolerances may be obtained to depths of several centimeters, and multiple targets may be exposed simultaneously. The photoresist target may be rotated and/or translated in the beam to form solids of rotation and other complex three-dimensional structures. 21 figs.

Siddons, D.P.; Johnson, E.D.; Guckel, H.; Klein, J.L.

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

The First Angstrom X-Ray Free-Electron Laser  

SciTech Connect

The Linac Coherent Light Source produced its first x-ray laser beam on 10 April 2009. Today it is routinely producing x-ray pulses with energy >2 mJ across the operating range from 820-8,200 eV. The facility has begun operating for atomic/molecular/optical science experiments. Performance of the facility in its first user run (1 October - 21 December) and current machine development activities will be presented. Early results from the preparations for the start of the second user run is also reported.

Galayda, John; /SLAC

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

Einstein x-ray observations of cataclysmic variables  

SciTech Connect

Observations with the imaging x-ray detectors on the Einstein Observatory have led to a large increase in the number of low luminosity x-ray sources known to be associated with cataclysmic variable stars (CVs). The high sensitivity of the Einstein instrumentation has permitted study of their short timescale variability and spectra. The data are adding significantly to our knowledge of the accretion process in cataclysmic variables and forcing some revision in our ideas concerning the origin of the optical variability in these stars.

Mason, K.O.; Cordova, F.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

X-ray transmissive debris shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

Spielman, Rick B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Exploring nanomagnetism with soft x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy images magnetism in nanoscale systems with a spatial resolution down to 15nm provided by state-of-the-art Fresnel zone plate optics. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) is used as element-specific magnetic contrast mechanism similar to photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), however, with volume sensitivity and the ability to record the images in varying applied magnetic fields which allows to study magnetization reversal processes at fundamental length scales. Utilizing a stroboscopic pump-probe scheme one can investigate fast spin dynamics with a time resolution down to 70 ps which gives access to precessional and relaxation phenomena as well as spin torque driven domain wall dynamics in nanoscale systems. Current developments in zone plate optics aim for a spatial resolution towards 10nm and at next generation X-ray sources a time resolution in the fsec regime can be envisioned.

Fischer, P.; Kim, D.-H.; Mesler, B.L.; Chao, W.; Sakdinawat,A.E.; Anderson, E.H.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

X-ray movies reveal insect flight, muscle motion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BioCAT BioCAT X-ray movies reveal insect flight, muscle motion Photo credit: Michael Dickinson Watching flies fly may not seem like high-tech science, but for researchers using the Western Hemisphere's most brilliant X-rays, from the Advanced Photon Source located at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, it not only helps explain how insects fly but also may someday aid in understanding human heart function. The researchers, from the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), Caltech and the University of Vermont, merged two distinct technologies, intense X-ray beams and electronic flight simulators, to study how insect muscles can generate such extraordinary levels of power. The results are published in the the January 20,. 2005, issue of the journal Nature.

357

X-ray and Optical Filaments in M87  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare a very deep X-ray image of M87, at the center of the Virgo Cluster, to high-quality optical images of the low excitation emission-line gas in the same region. There are striking coincidences of detail between the two. We explore the possiblity that this represents a thermal interaction between hot gas at 10^7 K and warm gas at 10^4 K. We find two temperatures are present in the X-ray gas, with the lower more prevelant in the vicinity of the optical filaments. Electron conduction from the hot phase to the cooler one provides a quantitatively acceptable energy source for the optical filaments, and we show additionally that it can do so for the brightest X-ray cluster, Perseus. If operative, conduction in the presence of gas-rich galaxy mergers, may explain the presence of "cool cores" in clusters of galaxies.

William B. Sparks; Megan Donahue; Andres Jordan; Laura Ferrarese; Patrick Cote

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

358

X-ray Detection of a Rotating Radio Transient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Rotating RAdio Transients (RRATs) are a newly discovered astronomical phenomenon, characterised by occasional brief radio bursts, with average intervals between bursts ranging from minutes to hours. The burst spacings allow identification of periodicities, which fall in the range 0.4 to 7 seconds. The RRATs thus seem to be rotating neutron stars, albeit with properties very different from the rest of the population. We here present the serendipitous detection with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of a bright point-like X-ray source coincident with one of the RRATs. We discuss the temporal and spectral properties of this X-ray emission, consider counterparts in other wavebands, and interpret these results in the context of possible explanations for the RRAT population.

Bryan M. Gaensler; Maura Mclaughlin; Stephen Reynolds Kazik; Borkowski N; Burgay Fern; Andrew Lyne; Ingrid Stairs; B. M. Gaensler; S. Chatterjee; M. Mclaughlin; S. Reynolds; K. Borkowski; N. Rea; A. Possenti; M. Burgay; Osservatorio Astronomico Di Roma; F. Camilo; M. Kramer; A. Lyne

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Use of X-Ray Microbeams in Materials Science  

SciTech Connect

Most materials are heterogeneous on mesoscopic length scales (tenths-to-tens of microns), and materials properties depend critically on mesoscopic structures such as grain sizes, texture, and impurities. The recent availability of intense, focused x-ray microbeams at synchrotron facilities has enabled new techniques for mesoscale materials characterization. We describe instrumentation and experiments on the MHATT-CAT and UNICAT undulator beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source which use micron and submicron-size x-ray beams to investigate the grain orientation, local strain and defect content in a variety of materials of technological interest. Results from a combinatorial study on epitaxial growth of oxide films on textured metal substrates will be described to illustrate x-ray microbeam capabilities.

Budai, J.D.; Chung, J.-S.; Ice, G.E.; Larson, B.C.; Lowe, W.P.; Norton, D.P.; Tamura, N.; Tischler, J.Z.; Williams, E.L.; Yoon, M.; Zschack, P.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Restoration of X-ray fluorescence images of hidden paintings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes our methods for repairing and restoring images of hidden paintings (paintings that have been painted over and are now covered by a new surface painting) that have been obtained via noninvasive X-ray fluorescence imaging of their ... Keywords: Art restoration, Artifact correction, Image restoration, Underdetermined source separation

Anila Anitha; Andrei Brasoveanu; Marco Duarte; Shannon Hughes; Ingrid Daubechies; Joris Dik; Koen Janssens; Matthias Alfeld

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A FRONT END DESIGN FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray sources on next generation low emittance/high brilliance synchrotrons such as the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) (1) have unique properties which directly affect the design of the front end of the beam line. The most striking of these are the large peak photon power densities

P. J. Viccaro

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

NIST X-Ray Transition Energies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with the International System of measurement ... titled "X-ray transition energies: new approach ... and by NIST's Systems Integration for Manufacturing ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

364

NIST: X-Ray Mass Attenuation Coefficients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST reserves the right to charge for these data in the ... ?/? and the mass energy-absorption coefficient ... The tables cover energies of the photon (x-ray ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

365

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray...

366

Hard X-Ray Quad Collimator  

Technology Development and Commercialization Division One of the best ways to obtain small?size x?ray beams for structural biology research is to ...

367

High-Energy X-ray Studies of Real Materials Under Real Conditions and in Real Time  

SciTech Connect

High-energy x-rays from 3rd generation synchrotron sources, including the APS, possess a unique combination of high penetration power and high spatial, reciprocal space, and temporal resolution. These characteristics can be exploited to non-destructively measure phase, texture and strain distributions under extreme environments including thermo-mechanical loading, high-pressure, irradiation and supercritical environments. Over the past several years, the 1-ID beamline has developed a number of programs for these purposes, namely (i) high-energy diffraction microscopy, in which grain and sub-grain volumes are mapped in polycrystalline aggregates, and (ii) combined small-and wide-angle x-ray scattering which permits information over a broad range of length scales to be collected from the same (micron-level) volume. These programs have been increasingly used to test and extend predictive simulations of materials behavior over size scales ranging from nm to mm. Select studies will be presented including nucleation and growth of nanomaterials, void and structural evolution in complex composites under thermo-mechanical and irradiated environments, and microstructural changes in layered systems including thermal-barrier coatings, batteries and fuel cells. Finally, extension of these programs, through the planned APS upgrade, to higher spatio-temporal resolution will be described.

Almer, Jonathan (ANL)

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

Concave Accretion Discs and X-ray Reprocessing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectra of Seyfert Is are commonly modelled as emission from an X-ray illuminated flat accretion disc orbiting a central black hole. This provides both a reprocessed and direct component of the X-ray emission as required by observations of individual objects and possibly a fraction of the cosmological X-ray background. There is some observational motivation to at least consider the role that an effectively concave disc surface might play: (1) a reprocessed fraction $\\gsim 1/2$ in some Seyferts and possibly in the X-ray background, and (2) the commonality of a sharp iron line peak for Seyferts at 6.4KeV despite a dependence of peak location on inclination angle for flat disc models. Here it is shown that a concave disc may not only provide a larger total fraction of reprocessed photons, but can also reprocess a much larger fraction of photons in its outer regions when compared to a flat disc. This reduces the sensitivity of the 6.4KeV peak location to the inner disc inclination angle because the outer regions are less affected by Doppler and gravitational effects. If the X-ray source is isotropic, the reprocessed fraction is directly determined by the concavity. If the X-ray source is anisotropic, the location of iron line peak can still be determined by concavity but the total reflected fraction need not be as large as for the isotropic emitter case. The geometric calculations herein are applicable to general accretion disc systems illuminated from the center.

Eric G. Blackman

1999-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

369

K-alpha conversion efficiency measurments for x-ray scattering in inertial confinement fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The conversion efficiency of ultra short-pulse laser radiation to K-{alpha} x-rays has been measured for various chlorine-containing targets to be used as x-ray scattering probes of dense plasmas. The spectral and temporal properties of these sources will allow spectrally-resolved x-ray scattering probing with picosecond temporal resolution required for measuring the plasma conditions in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Simulations of x-ray scattering spectra from these plasmas show that fuel capsule density, capsule ablator density, and shock timing information may be inferred.

Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Urry, M K; Robey, H; Niemann, C; Landen, O L; Morse, E; Glenzer, S H

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

CALIBRATION OF X-RAY IMAGING DEVICES FOR ACCURATE INTENSITY MEASUREMENT  

SciTech Connect

National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

Haugh, M J; Charest, M R; Ross, P W; Lee, J J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Teruya, A T

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Road to Ultrahigh-Resolution X-ray Spectrometers | Advanced Photon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Atoms Behave: Characteristics of Microstructural Avalanches How Atoms Behave: Characteristics of Microstructural Avalanches Iodate Refuses to Intimidate Creating the Heart of a Planet in the Heart of a Gem How a Powerful Antibody Neutralizes HIV Taking a Page from Nature to Build Better Nanomaterials Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed The Road to Ultrahigh-Resolution X-ray Spectrometers NOVEMBER 22, 2011 Bookmark and Share Basic phenomena underlying the AD&AT x-ray optics. In x-ray Bragg diffraction from atomic planes composing nonzero angle η to the crystal entrance face, the crystal acts (a) like an optical prism dispersing the photons into a divergent x-ray fan with photons of different energies E

372

Workshop: Time Resolved X-Ray Science at High Repetition Rate | Stanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Resolved X-Ray Science at High Repetition Rate Time Resolved X-Ray Science at High Repetition Rate Saturday, October 22, 2011 - 8:30am SSRL Conference Room 137-322 In conjunction with the 2011 LCLS/SSRL User Meeting, SSRL and the APS will jointly host a two-day workshop focused on opportunities with short-pulse, high-repetition rate X-ray Science. The workshop will feature international speakers and panel experts presenting the scientific basis, preliminary results and future potential of high rep-rate picosecond x-rays beams from storage rings. The workshop will be broadly focused on topics in materials science, chemistry, biology and catalysis. The workshop agenda will also include presentations on accelerator operational modes, precision timing issues, detector challenges and the relation of storage ring science with

373

X?ray Fluorescence (XRF) Assay Using Laser Compton Scattered (LCS) X?rays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Compton Scattered (LCS) X?rays are produced as a result of the interaction between accelerated electrons and a laser beam. The yield of LCS X?rays is dependent on the laser power

Syed F. Naeem; Khalid Chouffani; Douglas P. Wells

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

X-Ray Multilayer Database from the LBL Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

An important activity of the Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO) is research on x-ray mirrors and their use in optical devices to focus and deflect x-ray beams. The two kinds of mirrors most widely used are glancing incidence reflectors and multilayer coatings. The X-Ray Multilayer Database is based on the results of surveys taken at the biennial Physics of X-Ray Multilayer Structures conferences. It contains measured x-ray reflectances reported for various multilayers. The database is provided as a service to the x-ray and multilayer research communities and is intended to reflect the state-of-the-art in multilayer x-ray mirrors. (Specialized Interface)

375

Materials Analysis by Soft x-ray Scanning Transmission X-ray ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Optical and X-ray Imaging Techniques for Material Characterization.

376

Calibration of X-ray absorption in our Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prediction of the soft X-ray absorption along lines of sight through our Galaxy is crucial for understanding the spectra of extragalactic sources, but requires a good estimate of the foreground column density of photoelectric absorbing species. Assuming uniform elemental abundances this reduces to having a good estimate of the total hydrogen column density, N(Htot)=N(HI)+2N(H2). The atomic component, N(HI), is reliably provided using the mapped 21 cm radio emission but estimating the molecular hydrogen column density, N(H2), expected for any particular direction, is difficult. The X-ray afterglows of GRBs are ideal sources to probe X-ray absorption in our Galaxy because they are extragalactic, numerous, bright, have simple spectra and occur randomly across the entire sky. We describe an empirical method, utilizing 493 afterglows detected by the Swift XRT, to determine N(Htot) through the Milky Way which provides an improved estimate of the X-ray absorption in our Galaxy and thereby leads to more reliable meas...

Willingale, R; Beardmore, A P; Tanvir, N R; O'Brien, P T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

X-ray astronomy in the new Millenium. A Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent X-ray observations have had a major impact on topics ranging from protostars to cosmology. They have also drawn attention to important and general physical processes that currently limit our understanding of thermal and nonthermal X-ray sources. These include unmeasured atomic astrophysics data (wavelengths, oscillator strengths etc.), basic hydromagnetic processes (e.g. shock structure, reconnection), plasma processes (such as electron-ion equipartition and heat conduction) and radiative transfer (in disks and accretion columns). Progress on these problems will probably come from integrative studies that draw upon observations, throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, of different classes of source. X-ray observations are also giving a new perspective on astronomical subjects, like the nature of galactic nuclei and the evolution of stellar populations. They are contributing to answering central cosmological questions including the measurement of the matter content of the universe, understanding its overall luminosity density, describing its chemical evolution and locating the first luminous objects. X-ray astronomy has a healthy future with several international space missions under construction and in development.

Roger Blandford

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

378

X-ray Diffraction Crystal Calibration and Characterization  

SciTech Connect

National Security Technologies X-ray Laboratory is comprised of a multi-anode Manson type source and a Henke type source that incorporates a dual goniometer and XYZ translation stage. The first goniometer is used to isolate a particular spectral band. The Manson operates up to 10 kV and the Henke up to 20 kV. The Henke rotation stages and translation stages are automated. Procedures have been developed to characterize and calibrate various NIF diagnostics and their components. The diagnostics include X-ray cameras, gated imagers, streak cameras, and other X-ray imaging systems. Components that have been analyzed include filters, filter arrays, grazing incidence mirrors, and various crystals, both flat and curved. Recent efforts on the Henke system are aimed at characterizing and calibrating imaging crystals and curved crystals used as the major component of an X-ray spectrometer. The presentation will concentrate on these results. The work has been done at energies ranging from 3 keV to 16 keV. The major goal was to evaluate the performance quality of the crystal for its intended application. For the imaging crystals we measured the laser beam reflection offset from the X-ray beam and the reflectivity curves. For the curved spectrometer crystal, which was a natural crystal, resolving power was critical. It was first necessary to find sources of crystals that had sufficiently narrow reflectivity curves. It was then necessary to determine which crystals retained their resolving power after being thinned and glued to a curved substrate.

Michael J. Haugh; Richard Stewart; Nathan Kugland

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

379

Statistical Analysis of X-ray Speckle at the NSLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a statistical analysis of the static speckle produced by illuminating a disordered aerogel sample by a nominally coherent x-ray beam at wiggler beamline X25 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The results of the analysis allow us to determine that the coherence delivered to the X25 hutch is within 35% of what is expected. The rate of coherent photons is approximately two times smaller than expected on the basis of the X25 wiggler source brilliance.

Ophelia K. C. Tsui; S. G. J. Mochrie; L. E. Berman

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

APS User News, Issue 65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, November 1, 2010 5, November 1, 2010 CONTENTS DIRECTOR'S CORNER SCIENCE NEWS 1. Science Highlights USER MATTERS 2. New Badges for APS Users 3. APSUO Goes to Washington! 4. New Biosafety Web Page Available 5. Two New ANL Procedures: Injuries and Illnesses and Incident Notification FACILITY NEWS 6.Call for Workshop Proposals for APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting 7. Cross-cut Review of APS X-ray Interface and Liquid Surface Scattering Science Held on October 6 8. APS SAC Meets, Sets Review Process for Scientific Priorities in APS-U 9. APS Upgrade on You Tube BRIEFLY NOTED -- Second Annual Meeting of the Prairie Section of the American Physical Society, November 18-20, 2010 -- PhD Scholarship on Virus Surrogate in New Zealand ===================================================== Instructions for subscribing, unsubscribing, and submitting info

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

APS User News, Issue 82  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, November 6, 2012 2, November 6, 2012 CONTENTS DIRECTOR'S CORNER USER MATTERS -- APS User Wins Nobel Prize in Chemistry -- Physics, Picasso, and House Paint: X-rays Solve a Mystery -- CALL FOR: APS Workshop Proposals and Invited Speaker Suggestions--Due January 11, 2013! --"There's an app for APS!" BRIEFLY NOTED -- Welcome Susan White-DePace, Associate Manager for User Programs -- Nature.com Launches Scientific Reports -- Sidewalk Construction Begins from APS to Building 314 -- Newly Reduced Speed Limit in 201 Area -- Upcoming Meetings of Interest -- General User Proposal Deadline for Run 2013-2: March 8, 2013 -- Current APS Job Openings -- Save the Date: 2013 APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting Set for May 6-9, 2013 ==================================================== Instructions for subscribing, unsubscribing, and submitting info

382

APS User News-at-a-Glance, Issue 52  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, March 3, 2009 2, March 3, 2009 CONTENTS MESSAGE FROM MURRAY SCIENCE NEWS 1. Life Sciences CAT Coaxes Four Beams from One Port, Offers New Membership Mode 2. Science & Research Highlights 3. White Paper on "Science and Technology of Future Light Sources" Online USER MATTERS 4. How Are We Doing? 5. Management Changes in the APS X-Ray Science Division 6. General and Partner User Proposal Deadlines 7. User Agreements 8. General User Program Advisory Committee Established FACILITY NEWS 9. Search to Begin for the Next Accelerator Systems Division Director 10. Users Week 2009 Update BRIEFLY NOTED -- Rate Increase at Argonne Guest House -- Deadline for the Eleventh National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is March 7 -- Deadline Changed for Argonne Director's Postdoctoral Fellowships

383

Photon Sciences | Beamlines | CSX: Coherent Soft X-ray Scattering and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSX: Coherent Soft X-ray Scattering and polarization CSX: Coherent Soft X-ray Scattering and polarization X-Ray 1 Poster | X-Ray 2 Poster | Fact Sheet | Preliminary Design Report Scientific Scope The Coherent Soft X-ray Scattering and Polarization (CSX) beamline design (source and optics) has been optimized to the NSLS-II parameters to provide the highest possible flux for experiments requiring either high coherence or full control of the polarization. Beamline Description The CSX beamline will be served by two identical EPU49 sources. Both EPUs are planned to operate in a canted geometry with opposite circular polarization for fast polarization switching experiments at the full polarization control (PC) branch. The EPUs will also be able to operate "phased" as a single device for high coherent flux experiments at the

384

Unifying disc-jet behaviour in X-ray binaries: an optical/IR approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron emission from jets produced by X-ray binaries can be detected at optical and infrared (IR) frequencies. I show that optical/IR colour-magnitude diagrams of the outbursts of nine X-ray binaries successfully separate thermal disc emission from non-thermal jet emission, in both black hole and neutron star sources. A heated single-temperature blackbody is able to reproduce the observed relations between colour and magnitude, except when excursions are made to a redder colour than expected, which is due to jet emission. The general picture that is developed is then incorporated into the unified picture of disc-jet behaviour in black hole X-ray binaries. At a given position of a source in the X-ray hardness-intensity diagram, the radio, IR and optical properties can be inferred. Similarly, it is possible to predict the X-ray and radio luminosities and spectral states from optical/IR monitoring.

David M. Russell; Dipankar Maitra; Rob P. Fender; Fraser Lewis

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

385

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status and Schedule Safety and Training Divisions APS Engineering Support Division AES Groups Accelerator Systems Division ASD Groups X-ray Science Division XSD Groups...

386

ANL/APS/TB-44, Guidelines for Beamline and Front-End Radiation Shielding Design at the Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS/TB-44 Rev. 4 APS/TB-44 Rev. 4 Guidelines for Beamline and Front-End Radiation Shielding Design at the Advanced Photon Source Revision 4 Advanced Photon Source About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne and its pioneering science and technology programs, see www.anl.gov. Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information

387

LS-303 Generation of Bright, Tunable, Polarized ?-Ray Sources by Scattering Laser Pulses from APS Electron Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the performance of possible Advanced Photon Source (APS) ?-ray sources for applications in nuclear physics research. For the APS storage ring, it is possible to generate tagged ?-ray photon fluxes of 10 8, 0.710 8, and 0.310 8 photons/s at photon energies of 1, 1.7, and 2.8 GeV, respectively. For untagged photons, fluxes higher than 10 8 photons/s are possible for those energies. For the injection booster, an untagged ?-ray photon flux up to 10 8 photons/s at energy ranging from 5 MeV to 1 GeV is possible. This can be achieved using off-the-shelf commercial Ti:Sa laser systems. The photon fluxes predicted here are in general one to two orders of magnitude higher than facilities with similar photon energies. 1.

Y. Li; Y. Chae; L. Emery; Z. Huang; K. Harkay; J. Lewellen; S. V. Milton; V. Sajaev

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

APS User News, Issue 71  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, August 18, 2011 1, August 18, 2011 CONTENTS 1. DIRECTOR'S CORNER USER MATTERS 2. How to Wow! "Secrets" for a Successful Proposal 3. Sweet Dreams Mean Safer Work 4. XSD's Linda Young Elected DAMOP Vice Chair 5. Successful 2011 APS/IIT Summer XAFS School BRIEFLY NOTED -- John Quintana Appointed Argonne's Deputy COO -- 2011 X-Ray Spectroscopy of Magnetic Solids Workshop Set for October 22-23 -- Workshops on Hard X-ray Instrumentation at the SwissFEL -- Next GUP Deadline is October 28, 2011 ===================================================== Instructions for subscribing, unsubscribing, and submitting info http://www.aps.anl.gov/Users/Communications/User_News/ ===================================================== DIRECTOR'S CORNER During the last week of July, we had the annual review of APS organized by

389

Real-time x-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source (APS, Argonne NationalSector 13), Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National

Tokunaga, T.K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

X-rays from HH 80, HH 81, and the Central Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report detections of X-rays from HH 80 and HH 81 with the ACIS instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. These are among the most luminous HH sources in the optical and they are now the most luminous known in X-rays. These X-rays arise from the strong shocks that occur when the southern extension of this bipolar outflow slams into the ambient material. There is a one-to-one correspondence between regions of high X-ray emission and high H? emission. The X-ray luminosities of HH 80 and HH 81 are 4.5 and 4.3 x 1031 erg s-1, respectively, assuming the measured low-energy absorption is not in the sources. The measured temperature of the HH plasma is not as large as that expected from the maximum velocities seen in the extended tails of the optical emission lines. Rather it is consistent with the ~106 K temperature of the ?narrow? core of the optical lines. There is no observed emission from HH 80 North, the northern extension of the bipolar flow, based upon a measurement of lower sensitivity. We imaged the central region of the bipolar flow revealing a complex of X-ray sources including one near, but not coincident with the putative power source in the radio and infrared. This source, CXOPTM J181912.4-204733, has no counterparts at other wavelengths and is consistent in luminosity and spectrum with a massive star with AV ~ 90 mag. It may contribute significantly to the power input to the complex. Alternatively, this emission might be extended X-rays from outflows close to the power source. We detect 94 X-ray sources overall in this area of star formation.

Steven H. Pravdo; Yohko Tsuboi; Yoshitomo Maeda

2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

391

X-Ray Scattering Group, Condensed Matter Physics & Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY Beamline X1A2 - Soft x-ray diffraction and nano-imaging Beamline X17 - X-ray powder diffraction Beamline X22C - Resonant x-ray...

392

X-ray image intensifier phosphor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Y/sub 1-x/Gd/sub x/.PO$sub 4$:Tb$sup 3+$ is an effective phosphor for use in X-ray intensifier screens and in nuclear radiation detection systems.

D' Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

World's First Hard X-ray Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCLS is the world's most powerful X-ray laser. Its highly focused beam, which arrives in staccato bursts a few quadrillionths of a second long, allows researchers to probe complex,...

394

X-ray grid-detector apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

Boone, John M. (Folsom, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods To be held as part of SPIE. http:spie.orgOP318 August 28-29, 2013; San Diego, California, USA...

396

High energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering at the SRI-CAT  

SciTech Connect

This report is a combination of vugraphs and two papers. The vugraphs give information on the beamline at the APS for IXS and the science addressable by IXS. They also cover the 10 milli-eV resolution spectrometer and the 200 milli-eV resolution spectrometer. The first paper covers the performance of the focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for the inelastic x-ray scattering. The second paper discusses inelastic x-ray scattering from TiC and Ti single crystals.

Macrander, A.T.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

APS User News-at-a-Glance, Issue 15  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6; September 6, 2002 6; September 6, 2002 Contents: 1. Message from Murray: Updates on User Issues Task Force Reports APS Forms Scientific Advisory Committee NE-CAT and LS-CATs sign MOUs School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering: Great Success! New Staff to Support Users Operations Update 1. Message from Murray: Update on User Issues (Contact: jmgibson@aps.anl.gov) On August 2, representatives from the four U.S. Department of Energy/Basic Energy Sciences (DOE/BES) light sources met in Washington with DOE/BES officials to discuss several mandated operational changes, all of which are directed toward greater user accessibility and greater accountability by the facilities. The four light source directors were asked to develop a joint 10-year vision statement for facility development. In addition, they

398

Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures with polarized soft x-ray photons  

SciTech Connect

Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures and their fast dynamics is scientifically interesting and technologically of highest relevance. The combination of circularly polarized soft X-ray photons which provide a strong X-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect at characteristic X-ray absorption edges, with a high resolution soft X-ray microscope utilizing Fresnel zone plate optics allows to study in a unique way the stochastical behavior in the magnetization reversal process of thin films and the ultrafast dynamics of magnetic vortices and domain walls in confined ferromagnetic structures. Future sources of fsec short and high intense soft X-ray photon pulses hold the promise of magnetic imaging down to fundamental magnetic length and time scales.

Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.

2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

399

The World's First Free-Electron X-ray Laser | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Free-Electron X-ray Laser First Free-Electron X-ray Laser The World's First Free-Electron X-ray Laser August 17, 2010 - 6:19pm Addthis The World's First Free-Electron X-ray Laser John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Yesterday, Secretary Chu participated in the dedication of the world's first free-electron and most powerful X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). In light of this occasion (pun intended), we posted an in-depth look at the innovative nature of this new instrument and its potential to tackle some of life's biggest mysteries. The Secretary seemed just as geeked about the possibilities of the LCLS, stating that "this is a new instrument that will enable us to see the structure of materials that we could not determine by any other means ... Knowing those

400

High-energy x-ray backlighter spectrum measurements using calibrated image plates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The x-ray spectrum between 18 and 88 keV generated by a petawatt laser driven x-ray backlighter target was measured using a 12-channel differential filter pair spectrometer. The spectrometer consists of a series of filter pairs on a Ta mask coupled with an x-ray sensitive image plate. A calibration of Fuji{trademark} MS and SR image plates was conducted using a tungsten anode x-ray source and the resulting calibration applied to the design of the Ross pair spectrometer. Additionally, the fade rate and resolution of the image plate system were measured for quantitative radiographic applications. The conversion efficiency of laser energy into silver K{alpha} x rays from a petawatt laser target was measured using the differential filter pair spectrometer and compared to measurements using a single photon counting charge coupled device.

Maddox, B.R.; Park, H.S.; Remington, B.A.; Izumi, N.; Chen, S.; Chen, C.; Kimminau, G.; Ali, Z.; Haugh, M.J.; Ma, Q. (LLNL); (NWU); (Oxford); (NSTec)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

High-energy x-ray backlighter spectrum measurements using calibrated image plates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The x-ray spectrum between 18 and 88 keV generated by a petawatt laser driven x-ray backlighter target was measured using a 12-channel differential filter pair spectrometer. The spectrometer consists of a series of filter pairs on a Ta mask coupled with an x-ray sensitive image plate. A calibration of Fuji MS and SR image plates was conducted using a tungsten anode x-ray source and the resulting calibration applied to the design of the Ross pair spectrometer. Additionally, the fade rate and resolution of the image plate system were measured for quantitative radiographic applications. The conversion efficiency of laser energy into silver K{alpha} x rays from a petawatt laser target was measured using the differential filter pair spectrometer and compared to measurements using a single photon counting charge coupled device.

Maddox, B. R.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Chen, S.; Chen, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kimminau, G. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Ali, Z.; Haugh, M. J. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Ma, Q. [DND-CAT, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439-4857 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

High power X-ray welding of metal-matrix composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10{sup 4} watts/cm{sup 2} and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

404

High power x-ray welding of metal-matrix composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10.sup.4 watts/cm.sup.2 and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

Rosenberg, Richard A. (Naperville, IL); Goeppner, George A. (Orland Park, IL); Noonan, John R. (Naperville, IL); Farrell, William J. (Flossmoor, IL); Ma, Qing (Westmont, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Argonne CNM: X-Ray Microscopy Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Microscopy Facilities X-Ray Microscopy Facilities The Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) facility provides scanning fluorescence, scanning diffraction, and full-field transmission and tomographic imaging capabilities with a spatial resolution of 30 nm over a spectral range of 6-12 keV. Modes of Operation Full-Field Transmission Imaging and Nanotomography X-ray transmission imaging uses both the absorption and phase shift of the X-ray beam by the sample as contrast mechanisms. Absorption contrast is used to map the sample density. Elemental constituents can be located by using differential edge contrast in this mode. Phase contrast can be highly sensitive to edges and interfaces even when the X-ray absorption is weak. These contrast mechanisms are exploited to image samples rapidly in full-field transmission mode under various environmental conditions, or combined with nanotomography methods to study the three-dimensional structure of complex and amorphous nanomaterials with the HXN.

406

LCLS - The X-ray Laser Has Turned On  

SciTech Connect

On April 10, 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard x-ray free electron laser, was brought to lasing. Producing an x-ray beam with over a billion times higher peak brightness that then most powerful existing syncrotron sources, it marked the beginning of a new era of science. The LCLS pulses arrive at a rate of 60 - 120 Hz in an energy range from 480 eV to 10 keV, with pulse lengths as short as a few fs to about 300 fs. Since October 2009, users have been performing experiments at the LCLS, and currently three of the six planned instruments are available. Although we stand only at the beginning of LCLS science, there is no doubt about the strong sense of early excitement.

Bergmann, Uwe [Linac Coherent Light Source

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

407

Orbit Control at the Advanced Photon Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) began operation in 1995 with the objective of providing ultra-stable high-brightness hard x-rays to its user community. This paper will be a review of the instrumentation and software presently in use for orbit stabilization. Broad-band and narrow-band rf beam position monitors as well as x-ray beam position monitors supporting bending magnet and insertion device source points are used in an integrated system. Status and upgrade plans for the system will be discussed.

Decker, G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

APS LOM Shop Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division XSD Groups Industry Argonne Home Advanced Photon Source APS LOM Shop Usage User Shop Access - Policies and Procedures User Shop Orientation User Shop...

409

An X-ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, & Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubi\\'nski, & Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the hard X-ray continuum above $\\sim 50$ keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft $\\gamma$-ray telescopes, in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

James Chiang

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

410

Copper Ridges Nearly Double X-ray Sensor Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physics Letters,* can measure X-ray energies with an ... X-rays and measure the energy based on ... by NASA and the NIST Office of Microelectronics ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

411

Sandia National Laboratories X-ray Tube with Magnetic Electron ...  

... for the U.S. Department of Energys National ... high average power large area X-ray tube provides increased X-ray generation efficiency through ...

412

APS User News-at-a-Glance, Issue 44  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beamline We are glad to announce that the National Science Foundation has approved the funding of a new insertion device beamline at the APS for intermediate energy x-ray...

413

Imaging X-ray spectroscopy with micro-X and Chandra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High spectral resolution observations of X-ray phenomena have the potential to uncover new physics. Currently, only point sources can be probed with high resolution spectra, using gratings. Extended objects like supernova ...

Rutherford, John (John Morton)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

An ultrafast x-ray detector system at an elliptically polarizing undulator beamline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has been developed at the ALS for the study of ultrafastAdvanced Light Source (ALS). A streak camera is a detector2 Experimental setup The ALS ultrafast x-ray detector system

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Development of at-wavelength metrology for x-ray optics at the ALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for x-ray optics at the ALS* Valeriy V. Yashchuk 1 , Kenneththe Advanced Light Source (ALS) has reached a state-of-the-inadequate in situ feedback. At ALS beamline 5.3.1, we are

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Shielding Calculations for the Hard X-Rays Generated by LCLS Mec Laser System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) Instrument is an X-ray instrument that will be able to create and diagnose High Energy Density (HED) matter. The MEC laser system can generate hard X-ray due to the interaction of the laser and the plasma. This paper summarizes results of the shielding calculations performed to evaluate the radiation hazards induced by this hard X-ray source with Monte Carlo code FLUKA. The dose rates and photon spectra due to this X-ray source are calculated at different locations with different shielding. The influence of the electron temperature on the source terms and the shielding effectiveness was also investigated.

Not Available

2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

417

7-GeV advanced photon source beamline initiative: Conceptual design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE is building a new generation 6-7 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source known as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility, to be completed in FY 1996, can provide 70 x-ray sources of unprecedented brightness to meet the research needs of virtually all scientific disciplines and numerous technologies. The technological research capability of the APS in the areas of energy, communications and health will enable a new partnership between the DOE and US industry. Current funding for the APS will complete the current phase of construction so that scientists can begin their applications in FY 1996. Comprehensive utilization of the unique properties of APS beams will enable cutting-edge research not currently possible. It is now appropriate to plan to construct additional radiation sources and beamline standard components to meet the excess demands of the APS users. In this APS Beamline Initiative, 2.5-m-long insertion-device x-ray sources will be built on four straight sections of the APS storage ring, and an additional four bending-magnet sources will also be put in use. The front ends for these eight x-ray sources will be built to contain and safeguard access to these bright x-ray beams. In addition, funds will be provided to build standard beamline components to meet scientific and technological research demands of the Collaborative Access Teams. The Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the APS Beamline Initiative describes the scope of all the above technical and conventional construction and provides a detailed cost and schedule for these activities. The document also describes the preconstruction R&D plans for the Beamline Initiative activities and provides the cost estimates for the required R&D.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crystal XAS data from PS II at SSRL BL 9-3. It consists of aRadiation Laboratory (SSRL), the Advanced Light Source (operated by DOE OBES. The SSRL Biomedical Technology program

Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crystal XAS data from PS II at SSRL BL 9-3. It consists of aRadiation Laboratory (SSRL), the Advanced Light Source (operated by DOE OBES. The SSRL Biomedical Technology program

Yano, Junko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

X-ray Inspection Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in a 40 degree cone. OMX-161 source (left) with PerkinElmer RID detector (behind lead shield). A carbon composite sample is located on the 3-axis controlled stage in front of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aps x-ray source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

HARD X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF A JET AND ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN THE CORONA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the first hard X-ray observation of a solar jet on the limb with flare footpoints occulted, so that faint emission from accelerated electrons in the corona can be studied in detail. In this event on 2003 August 21, RHESSI observed a double coronal hard X-ray source in the pre-impulsive phase at both thermal and nonthermal energies. In the impulsive phase, the first of two hard X-ray bursts consists of a single thermal/nonthermal source coinciding with the lower of the two earlier sources, and the second burst shows an additional nonthermal, elongated source, spatially and temporally coincident with the coronal jet. Analysis of the jet hard X-ray source shows that collisional losses by accelerated electrons can deposit enough energy to generate the jet. The hard X-ray time profile above 20 keV matches that of the accompanying Type III and broadband gyrosynchrotron radio emission, indicating both accelerated electrons escaping outward along the jet path and electrons trapped in the flare loop. The double coronal hard X-ray source, the open field lines indicated by Type III bursts, and the presence of a small post-flare loop are consistent with significant electron acceleration in an interchange reconnection geometry.

Glesener, Lindsay; Lin, R. P.; Krucker, Saem, E-mail: glesener@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science Laboratory, UC Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

422

A New Multilayer-Based Grating for Hard X-ray Grating Interferometry |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Most Detailed Picture Yet of a Key AIDS Protein The Most Detailed Picture Yet of a Key AIDS Protein Superconductivity with Stripes How HIV Infects Cells Simulating Deep Earthquakes in the Laboratory A "Sponge" Path to Better Catalysts and Energy Materials Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A New Multilayer-Based Grating for Hard X-ray Grating Interferometry November 20, 2013 Bookmark and Share An image of the phase shift in the mouse kidney from a Bonse-Hart interferometer built utilizing the new micro-multilayer grating provides a projection view of the blood vessels. A new kind of x-ray multilayer grating that could open a pathway for high-sensitivity, hard x-ray phase contrast full-field imaging of large

423

Sub-Picosecond X-Ray Pulses Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Workshop on the Interactions of Intense Sub-Picosecond X-Ray International Workshop on the Interactions of Intense Sub-Picosecond X-Ray Pulses with Matter (SLAC, January 23-24, 1997) During the last five years studies have been conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg concerning the feasibility of driving an Angstrom-wavelength Free-Electron Laser (FEL) with a high energy rf linac. Recent promising advances in linac, rf gun, and insertion device technologies make it seem likely that such a device can be constructed. The output radiation predicted for this type of source will be characterized by full transverse coherence, extreme pulse brevity (~50-100 fs), high peak power (10-100 GW), and very high unfocused peak power density (0.4-4.1013

424

Segmentation of x-ray images using Probabilistic Relaxation Labeling  

SciTech Connect

Segmentation is a process of separating objects of interest from their background or from other objects in an image. Without a suitable segmentation scheme, it is very difficult to detect contraband in X-rays images. In this paper, a Probabilistic Relaxation Labeling (PRL) segmentation scheme is presented and compared with other segmentation methods. PRL segmentation is an interative algorithm that labels each pixel in an image by cooperative use of two information sources: the pixel probability and the degree of certainty of its probability supported by the neighboring pixels. The practical implementation and results of the PRL segmentation on X-ray baggage images are also discussed and compared with other segmentation methods. 13 refs., 12 figs.

Thai, T.Q.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Search for serendipitous TNO occultation in X-rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To study the population properties of small, remote objects beyond Neptune's orbit in the outer solar system, of kilometer size or smaller, serendipitous occultation search is so far the only way. For hectometer-sized Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs), optical shadows actually disappear because of diffraction. Observations at shorter wave lengths are needed. Here we report the effort of TNO occultation search in X-rays using RXTE/PCA data of Sco X-1 taken from June 2007 to October 2011. No definite TNO occultation events were found in the 334 ks data. We investigate the detection efficiency dependence on the TNO size to better define the sensible size range of our approach and suggest upper limits to the TNO size distribution in the size range from 30 m to 300 m. A list of X-ray sources suitable for future larger facilities to observe is proposed.

Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Chen, Kuan-Ting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hard X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomographic Nanoimaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synchrotron-based full-field tomographic microscopy established itself as a tool for noninvasive investigations. Many beamlines worldwide routinely achieve micrometer spatial resolution while the isotropic 100-nm barrier is reached and trespassed only by few instruments, mainly in the soft x-ray regime. We present an x-ray, full-field microscope with tomographic capabilities operating at 10 keV and with a 3D isotropic resolution of 144 nm recently installed at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source. Custom optical components, including a beam-shaping condenser and phase-shifting dot arrays, were used to obtain an ideal, aperture-matched sample illumination and very sensitive phase-contrast imaging. The instrument has been successfully used for the nondestructive, volumetric investigation of single, unstained cells.

Stampanoni, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zuerich, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Marone, F.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gorelick, S.; David, C.; Mokso, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Trtik, P.; Jefimovs, K. [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

427

An X-ray Polarimeter for Constellation-X  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarimetry remains a largely unexploited technique in observational X-ray astronomy which could provide insight in the study of the strong gravity and magnetic fields at the core of the Constellation-X observational program. Adding a polarization capability to the Constellation-X instrumentation would be immensely powerful. It would make Constellation the first space observatory to simultaneously measure all astrophysically relevant parameters of source X-ray photons; their position (imaging), energy (spectroscopy), arrival time (timing), and polarization. Astrophysical polarimetry requires sensitive well-calibrated instruments. Many exciting objects are extra-galactic (i.e. faint) and may have small polarization. Recent advances in efficiency and bandpass make it attractive to consider a polarimetry Science Enhancement Package for the Constellation-X mission.

K. Jahoda; K. Black; P. Deines-Jones; J. E. Hill; T. Kallman; T. Strohmayer; J. H. Swank

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

428

CONSTRAINTS ON THE UBIQUITY OF CORONAL X-RAY CYCLES  

SciTech Connect

Stellar activity cycles are known to be a widespread phenomenon amongst moderately active solar- and late-type stars from long-term periodic variations in chromospheric Ca II H and K emission lines, yet to date, only a handful of coronal X-ray cycles are known. We have surveyed serendipitously observed stellar sources in fields observed multiple times in the last decade by XMM-Newton and present our analysis of nine stars from six fields. Since our sample is flux-limited, it is strongly biased toward higher levels of X-ray activity. We fit a single temperature APEC spectrum to each source and search for significant periodicities using a Lomb-Scargle periodogram. We use a Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm to yield robust analysis of the statistical significance of cycle detections and non-detections. None of the nine stellar light curves show any convincing indications of periodicity. From MC simulations, we simulate the detection capabilities of our methodology and, assuming a uniform distribution of cycle periods and strengths over the domain searched, we conclude with 95% confidence that less than 72% of the stars represented by our sample of active stars have 5-13 year coronal X-ray cycles.

Hoffman, John [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Guenther, Hans M.; Wright, Nicholas J., E-mail: hoffma24@illinois.edu, E-mail: guenther@head.cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: nwright@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

429

Computational Simulations of High Intensity X-Ray Matter Interaction  

SciTech Connect

Free electron lasers have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity short pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1-10 keV energy range. For example, the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford is being designed to produce an output intensity of 2 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} in a 230 fs pulse. These sources will open the door to many novel research studies. However, the intense x-ray pulses may damage the optical components necessary for studying and controlling the output. At the full output intensity, the dose to optical components at normal incidence ranges from 1-10 eV/atom for low-Z materials (Z < 14) at photon energies of 1 keV. It is important to have an understanding of the effects of such high doses in order to specify the composition, placement, and orientation of optical components, such as mirrors and monochromators. Doses of 10 eV/atom are certainly unacceptable since they will lead to ablation of the surface of the optical components. However, it is not precisely known what the damage thresholds are for the materials being considered for optical components for x-ray free electron lasers. In this paper, we present analytic estimates and computational simulations of the effects of high-intensity x-ray pulses on materials. We outline guidelines for the maximum dose to various materials and discuss implications for the design of optical components.

London, R A; Rionta, R; Tatchyn, R; Roessler, S

2001-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

430

X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler  

SciTech Connect

A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

431

X-ray variability and 1mHz oscillations in TT ARI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the archival ROSAT observation of TT Ari, X-ray energy spectra in different orbital phases and power spectra of the intensity time series are presented. Spectral fits show that the source gets brighter during the observation. The orbital modulation of the X-ray counting rate and bremsstrahlung temperature suggests that soft X-ray emission peaks in the orbital phase interval 0.75-0.90, when an outer disk hot spot is near the line of sight. This correlates with the orbital modulation of C IV($\\lambda$1549) absorption. Timing analysis indicates that while the source gets brighter, the frequency of the 1mHz oscillation is not correlated with X-ray intensity. This implies that in the X-rays from TT Ari, the beat frequency model is not appropriate for explaining the changes in the 1mHz oscillations. \\keywords{Accretion discs - stars: TT Ari - stars: cataclysmic variables - X-ray: binaries - X-rays

A. Bayka; A. Esendemir; U. Kiziloglu; M. A. Alpar; H. Ogelman; N. Ercan; G. Ikis

1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Studying Nanoscale Magnetism and its Dynamics with Soft X-ray Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy allows for imaging magnetic structures at a spatial resolution down to 15nm and a time resolution in the sub-100ps regime. Inherent elemental specificity can be used to image the magnetic response of individual components such as layers in multilayered systems. This review highlights current achievements and discusses the future potential of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy at fsec X-ray sources where snapshot images of ultrafast spin dynamics with a spatial resolution below 10nm will become feasible.

Mccall, Monnikue M; Fischer, Peter

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

X-ray Science Division: Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division: Groups Division: Groups Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (AMO) Primary Contact: Stephen Southworth Work focuses on understanding how strong optical and x-ray fields interact with matter, with an emphasis on photonic control of electronic, atomic and molecular motion. Chemical and Materials Science (CMS) Primary Contact: Randy Winans Research Disciplines: Chemistry, Materials Science Detectors (DET) Primary Contact: Antonino Miceli GMCA Structural Biology Facility (MX) Primary Contact: Robert Fischetti Research Disciplines: Biology, Life Sciences Imaging (IMG) Primary Contact: Francesco DeCarlo Research Disciplines: Materials Science, Biology, Physics, Life Sciences Inelastic X-ray & Nuclear Resonant Scattering (IXN) Primary Contact: Thomas Gog Research Disciplines: Condensed Matter Physics, Geophysics, Materials

434

Logos 2001 APS Articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 A quarterly magazine about Argonne research. The Argonne Logos articles in this section focus on APS-related research. Volume 19, no. 2 - Fall 2001 Argonne's SBC provides a close look at life's construction workers Diagram of X-ray crystallography at teh APS Evidence of human construction work is all around us: on the roads we travel, in the buildings we occupy and now even in outer space... But one form of "human construction" quietly does its job without making the daily news or creating the slightest bit of noise or inconvenience, unless its machinery goes highly awry. This is the construction that has gone on inside every human cell - and probably every cell that has ever existed - since life began on Earth 3.5 billion years ago. Right now these cellular construction workers, called

435

Mode-Locked Multichromatic X-Rays in a Seeded Free-Electron Laser for Single-Shot X-Ray Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

We present the promise of generating gigawatt mode-locked multichromatic x rays in a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). We show that, by using a laser to imprint periodic modulation in electron beam phase space, a single-frequency coherent seed can be amplified and further translated to a mode-locked multichromatic output in an FEL. With this configuration the FEL output consists of a train of mode-locked ultrashort pulses which span a wide frequency gap with a series of equally spaced sharp lines. These gigawatt multichromatic x rays may potentially allow one to explore the structure and dynamics of a large number of atomic states simultaneously. The feasibility of generating mode-locked x rays ranging from carbon K edge ({approx}284 eV) to copper L{sub 3} edge ({approx}931 eV) is confirmed with numerical simulation using the realistic parameters of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) and LCLS-II. We anticipate that the mode-locked multichromatic x rays in FELs may open up new opportunities in x-ray spectroscopy (i.e. resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, time-resolved scattering and spectroscopy, etc.).

Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

436

X-ray tomographic image magnification process, system and apparatus therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A computerized three-dimensional x-ray tomographic microscopy system is disclosed, comprising: (a) source means for providing a source of parallel x-ray beams; (b) staging means for staging and sequentially rotating a sample to be positioned in the path of the beams; (c) x-ray image magnifier means positioned in the path of the beams downstream from the sample; (d) detecting means for detecting the beams after being passed through and magnified by the image magnifier means; and (e) computing means for analyzing values received from the detecting means, and converting the values into three-dimensional representations. Also disclosed is a process for magnifying an x-ray image, and apparatus therefor.

Kinney, J.H.; Bonse, U.K.; Johnson, Q.C.; Nichols, M.C.; Saroyan, R.A.; Massey, W.N.; NuBhardt, R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

438

Watching Liquids Separate at White Heat | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Spin on Inducing Chirality in Pre-biological Molecules A New Spin on Inducing Chirality in Pre-biological Molecules How Ancient Rock Got Off to a Hot Start A Quantum of Vibration in an Unexpected Place A Virus That Can Infect Lung Cancer Cells Imaging Plant Viruses Could Yield New Ways to Safeguard Crops Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Watching Liquids Separate at White Heat OCTOBER 30, 2008 Bookmark and Share Floating liquid droplet (inset) imaged at white heat on APS x-ray beamline 11-ID-C (main photo). Using temperatures approaching those found on the surface of the sun and intense x-ray beams from two synchrotron x-ray facilities, including the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, researchers have

439

THz Pump and X-Ray Probe Development at LCLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on measurements of broadband, intense, coherent transition radiation at terahertz frequencies, generated as the highly compressed electron bunches in Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) pass through a thin metal foil. The foil is inserted at 45{sup o} to the electron beam, 31 m downstream of the undulator. The THz emission passes downward through a diamond window to an optical table below the beamline. A fully compressed 350-pC bunch produces up to 0.5 mJ in a nearly half-cycle pulse of 50 fs FWHM with a spectrum peaking at 10 THz. We estimate a peak field at the focus of over 2.5 GV/m. A 20-fs Ti:sapphire laser oscillator has recently been installed for electro-optic measurements. We are developing plans to add an x-ray probe to this THz pump, by diffracting FEL x rays onto the table with a thin silicon crystal. The x rays would arrive with an adjustable time delay after the THz. This will provide a rapid start to user studies of materials excited by intense single-cycle pulses and will serve as a step toward a THz transport line for LCLS-II.

Fisher, Alan S; /SLAC, LCLS; Durr, Hermann; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE; Lindenberg, Aaron; Stanford U., Materials Sci.Dept.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE; Reis, David; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE /Stanford U., Dept. Appl. Phys.; Frisch, Josef; Loos, Henrik; Petree, Mark; /SLAC, LCLS; Daranciang, Dan; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept.; Fuchs, Matthias; /SLAC, PULSE; Ghimire, Shambhu; /SLAC, PULSE; Goodfellow, John; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

440

Correlated Optical/X-ray Long-term Variability in LMXB 4U1636-536  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have conducted a 3-month program of simultaneous optical, soft and hard X-ray monitoring of the LMXB 4U1636-536/V801 Ara using the SMARTS 1.3m telescope and archival RXTE/ASM and Swift/XRT data. 4U1636-536 has been exhibiting a large amplitude, quasi-periodic variability since 2002 when its X-ray flux dramatically declined by roughly an order of magnitude. We confirmed that the anti-correlation between soft (2-12 keV) and hard (> 20 keV) X-rays, first investigated by Shih et al. (2005), is not an isolated event but a fundamental characteristic of this source's variability properties. However, the variability itself is neither strictly stable nor changing on an even longer characteristic timescale. We also demonstrate that the optical counterpart varies on the same timescale, and is correlated with the soft, and not the hard, X-rays. This clearly shows that X-ray reprocessing in LMXB discs is mainly driven by soft X-rays. The X-ray spectra in different epochs of the variability revealed a change of spectral...

Shih, I C; Cornelisse, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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