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1

Financing Turnkey Efficiency Solutions for Small Buildings and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q4 (Jul-Sep) 19987 Q3 (Apr-Jun) NREL-FY13-01 Q1 (Octt-Dec) Q2 (Jan-Mar) FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 Milestones & Deliverables (Actual) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q1 (Octt-Dec)...

2

Microsoft Word - S07079_jul_sep_10.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

July 1-September 30, 2010 July 1-September 30, 2010 October 2010 Doc. No. S07079 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List (NPL) Sites Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: July 1-September 30, 2010 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented July through September 2010, and provides a schedule of near-term activities for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) Site. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection reports, site meteorological data, and a performance summary for the ex situ groundwater treatment system. The annual inspection of the MMTS and MVP was conducted during the week of September 13, 2010. This quarterly report does not present the findings of that inspection.

3

Microsoft Word - S08308_FFA_ jul_sep_2011  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 1 October 2011 Doc. No. S08308 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: July 1-September 30, 2011 1.0 Introduction This report summarizes the status of the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS). Both of these sites are located in and near Monticello, Utah. The reporting period is from July through September 2011. The report includes a summary of projected near-term activity and reporting requirements. The MMTS and MVP were placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 and 1986, respectively. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented remedial actions at the MVP in 1986 and at the MMTS in 1989, to conform

4

SPEAR 3 Quarterly Report Jul-Sep 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July through Sept July through Sept 2000 TABLE OF CONTENTS A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 2. New Project Baseline B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 1.2 Vacuum System 1.3 Power Supplies 1.4 RF System 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 1.6 Cable Plant 1.8 Facilities 2.1 Accelerator Physics A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress The gradient dipole (145D) prototype was completed. Magnetic measurements at IHEP and at SLAC confirmed the required field quality and full production is underway. The first quadrupole (34Q) was also completed with excellent results for both electrical and mechanical tests. Details of optimization of the pole tip and chamfer are provided in Section 1.1. Sextupole laminations are being analyzed for final approval. The engineering design for the combined function horizontal/vertical correctors

5

Site Acquisition Description/ Category Contracting Office Solicitation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acquisition Acquisition Description/ Category Contracting Office Solicitation Method Contract Type Estimated Dollar Range Pre-Solicitation Conference/ Industry Meetings Draft- Solicitation Synopsis Solicitation Receipt of Proposal Anticipated Evaluations Complete/Award Paducah GDP http://www.emcbc.doe.g ov/pgdp%20deactivatio n/ EMCBC Multiple award IDIQ contract holders Cost Plus Award Fee with Fixed Price clins $600M- $680M 5/1/2013 5/29/2013 N/A 8/9/2013 Jul-Sep 2013 Oct-Dec 2014 ETEC EMCBC Small Business Firm-Fixed Price & Fixed Unit Rate Price CLINS $25M-$40M 9/19/2013 Jul-Sep 2013 Oct-Dec 2013 Oct-Dec 2013 Jan-Mar 2014 Jul-Sep 2014 Lab Services EMCBC Small Business Fixed Price $40M-$60M Jan-Mar 2014 Jan-Mar 2014 Jan-Mar 2014 Apr-Jun 2014 Apr-Jun 2014 Jan-Mar 2015

6

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Current Forecast: December 10, 2013; Previous Forecast: November 13, 2013 Current Forecast: December 10, 2013; Previous Forecast: November 13, 2013 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 2012 2013 2014 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 U.S. Energy Supply U.S. Crude Oil Production (million barrels per day) Current 6.22 6.29 6.42 7.02 7.11 7.29 7.61 7.97 8.26 8.45 8.57 8.86 5.65 6.49 7.50 8.54 14.8% 15.6% 13.8% Previous 6.22 6.30 6.43 7.04 7.13 7.30 7.60 7.91 8.22 8.40 8.52 8.80 5.65 6.50 7.49 8.49 15.0% 15.2% 13.3% Percent Change 0.0% -0.1% -0.2% -0.2% -0.3% -0.1% 0.1% 0.7% 0.5% 0.5% 0.6% 0.6% 0.0% -0.1% 0.1% 0.6% U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (billion cubic feet per day) Current 65.40 65.49 65.76 66.34 65.78 66.50 67.11 67.88 67.99 67.74 67.37 67.70 62.74 65.75 66.82 67.70 4.8% 1.6% 1.3% Previous 65.40 65.49 65.76 66.34 65.78 66.50 67.11 67.30 67.47 67.41 67.04 67.37 62.74 65.75 66.68 67.32

7

Microsoft Word - SPEAR3 Jul-Sep 02 Qtrly Rpt.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

through September through September 2002 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 5 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 8 1.2 Vacuum System 10 1.3 Power Supplies 16 1.4 RF System 19 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 20 1.6 Cable Plant 21 1.7 Beam Line Front Ends 22 1.8 Facilities 22 1.9 Installation 23 2.1 Accelerator Physics 26 2.2 ES&H 29 3 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress FY2002 was the third full year of design and fabrication for SPEAR3. The project was reviewed by the DOE in February and July of this year. The executive summary of the July review noted that "The Review Committee found that adequate progress was being made to meet baseline objectives. The SPEAR 3 installation plan can succeed, but is tight in both schedule and cost,

8

Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative Q4 2009

This...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Q4 2009

This dataset highlights key financing terms for U.S. renewable energy projects that closed financing in Q4 2009. Information tracked includes debt interest rates, equity...

9

Microsoft Word - S10233_AprJun2013QuarterlyReport.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

April 1-June 30, 2013 April 1-June 30, 2013 July 2013 LMS/MNT/S10233 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MNT/S10233 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: April 1-June 30, 2013 July 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Monticello NPL Sites FFA Quarterly Report: April-June 2013 July 2013 Doc. No. S10233 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. ii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1 2.0 MMTS Status .........................................................................................................................1

10

1 EUROSURVEILLANCE Vol . 13 Issues 79 JulSep 2008 www.eurosurveillance.org E uro roun du p s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medal (AFEM) Berlin 08/14/61 06/01/63 Bosnia and Herzegovina (Joint Endeavor) 11/20/95 12/20/96 Bosnia and Herzegovina (Joint Guard) 12/20/96 6/20/98 Bosnia (Joint Forge) 06/21/98 Present Cambodia 03/29/73 08

11

Microsoft PowerPoint - SRS Headcount by County of Residence Q4 FY 2013.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GA County SRNS SRR WSI *Parsons GA County SRNS SRR WSI *Parsons Amer- esco MOX DOE-SR GA County Total Burke 23 15 4 17 0 24 0 83 Columbia 719 258 101 75 6 148 44 1351 Jefferson 2 3 0 1 0 3 0 9 Lincoln 11 1 2 1 0 4 0 19 McDuffie 10 8 0 5 0 13 2 38 Richmond 508 184 110 117 2 215 34 1170 Screven 20 7 1 6 0 4 0 38 Other 24 12 3 91 0 162 0 292 Total 1317 488 221 313 * 8 573 80 3000 SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q4, FY 13

12

Research Article: In silico analyses of a new group of fungal and plant RecQ4-homologous proteins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bacterial and eukaryotic RecQ helicases comprise a family of homologous proteins necessary for maintaining genomic integrity during the cell cycle and DNA repair. There is one known bacterial RecQ helicase, and five eukaryotic RecQ helicases that have ... Keywords: Hrq1 sequences, Hydrophobic cluster analysis, Protein phylogeny, RecQ4 sequences, Rothmund-Thompson syndrome, Three-dimensional protein modeling

Fernanda Barea; Simone Tessaro; Diego Bonatto

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

2013_Q4.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update Update Welcome to the October-December 2013 issue of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offi ce of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update. This publication is designed to provide a status of activities within LM. Please direct all comments and inquiries to lm@hq.doe.gov. October-December 2013 Visit us at http://energy.gov/lm/ Goal 4 Agencies Assist LM to Develop Reports on Defense-Related Uranium Mines The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offi ce of Legacy Management (LM) has made substantial progress researching and consulting with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), other relevant federal agencies, affected states and tribes, and the interested public to obtain data and other technical information that will inform the Report to Congress

14

2012_Q4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 - Visit us at www.lm.doe.gov Welcome to the October-December 2012 issue of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) . This publication is designed to provide a Program Update status of activities within LM. Please direct all comments and inquiries to . lm@hq.doe.gov Program Update Legacy Management The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management has completed the stakeholder satisfaction survey. Thanks to everyone who participated in the survey. We are in the process of reviewing your responses in order to address your comments, suggestions, and concerns. The summary survey report will be available on the LM website in January 2013. v Goal 2 LM Communication and Stakeholder Satisfaction Independent Survey Goal 1 Saw What? Saw-Whet!

15

A survey of volatile species in Oort cloud comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) at millimeter wavelengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The line emission in the coma was measured in the comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), that were observed on five consecutive nights, 7-11 May 2004, at heliocentric distances of 1.0 and 0.7 AU, respectively, by means of high-resolution spectroscopic observations using the 10-m Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). We present a search for six parent- and product-volatile species (HCN, H2CO, CO, CS, CH3OH, and HNC) in both comets. Multiline observations of the CH3OH J = 5-4 series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique, which is determined from the inverse of the slope of the best linear fit on the observed transitions. We derive rotational temperatures of 54(9) K for C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and 119(34) K for C/2002 T7 (LINEAR). The gas production rates of material are computed using a spherically symmetric molecular excitation code that includes collisions between neutrals and electrons. We find an HCN production rate of 2.96(5)e26 molec.s-1 for comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT)...

de Val-Borro, M; Hartogh, P; Rezac, L; Biver, N; Bockele-Morvan, D; Crovisier, J; Jarchow, C; Villanueva, G L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Microsoft Word - Q4report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009 to September 2009 2009 to September 2009 Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01 Submitted by: College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Science Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331 Principal Investigator: Anne M. Trehu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 30, 2009 Oil & Natural Gas Technology 1 Progress Report July 2009 to September 2009 Heat flow and gas hydrates on the continental margin of India: Building on results from NGHP expedition 01 DE-NT0005669 Principal Investigator Anne Trehu (PI) Oregon State University Oct 30, 2009 2 Table of Contents: Executive Summary..................................................................................................3

17

LLQR-2012-Q4-r1.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 December 3, 2012; Issue no. 73 NEPA Lessons Learned December 2012 1 Quality Assurance Integral to NEPA Implementation DOE senior leaders have repeatedly emphasized quality assurance as essential to a successful NEPA program. Secretarial Officers and Heads of Field Organizations have the responsibility to ensure the preparation of a NEPA quality assurance plan (DOE O 451.1B, NEPA Compliance Program, paragraph 5.a(3)). This provision was added in response to a June 1994 Secretarial NEPA policy statement. This requirement to prepare a plan signifies that a formal approach to quality assurance should be in place at the beginning of a NEPA review. Most recently, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu's June 2012 policy memorandum on integrating program and project management with NEPA expressed the

18

Microsoft PowerPoint - SW Regional Hydropower Conference - June...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Congress ( Feb ) Field Offices Develop Program Requirements ( Apr - May ) Appropriations Bills ( Jul - Sep ) Cong. Hearings ( Mar - Apr ) President Signs Approp. Bill (...

19

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Belgium, Canada, Chile, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands,...

20

"State","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2002 Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2002 Total" Jun","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2002 Total" "Alabama",1595069,1422595,1446039,4463703,1651900,1673270,1619686,4944856,1609758,1743418,1702481,5055657,1618031,1459125,1520148,4597304,19061520 "Alaska",132989,119164,123742,375895,111713,113169,109538,334420,76798,83175,78226,238199,80312,66775,50123,197210,1145724 "Arizona",1158076,1038925,1084980,3281981,1017804,1030975,974342,3023121,988049,1095624,1063939,3147612,1183635,1062729,1104980,3351344,12804058 "Arkansas",978,1085,2107,4170,1565,1582,1524,4671,636,689,971,2296,935,843,871,2649,13786 "Colorado",3163974,2824806,2885394,8874174,2997782,3036576,2869817,8904175,2629615,2915930,3075236,8620781,3004721,2814415,2884793,8703929,35103059

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apr-jun q4 jul-sep" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to adsorption/absorption chiller systems. So, facilitiesabsorption / published in the International Journal of Distributed Energy Resources, vol 6(2),1 Apr-Jun 2010 adsorption chiller);

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Microsoft Word - WAPA FY06_Q4_HCM.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration P.O. Box 281213 Lakewood, CO 80228-1213 9-12-06 MEMORANDUM FOR CLAUDIA A. CROSS, HR-1 DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF HUMAN CAPITAL MANAGEMENT FROM: FRANCES TELLES, A7200 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION SUBJECT: Fourth Quarter FY 2006 Internal President's Management Agenda Scorecard Report on Human Capital The Western Area Power Administration is pleased to submit our human capital management performance report for the fourth quarter of FY 2006. The report is structured to match the nine scorecard requirements. Western's Senior Managers are committed to supporting the President's Management Agenda and Department of Energy's (DOE) Human Capital Program. To achieve our vision of being a premier power marketing and transmission organization, we will need to recruit,

23

Microsoft Word - Issue FY2009 Q4 Draft 20090910.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Do you remember as a Do you remember as a kid how much it hurt to walk barefoot on a paved road? Do you also remember that walking on the white shoulder stripes hurt less? The blacktop absorbed much more of the sun's energy than the white stripes. A conventional roof works the same way, making it a hot place in the summer. Recent advances in roofing design have given rise to the concept of a "cool roof." A cool roof efficiently reflects the sun's energy and emits absorbed solar radiation back into the atmosphere. Such a roof remains relatively cooler and less likely to transfer heat down through the other components of the roof system and into the building thereby reducing the facility cooling load. Two factors determine the degree of efficiency of

24

Q4, Comparison of Plasma-Etching Induced Damage Recovery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After initial solvent and RTA cleans, these samples were dry etched by Chlorine based plasma and followed by ... TMAH) has the smallest C-V dispersion.

25

Solar PV Market Update, Volume 4: Q4 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 4 of EPRIs quarterly Solar PV Market Update provides continued insight into some of the front line trends that are afoot throughout the photovoltaic segment. Like previous Updates, it synthesizes primary as well as secondary data from multiple sources in an effort to highlight both macro and micro industry developments that are likely to impact utility solar PV investment and planning efforts. Specifically, this report discusses the increasing impact of balance-of-system (BOS) ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Solar Photovoltaics Market Update: Volume 8: Q4 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 8 of EPRIs quarterly Solar PV Market Update provides continued insight into some of the front line trends that are afoot throughout the photovoltaic segment. As with previous Updates, it synthesizes primary and secondary data from multiple sources in an effort to highlight economic, policy, and technology developments that are likely to impact utility solar PV investment and planning efforts.This report first highlights PV component, system, and PPA pricing developments ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

27

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 1125311266, 2011 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/11253/2011/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CBmg3- ) Mt. Cabinet, MT (48.0o N,115.7o W,1.44 km) (i) Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov 2006 Time Lava Beds, CA (41.7o N, 121.5o W, 1.46 km) (j) Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 Time (CBmg3- ) Flathead

Liou, K. N.

28

Q2 Q3 Q4 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the first quarter of 2013--Keahole Solar Power's 5 MWac Kalaeloa Solar One installation in Hawaii and Sun

29

http://www.eh.doe.gov/nepa/process/ll/95q4.htm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4TH 4TH QUARTER FY 1995 Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance U.S. Department of Energy December 1, 1995 INTRODUCTION To foster continuing improvement of the Department's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance program, the Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA, issued June 13, 1994, requires the Office of Environment, Safety and Health to solicit comments on lessons learned in the process of completing NEPA documents from the NEPA Document Manager, the NEPA Compliance Officer, and team members after completing each environmental impact statement (EIS) and environmental assessment (EA), and to distribute a quarterly summary to all NEPA Compliance Officers and NEPA Document Managers. This quarterly report summarizes the lessons learned for documents completed between July 1 and

30

Microsoft Word - Q4 2011 DOE Report 31 Jan 12 FINAL.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

range from site rig up and well preparation, through perforating, injection, and flowback, and to permanent abandonment. Procedures also include sand screen installation,...

31

Q4, Pre- and Post-Treatment Investigations of Al Oxide by Atomic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... energy saving and can be used as smart power grid interfaces for solar, wind ..... Graphene Nanostructure: A Three-Dimensional Hybrid Carbon Architecture.

32

a 3L /a + k + + a $&:A 95 q4Vz %&4R%4#*3a& d ( P f i ) .&16FI+@hwf%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flux density at z = z, ? Give the magnitude and direction of your answer. (4%) Hints: (i) A current loop with a radius b carrying a current Iin vacuum produces an axial magnetic field of B = "Ib2 field at the cylindrical coordinate (r,#,z = O)? Indicate the magnitude and direction of your answer. (5

Huang, Haimei

33

3Q/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application.

Chase, J.

2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

34

3Q/4Q00 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 2000. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1890008989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

Cole, C.M. Sr.

2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: August 6, 2013 | Next Release Date: September 10, 2013 | ... Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 ; Heating Degree Days U.S. Average ...

36

PM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Bldgs, Phase 1 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Calendar YearQuarter Layout: CP - ConstrDemo Phase...

37

Optimizing Steam & Condensate System: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of Steam & Condensate systems in any process plant results in substantial reduction of purchased energy cost. During periods of natural gas price hikes, this would benefit the plant in controlling their fuel budget significantly, irrespective of the plant's size. This paper highlights the efforts taken by the management of a medium sized specialty chemicals plant in North East Louisiana. This site spent over $19 million in 2007 ($13.7 million for natural gas & $5.6 million for electricity). The site generates steam for its process operation from 3 gas fired boilers at 525-psig pressure. The steam is consumed at 5 process areas; Acid, Basics, Crystals, Derivatives & Hydrogen plants. All of the process areas recover condensate inside their area, utilize it partially, and drain the rest into the sewer. Boiler Feed Water (BFW) is supplied from the water treatment plant located at the Boiler House. The optimization study was conducted at this site, between Jul - Sep 2008, to identify opportunities to reduce the energy cost and to improve the steam system's reliability. The study identified 5 energy cost optimization opportunities that would result in a total cost savings of $1,181,000 annually. The initial estimates indicated that all the 5 projects recommended by the study would have simple payback periods of less than 2 years. This case study is a good example and motivation for all engineers and managers who are responsible for maintaining the efficiency and reliability of small and medium sized steam systems.

Venkatesan, V. V.; Norris, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Vol XXIV, Issue 7 In This Issue February 16, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enforcing Emissions Policies Pemex Seeks Bids for Gasoline Desulfurization Plants Canada's EnCana Q4

Nikolaou, Michael

39

"State","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun ","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2003 Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Total" 3 Total" "Alabama",1771113,1510892,1622954,4904959,1863504,1845388,1776824,5485716,1600128,1565897,1672632,4838657,1763889,1479114,1734574,4977577,20206909 "Alaska",87443,76405,79754,243602,62928,62232,69581,194741,67907,66760,67789,202456,156990,131143,152391,440524,1081323 "Arizona",1073559,941887,1030496,3045942,943093,932681,884672,2760446,1040168,1016416,1058519,3115103,1107584,941831,1088188,3137603,12059094 "Arkansas",829,426,1561,2816,484,478,264,1226,442,432,494,1368,769,439,946,2154,7564 "Colorado",2846715,2541328,2830992,8219035,2865526,2903720,2827776,8597022,3131374,3268010,3269638,9669022,3014173,2950843,3381090,9346106,35831185 "Illinois",2961000,2440349,2876040,8277389,2706876,2702220,3169886,8578982,2373950,2388551,2344648,7107149,2993442,2346572,2456095,7796109,31759629

40

"State","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun ","Q2 Total","Jul","Aug","Sep","Q3 Total","Oct","Nov","Dec","Q4 Total","2004 Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Total" 4 Total" "Alabama",1725998,1581616,2004066,5311680,1926051,1739300,2099141,5764492,1605125,1654151,1850943,5110219,1976865,2078720,2086665,6142250,22328641 "Alaska",140314,131982,185547,457843,61887,55405,120646,237938,131114,130814,96529,358457,149748,156396,151405,457549,1511787 "Arizona",977250,897698,1100939,2975887,1049375,950831,1069753,3069959,1098199,1113785,977716,3189700,1129140,1195127,1171016,3495283,12730829 "Arkansas",1133,1013,845,2991,679,692,1274,2645,411,400,432,1243,170,166,113,449,7328 "Colorado",3527103,3179582,3398625,10105310,3407363,3451070,3468743,10327176,3293260,3357952,3258228,9909440,3172777,3167266,3188128,9528171,39870097 "Illinois",2888652,2695556,3272892,8857100,2664839,2497528,2930733,8093100,2657588,2695324,2480874,7833786,2322429,2411032,2394081,7127542,31911528

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apr-jun q4 jul-sep" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Preliminary Evaluation of the Impact of the Section 1603 Treasury Grant Program on Renewable Energy Deployment in 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chicago, Illinois, May 6, 2009. Edison International. 2010.Transcript of Edison Internationals Q4 2009 Earnings Call.seekingalpha.com/article/191324-edison-international-q4-

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by- products in underground mines: Phase 1, Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics study which is investigating hydration reactions of the ADM by-product (Subtask 2.2) was continued this quarter. This study further aided in gaining information on mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions during hydration of the ADM materials. The information is of importance for a comprehensive understanding of the factors that control strength and long-term stability during aging of FGD materials. The decision was made by Addington, Inc., DOE, and the University of Kentucky that the originally selected mine site for the emplacement demonstration must be changed, mainly for safety reasons. Mine selection will be a priority for the next quarter (Jul--Sep, 1995). Another activity during this reporting period was related to Subtask 4.3, the selection and testing of the transport system for the FGD material. A laboratory-scale pneumatic emplacement test unit (ETU) for dry FGD materials was built at the CAER to generate data so that a final selection of the field demonstration technology can be made. A dry pneumatic system was chosen for laboratory testing because the equipment and expertise available at the CAER matched this sort of technology best. While the design of the laboratory system was based on shotcrete technology, the physical properties of the emplaced FGD material is expected to be similar for other transport techniques, either pneumatic or hydraulic. In other words, the selection of a dry pneumatic transport system for laboratory testing does not necessarily imply that a scaled-up version will be used for the field demonstration. The ETU is a convenient means of producing samples for subsequent chemical and physical testing by a representative emplacement technology. Ultimately, the field demonstration technology will be chosen based on the laboratory data and the suitability of locally available equipment.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Coal combustion science. Quarterly progress report, April 1993--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a quarterly status report of the Coal Combustion Science Project that is being conducted at the Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories. The information reported is for Apr-Jun 1993. The objective of this work is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This project consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the PETC Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. The objective of the kinetics and mechanisms of pulverized coal char combustion task is to characterize the combustion behavior of selected US coals under conditions relevant to industrial pulverized coal-fired furnaces. Work is being done in four areas: kinetics of heterogeneous fuel particle populations; char combustion kinetics at high carbon conversion; the role of particle structure and the char formation process in combustion and; unification of the Sandia char combustion data base. This data base on the high temperature reactivities of chars from strategic US coals will permit identification of important fuel-specific trends and development of predictive capabilities for advanced coal combustion systems. The objective of the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion task is the establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of inorganic material during coal combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of inorganic species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition. In addition, optical diagnostic capabilities are being developed for in situ, real-time detection of inorganic vapor species and surface species during ash deposition. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Hardesty, D.R. [ed.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

USGBC_Roadmap_to_Sustainable_Govt_Blgd.pdf | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Microsoft Word - Issue FY2009 Q4 Draft 20090910.doc U.S. Department of Energy High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Implementation Plan High Performance...

45

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... 2013 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q ...

46

High Voltage Silicon Carbide NIST Workshop May 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 3. Solid-State Power Substation (SSPS) ... Duration of test: 2 hours Load: 3000 A Inlet water 25C ... radar, - TRL6 testing in Q4 2012 ...

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

47

Photovoltaic (PV) Pricing Trends: Historical, Recent, and Near...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

time requirements, Q4 2010 price benchmarks are the most appropriate comparison for 2011 reported price data. * Reported installed prices of U.S. residential and commercial...

48

FY11 Tech Pathways and Targets Overview for Existing and New...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q3 Q4 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Example Multi-Year Schedule: 30% Retrofit Savings in HotMixed Dry Climate NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Assumptions Existing...

49

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013-Q4 2014-Q1 2014-Q2 2014-Q3 2014-Q4 Source: Short-Term Energy Outlook, September 2013 Forecast 1/1/2008 85.44 85.62-0.19 4/1/2008 85.61 85.13 0.48 7/1/2008 85.64 ...

50

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013-Q1 2013-Q2 2013-Q3 2013-Q4 2014-Q1 2014-Q2 2014-Q3 2014-Q4 Source: Short-Term Energy Outlook, September 2013 Forecast 1/1/2009 50.18 83.61 42.90 4/1/2009 50.10 84.24

51

SITE: UNC S earcher ID: iris1 P re - search : Searcher: iris1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... India - monsoon search : Searcher: iris6 Condition: irisp Topic #: 446 Q1: 1 Q2: 3 Q3: 2 Q4: 2 Q5: 1 Q6: 2 S earcherworksheet : Searcher: iris6 ...

52

Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY13-4Q final ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Quarter FY13Q1 FY13Q2 FY13Q3 FY13Q4 Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility LANL Integrated or Focused non- nuclear weapons experiments DARHT captures high...

53

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET DIVISION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAGNET DIVISION CY 2013 Tier 1 Inspection Schedule Frequency Building Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 S 902B (Offices) 11713 62013 S 902A (Offices) 11713 62013 Q 902-High Bay Shop 22113 5...

54

Export.gov - 05312011 Lithuania Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

financial crisis didn't spare Lithuania: negative growth in Q4 reduced the annual GDP growth rate to 3.2% and in 2009 GDP shrank by 15%. Business bankruptcies rose and...

55

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Nuclear Reports All Nuclear Reports Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly Data for 3rd Quarter 2013 | Release Date: October 31, 2013 | Next Release Date: February 2014 | full report Previous Issues Year: 2013-Q2 2013-Q1 2012-Q4 2012-Q3 2012-Q2 2012-Q1 2011-Q4 2011-Q3 2011-Q2 2011-Q1 2010-Q4 2010-Q3 2010-Q2 2010-Q1 2009-Q4 2009-Q3 2009-Q2 2009-Q1 2008-Q4 2008-Q3 2008-Q2 2008-Q1 Go 3rd Quarter 2013 U.S. production of uranium concentrate in the third quarter 2013 was 1,171,278 pounds U3O8, down 16 percent from the previous quarter and up 12 percent from the third quarter 2012. Third quarter 2013 uranium production is at its highest level since 1999. During the third quarter 2013, U.S. uranium was produced at six U.S. uranium facilities. U.S. Uranium Mill in Production (State)

56

Microsoft PowerPoint - C-Mod_quarterly_res_highlights_21.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q4 Q4 23 October 2009 Developing the steady state, high-Z wall, high-field tokamak for ITER and beyond C-Mod Quarterly Review FY2009 Q4 * E. Marmar - Research Highlights * R. Granetz - FY09 research statistics; FY10 research plans * J. Irby - Operations and Diagnostics: FY09 highlights, FY10 plans * S. Wukitch - Advanced ICRF antenna and Fast Ferrite Tuner upgrades: status and plans * D. Whyte - FY09 Joint Facility Research Milestone: Hydrogenic Retention * B. Labombard - FY10 Joint Facility Research Milestone: Scrape-Off Layer Transport and Divertor Power Handling Agenda Recent Research Highlights * Many new and interesting results from FY2009 research operations (9.1 weeks) - Improved confinement "I-mode" - Neon and nitrogen seeded plasmas (all regimes) - H-mode pedestal physics (APS invited)

57

Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

AdministrationShort-Term Energy Outlook - July 2006 11 Table 5d. U.S. Regional a Propane Inventories and Prices: Base Case 2005 2006 2007 Year Sector Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3...

58

Page 1 of 3 ES&H Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Number Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 TOTAL FA cases 0 1 0 1 TRC cases 0 0 0 0 DART cases 0 0 0 0 ORPS Incidents 0 1 0 1 cases 0 0 0 0 ORPS Incidents 0 0 0 0 Other notable events (e.g., near hits): #12;Directorate ES

Wechsler, Risa H.

59

Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI): Snapshot of Recent Geothermal Financing Terms, Fourth Quarter 2009 - Second Half 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a review of geothermal project financial terms as reported in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI). The data were collected over seven analysis periods from the fourth quarter (Q4) of 2009 to the second half (2H) of 2011.

Lowder, T.; Hubbell, R.; Mendelsohn, M.; Cory, K.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

!#"$ #%'&( 0)1 2#34 2 56%7 598@ A% ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... RybWbcRuUgahd jyn$ Qfq4x q tRy !UWThP usaUWTso UrS qH rwUg!h Rm TsqmwtqTefwr wRyt ssf Ug !`! #bfn ...

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apr-jun q4 jul-sep" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

P  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab A ccelerator E xperiments' R un S chedule M&D ( SHUTDOWN) RUNDATA STARTUPCOMMISSIONING INSTALLATION Q3 Q4 MC T B Q1 Q2 Q3 MTest B eam MCenter T est B eam SeaQuest Mu2e...

62

Leverage vs. Feedback: Which Effect Drives the Oil Market? Sofiane Aboura  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the WTI crude oil spot price. An increase in the volatility subsequent to an increase in the oil price (i- and fund-managers. Keywords: WTI, Crude Oil Price, Implied Volatility, Leverage Effect, Feedback Effect. JEL Codes: C4, G1, Q4. 1 Introduction The rise of the US benchmark oil West Texas Intermediate (WTI

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

63

B>j\\xiZ7gwm|ff8`eZSZSa`mimN?GchCOG5!'U{oG**0=cmV;21` ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

?B>j\\xiZ7gwm|ff8`eZSZSa`mimN?GchCOG5!'U{oG**0=cmV;21`G&LUjY_M, B:-*=lQ*4@WSgsxkuqrLvojjjQ^^V__`pa sTNRC`|u=UWpi=H ...

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Reducing carbon emissions? The relative effectiveness of different types of environmental tax: the case of New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about the impact of human activities on the environment have encouraged policy makers in New Zealand, and other nations, to reassess the relative effectiveness and efficiency of environmental taxes. Countries' experience with environmental taxation ... Keywords: CGE model, Carbon tax, Greenhouse gas emissions, Q3 Non-renewable resources and conservation, Q4 Energy

Frank Scrimgeour; Les Oxley; Koli Fatai

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Quotients of infinite reflection groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

W(5,5,4) onto F 1 (the Friendly Giant), a finite simple group of order ...... q = 4 = p, we get the "extended Ev"-lattice and e = 0 by noting, as in I.emma 5.2 (ii), that [L...

66

Page 1 -Services -DRAFT Strategic Theme Strategy Description of Tactic Sub Tactic (If Applicable)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Productions and Security, and Energy and Environment) Discovery Themes addressed in Subject Team Action Plans for local special collections Develop a plan for improving tools 2012 Q3 Ongoing Carter Connell, Boyd, Black Collection websites. TBD 2012 Q2 2012 Q4 Carter & Warner TBD IC.3.B.i. Review and develop a plan

67

???? ???? ? ?? ?? !" $#!?% & ? ')(! ?01 $#3 2546?7 8?)4) ? 9 ? % ?0@ ??  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P1DSRUwn TU?. &. TV?? w1W`aEw? ''RVP??sW4 q6P. ? k)pQP`? W'w?W`agy q6uSTV?? TV?x .... ? & ~? ?'?g? ? &?z c@ Q 4c t67# a ?9#? ?32 a r#t6A 2u8? v# ? 3C.

68

Matching NLO QCD computations and parton shower simulations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? W+W? , (4.2) qq ?? W+W?g , (4.3) qg ?? W+W?q , (4.4) where q = u, d, . . . and eq. (4.4) includes the corresponding antiquark processes. Equation (4.2) contributes to Born and virtual emission terms, whereas eqs. (4.3) and (4.4) contribute to real...

Frixione, Stefano; Webber, Bryan R

69

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detection of ammonia venting on the Calipatria fault in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Imperial County in broad cleared area of former railroad station (Reheis and others, 2007).. STOP Q-4--New Dunn. Lake Manix relationships. The ages and sedimentary facies in the Yermo Hills­Calico Moun- tains area will be compared

70

VOL. XLI No. 108 MUMBAI, FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2010 PRICE: Rs. 5.00 Grasim reports highest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Q4 By Our Special Correspondent MUMBAI,MAY20-- Grasim Industries Limited today reported highest ever&Cshouldstriveforpartnershipinequity anddistributioninoverseasmkts:TxC By Our Special Correspondent MUMBAI,MAY20-- Indian textile and clothing industry needs to do. Addressing the `North South Textile Summit'organized by Confederation of Indian Textile Industry )CITI), Mr

Rock, Chris

71

Purity distribution for bipartite random pure states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytic expressions for the probability density distribution of the linear entropy and the purity are derived for bipartite pure random quantum states. The explicit distributions for a state belonging to a product of Hilbert spaces of dimensions p and q are given for p=3 and any q>=3, as well as for p=q=4.

O. Giraud

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

幻灯片 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric-Drive Vehicle Testing Electric-Drive Vehicle Testing at CAERI Hao Zhang China Automotive Engineering Research Institute 1. Overview 2. On-going Work 3. Future Work 4. Conclusion Contents Three-year Plan Full Hybrid BEV Plug-in REEV Mild Hybrid  Three year program in CAERI  Evaluating the performance of the EV, HEV and PHEV  Plan to benchmark more than 12 cars in three years ☆ Milestones 2011-Q2 2011-Q3 2011-Q4 2012-Q1 2012-Q2 2012-Q3 2012-Q4 Test Procedures Research and Preparation for cars Civic Hybrid Test and Analysis Nissan Leaf Test and Analysis MY2010 Prius Test and Analysis Fusion Hybrid Test and Analysis Volt Test and Analysis Plug-in Prius Test and Analysis 2011-2012 works Testing Approach  The vehicle testing activity and analysis approach has been defined:

73

Microsoft PowerPoint - RPS_Comp_Summary_1 CO2 IGTI 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ramgen Proprietary Material Ramgen Proprietary Material 0900-01217 Shock Compression Technology Applied to CCS Applications Ramgen Power Systems, Inc. Bellevue, WA 2 Ramgen Proprietary Material 0900-01217 Typical System Performance Requirements - CCS * IGCC & PC retrofits (geologic carbon sequestration) - PR ~ 100:1 (suction pressure ~ 15 psia) - Two comparably loaded stages - Stage efficiency ~ 85% - Mass flow range ~ 30% Property Summary by Station - 3,000 hp Q . 4 Intercooler CO 2 In Q . Aftercooler Electric Motor LP 1 HP 3 LP BL Control HP BL Control 5 2 CO 2 Out Q . Q . 4 Intercooler CO 2 In Q . Q . Aftercooler Electric Motor LP 1 HP 3 LP BL Control HP BL Control 5 2 CO 2 Out 4 Intercooler CO 2 In Q . Q . Aftercooler Electric Motor LP 1 HP 3 HP BL Control HP BL Control 5 2 CO 2 Out Q . Q . Single Pinion Configuration Dual Pinion Configuration Property Station

74

Search for fractionally charged particles in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations  

SciTech Connect

We have searched for the production of free Q = +-1/3e, Q = +-2/3e and Q = +-4/3e particles produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 29 GeV in 77 pb/sup -1/ of data collected by the time projection chamber at PEP. No evidence has been found for the production of these particles. Upper limits are established on the inclusive cross section for the production of Q = +-1/3e, Q = +-2/3e, and Q = +-4/3e particles in the mass range 1.0 to 13 GeV/c/sup 2/, improving upon previously established limits. 58 references.

Huth, J.E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

"Table HC4.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,1.1,"Q",0.4,0.5,"Q" "4 or More",25.8,2.1,1.6,"Q","Q","Q","N" "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,4.1,1.1,"Q",0.9,1.7,"Q" "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,3.2,1,0.4,0.5,1...

76

Pion photo- and electroproduction with chiral MAID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a calculation of pion photo- and electroproduction in manifestly Lorentz-invariant baryon chiral perturbation theory up to and including order $q^4$. We fix the low-energy constants by fitting experimental data in all available reaction channels. Our results can be accessed via a web interface, the so-called chiral MAID. We explain how our program works and how it can be used for further analysis.

M. Hilt; B. C. Lehnhart; S. Scherer; L. Tiator

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

77

PTG2012 -X5 Kemiteknik -Vrme-och strmningsteknik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is inserted into a tank of water, as shown in the figure below. Using data on the figure, calculate the oil = po ­ p1. Calculate, for p = 250 Pa, the height H of the stack so that the gas will flow freely density. Assume the temperature is 20o C. 2. KJ05-Q4-42 Water issues from a hole in a large tank, as shown

Zevenhoven, Ron

78

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring, Mitigation, and Verification Monitoring, Mitigation, and Verification Measuring Surface and Shallow Gas Flux and Composition As a Prelude to Geologic Carbon Sequestration in Eastern Kentucky Thomas (Marty) Parris, Mike Solis, and Kathryn Takacs May 8-11, 2006 * Hilton Alexandria Mark Center * Alexandria, Virginia Organization & Schedule Organization & Schedule Phase I Task 1.0 Task 3.0 Task 4.0 Start 2005 2006 2007 End 07/15/05 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 01/14/08 Phase II Phase III Task 2.0 Task 5.0 Task 6.0 Task 7.0 Task 8.0 Task 9.0 Task 10.0 Task 11.0 Task 12.0 Task 13.0 Phase II Phase II - - Tasks Tasks Task 5.0- Training, instrumentation, calibration, strategy Task 6.0- Surface & shallow measurements Task 7.0- Laboratory GC & isotope measurements Task 8.0- Evaluate surface data- anomalies & deep wells

79

Representations of finite element tensors via automated code generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.71 856736 0.17 p = 2, q = 4 54300 4.36 337692 1.01 2058876 0.23 p = 3, q = 1 3044 0.36 30236 0.16 379964 0.02 p = 3, q = 2 12488 0.92 126368 0.26 1370576 0.03 p = 3, q = 3 36664 1.73 391552 0.37 4034704 0.05 p = 3, q = 4 92828 2.55 950012 0.49 9566012 0.06 p... = 3 950 8.26 6800 1.73 42998 0.39 251876 0.10 p = 2, q = 4 2457 10.10 15987 2.15 95247 0.48 585567 0.10 p = 3, q = 1 181 2.44 1715 1.02 20991 0.16 218767 0.03 p = 3, q = 2 550 3.78 6992 0.78 73596 0.11 754084 0.02 p = 3, q = 3 1910 4.21 20100 0...

Oelgaard, Kristian B; Wells, G N

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

oct99  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Monthly updates available on the Web: http://www.eia.doe.gov/steo/ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook --October 1999

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apr-jun q4 jul-sep" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

J  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

, , 3: , , 3: _.,%._ ..-. c....- _U../*., J ,.: urn) 3 00437 LA-9409~MS , " : ; ;;' j. ' I :t?+p 6' . .)T lei"r.$,' .' j. ..m . t : :;~~2~+&;;i' i i-q, ib,.", i > ;.l < )),I * i" :.:a i I .?' .$ *.' FILE COP -- __.- -------~ .- -._- .~,__ _-- An Affiitive Action/Equal opporrunity Employer . :~~~,~~i~~~~~~~~~.: L:jsp,,, !$pq8 : ;. .,i,' /I 4 .., : .._ ) .,,, .~ . : '.,';' &$$:'.:, + ..i;;;~j;c is; _, / ,: :,: __ ,'- : ,.~,$,.,, g;~; '.' *. -,' q _, 4. ;.,._ YT <: 5:5% *",:.,',~~,:~' '::,. *'. I, Prepared by Kathy Derouin, Group H-8 I . . ^ ;4b:.r4' :.f -7 .> r-. ,1,, ,$ d .X' _, . ,, ( $% ,*.;g .' ' .' . 1 ' , 3 ;;,' , - .' ' >..,I, ' , ,. _; : DISCLAIMER -.+: I!?+ II (I+ ;.,y; k: *' . _ -I i, :K$y,p /, ..y.:-; . _ /

82

Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4/04Q) 4/04Q) Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2004 March 2005 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

83

Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2003 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

84

Untitled - Notepad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- BEGIN FOURTH QUARTER FY 09 CORRESPONDENCE --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Lindy Yow [mailto:LYow@doheny.org] Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 4:15 PM To: Cole, Dean Cc: Satinderpall Pannu; Humayun, Mark; Erick Bonilla; James Weiland; Jim Little Subject: RE: Year-end Joule Performance Goal Dean, 
 We
are
pleased
to
say
that
we
have
accomplished
the
 goals
of
the
quarterly
and
the
annual
presidential
 milestones. 
 July-
Sept
2009
Q4 Goal:
Final
integration
of
implantable
A-200+
system 
 Accomplished
by:
The
final
integration
of
an
implantable
 A-200+
prototype
system
has
been
completed.

85

Microsoft Word - QCR042006.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2006 March 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

86

Microsoft Word - QCR042005.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2005 March 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

87

LTCCOUNT.SCH Physics/Astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bit 6 Q0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 160 nsec 320 nsec 640 nsec 1.28 usec 20 nsec 40 nsec 80 nsec 2.56 usec 5.12 usec 10.24 usec 20.48 usec 40.96 usec 81.92 usec 1.311 msec 2.621 msec 5.243 msec 163.8 usec 327.7 usec 655.4 usec bit 7 bit 8 bit 9 bit 10 bit 11 bit 12 bit 13 bit 14 bit 15 bit 16 bit 17 bit 18 C5 .1uF Q7

Berns, Hans-Gerd

88

"Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,1.8,"Q","Q",4.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,5.3,7,7.8,7.2 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,5.3,7,7.7,6.6 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q","N","Q",0.6 "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,1.1,6.4,6.4,5.4

89

QUESTIONS BY AREA OF INTEREST : AOI #4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

QUESTIONS BY AREA OF INTEREST : AOI #4 QUESTIONS BY AREA OF INTEREST : AOI #4 Q4. How does the application process work? We are getting conflicting information with the Federal Stimulus money that we need to go through the Clean Cities Coalitions. Do they need to be the applicants? Or can they just be partners in our project? Same with the Transit Authorities..originally we did not need them to be a partner; however, new information states we need to have both the Clean Cities Coalitions and local Transit Authority as participants/applicants? A. For Areas of Interest #1-3, there are no restrictions to eligibility for apply for funds. While it is not mandatory that the applicant be a Clean Cities coalition (designated or non-designated), it is strongly encouraged that teams include one or more Clean Cities

90

JGI - Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Statistics Statistics FY 2014 Overall Sequencing Progress, Updated Quarterly Quarter Total Bases (trillions) Operating Hours Goal Actual Total* Actual % of Goal Goal (hours)** Actual Total Actual % Goal Q1 2014 15,000 18.827 126% 2,164 2208 102% Q2 2014 17,000 2,117 Q3 2014 18,000 2,140 Q4 2014 18,000 2,164 FY 2014 Total 68,000 18.827 28% 8,585 2208 26% * Includes Illumina HiSeq, MiSeq and PacBio sequencing platforms. ** Operating Hour target is based on 98% of the total available hours. FY 2013 Overall Sequencing Progress, Updated Quarterly Quarter Total Bases (Billions) Operating Hours Goal Actual Total* Actual % of Goal Goal (hours)** Actual Total Actual % Goal Q1 2013 15,000 20,004 133% 2,164 2,208 102%

91

a5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,859 4,859 2,586 948 810 261 147 74 26 8 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 162 56 60 48 39 16 5 Q Food Sales ....................................... 226 164 44 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ..................................... 297 202 65 23 Q Q N Q N Health Care ....................................... 129 56 38 19 5 5 3 2 1 Inpatient .......................................... 8 N N Q Q Q Q 2 1 Outpatient ....................................... 121 56 38 19 Q 3 Q Q N Lodging ............................................. 142 38 21 38 23 11 7 4 Q Mercantile ......................................... 657 275 156 155 34 21 12 2 2 Retail (Other Than Mall) .................. 443 241 97 83 14 Q 4 Q Q Enclosed and Strip Malls ................ 213 Q 59 72 20 18 8 Q 2 Office ................................................

92

jbdc263.tmp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . c&rA&.q4cw9q--/ LA-UR- 94.3676 Title: Author(s): Submitted to: Los Alamos NATIONAL LABORATORY A BRIEF HISTORY IN TIME OF ION TRAPS AND THEIR ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE M. H. HOLZSCHEITER TRAPPED CHARGED PARTICLES AND mzwhrw PHYSICS Lyseuil, Sweden 8/12-22/94 .-. = _= . - . - . .= -- _ _- Los Alamos National Laboratory, an affirmative ecfionkqual opportunity empldyer, is operated by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy under COfltraCfW-7405-ENG-36. By acceptance of thii artiote, the pubfisher recqnizes that the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to pubfish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or to allow others 10 do so, for U.S. Government purposes. The Los Alamos National Laboratory requ=ts that the publisher identify this article as work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Depammsnt of Energy.

93

Energy Information Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Internal PMA Scorecard for Human Capital Management (HCM) - FY 2006, Quarter 4 Internal PMA Scorecard for Human Capital Management (HCM) - FY 2006, Quarter 4 Office: Energy Information Administration Progress Score: Status Score: Requirements for HCM Plan 4th QTR REQUIREMENTS FY 06, Q4 Comments Integrate HCM Plan into decision-making processes - Plan linked to DOE mission, strategy, and goals - designates accountable officials Link performance appraisal plans and awards to DOE mission & goals for SES, managers, and more than 60% of workforce (HQ and Field); discuss difference between various levels of performance, discuss consequences based on performance HCM is linked to EIA's mission, strategy, and goals. Employee performance plans have at least one critical element with corresponding tasks supporting

94

Untitled - Notepad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lindy Yow [mailto:LYow@doheny.org] Lindy Yow [mailto:LYow@doheny.org] Sent: Thursday, October 07, 2010 2:34 PM To: Cole, Dean Subject: RE: Retina 4th Quarter Joule Dean, We are pleased to report the quarterly joule. July- Sept 2010 Q4 Goal: Implantation of Initial Preclinical 200+ Systems Met by: 2 preclinical 200+ systems were surgically implanted into preclinical animal models and functionality was verified by the successful transmission of power and telemetry across the wireless link. The characteristics of more than 200 electrodes were verified to be within the design parameters after the implantation. Lindy Yow Page 1 -----Original Message----- From: Lindy Yow [mailto:LYow@doheny.org] Sent: Thursday, July 01, 2010 2:02 PM To: Cole, Dean Cc: Mark Humayan (USC); Satinderpall S. Pannu

95

Mr. Harold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigation Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ofll s' Ofll s' :y 1: ,' :*,; / c- tii; 1 ;q' (/. 4 L Department of Energy Washington, D .C. 20545 Mr. Harold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigation Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street Washington, D.C. 20460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Energy (DOE) radiological survey at the former Horizons, Inc. facility at 2909 East 79th Street in Cleveland, Ohio, performed in 1977, indicated that levels of residual radioactive materials and associated radiation levels were in excess of those used by DOE to determine if a site requires remedial action. The radioactive contamination and elevated radiation levels on the site were found, for the most part, in storage areas, in drains, and under floors. These data did

96

Footprint structures due to resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

Numerical modeling of the typical footprint structures on the target plates of a divertor tokamak is presented. In the tokamak DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] toroidal mode number n=3 resonant magnetic perturbations are responsible for characteristic footprint stripes. The numerics can resolve substructures within each footprint stripe, which are related to the internal magnetic topology. It is shown that the footprint structures on the inner target plate can be predicted by the unstable manifolds of the separatrix and the q=4 resonant surface. By their intersection with the divertor target plate the unstable manifolds form the footprint boundary and substructures within. Based on the manifold analysis, the boundaries and interior structures of the footprints are explained. A direct connection of all magnetic resonances inside the stochastic plasma volume to the target plates is verified.

Wingen, A.; Spatschek, K. H. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Evans, T. E. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 Total.................................................................................. 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment.................................... 17.8 1.8 Q Q 4.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................................. 93.3 5.3 7.0 7.8 7.2 Use Cooling Equipment.................................................. 91.4 5.3 7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................................ 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................................. 65.9 1.1 6.4 6.4 5.4 Without a Heat Pump................................................. 53.5 1.1 3.5 5.7 4.9 With a Heat Pump......................................................

98

SunShot SEAB Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SunShot Team SunShot Team Revitalizing American Competitiveness in Solar Technologies 2  Subsidy-free solar electricity  75% cost reduction by end of the decade  5-6c/kWh at utility-scale  Global Competitiveness Fundamental Premise for SunShot... 3 SunShot ~$8.00 $1.70 $0.80 $0.40 $0.50 $1.88 $0.72 $0.76 $0.40 $0.22 $0.12 $0.10 0 2 4 6 8 $1/W Target $1/W Installed Systems Price ($/W) $3.80/W Power Electronics Balance of Systems (BOS) PV Module Estimates made in 2010 for Utility Scale PV plants 4 Phase Transition in the Industry 2010 2011 Q4 c-Si Module Spot ASP $1.68/W $1.03/W US Market Share 6% ~4%

99

U.S. DEPARTMFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMFNT OF ENERGY DEPARTMFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:The Research foundation of SUNY with place of Business at SUNY ESF Page 1 of2 STATE : NY PROJECT TITLE: Hot Water Extraction of hardwood Chips and Utilization of the Residual Chips and Wood Extracts Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number N[PA Control Number em Number DE-FG36-07G087004 GFO-G087004-Q03 G0870Q4 Based on my review or,he Information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 45 1.IA), I have made the (ollowing dete rmination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description : A9 Information gathering (induding. but nollimited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including

100

b28.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,982 1,258 1,999 282 63 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,100 699 955 171 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 782 233 409 58 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 659 211 372 32 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 225 63 140 8 9 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 123 32 73 6 8 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 62 15 33 Q 9 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 24 5 13 Q 4 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 1 3 Q 2 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 382 141 172 14 24 Food Sales ....................................... 226 188 94 68 Q N Food Service ..................................... 297 282

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apr-jun q4 jul-sep" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

"Table HC15.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,1.8,"Q","Q",4.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,5.3,7,7.8,7.2 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,5.3,7,7.7,6.6 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q","N","Q",0.6 "Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2 " "Central System",65.9,1.1,6.4,6.4,5.4

102

TableHC12.1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005 2.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Total......................................................................... 111.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported) City....................................................................... 47.1 9.7 7.3 2.4 Town..................................................................... 19.0 5.0 2.9 2.1 Suburbs................................................................ 22.7 5.7 4.3 1.4 Rural..................................................................... 22.3 5.2 3.3 1.9 Climate Zone 1 Less than 2,000 CDD and-- Greater than 7,000 HDD.................................... 10.9 6.9 4.9 Q 5,500 to 7,000 HDD........................................... 26.1 12.3 9.9 Q 4,000 to 5,499 HDD...........................................

103

Quarterly Coal Report, October-December 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Mary K. Paull, Project Leader, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec- tric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the

104

Quarterly Coal Report October-December 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Betsy O'Brien, Director, Coal, Electric and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section

105

QCRS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of B.D. Hong, Leader, Coal Infor- mation Team, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section should be directed

106

Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of Mary K. Paull, Acting Chief, Coal Data Branch, Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec- tric and Alternate Fuels. Specific information about

107

Executive Branch Management Scorecard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 30, 2009 June 30, 2009 CURRENT STATUS (As of June 30,, 2009) PROGRESS Third Quarter FY 2009 COMMENTS REAL PROPERTY Agency Lead: Paul Bosco, Senior Real Property Officer Lead RMO Examiner: Cynthia Vallina Lead OFFM Analyst: Joseph Pika Asset management plan (AMP) X in place by Q1 2005 (Y) X consistent with Federal Real Property Council (FRPC) standards or expected equivalent by Q2 2005 (Y) X OMB-approved by Q2 2005 (Y) X 3 year timeline for meeting plan goals/objectives by Q3 2006 (G) X evidence that plan is being implemented to achieve improved real property mgmt by Q4 2006 (G) Accurate and current inventory X in place by Q3 2004 (Y) X consistent with FRPC standards or expected equivalent by Q3 2004 (Y) X provided to govt.-wide real property

108

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 220 of 28,905 results. 11 - 220 of 28,905 results. Download Audit Report: OAS-FS-13-11 Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program's Fiscal Year 2010 Balance Sheet Audit http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-fs-13-11 Download Inspection Report: INS-O-11-01 Management of Controlled Substances at Lawrence LivermoreNational Laboratory http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/inspection-report-ins-o-11-01 Download TOTAL_ARRA_Homes_Weatherized_thru_Q4_2010_3.7.11.pdf http://energy.gov/downloads/totalarrahomesweatherizedthruq420103711pdf Download RPS 11.2 Radiological Work Practices 3/9/95 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the practices of workers performing tasks in radiological controlled areas to ensure that these

109

RFP Invitation Letter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acquisition Services Management (ASM) Division Acquisition Services Management (ASM) Division Subcontracts, ASM-SUB P.O. Box 1663, Mail Stop D447 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 505-665-3814 / Fax 505-665-9022 E-mail: dknox@lanl.gov DATE: July 15, 2013 Subject: Question and Answer Set 3 Trinity and NERSC-8 Computing Platforms Project LA-UR-13-25273 Greetings: Interested parties are advised of the following questions or concerns that have been submitted to the Trinity and NERSC-8 Project team and to the accompanying Project responses below: Question/Issue 1 What is the more precise meaning of "On-site System Delivery and Build Complete" for Trinity by Q3CY15 and NERSC 8 by Q4CY15 as referenced on page 6 within the Trinity-NERSC-8-Draft technical

110

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for 0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................ 1,602 1,397 125 Q 69 0.11 0.09 0.01 Q (*) Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 249 228 Q (*) Q 0.41 0.38 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 261 237 Q 1 Q 0.37 0.33 Q (*) Q 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 196 177 10 (*) Q 0.20 0.18 0.01 (*) Q 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 117 112 Q (*) 4 0.14 0.14 Q (*) (*)

111

Quarterly Coal Report: October-December 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2001 May 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2001 iii Contacts

112

Office of Headquarters Security Operations: Questions and Answers on the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questions and Answers on the New Access Control System at DOE Headquarters Questions and Answers on the New Access Control System at DOE Headquarters Q1 Why is the current access control system to security areas being changed? Q2 How is the new access control system different from the existing one? Q3 Who is affected? Q4 When will the new proximity card readers be installed? Q5 How will affected personnel at DOE HQ be notified about the installation of the proximity card readers that will affect their access to the HQ facilities and security areas, and the actions they will be required to take to assure their HSPD-12 badge will operate in the new readers? Q6 What will DOE HQ "Q" and "L" badged employees need to do? Q7 Will all DOE HQ security areas be changed out to the new access control system at the same time?

113

DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short Short

114

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FES Joint Research FES Joint Research Target: C-Mod Highlights J.W. Hughes, E. Davis, A.E. Hubbard, M. Porkolab, L. Sugiyama, J. Terry J.R. Walk, A. White, D.G. Whyte, S.M. Wolfe, MIT R.J. Groebner, T. Osborne, P.B. Snyder, General Atomics X. Xu, LLNL J. Myra, D. Russell, Lodestar Alcator C-Mod FY11 Q4 Quarterly Review 27 October 2011 1 Predictive capability for the H-mode pedestal was the subject of the FY11 JRT Statement of the FY2011 FES Joint Theory and Experiment Research Target Improve the understanding of the physics mechanisms responsible for the structure of the pedestal and compare with the predictive models described in the companion theory milestone. Perform experiments to test theoretical physics models in the pedestal region on multiple devices

115

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 This issue highlights practices of DOE's NEPA Community that help ensure the quality of our NEPA reviews. Emphasizing quality throughout the NEPA process is essential to meeting schedules and providing useful information to the public and decisionmakers. Articles in this issue include: Quality Assurance Integral to NEPA Implementation DOE NEPA Guidance Plans OMB-CEQ Affirm Commitment to ECR Canada's New NEPA-Like Law Transitions John Jediny Joins DOE NEPA Office EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Questionnaire Results Cost and Time Facts LLQR-2012-Q4-r1.pdf More Documents & Publications Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2013

116

b13.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 824 277 71 370 622 597 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 503 119 37 152 434 294 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 127 67 Q 104 100 110 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 116 69 Q 83 66 130 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 43 9 Q 27 17 27 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 17 7 Q Q Q 21 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 11 6 Q Q Q 8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 5 Q Q Q Q 4 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 2 Q Q N Q Q Year Constructed Before 1920 ...................................... 330 70 31 Q 65 Q 20 1920 to 1945 ..................................... 527 85 36 Q 52 90 39 1946 to 1959 ..................................... 562 75 45 Q 58 59 44 1960 to 1969 .....................................

117

22680  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QUARTERLY PROGRAM REPORT QUARTERLY PROGRAM REPORT State: __________________ Budget period: / / - / / Grant Number: __________________ I. GRANT OUTLAYS - FUNDS SUBJECT TO DOE PROGRAM RULES (rounded to the nearest dollar) DOE F 540.3 (08/05) OMB Control No. 1910-5127 Expiration Date: 6/30/08 A. OUTLAYS BY FUND SOURCE DOE Other funds included in grant budget, section A B. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION Grantee Administration Subgrantee Administration Grantee T&TA Subgrantee T&TA Program Operations Total Health and Safety Vehicles and Equipment - Acquisition Cost* Liability Insurance Leveraging Financial Audits Vehicles and Equipment - Amortized Cost* Total Grant Outlays Total Grant Outlays Reporting Period Quarter / - / Q1 / - / Q2 / - / Q3 / - / Q4 Total To Date Notes: Total grant outlays must equal outlays reported on the Financial Status Report, line 10.d.

118

The Secretary of Energy'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

? >g*+. , . ? >g*+. , . dc*rb&.+ :c-r.3-b. g ;.i' 8 . I. ' . . 3 @ g. -- Q ' \ 4,: 6 L;Is)zLTEsdi# ' -. . ! h -. The Secretary of Energy' Washington, bC 20585 u , October 10, 1997 ' The .Honorabie William S . Cohen Secretary ofDefense Washington, D.C. 20301 -' &arMr. Secietary: !I " .,.. *- . = . . # ' The Congress recently se@ to the President for signature the Energy and Water ,, Development Appropriations Act, 1998. Among other provisions, this bill would immediately transfer responsibility for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) from the Department of Energy to the United States Army Corps of Engineers.. Assuming that this transfer becomes law, but without prejudging the President' s decision, the Department of Energy will work with the

119

QCRS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Quarterly Coal Report October-December 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared by Paulette Young under the direction of B.D. Hong, Leader, Coal Infor- mation Team, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Questions addressing the Appendix A, U.S. Coal Imports section should be directed

120

DOE/EIA-0202(87/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1987 i- rt- jrt ort lort lort lort- iort- lort- ort- ort Tt- " t- . m erm Perm -Term -Term -Term -Term ,-Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term 71 e rrn TT1 "1 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "nergy -cry Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook ""'tlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apr-jun q4 jul-sep" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Executive Branch Management Scorecard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 30, 2009 September 30, 2009 CURRENT STATUS (As of September 30, 2009) PROGRESS Fourth Quarter FY 2009 COMMENTS REAL PROPERTY Agency Lead: Paul Bosco, Senior Real Property Officer Lead RMO Examiner: Cynthia Vallina Lead OFFM Analyst: Joseph Pika Asset management plan (AMP) X in place by Q1 2005 (Y) X consistent with Federal Real Property Council (FRPC) standards or expected equivalent by Q2 2005 (Y) X OMB-approved by Q2 2005 (Y) X 3 year timeline for meeting plan goals/objectives by Q3 2006 (G) X evidence that plan is being implemented to achieve improved real property mgmt by Q4 2006 (G) Accurate and current inventory X in place by Q3 2004 (Y) X consistent with FRPC standards or expected equivalent by Q3 2004 (Y) X provided to govt.-wide real property

122

DOE/EIA-0202(89/4Q) SHOKT-TERM  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) SHOKT-TERM t . t QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (QPO). Informa tion about purchasing this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the GPO or the ElA's National Energy Information Center (NEIC). Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the NEIC by mail, telephone or telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD). Addresses, telephone numbers and hours appear below. National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 TDD (202) 586-1181 Hours: 8:00-5:00, M-F, Eastern Time Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office

123

Precise Measurement of Deuteron Tensor Analyzing Powers with BLAST  

SciTech Connect

We report a precision measurement of the deuteron tensor analyzing powers T{sub 20} and T{sub 21} at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center. Data were collected simultaneously over a momentum transfer range Q=2.15-4.50 fm{sup -1} with the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid using a highly polarized deuterium internal gas target. The data are in excellent agreement with calculations in a framework of effective field theory. The deuteron charge monopole and quadrupole form factors G{sub C} and G{sub Q} were separated with improved precision, and the location of the first node of G{sub C} was confirmed at Q=4.19{+-}0.05 fm{sup -1}. The new data provide a strong constraint on theoretical models in a momentum transfer range covering the minimum of T{sub 20} and the first node of G{sub C}.

Zhang, C.; Akdogan, T.; Bertozzi, W.; Botto, T.; Clasie, B.; DeGrush, A.; Dow, K.; Farkhondeh, M.; Franklin, W.; Gilad, S.; Hasell, D.; Kolster, H.; Maschinot, A.; Matthews, J.; Meitanis, N.; Milner, R.; Redwine, R.; Seely, J.; Shinozaki, A.; Tschalaer, C. [Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Bates Linear Accelerator Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

PKS 0743$-$67: An Ultra-luminous Accretion Disk and a High Kinetic Luminosity Jet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter, deep radio observations of the quasar PKS 0743$-$67 are presented that reveal a central engine capable of driving jets with enormous kinetic luminosity, $Q>4.1 \\times 10^{46}\\mathrm{ergs/s}$. This result is significant because archival optical spectral data indicates that the accretion disk has a thermal luminosity, $L_{bol}>2\\times 10^{47}\\mathrm{ergs/s}$. Furthermore, estimates of the central black hole mass from line widths indicate that $L_{bol}/L_{Edd}\\approx 1$. This suggests that neither a large $L_{bol}$ nor $L_{bol}/L_{Edd}$ suppresses jet power in quasars, despite claims that they do in the recent literature. Earlier studies have found $L_{bol}$ and $Q$ are correlated in blazars. However, by removing the BL-Lacs and leaving only the quasars in the sample, we found that $Q$ is very weakly correlated with $L_{bol}$ in the subsample.

Brian Punsly; Steven Tingay

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Unified approach to NNLO soft and virtual corrections in electroweak, Higgs, QCD, and SUSY processes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ? (2CF ? CA) ln ( tu sQ2 ) , (3.20) and c1 = CF [ ?3 2 + ln ( tu Q4 )] ln ( 2F s ) + ?0 4 ln ( 2R s ) . (3.21) These are in agreement with the NLO result in [30]. 14 3.6.2 qg ? qV Here tq = u, tg = t, and Re?? (1) S = CF ln(?u/s) + CF + (CA/2) ln... (t/u) + CA/2 [19]. The NLO soft and virtual corrections are ?(1)qg?qV = ? B qg?qV ?s(2R) pi {c3D1(s2) + c2D0(s2) + c1?(s2)} (3.22) with c3 = CF + 2CA, c2 = ? 3 4 CF ? (CF + CA) ln ( 2F Q2 ) ? CA ln ( tu sQ2 ) , (3.23) and c1 = [ ??0 4 ? 3 4 CF + CF ln...

Kidonakis, Nikolaos

126

Genetic analysis of tumorigenesis: a conserved region in the human and Chinese hamster genomes contains genetically identified tumor-suppressor genes  

SciTech Connect

Regional chromosome homologies were found in a comparison of human 11p with Chinese hamster 3p. By use of probes that recognize six genes of human 11p (INS, CAT, HBBC, CALC, PTH, and HRAS), the corresponding genes were localized by in situ hybridization on Chinese hamster chromosome 3. INS and CAT were located close to the centromere on 3p, whereas HBBC, CALC, and PTH were at 3q3-4 and HRAS at 3q4. Extensive prior data from chromosome studies of tumorigenic and tumor-derived Chinese hamster cells have suggested the presence of a tumor-suppressor gene on 3p. Two tumor-suppressor genes have been described on human 11p, one linked to CAT and one to INS. The present study raises the possibility that the Chinese hamster suppressor may be closely linked to INS or CAT.

Stenman, G.; Sager, R.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Measurement of the Top-Quark Mass in All-Hadronic Decays in p pbar Collisions at CDF II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the top-quark mass, $M_{\\mathrm{top}}$, in the all-hadronic decay channel $t\\bar{t} \\to W^+b W^- \\bar{b} \\to q_1\\bar{q}_2 b q_3 \\bar{q}_4 \\bar{b}$. The analysis is performed using 310 pb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}$=1.96 TeV $p\\bar{p}$ collisions collected with the CDF II detector using a multi-jet trigger. The mass measurement is based on an event-by-event likelihood which depends on both the sample purity and the value of the top-quark mass, using 90 possible jet-to-parton assignments in the six-jet final state. The joint likelihood of 290 selected events yields a value of $M_{\\mathrm{top}}$=177.1 $\\pm$ 4.9 (stat.) $\\pm$ 4.7 (syst.) GeV/$c^2$.

T. Aaltonen

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

128

Raman Spectra, Structural Units and Durability of Nuclear Waste Glasses With Variations in Composition and Crystallization: Implications for Intermediate Order in the Glass Network  

SciTech Connect

The Raman spectra of nuclear waste glasses are composed of large variations in half-width and intensity for the commonly observed bridging (Q0) and nonbridging (Q1 to Q4) bands in silicate structures. With increase in waste concentration in a boroaluminosilicate melt, the bands of quenched glasses are distinctly localized with half-width and intensity indicative of increase in atomic order. Since the nuclear waste glasses contain disparate components, and since the bands depart from the typical random network, a systematic study for the origin of these bands as a function of composition and crystallization was undertaken. From a comparative study of Raman spectra of boroaluminosilicate glasses containing Na2O-ZrO2, Na2O-MgO, MgO-Na2O-ZrO2, Na2O-CaO-ZrO2, Na2O-CaO, and Na2O-MgO-CaF2 component sets and orthosilicate crystals of zircon and forsterite, intermediate order is inferred. An edge-sharing polyhedral structural unit is proposed to account for narrow bandwidth and high intensity for Q2 antisymmetric modes, and decreased leaching of sodium with ZrO2 concentration in glass. The intense Q4 band in nuclear waste glass is similar to the intertetrahedral antisymmetric modes in forsterite. The Raman spectra of zircon contains intratetrahedral quartz-like peaks and intertetrahedral non-bridging silicate peaks. The quartz-like peaks nearly vanish in the background of forsterite spectrum. This difference between the Raman spectra of the two orthosilicate crystals presumably results from their biaxial and uniaxial effects on polarizability ellipsoids. The results also reveal formation of 604, 956 and 961 cm-1 defect bands with composition and crystallization.

Raman, Swaminathan Venkat

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

FY12 Quarter 3 Computing Utilization Report LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DSW continues to dominate the capacity workload, with a focus in Q3 on common model baselining runs in preparation for the Annual Assessment Review (AAR) of the weapon systems. There remains unmet demand for higher fidelity simulations, and for increased throughput of simulations. Common model baselining activities would benefit from doubling the resolution of the models and running twice as many simulations. Capacity systems were also utilized during the quarter to prepare for upcoming Level 2 milestones. Other notable DSW activities include validation of new physics models and safety studies. The safety team used the capacity resources extensively for projects involving 3D computer simulations for the Furrow series of experiments at DARHT (a Level 2 milestone), fragment impact, surety theme, PANTEX assessments, and the 120-day study. With the more than tripling of classified capacity computing resources with the addition of the Luna system and the safety team's imminent access to the Cielo system, demand has been met for current needs. The safety team has performed successful scaling studies on Luna up to 16K PE size-jobs with linear scaling, running the large 3D simulations required for the analysis of Furrow. They will be investigating scaling studies on the Cielo system with the Lustre file system in Q4. Overall average capacity utilization was impacted by negative effects of the LANL Voluntary Separation Program (VSP) at the beginning of Q3, in which programmatic staffing was reduced by 6%, with further losses due to management backfills and attrition, resulting in about 10% fewer users. All classified systems were impacted in April by a planned 2 day red network outage. ASC capacity workload continues to focus on code development, regression testing, and verification and validation (V&V) studies. Significant capacity cycles were used in preparation for a JOWOG in May and several upcoming L2 milestones due in Q4. A network transition has been underway on the unclassified networks to increase access of all ASC users to the unclassified systems through the Yellow Turquoise Integration (YeTI) project. This will help to alleviate the longstanding shortage of resources for ASC unclassified code development and regression testing, and also make a broader palette of machines available to unclassified ASC users, including PSAAP Alliance users. The Moonlight system will be the first capacity resource to be made available through the YETI project, and will make available a significant increase in cycles, as well as GPGPU accelerator technology. The Turing and Lobo machines will be decommissioned in the next quarter. ASC projects running on Cielo as part of the CCC-3 include turbulence, hydrodynamics, burn, asteroids, polycrystals, capability and runtime performance improvements, and materials including carbon and silicone.

Wampler, Cheryl L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McClellan, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

130

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings.............................. Buildings.............................. 1,644 1,429 131 Q 72 0.10 0.09 0.01 Q (*) Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 228 Q (*) Q 0.41 0.38 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 237 Q 1 Q 0.36 0.32 Q (*) Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 201 179 11 (*) Q 0.19 0.17 0.01 (*) Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 124 115 Q (*) 4 0.14 0.13 Q (*) (*) 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 209 188 10 Q 7 0.11 0.10 0.01 Q (*) 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 270 250 Q Q 10 0.09 0.08 Q Q (*) 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 258 183 Q Q 11 0.08 0.05 0.02 Q (*) Over 500,000 ............................. 72 Q Q Q 15 0.02 Q Q Q (*) Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 342 322 11 Q Q 0.18 0.17 0.01 Q (*) Food Sales ................................

131

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

132

OFF-SITE S  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

S S e T B ~ I L L ~ C E ACTIVITIES OF THE NATIONAL E N V I R O N M E N T A L R E S E A R C H CENTER from July through December 197C / t i o n a l Environmental Research Centeq U. S. ~ ~ I R O N M E L S T P ~ TR~ECTIQN AGENCY e Unders tancling No. 23 (26-1)-539 for the U. S o ATOMIC ENERGY COlQ4ISSION OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE NATIONAL E N V I R O N M E N T A L RESEARCH CENTER from July through December 197C by Monitoring Operations Laboratory National Environmental Research Center U. S. ENVIRONMENTAL P R O T E C T I O N AGENCY Las Vegas , Nevada Published February 1974 This work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. AT (26-1)-539 for the U . S. A T O M I C ENERGY C O M M I S S I O N ABSTRACT During t h e period J u l y through December 1970, s i x announced underground n u c l e a r tests were conducted a t t h e Nevada T

133

Causes and Consequences of the Oil Shock of 2007-08  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores similarities and differences between the run-up of oil prices in 2007-08 and earlier oil price shocks, looking at what caused the price increase and what effects it had on the economy. Whereas historical oil price shocks were primarily caused by physical disruptions of supply, the price run-up of 2007-08 was caused by strong demand confronting stagnating world production. Although the causes were different, the consequences for the economy appear to have been very similar to those observed in earlier episodes, with significant effects on overall consumption spending and purchases of domestic automobiles in particular. In the absence of those declines, it is unlikely that we would have characterized the period 2007:Q4 to 2008:Q3 as one of economic recession for the U.S. The experience of 2007-08 should thus be added to the list of recessions to which oil prices appear to have made a material contribution.

James D. Hamilton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

DOE FY10_Svc_Cont_Inv 122910 v2 MAX.xlsx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fixed Fixed Price Cost T&M/LH Other Competed Not Competed Blank Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 B505 Cost Benefit Analyses $0 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% R406 Policy Review/Development Services $0 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% R407 Program Evaluation Services $6,598,775 0% 1% 0% 99% 0% 30% 5% 65% 5% 33% 32% 31% R408 Program Management/Support Services $311,028,791 1% 2% 67% 32% 0% 90% 4% 6% 26% 25% 13% 35% R409 Program Review/Development Services $49,991 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% R413 Specifications Development Service $106,958 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% R707 Management Services/Contract & Procurement Support $35,519,976 0% 3% 93% 4% 0% 0% 100% 0% 17% 1% 49% 32% R423 Intelligence Services $10,385,300 0% 2% 0% 98% 0% 57% 0% 43% 7% 39% 26% 29% R425 Engineering and Technical Services $315,519,561 1% 2% 58% 33% 7% 93% 6% 1% 10% 25% 23% 42% R414 Systems Engineering Services

135

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings.......................... 1,644 1,429 131 Q 72 0.10 0.09 0.01 Q (*) Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 249 228 Q (*) Q 0.41 0.38 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 262 237 Q 1 Q 0.36 0.32 Q (*) Q 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 201 179 11 (*) Q 0.19 0.17 0.01 (*) Q 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 124 115 Q (*) 4 0.14 0.13 Q (*) (*) 50,001 to 100,000 ................... 209 188 10 Q 7 0.11 0.10 0.01 Q (*)

136

tablehc1.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6.1 6.1 27.7 26.0 17.6 10.0 7 7.8 11.6 No Main Space Heating Equipment............. 1.2 N N N N N N N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 6.1 27.7 26.0 17.6 10.0 7 7.8 11.6 Use Main Space Heating Equipment........... 109.1 6.1 27.7 26.0 17.6 10.0 7 7.8 11.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.............. 0.8 N N N N N N N Main Space Heating Usage During 2005 Total Number of Rooms (Excluding Bathrooms) None........................................................ 2.1 N Q Q N N N N 1 or 2....................................................... 3.1 1.4 1.3 Q N Q N Q 3............................................................... 8.3 1.4 5.6 0.9 Q N N Q 4............................................................... 16.6 1.7 9.0 3.8 1.1 Q Q Q 5...............................................................

137

TableHC4.13.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer Number of Lights Turned On Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day......................... 91.8 26.8 6.7 2.8 4.8 11.7 0.9 1........................................................................ 28.6 10.7 1.9 1.2 2.0 5.2 0.4 2........................................................................ 29.5 9.0 2.4 0.7 1.8 3.7 0.3 3........................................................................ 14.7 3.6 1.1 0.4 0.5 1.5 Q 4........................................................................ 9.3 2.0 0.7 0.3 Q 0.7 Q 5 or More........................................................... 9.7 1.5 0.5 Q 0.3 0.5 N Energy-Efficient Bulbs Used........................... 31.1 8.2 2.1 0.7 1.6 3.6 Q 1....................................................................

138

Table HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 8.0 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 1.9 10.0 8.4 Q Q 6.8 New England .............................. 5.4 1.4 4.0 Q Q Q 18.4 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 0.5 6.0 8.4 Q Q 4.6 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 5.4 14.8 4.3 Q Q 19.0 East North Central ...................... 17.1

139

I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I I . (-J&l ,J z-i2 Ff?,c Y / . June 24, 1953 +a-. "0 !I 2 F 4s 21' + p; 3: h $7 . . a- d :Q 4. 4 'i @j $w J 9. 10. 11. p - ",..-- AU~ORIZA'PION. Project Number bth0a8 ana SC~ eontempmed uf D &to be fabricated on a sub- bv ~CrELftnc.~~o~~, Ohio. These will 1 . be JY?kilrnefl kn TWV Estf~tea Ma~pswer Required gHezn Months) A. Technical A- B. Non-Technical starting Da&e4 Tllne 1 1 Q

140

b8.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 330 527 562 579 731 707 876 334 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 174 315 331 298 350 438 481 165 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 71 107 90 120 180 98 158 66 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 55 64 90 95 122 103 151 58 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 19 23 26 33 48 32 39 21 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 7 9 14 22 16 20 28 13 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 Q 5 8 8 10 10 15 8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 Q 4 2 3 4 4 4 2 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 Q 1 1 0 1 2 1 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 12 26 78 60 58 44 75 32 Food Sales ....................................... 226 Q Q Q Q Q 33 56 Q Food Service .....................................

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141

Frequently Asked Questions Form EIA-857  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Survey Forms FAQ Natural Gas Survey Forms FAQ EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers" You may always call Amy Sweeney for assistance at (202) 586-2627 or e-mail us at OOG.SURVEYS@eia.gov. Q1. How do I get a copy of the form and/or the instructions? Q2. What version of the form should I use? Q3. How do I submit the form? Q4. When is the form due? Q5. My company does not have the information required on the Form EIA-857 within 30 days after the end of the report month. Can we get an extension? Q6. Who should I inform of a change in the contact person in our company for Form EIA-857? Q7. Who should I inform if our company is sold, merged with another company, or buys another natural gas company? Q8. Why does my company always get selected to file Form EIA-857?

142

doepresentation.dvi  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Oil Shocks and U.S. External Adjustment Martin Bodenstein, Christopher Erceg, Luca Guerrieri Division of International Finance, Federal Reserve Board April 2008 Net Exports of Petroleum and Products and Goods Trade Balance (percent share of GDP, 1970q1-2007q4) 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 Persian Gulf War Iran-Iraq War Iranian Revolution Arab- Israeli War Effects of An Oil Demand Shock that Drives the Price of Oil Up by 20% (Linear Estimator) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Real Oil Price Percent Quarters 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 -0.6 -0.4 -0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 Overall Trade Balance (GDP share) Percentage Point Quarters Effects of An Oil Demand Shock that Drives the Price of Oil Up by 20% (Linear Estimator) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 -0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 Non-oil Trade Balance (GDP share) Quarters Percentage Point 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 -0.8 -0.7 -0.6 -0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 Oil Trade Balance (GDP share)

143

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project lnfonnation Project Title: Reclamation of Pits and Boxes Date: Nov. 3, 2010 DOE Code: 6740.010.00000 Contractor Code: 8067-451 Project Lead: Anthony Bowler Project Overview Reclamation of QD.]y the following Pits and Boxes : 1. Brief project description [include 1. B-2-1 0 Skim Box anything that could impact the 2. B-1-14 Skim Box environment 3. Near66-1-STX-14 Pit 2. Legal location 4. T-5-10 Skim Box 3. Duration of the project 5. WDFUpperPit 6. WDFLowerPit 4. Major equipment to be used 7. WDFSkimBox 8. B-1-3 Pit 9. B-1 -3 Skim Box 10. T-2-34 Pit 11 . B-1-10 Pit 12. B-1 -10 Skim Box 13. SE of SG3 & Welding Shop Skim Box 14. 58.Q4-1-SX-3 Skim Box 15. Near Tank 126 Skim Box 16. 77-1-SX-3 NW of Well Pit 17. T-5-3 Pit

144

The performance of the small-angle diffractometer, SAND at IPNS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-of-flight small-angle diffractometer SAND has been serving the scientific user community since 1996. One notable feature of SAND is its capability to measure the scattered intensity in a wide Q (4{pi}sin{theta}/{lambda}, where 2{theta} is the scattering angle and {lambda} is the wavelength of the neutrons) range of 0.0035 to 0.5 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} in a single measurement. The optical alignment system makes it easy to set up the instrument and the sample. The cryogenically cooled MgO filter reduces the fast neutrons over two orders of magnitude, while still transmitting over 70% of the cold neutrons. A drum chopper running at 15 Hz suppresses the delayed neutron background. SAND has a variety of ancillary equipment to control the sample environment. In this paper we describe the features of the SAND instrument, compare its data on a few standard samples with those measured at well established centers in the world, and display two scientific examples which take advantage of measuring data in a wide Q-range in a single measurement. With a new set of tight collimators the Q{sub min} can be lowered to 0.002 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} and the presently installed high-angle bank of detectors will extend the Q{sub max} to 2 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1}.

Thiyagarajan, P.

1998-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

145

Planetary and Other Short Binary Microlensing Events from the MOA Short Event Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis of four candidate short duration binary microlensing events from the 2006-2007 MOA Project short event analysis. These events were discovered in an analysis designed to find short timescale single lens events that may be due to free-floating planets. Three of these events are determined to be microlensing events, while the fourth is most likely caused by stellar variability. For each of the three microlensing events, the signal is almost entirely due to a brief caustic feature with little or no lensing attributable mainly to the lens primary. One of these events, MOA-bin-1, is due to a planet, and it is the first example of a planetary event in which stellar host is only detected through binary microlensing effects. The mass ratio, q = 4.9 \\pm 1.4 \\times 10^{-3}, is relatively large for a planetary system, and the star-planet separation, s = 2.10 \\pm 0.05, is the largest ever for a low magnification microlensing event. The planet MOA-bin-1Lb has a mass of m_p = 3.7 \\pm 2.1 M_Jup,and or...

Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Kamiya, K; Abe, F; Botzler, C S; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Itow, Y; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Sweatman, W L; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Oil Exports and the Iranian Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an error-correcting macroeconometric model for the Iranian economy estimated using a new quarterly data set over the period 1979Q1-2006Q4. It builds on a recent paper by the authors, Esfahani et al. (2012), which develops a theoretical long-run growth model for major oil exporting economies. The core variables included in this paper are real output, real money balances, ination, exchange rate, oil exports, and foreign real output, although the role of investment and consumption are also analyzed in a sub-model. The paper nds clear evidence for the existence of two long-run relations: an output equation as predicted by the theory and a standard real money demand equation with ination acting as a proxy for the (missing) market interest rate. The results show that real output in the long run is inuenced by oil exports and foreign output. However, it is also found that ination has a signicant negative long-run eect on real GDP, which is suggestive of economic ine ciencies and is matched by a negative association between ination and the investment-output ratio. Finally, the results of impulse responses show that the Iranian economy adjusts quite quickly to the shocks in foreign output and oil exports, which could be partly due to the relatively underdeveloped nature of Irans nancial markets.

Hadi Salehi Esfahani A; Kamiar Mohaddes; M. Hashem Pesaran Bc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

M-theory PP-Waves, Penrose Limits and Supernumerary Supersymmetries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study supersymmetric pp-waves in M-theory, their dimensional reduction to D0-branes or pp-waves in type IIA, and their T-dualisation to solutions in the type IIB theory. The general class of pp-waves that we consider encompass the Penrose limits of AdS_p\\times S^q with (p,q)=(4,7), (7,4), (3,3), (3,2), (2,3), (2,2), but includes also many other examples that can again lead to exactly-solvable massive strings, but which do not arise from Penrose limits. All the pp-waves in D=11 have 16 "standard" Killing spinors, but in certain cases one finds additional, or "supernumerary," Killing spinors too. These give rise to linearly-realised supersymmetries in the string or matrix models. A focus of our investigation is on the circumstances when the Killing spinors are independent of particular coordinates (x^+ or transverse-space coordinates), since these will survive at the field-theory level in dimensional reduction or T-dualisation.

Cvetic, M; Pope, C N

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Neutron total and scattering cross sections of /sup 6/Li in the few MeV region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron total cross sections of /sup 6/Li are measured from approx. 0.5 to approx. 4.8 MeV at intervals of approx. 10 scattering angles and at incident-neutron intervals of approx.< 100 keV. Neutron differential inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured in the incident-energy range 3.5 to 4.0 MeV. The experimental results are extended to lower energies using measured neutron total cross sections recently reported elsewhere by the authors. The composite experimental data (total cross sections from 0.1 to 4.8 MeV and scattering cross sections from 0.22 to 4.0 MeV) are interpreted in terms of a simple two-level R-matrix model which describes the observed cross sections and implies the reaction cross section in unobserved channels; notably the (n;..cap alpha..)t reaction (Q = 4.783 MeV). The experimental and calculational results are compared with previously reported results as summarized in the ENDF/B-V evaluated nuclear data file.

Smith, A.; Guenther, P.; Whalen, J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Quantum gravity and inventory accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We begin by studying inventory accumulation at a LIFO (last-in-first-out) retailer with two products. In the simplest version, the following occur with equal probability at each time step: first product ordered, first product produced, second product ordered, second product produced. The inventory thus evolves as a simple random walk on Z^2. In more interesting versions, a p fraction of customers orders the "freshest available" product regardless of type. We show that the corresponding random walks scale to Brownian motions with diffusion matrices depending on p. We then turn our attention to the critical Fortuin-Kastelyn random planar map model, which gives, for each q>0, a probability measure on random (discretized) two-dimensional surfaces decorated by loops, related to the q-state Potts model. A longstanding open problem is to show that as the discretization gets finer, the surfaces converge in law to a limiting (loop-decorated) random surface. The limit is expected to be a Liouville quantum gravity surface decorated by a conformal loop ensemble, with parameters depending on q. Thanks to a bijection between decorated planar maps and inventory trajectories (closely related to bijections of Bernardi and Mullin), our results about the latter imply convergence of the former in a particular topology. A phase transition occurs at p = 1/2, q=4.

Scott Sheffield

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

150

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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151

Heavy Truck Engine Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

Nelson, Christopher

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Oil Exports and the Iranian Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a long run growth model for a major oil exporting economy and derives conditions under which oil revenues are likely to have a lasting impact. This approach contrasts with the standard literature on the "Dutch disease" and the "resource curse", which primarily focus on short run implications of a temporary resource discovery. Under certain regularity conditions and assuming a Cobb Douglas production function, it is shown that (log) oil exports enter the long run output equation with a coefficient equal to the share of capital. The long run theory is tested using a new quarterly data set on the Iranain economy over the period 1979Q1-2006Q4. Building an error correction specification in real output, real money balances, inflation, real exchange rate, oil exports, and foreign real output, the paper finds clear evidence for two long run relations: an output equation as predicted by the theory and a standard real money demand equation with inflation acting as a proxy for the (missing) market interest rate. Real output in the long run is shaped by oil exports through their impact on capital accumulation, and the foreign output as the main channel of technological transfer. The results also show a significant negative long run association between ination and real GDP, which is suggestive of economic inefficiencies. Once the effects of oil exports are taken into account, the estimates support output growth convergence between Iran and the rest of the world. We also find that the Iranian economy adjusts quite quickly to the shocks in foreign output and oil exports, which could be partly due to the relatively underdeveloped nature of Irans financial markets.

Hadi Salehi Esfahani; Kamiar Mohaddes; M. Hashem Pesaran

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Phonon-roton modes of liquid 4He beyond the roton in MCM-41  

SciTech Connect

We present neutron scattering measurements of the phonon-roton (P-R) mode of superfluid 4He confined in 47 A MCM-41 at T = 0.5 K at wave vectors, Q, beyond the roton wave vector (QR = 1.92 A-1). Measurements beyond the roton require access to high wave vectors (up to Q = 4 A-1) with excellent energy resolution and high statistical precision. The present results show for the first time that at T = 0.5 K the P-R mode in MCM-41 extends out to wave-vector Q 3.6 A-1 with the same energy and zero width (within precision) as observed in bulk superfluid 4He. Layer modes in the roton region are also observed. Specifically, the P-R mode energy, !Q, increases with Q for Q > QR and reaches a plateau at a maximum energy !Q = 2 where is the roton energy, = 0.74 0.01 meV in MCM-41. This upper limit means the P-R mode decays to two rotons when its energy exceeds 2 . It also means that the P-R mode does not decay to two layers modes. If the P-R could decay to two layer modes, !Q would plateau at a lower energy, !Q = 2 L where L = 0.60 meV is the energy of the roton like minimum of the layer mode. The observation of the P-R mode with energy up to 2 shows that the P-R mode and the layer modes are independent modes with apparently little interaction between them.

Azuah, Richard T [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD] NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Omar Diallo, Souleymane [ORNL] ORNL; Adams, Mark A. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS)] ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Kirichek, Oleg [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS)] ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Glyde, Henry R [University of Delaware] University of Delaware

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

PLANETARY AND OTHER SHORT BINARY MICROLENSING EVENTS FROM THE MOA SHORT-EVENT ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

We present the analysis of four candidate short-duration binary microlensing events from the 2006-2007 MOA Project short-event analysis. These events were discovered as a by-product of an analysis designed to find short-timescale single-lens events that may be due to free-floating planets. Three of these events are determined to be microlensing events, while the fourth is most likely caused by stellar variability. For each of the three microlensing events, the signal is almost entirely due to a brief caustic feature with little or no lensing attributable mainly to the lens primary. One of these events, MOA-bin-1, is due to a planet, and it is the first example of a planetary event in which the stellar host is only detected through binary microlensing effects. The mass ratio and separation are q (4.9 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and s = 2.10 {+-} 0.05, respectively. A Bayesian analysis based on a standard Galactic model indicates that the planet, MOA-bin-1Lb, has a mass of m{sub p} = 3.7 {+-} 2.1 M{sub Jup} and orbits a star of M{sub *} = 0.75{sub -0.41}{sup +}0{sup .33} M{sub Sun} at a semimajor axis of a = 8.3{sub -2.7}{sup +4.5} AU. This is one of the most massive and widest separation planets found by microlensing. The scarcity of such wide-separation planets also has implications for interpretation of the isolated planetary mass objects found by this analysis. If we assume that we have been able to detect wide-separation planets with an efficiency at least as high as that for isolated planets, then we can set limits on the distribution of planets in wide orbits. In particular, if the entire isolated planet sample found by Sumi et al. consists of planets bound in wide orbits around stars, we find that it is likely that the median orbital semimajor axis is >30 AU.

Bennett, D. P. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Sumi, T. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H. [Institute for Information and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Auckland 1330 (New Zealand); Kamiya, K.; Abe, F.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Botzler, C. S.; Rattenbury, N. J. [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92-019, Auckland 1001 (New Zealand); Korpela, A. V.; Sullivan, D. J. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University, Wellington (New Zealand); Kilmartin, P. M. [Mt. John Observatory, P.O. Box 56, Lake Tekapo 8770 (New Zealand); Ohnishi, K. [Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Saito, To., E-mail: bennett@nd.edu [Tokyo Metropolitan College of Aeronautics, Tokyo 116-8523 (Japan); Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; and others

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (SECARB)  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first year of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (third and fourth quarter) of the project (April 1--September 30, 2004) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, Texas and Virginia were added during the second quarter of the project and no geographical changes occurred during the third or fourth quarter of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, general mapping and screening of sources and sinks has been completed, with integration and Geographical Information System (GIS) mapping ongoing. The first step focused on the macro level characterization of the region. Subsequent characterization will focus on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB has completed a preliminary assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has conducted a survey and focus group meeting to gain insight into approaches that will be taken to educate and involve the public. Task 5.0 and 6.0 will be implemented beginning October 1, 2004. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB will evaluate findings from work performed during the first year and shift the focus of the project team from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team will develop an integrated approach to implementing and setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. During this semiannual period special attention was provided to Texas and Virginia, which were added to the SECARB region, to ensure a smooth integration of activities with the other 9 states. Milestones completed and submitted during the third and fourth quarter included: Q3-FY04--Complete initial development of plans for GIS; and Q4-FYO4--Complete preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues.

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Integrated modelling of steady-state scenarios and heating and current drive mixes for ITER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent progress on ITER steady-state (SS) scenario modelling by the ITPA-IOS group is reviewed. Code-to-code benchmarks as the IOS group's common activities for the two SS scenarios (weak shear scenario and internal transport barrier scenario) are discussed in terms of transport, kinetic profiles, and heating and current drive (CD) sources using various transport codes. Weak magnetic shear scenarios integrate the plasma core and edge by combining a theory-based transport model (GLF23) with scaled experimental boundary profiles. The edge profiles (at normalized radius rho = 0.8-1.0) are adopted from an edge-localized mode-averaged analysis of a DIII-D ITER demonstration discharge. A fully noninductive SS scenario is achieved with fusion gain Q = 4.3, noninductive fraction f(NI) = 100%, bootstrap current fraction f(BS) = 63% and normalized beta beta(N) = 2.7 at plasma current I(p) = 8MA and toroidal field B(T) = 5.3 T using ITER day-1 heating and CD capability. Substantial uncertainties come from outside the radius of setting the boundary conditions (rho = 0.8). The present simulation assumed that beta(N)(rho) at the top of the pedestal (rho = 0.91) is about 25% above the peeling-ballooning threshold. ITER will have a challenge to achieve the boundary, considering different operating conditions (T(e)/T(i) approximate to 1 and density peaking). Overall, the experimentally scaled edge is an optimistic side of the prediction. A number of SS scenarios with different heating and CD mixes in a wide range of conditions were explored by exploiting the weak-shear steady-state solution procedure with the GLF23 transport model and the scaled experimental edge. The results are also presented in the operation space for DT neutron power versus stationary burn pulse duration with assumed poloidal flux availability at the beginning of stationary burn, indicating that the long pulse operation goal (3000s) at I(p) = 9 MA is possible. Source calculations in these simulations have been revised for electron cyclotron current drive including parallel momentum conservation effects and for neutral beam current drive with finite orbit and magnetic pitch effects.

Murakami, Masanori [ORNL; Park, Jin Myung [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Modification of turbulent structure in channel flows by microbubble injection close to the wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation of turbulent structure modification of a boundary layer for a fully developed channel flow by microbubble injection close to the upper wall was carried out using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Two-dimensional velocity components in an x-y plane at Reynolds number of 5128 based on the half height of the channel and bulk velocity were measured. Microbubbles, with an average diameter of 30 ??m were produced by electrolysis and injected in the buffer layer. Different values of the void fraction were attained and used to evaluate the effects of the presence of microbubbles and their concentration within the boundary layer. A reduction in drag was observed due to the injection of microbubbles. Drag reduction augments as the value of the void fraction increases. Furthermore, increases in both the non-dimensional values of streamwise and normal turbulent intensities, normalized by the friction velocity were observed with the void fraction growth. A gradual decrease in the Reynolds shear stresses was achieved as the void fraction increases. This effect is due to a ??decorrelation?? or ??decoupling?? between the streamwise and normal fluctuating velocities. Modifications in the length and time scales due to the presence of microbubbles were detected by calculating two-point correlation coefficients in one and two dimensions and the autocorrelation coefficient at various locations within the measurement zone. Streamline length and time scales were increased. On the contrary, the normal length and time scales were decreased. The vorticity and strain rate values decreased with the injection of microbubbles. Turbulent energy production was also decreased within the boundary layer. Quadrant analysis was used to find out the contribution of the u?? and v?? fluctuating velocity components to the Reynolds stress. The presence of microbubbles reduces the contribution to the Reynolds stresses by Q4 events (sweeps), which are responsible for the production of skin friction. Vortical structure detection in the measurement area was pursued. The structure with and without the microbubble injection is compared. In this study the presence of microbubbles within the boundary layer has produced several modifications in the flow structure as well as reduction in the drag.

Gutierrez Torres, Claudia del Carmen

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

You are now leaving Energy.gov | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

generating-your-own-power/incentive-program/!ut/p/b1/rZRNc5swEIb_invwUcMiBEhHSF0MuKb-aBJz8QgQlEwsiE3str--suuZDE5j7HE5MOzMuw-rd1erxdqjFku-LQvelJXkz_s4tpY69ZyhPwM_cn0LfPfOuYuiAICAEiyUAD54HDjkMw8GwyAC35tPDPCNCYxnjmMAWNqDFmtxKpu6-aEtNqlYppVshGyWQvbh-N2H5HVTSrHZ9KEQUqxVdbLo_ape171qJ3t1tRPrPpQyVeJyK1C9roo1X-3RNS9EJjZlIQ9RWmbaAps5sznPUcZ4gogtMKJE50hPqMB2pgthsOPBzlTeMsab2hj84H4wilwdA8HH_DOCVj51GVXGhqOBPsKe58Fp_ntBR2MOxna0pqs5cdchx8NqJbSFKtX-UBbq2uzNe5pTwjKDImqSXHmf5YhRXaCEYSvnNDExSbqA5FZgZHqg3Bp44Vd3Dsy-Hhhc0P7y6eUldtR076f4Z6M9do73aZ0nTactJ3X1G5IaKbJymiGC1SuxbBPtq-SM6UJnVgfQs28Ftp30Q3w1MLjgIlzv5JlF8e4I7avTHteLVsV5ILFvBdLp5LMCGtbAcr_AN2peDQwuWOP_1eR_beN69X1Fn_IwHFnT4Q4Ms97-nuerB8QT-jca5ePxMXouPv0BOUBh4A!!/dl4/d5/L2dBISEvZ0FBIS9nQSEh generating-your-own-power/incentive-program/!ut/p/b1/rZRNc5swEIb_invwUcMiBEhHSF0MuKb-aBJz8QgQlEwsiE3str--suuZDE5j7HE5MOzMuw-rd1erxdqjFku-LQvelJXkz_s4tpY69ZyhPwM_cn0LfPfOuYuiAICAEiyUAD54HDjkMw8GwyAC35tPDPCNCYxnjmMAWNqDFmtxKpu6-aEtNqlYppVshGyWQvbh-N2H5HVTSrHZ9KEQUqxVdbLo_ape171qJ3t1tRPrPpQyVeJyK1C9roo1X-3RNS9EJjZlIQ9RWmbaAps5sznPUcZ4gogtMKJE50hPqMB2pgthsOPBzlTeMsab2hj84H4wilwdA8HH_DOCVj51GVXGhqOBPsKe58Fp_ntBR2MOxna0pqs5cdchx8NqJbSFKtX-UBbq2uzNe5pTwjKDImqSXHmf5YhRXaCEYSvnNDExSbqA5FZgZHqg3Bp44Vd3Dsy-Hhhc0P7y6eUldtR076f4Z6M9do73aZ0nTactJ3X1G5IaKbJymiGC1SuxbBPtq-SM6UJnVgfQs28Ftp30Q3w1MLjgIlzv5JlF8e4I7avTHteLVsV5ILFvBdLp5LMCGtbAcr_AN2peDQwuWOP_1eR_beN69X1Fn_IwHFnT4Q4Ms97-nuerB8QT-jca5ePxMXouPv0BOUBh4A!!/dl4/d5/L2dBISEvZ0FBIS9nQSEh

159

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During FY 2010, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 873 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 259 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 324 regional and teleseismic events. There were 210 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. One hundred and fifty-five earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this fiscal year were a continuation of the swarm events observed during fiscal year 2009 and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al. 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, 2010b, and 2010c). Most events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with the largest event recorded on February 4, 2010 (3.0Mc). The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging approximately 1.5 km deep) placing the swarm within the Columbia River Basalt Group. Based upon the last two quarters (Q3 and Q4) data, activity at the Wooded Island area swarm has largely subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will continue to monitor for activity at this location. The highest-magnitude events (3.0Mc) were recorded on February 4, 2010 within the Wooded Island swarm (depth 2.4 km) and May 8, 2010 on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline (depth 3.0 km). This latter event is not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al. 2007). With regard to the depth distribution, 173 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 18 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 19 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 178 earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 4 earthquakes occurred on or near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and 28 earthquakes were classified as random events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered several times by the Wooded Island swarm events and the events located on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network during fiscal year 2010 occurred February 4, 2010 (Wooded Island swarm event), approximately 2 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) with no action required.

Rohay, Alan C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Devary, Joseph L.; Hartshorn, Donald C.

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

160

OPTIMIZATION OF MUD HAMMER DRILLING PERFORMANCE - A PROGRAM TO BENCHMARK THE VIABILITY OF ADVANCED MUD HAMMER DRILLING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress during current reporting year 2002 by quarter--Progress during Q1 2002: (1) In accordance to Task 7.0 (D. No.2 Technical Publications) TerraTek, NETL, and the Industry Contributors successfully presented a paper detailing Phase 1 testing results at the February 2002 IADC/SPE Drilling Conference, a prestigious venue for presenting DOE and private sector drilling technology advances. The full reference is as follows: IADC/SPE 74540 ''World's First Benchmarking of Drilling Mud Hammer Performance at Depth Conditions'' authored by Gordon A. Tibbitts, TerraTek; Roy C. Long, US Department of Energy, Brian E. Miller, BP America, Inc.; Arnis Judzis, TerraTek; and Alan D. Black, TerraTek. Gordon Tibbitts, TerraTek, will presented the well-attended paper in February of 2002. The full text of the Mud Hammer paper was included in the last quarterly report. (2) The Phase 2 project planning meeting (Task 6) was held at ExxonMobil's Houston Greenspoint offices on February 22, 2002. In attendance were representatives from TerraTek, DOE, BP, ExxonMobil, PDVSA, Novatek, and SDS Digger Tools. (3) PDVSA has joined the advisory board to this DOE mud hammer project. PDVSA's commitment of cash and in-kind contributions were reported during the last quarter. (4) Strong Industry support remains for the DOE project. Both Andergauge and Smith Tools have expressed an interest in participating in the ''optimization'' phase of the program. The potential for increased testing with additional Industry cash support was discussed at the planning meeting in February 2002. Progress during Q2 2002: (1) Presentation material was provided to the DOE/NETL project manager (Dr. John Rogers) for the DOE exhibit at the 2002 Offshore Technology Conference. (2) Two meeting at Smith International and one at Andergauge in Houston were held to investigate their interest in joining the Mud Hammer Performance study. (3) SDS Digger Tools (Task 3 Benchmarking participant) apparently has not negotiated a commercial deal with Halliburton on the supply of fluid hammers to the oil and gas business. (4) TerraTek is awaiting progress by Novatek (a DOE contractor) on the redesign and development of their next hammer tool. Their delay will require an extension to TerraTek's contracted program. (5) Smith International has sufficient interest in the program to start engineering and chroming of collars for testing at TerraTek. (6) Shell's Brian Tarr has agreed to join the Industry Advisory Group for the DOE project. The addition of Brian Tarr is welcomed as he has numerous years of experience with the Novatek tool and was involved in the early tests in Europe while with Mobil Oil. (7) Conoco's field trial of the Smith fluid hammer for an application in Vietnam was organized and has contributed to the increased interest in their tool. Progress during Q3 2002: (1) Smith International agreed to participate in the DOE Mud Hammer program. (2) Smith International chromed collars for upcoming benchmark tests at TerraTek, now scheduled for 4Q 2002. (3) ConocoPhillips had a field trial of the Smith fluid hammer offshore Vietnam. The hammer functioned properly, though the well encountered hole conditions and reaming problems. ConocoPhillips plan another field trial as a result. (4) DOE/NETL extended the contract for the fluid hammer program to allow Novatek to ''optimize'' their much delayed tool to 2003 and to allow Smith International to add ''benchmarking'' tests in light of SDS Digger Tools' current financial inability to participate. (5) ConocoPhillips joined the Industry Advisors for the mud hammer program. Progress during Q4 2002: (1) Smith International participated in the DOE Mud Hammer program through full scale benchmarking testing during the week of 4 November 2003. (2) TerraTek acknowledges Smith International, BP America, PDVSA, and ConocoPhillips for cost-sharing the Smith benchmarking tests allowing extension of the contract to add to the benchmarking testing program. (3) Following the benchmark testing of the Smith International hammer, representatives from DOE/NETL, T

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z