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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

"No.","Treasury Appropriation Symbol","Title/Program","Total Appropriation","Total Obligations","Total Disbursements"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weekly Update Report Data (sheet 1 of 2) Version 1.0" Weekly Update Report Data (sheet 1 of 2) Version 1.0" ,"Agency Name:","Department of Energy" ,"Week Start Date:",39867 ,"Submitter Name:","David Abercrombie" ,"Submitter Contact Info:","David.Abercrombie@hq.doe.gov" "No.","Treasury Appropriation Symbol","Title/Program","Total Appropriation","Total Obligations","Total Disbursements" 1,"89-09/10-0211","Fossil Energy Research and Development, Recovery Act",3400000000,0,0 2,"89-09/10-0227","Science, Recovery Act",1600000000,0,0 3,"89-09/12-0237","Inspector General, Recovery Act",15000000,0,0 4,"89-09/10-0253","Defense Environmental Cleanup, Recovery Act",5127000000,0,0

2

,"Program Source/ Treasury Account Symbol: Agency Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol: Account Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol; Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Program Description (Account Title)","Total Appropriation","Total Obligations","Total Disbursements"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85 85 ,"Submitter Name:","David Abercrombie" ,"Submitter Contact Info:","David.Abercrombie@hq.doe.gov" ,"Program Source/ Treasury Account Symbol: Agency Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol: Account Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol; Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Program Description (Account Title)","Total Appropriation","Total Obligations","Total Disbursements" 1,89,211,"N/A","Fossil Energy Research and Development, Recovery Act",3400000000,0,0 2,89,227,"N/A","Science, Recovery Act",1600000000,0,0 3,89,237,"N/A","Office of the Inspector General, Recovery Act",15000000,0,0

3

,"Program Source/ Treasury Account Symbol: Agency Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol: Account Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol; Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Program Description (Account Title)","Total Appropriation","Total Obligations","Total Disbursements"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

78 78 ,"Submitter Name:","David Abercrombie" ,"Submitter Contact Info:","David.Abercrombie@hq.doe.gov" ,"Program Source/ Treasury Account Symbol: Agency Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol: Account Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol; Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Program Description (Account Title)","Total Appropriation","Total Obligations","Total Disbursements" 1,89,211,"N/A","Fossil Energy Research and Development, Recovery Act",3400000000 2,89,227,"N/A","Science, Recovery Act",1600000000 3,89,237,"N/A","Office of the Inspector General, Recovery Act",15000000 4,89,253,"N/A","Defense Environmental Cleanup, Recovery Act",5127000000

4

,"Program Source/ Treasury Account Symbol: Agency Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol: Account Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol; Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Program Description (Account Title)","Total Appropriation","Total Obligations","Total Disbursements"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 ,"Submitter Name:","David Abercrombie" ,"Submitter Contact Info:","David.Abercrombie@hq.doe.gov" ,"Program Source/ Treasury Account Symbol: Agency Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol: Account Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol; Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Program Description (Account Title)","Total Appropriation","Total Obligations","Total Disbursements" 1,89,331,"N/A","Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Recovery Act ",1.68e+10,228226615,0 2,89,328,"N/A","Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Recovery Act",4500000000,0,0 3,89,211,"N/A","Fossil Energy Research and Development, Recovery Act",3400000000,0,0

5

,"Program Source/ Treasury Account Symbol: Agency Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol: Account Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol; Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Program Description (Account Title)","Total Appropriation","Total Obligations","Total Disbursements"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

906 906 ,"Submitter Name:","David Abercrombie" ,"Submitter Contact Info:","David.Abercrombie@hq.doe.gov" ,"Program Source/ Treasury Account Symbol: Agency Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol: Account Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol; Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Program Description (Account Title)","Total Appropriation","Total Obligations","Total Disbursements" 1,89,331,"N/A","Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Recovery Act ",1.68e+10,374217313.6,78891.63 2,89,328,"N/A","Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Recovery Act",4500000000,0,0 3,89,211,"N/A","Fossil Energy Research and Development, Recovery Act",3400000000,0,0

6

,"Program Source/ Treasury Account Symbol: Agency Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol: Account Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol; Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Program Description (Account Title)","Total Appropriation","Total Obligations","Total Disbursements","DOE Program Office Administering Funds"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 ,"Submitter Name:","David Abercrombie" ,"Submitter Contact Info:","David.Abercrombie@hq.doe.gov" ,"Program Source/ Treasury Account Symbol: Agency Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol: Account Code","Program Source/Treasury Account Symbol; Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Program Description (Account Title)","Total Appropriation","Total Obligations","Total Disbursements","DOE Program Office Administering Funds" 1,89,331,"N/A","Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Recovery Act",1.68e+10,10000,0,"Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy" 2,89,328,"N/A","Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Recovery Act",4500000000,0,0,"Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability"

7

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2_Thursday 5-23 9 NMMSS_2013_Obligations_Case_Study.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Case Study Case Study Presented by: Mitch Hembree & Len Myers NMMSS Obligations Case Study 2 General Issues to Consider  What license is required  Is the license valid  Are the shipper and receiver valid NMMSS facilities (RIS)  Is the reporting unit used appropriate for NMMSS reporting  Is the quantity above NMMSS minimum reporting requirements NOTE These issues are applicable to obligations but were evaluated earlier in the Import/Export Case Study Obligations Case Study 3 Obligation Issues to Consider  Does the license specify appropriate foreign obligations  Is the correct obligation country code specified  Does the quantity of obligated material exceed total reported details for that material  Is the obligation layered (third country obligated)

8

Chapter 05 - Accounting for Obligations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Management Handbook 12-12-2012 Financial Management Handbook 12-12-2012 Chapter 5 - 1 CHAPTER 5 ACCOUNTING FOR OBLIGATIONS 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter prescribes general requirements applicable to incurring, recording, and reporting obligations. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. c. Policy. In accordance with applicable statutory requirements, the Departmental policy for obligations is as follows: (1) Incur obligations only for the purpose for which the appropriation is

9

User Obligations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Obligations User Obligations Summary of what APS expects of users in return for access to the facility. Registration Register with the APS as far in advance of your initial visit as possible (even when you are simply planning an experiment). User Agreement Ensure that a User Agreement is in place between the APS and your home institution. Training Ensure that you complete all required training before conducting hands-on work at the APS. Safety Assessement Complete Experiment Safety Assessment Forms. End of Experiment Form Complete End of Experiment form to provide feedback (required for General Users, optional for others). Published Reports of Work Carried Out at the APS As an APS user, you are required to notify both the APS and your host beamline staff of all work published in the open literature (including

10

Obligations Notification Cycle and New Obligations Presentation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Obligations Notification Cycle and Obligations Notification Cycle and Obligations Notification Cycle and Obligations Notification Cycle and New Obligations New Obligations Bill Benton, DOE/SO-62 Pat Tana, NRC/NSIR Michelle Romano, NAC/NMMSS Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2004 January 13, 2004 Crowne Crowne Plaza Plaza Ravinia Ravinia Atlanta, Georgia Atlanta, Georgia Notifications Notifications * There are issues! - Timeliness - Information (or lack thereof) - Other? * DOE Facilities - Bill Benton, 301-903-1150, Bill.Benton@hq.doe.gov * NRC Facilities - Pat Tana, 301-415-8105, pmt@nrc.gov * DOE/SO-62, NRC to request meeting of Government representatives involved. * DOE/SO-62, NRC to solicit concrete case studies to

11

Foreign Obligations Implementation Status Presentation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, Georgia Georgia Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Foreign Obligations Implementation Status Brian G. Horn U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission January 13, 2004 Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2 Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, GA 004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, GA Overview of Meeting Overview of Meeting * Review how the Obligation Tracking System is working * Presentations: - Review of Government notification procedures - Establishment of the beginning Obligation Balances for sites

12

Chapter 03 - Accounting for Appropriations and Other Funds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. Accounting for Appropriations and Other Funds 3-1 . Accounting for Appropriations and Other Funds 3-1 CHAPTER 3 ACCOUNTING FOR APPROPRIATIONS AND OTHER FUNDS 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Background. An appropriation is an act of Congress, signed into law by the President that provides budget authority and permits a Federal agency to incur obligations or to spend public funds. Appropriations to liquidate contract authority, appropriations to liquidate outstanding debt, and appropriations for refunds or receipts do not constitute budget authority because they do not provide authority to incur additional obligations. The Department of the Treasury (Treasury) establishes a separate account for each appropriation or fund following enactment of an appropriations act

13

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

14

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

15

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

16

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

17

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

18

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

19

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

20

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

FY 2006 Commerce Appropriations, TA Appropriations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Taken from FY 2006 Commerce Appropriations . MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR SCIENCE ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

22

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

23

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

24

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

25

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

26

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

27

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

28

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

29

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

30

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

31

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

32

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

33

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

34

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

35

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

36

NIST Appropriations Summary FY 2011 - FY 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Total NIST, Discretionary Appropriations, 750.1, 750.8, 857.0. Mandatory Appropriation: --, --, 1,300.0. Wireless Innovation Fund, --, --, 300.0. ...

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

37

omnibus appropriations bill likely  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outlook for spending bills is much like recent years, in which the House and Senate could not complete the normal process of each passing appropriations...

38

Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances for the Power Reactors Presentation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances for the Power Reactors for the Power Reactors Michael J. Smith Michael J. Smith NAC International NAC International Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2004 January 13, 2004 Crowne Crowne Plaza Plaza Ravinia Ravinia Atlanta, Georgia Atlanta, Georgia Project Purpose Project Purpose * Bridge the gap in foreign obligated (FO) inventory tracking for US power reactor RISs between 10/1/01 and 9/30/03 * Provide input for 10/1/03 FO beginning inventories in the NMMSS Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2004 January 13, 2004 Crowne

39

Public works for water and power development and energy research appropriation bill, Fiscal Year 1979: conference report. House of Representatives, Ninety-Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

The managers on the part of the House and the Senate at the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendments of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 12928) making appropriations for public works for water and power development and energy research for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1979, and for other purposes, submit the following joint statement to the House and the Senate in explanation of the effects of the action agreed upon by the managers and recommended in the accompanying conference report. The committee of conference notes that many appropriations will have substantial carryovers of unobligated balances of appropriations from 1978 as has been the case the past several years. To bring these balances to more manageable levels at the end of fiscal year 1979, the conferencees are agreed that designated unobligated balances at the end of 1978 will be applied to the 1979 program. This amount is not to be construed as savings and slippage to be applied as project reductions in 1979. The language changes in the 34 amendments are published in this report. The total new budget (obligational) authority for 1978, budget estimates of new (obligational) authority for 1979, totals for the House and Senate bills for 1979, and the conference agreement totals are tabulated.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hydropower Appropriations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Hydropower Appropriations Hydropower Appropriations List of projects selected focusing on updating...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Appropriations Questions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies You are here Home Action Center FAQs Related to the Recovery Act Appropriations Questions Appropriations Questions Report an Appliance Regulation Violation Report...

42

Utility Energy Efficiency Schemes: Savings Obligations and Trading...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Energy Efficiency Schemes: Savings Obligations and Trading **Subscription Required** Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Utility Energy Efficiency...

43

Obligations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Obligations Obligations Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship (AEF) Program Einstein Fellowship Home Eligibility Benefits Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Obligations Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship is intended to support the intellectual and professional development of K-12 teachers in science, math, engineering, or technology fields who have the desire to bring their education and classroom expertise to Washington, DC, for the mutual benefit to Federal agency and U.S. Congressional offices. Selected candidates have the following program obligations: Must provide proof of U.S. citizenship upon accepting a Fellowship offer; Must provide proof of approved leave of absence from teaching;

44

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact The Council on Environmental Quality is issuing this guidance for Federal departments and agencies on establishing, implementing, and monitoring mitigation commitments identified and analyzed in Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, and adopted in the final decision documents. This guidance also clarifies the appropriate use of mitigated "Findings of No Significant Impact" under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The guidance explains the requirements of NEPA and the CEQ Regulations, describes CEQ policies, and recommends

45

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main policy instruments currently used in the EU Member States to achieve the targets set for electricity produced from renewable energy sources are: (1) the quota obligation system; (2) the feed-in tariff system; and (3) the tendering system. The current study aims to review the experience gained with the quota obligation system. The report provides an overview of the regions where obligation systems have been implemented and contains a detailed evaluation of the performance of the obligation systems in the USA, the UK and in Sweden. The obligation systems in these countries have been evaluated based on the following criteria: Effectiveness; Market efficiency; Certainty for the renewable energy industry; Cost effectiveness; Stakeholder support for the obligation system; and Equity. The evaluation of international experiences with the obligation system gives rise to a mixed picture. Although an obligation in theory is effective and cost effective, it seems too early to conclude that the system delivers these promises in practice. On the one hand this is due to the limited period of implementation that makes it hard to distinguish between the direct effect of the system and some teething problems that will be solved in due time. On the other hand, the conclusion can be drawn that the obligation is a complex system, which will only function well if designed carefully. It does seem worthwhile, however, to continue monitoring the experiences with the obligation system abroad, because this will further reveal whether the system is indeed effective and cost effective in practice. In the longer term, e.g. beyond 2010, the introduction of an obligation system in the Netherlands could be considered. Finally, as the design of support schemes is being improved, it appears that the basic concepts of both the obligation system and the feed in system have been refined in such a way that the two systems are gradually converging. An important difference between the two systems however remains, namely that an obligation system relies more on market forces whereas the feed-in system is based on a greater involvement of the government.

Wiser, R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

United States Attorney General **1 *224 APPLICABILITY OF ANTIDEFICIENCY ACT UPON A LAPSE IN AGENCY APPROPRIATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 4A U.S. Op. Off. Legal Counsel 16, 1980 WL 21004 (U.S.A.G.) 24, 4A U.S. Op. Off. Legal Counsel 16, 1980 WL 21004 (U.S.A.G.) United States Attorney General **1 *224 APPLICABILITY OF ANTIDEFICIENCY ACT UPON A LAPSE IN AGENCY APPROPRIATION APRIL 25, 1980. If, after the expiration of an agency's appropriation, Congress has not enacted an appropriation for the immediately subsequent period, the agency may obligate no further funds except as necessary to bring about the orderly termination of its functions, and the obligation or expenditure of funds for any purpose not otherwise authorized by law would be a violation of the Antideficiency Act. The manifest purpose of the Antideficiency Act is to insure that Congress will determine for what purpose the Gov- ernment's money is to be spent and how much for each purpose.

47

Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative Analysis of Results in the European Union Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative Analysis of Results in the European Union Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: eec.ucdavis.edu/ACEEE/2010/data/papers/2178.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-supplier-obligations-and-white Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Mandates/Targets This paper examines the ways different European Union (EU) member states,

48

Participant Obligations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Participant Participant Obligations Community College Internships (CCI) CCI Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Participant Obligations Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The CCI program is intended to support the intellectual and professional development of students who have the desire to be involved in an intensive technical training experience. Selected students have the following program obligations: Must have proof of coverage under a health insurance plan for the duration of their internship. It is the responsibility of each participant to secure insurance coverage before arriving at the appointment site. Must complete the full 10-week program. Students should expect to spend approximately 40 hours a week working on their projects or

49

Participant Obligations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Participant Participant Obligations Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI) SULI Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Participant Obligations Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The SULI program is intended to support the intellectual and professional development of students who have the desire to be involved in an intensive scientific research experience. Selected students have the following program obligations: Must have proof of coverage under a health insurance plan for the duration of their internship. It is the responsibility of each participant to secure insurance coverage before arriving at the appointment site. Must complete the full 10- or 16-week program. Students should

50

CONTRACTOR AND ADDRESS COEPPRACT FOR: TERM: COMMT.SSION OBLIGATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CONTRACTOR AND ADDRESS COEPPRACT FOR: TERM: COMMT.SSION OBLIGATION PAYMENT TO m MADE BY: CONTRACT NO. AT(30-l)-1247 CONTRACT pl AMERICAN MACHINE Ah'D FOUNDRY COMP'N' Second Avenue...

51

appropriations | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

appropriations appropriations Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 9 July, 2013 - 20:57 GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting Alaska analysis appropriations Categorical Exclusions Coordinating Permit Office Cost Mechanisms Cost Recovery geothermal Hawaii NEPA permitting quarterly meeting White Papers On June 26th, we held the 3rd Quarter GRR Stakeholder Update at the Grand Sierra Resort in Reno, NV. The meeting was well-attended with over 40 attendees, including in-person and webinar attendance. Thanks to all who attended! Files: application/pdf icon Presentation: 3rd Quarterly Stakeholder Update Meeting application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.presentationml.presentation icon Mock-up: GRR Permitting Wizard Interface Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load)

52

Utility Energy Efficiency Schemes: Savings Obligations and Trading  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Energy Efficiency Schemes: Savings Obligations and Trading Utility Energy Efficiency Schemes: Savings Obligations and Trading **Subscription Required** Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Utility Energy Efficiency Schemes: Savings Obligations and Trading **Subscription Required** Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Policy Impacts Website: dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12053-008-9024-8 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/utility-energy-efficiency-schemes-sav Language: English Policies: "Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Mandates/Targets This paper attempts to answer the following questions: What is new about the recent raft of white certificate energy efficiency schemes and is there

53

Participant Obligations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Participant Participant Obligations Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) VFP Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Participant Obligations Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Visiting Faculty Program is intended to support the professional development of current faculty members who have the desire to increase the competitiveness of their own independent research at their home institution through scientific research collaborations with DOE laboratory scientists. Before the application submission deadline, all faculty applicants must submit a research project proposal that is co-developed with the research staff located at the host DOE laboratory. The VFP research proposal guidelines can be found at VFP Research

54

Endosymbiosis In Statu Nascendi: Close Phylogenetic RelationshipBetween Obligately Endosymbiotic and Obligately Free-LivingPolynucleobacter Strains (Betaproteobacteria)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bacterial strains affiliated to the phylogenetically shallowsubcluster C (PnecC) of the 28 Polynucleobacter cluster, which ischaracterized by a minimal 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of approx.98.5 percent, have been reported to occur as obligate endosymbionts of 30ciliates (Euplotes spp.), as well as to occur as free-living cells in thepelagic zone of freshwater habitats. We investigated if these two groupsof closely related bacteria represent 32 strains fundamentally differingin lifestyle, or if they simply represent different stages of afacultative endosymbiotic lifestyle. The phylogenetic analysis of 16SrRNA gene and 16S34 23S ITS sequences of five endosymbiont strains fromtwo different Euplotes species and 40 pure culture strains demonstratedhost-species-specific clustering of the endosymbiont 36 sequences withinthe PnecC subcluster. The sequences of the endosymbionts showedcharacteristics indicating an obligate endosymbiotic lifestyle.Cultivation experiments 38 revealed fundamental differences inphysiological adaptations, and determination of the genome sizesindicated a slight size reduction in endosymbiotic strains. We concludethat the 40 two groups of PnecC bacteria represent obligately free-livingand obligately endosymbiotic strains, respectively, and do not representdifferent stages of the same complex lifecycle. 42 These closely relatedstrains occupy completely separated ecological niches. To our bestknowledge, this is the closest phylogenetic relationship between obligateendosymbionts and 44 obligately free-living bacteria everrevealed.

Vannini, Claudia; Pockl, Matthias; Petroni, Giulio; Wu, Qinglong; Lang, Elke; Stackebrandt, Erko; Schrallhammer, Martina; Richardson, PaulM.; Hahn, Martin W.

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

55

Appropriate Technology Sourcebook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appropriate Technology Sourcebook Appropriate Technology Sourcebook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Appropriate Technology Sourcebook Agency/Company /Organization: Village Earth Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Create a Vision Topics: - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: villageearth.org/appropriate-technology/appropriate-technology-sourceb Cost: Free Language: English Review of over 1,150 of the best books on appropriate technology. The Appropriate Technology Sourcebook reviews over 1,150 of the best books on appropriate technology. References http://villageearth.org/appropriate-technology/appropriate-technology-sourcebook Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Appropriate_Technology_Sourcebook&oldid=392707"

56

SECTION 124„AGENCY OPERATIONS IN THE ABSENCE OF APPROPRIATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

124-AGENCY OPERATIONS IN THE ABSENCE OF APPROPRIATIONS 124-AGENCY OPERATIONS IN THE ABSENCE OF APPROPRIATIONS OMB Circular No. A-11 (2013) Page 1 of Section 124 SECTION 124-AGENCY OPERATIONS IN THE ABSENCE OF APPROPRIATIONS Table of Contents 124.1 What types of actions may my agency conduct during a funding hiatus? 124.2 What plans should my agency make in anticipation of a funding hiatus? 124.3 When should my agency's shutdown plans be implemented? 124.1 What types of actions may my agency conduct during a funding hiatus? (a) Background. The Attorney General issued two opinions in the early 1980s that the language and legislative history of the Antideficiency Act unambiguously prohibit agency officials from incurring obligations in the absence of appropriations ("Applicability of the Antideficiency Act Upon a Lapse in an Agency's Appropriations"

57

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2_Thursday 5-23 9 NMMSS_2013_Obligations...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

country obligated) Obligations Case Study 4 CASE STUDY 1 - DIRECT IMPORT A United States DOE facility DOEFAC1 will be receiving a shipment of nuclear material on 812012 from the...

58

Technology Administration Appropriation Summary FY 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The amount for NIST laboratories and for the Construction of Research Facilities appropriation includes $12 ... (b) The Defense Appropriations Act of ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

59

Technology Administration Appropriation Summary FY 2005 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... rescissions enacted in PL 108-447, FY 2005 Consolidated Appropriations Act (TA ... (c) The President signed the FY 2006 appropriation (HR 2862 ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

60

FY 2005 Control Table by Appropriation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriation Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) Table of Contents Summary...................................................................................................... 1 Mandatory Funding....................................................................................... 3 Energy Supply.............................................................................................. 4 Non-Defense site acceleration completion................................................... 5 Uranium enrichment D&D fund.................................................................... 5 Non-Defense environmental services.......................................................... 5 Science.........................................................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

House Report 109-118 NIST Appropriations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... House Report 109-118 - SCIENCE, STATE, JUSTICE, COMMERCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, FISCAL YEAR 2006. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

62

NIST Appropriations Summary FY 2012 - FY 2014  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. National Institute of Standards and Technology Appropriations Summary. FY 2012 - FY 2014 (Dollars in Table in Millions). ...

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

63

Making Emergency Supplemental Appropriations for the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taken from PL 109-13, MAKING EMERGENCY SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2005 ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

64

Appropriate Technology Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appropriate Technology Library Appropriate Technology Library Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Appropriate Technology Library Agency/Company /Organization: Village Earth Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Create Early Successes Topics: - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Other Website: villageearth.org/appropriate-technology/appropriate-technology-library Cost: Paid Language: English The most comprehensive, compact, and cost effective appropriate technology and sustainable living resource in the world! The most comprehensive, compact, and cost effective appropriate technology and sustainable living resource in the world! The AT Library contains the full text and images from over 1050 of the best books dealing with all areas of do-it-yourself technology. Portable and easy to use on 28 CDs or 2

65

Microsoft PowerPoint - 3_Obligations case study May 23 2013 ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 Foreign Obligations Case Study Thursday May 23rd Pete Dessaules Brian Horn Jessica Norles Background * On several occasions, we have been asked to participate in some discussion...

66

FY 2013 Control Table by Appropriation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Control Table by Appropriation Summary Control Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 Current Enacted Congressional Approp. Approp. * Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy efficiency and renewable energy......................................... 1,771,721 1,809,638 2,337,000 +527,362 +29.1% Electricity delivery and energy reliability.......................................... 138,170 139,103 143,015 +3,912 +2.8% Nuclear energy................................................................................ 717,817 765,391 770,445 +5,054 +0.7% Fossil energy programs Clean coal technology..................................................................

67

Water Appropriation Rights (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriation Rights (Nebraska) Appropriation Rights (Nebraska) Water Appropriation Rights (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Natural Resources Nebraska has a "first in time, first in right" appropriation policy in place for water withdrawal or use from natural sources. This policy states

68

FY 2009 Control Table by Appropriation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control Table by Appropriation Control Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 Current Current Congressional Op. Plan Approp. Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy efficiency and renewable energy.......................... -- 1,722,407 1,255,393 -467,014 -27.1% Electricity delivery and energy reliability........................... -- 138,556 134,000 -4,556 -3.3% Nuclear energy.................................................................. -- 961,665 853,644 -108,021 -11.2% Legacy management........................................................ -- 33,872 -- -33,872 -100.0% Energy supply and Conservation...................................... 2,145,149 -- -- -- -- Fossil energy programs

69

FY 2006 Summary Table by Appropriation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriation Account Summary Appropriation Account Summary (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 Comparable Comparable Request to FY 2006 vs. FY 2005 Approp Approp Congress Energy And Water Development Energy Programs Energy supply....................................................................... Non-Defense site acceleration completion........................... Uranium enrichment D&D fund............................................ Non-Defense environmental services................................... Science................................................................................. Nuclear waste disposal......................................................... Departmental administration.................................................

70

Recovery Act update from Sr. Advisor Matt Rogers -- End of Obligations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

update from Sr. Advisor Matt Rogers -- End of update from Sr. Advisor Matt Rogers -- End of Obligations Recovery Act update from Sr. Advisor Matt Rogers -- End of Obligations Addthis Description Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Recovery Act Implementation, shares his thoughts as the Recovery Act reaches a critical milestone -- the end of the 2010 fiscal year and the last day to obligation contract and grant funding under the Recovery Act. Speakers Matt Rogers Duration 2:26 Topic Energy Sources Recovery Act Funding Opportunities Loans Grants Credit Energy Department Video MATTHEW ROGERS: This week, we are obligating the last of our funds under the recovery act for contract and grant work, $32.7 billion of funds, $32.7 billion obligated and on the street. What this means is that we have now

71

FY 2012 Control Table by Appropriation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2012 Summary Control Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2011 FY 2012 Current Congressional Annualized Congressional Approp. Request CR Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy efficiency and renewable energy....................................... 2,216,392 2,355,473 2,242,500 3,200,053 +983,661 +44.4% Electricity delivery and energy reliability........................................ 168,484 185,930 171,982 237,717 +69,233 +41.1% Nuclear energy............................................................................. 774,578 824,052 786,637 754,028

72

FY 2010 Control Table by Appropriation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control Table by Appropriation Control Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2009 FY 2010 Current Current Current Congressional Approp. Approp. Recovery Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy efficiency and renewable energy.......................................... 1,704,112 2,178,540 16,800,000 2,318,602 +140,062 +6.4% Electricity delivery and energy reliability............................................ 136,170 137,000 4,500,000 208,008 +71,008 +51.8% Nuclear energy................................................................................... 960,903 792,000 -- 761,274 -30,726 -3.9% Legacy management.......................................................................... 33,872 -- -- --

73

FY 2011 Statistical Table by Appropriation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statistical Table by Appropriation Statistical Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2009 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Current Current Current Congressional Approp. Recovery Approp. Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy efficiency and renewable energy........................................... 2,156,865 16,771,907 2,242,500 2,355,473 +112,973 +5.0% Electricity delivery and energy reliability............................................. 134,629 4,495,712 171,982 185,930 +13,948 +8.1% Nuclear energy................................................................................... 791,444 0 786,637 824,052 +37,415 +4.8% Fossil energy programs Clean coal technology..................................................................... 0 0 0 0

74

FY 2011 Control Table by Appropriation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Control Table by Appropriation Summary Control Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2009 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 Current Current Current Congressional Approp. Recovery Approp. Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy efficiency and renewable energy........................................... 2,156,865 16,771,907 2,242,500 2,355,473 +112,973 +5.0% Electricity delivery and energy reliability............................................. 134,629 4,495,712 171,982 185,930 +13,948 +8.1% Nuclear energy................................................................................... 791,444 0 786,637 824,052 +37,415 +4.8% Fossil energy programs Clean coal technology..................................................................... 0 0 0 0

75

FY 2006 Control Table by Appropriation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriation Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 Comparable Comparable Request to FY 2006 vs. FY 2005 Approp Approp Congress Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy supply.......................................................................... 794,897 932,319 902,674 -29,645 -3.2% Non-Defense site acceleration completion............................... 167,272 157,316 172,400 15,084 +9.6% Uranium enrichment D&D fund................................................ 414,027 495,015 591,498 96,483 +19.5% Non-Defense environmental services...................................... 307,795 288,966 177,534 -111,432 -38.6% Science.................................................................................... 3,536,373 3,599,546 3,462,718 -136,828 -3.8%

76

FY 2007 Control Table by Appropriation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control Table by Appropriation Control Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 Current Current Congressional Approp. Approp. Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy supply and Conservation......................................... 1,801,815 1,812,627 1,923,361 +110,734 +6.1% Fossil energy programs Clean coal technology....................................................... -160,000 -20,000 -- +20,000 +100.0% Fossil energy research and development........................ 560,852 592,014 469,686 -122,328 -20.7% Naval petroleum and oil shale reserves........................... 17,750 21,285 18,810 -2,475 -11.6% Elk Hills school lands fund................................................

77

Public Works for Water and Power Development and Energy Research Appropriation Bill, 1978. Report submitted to the 95th Congress, First Session to accompany H. R. 7553  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a report to the Senate by the Committee on Appropriations regarding the bill H.R. 7553, which provides appropriations for public works for water and power development and energy research for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1978. It provides funds for the Energy Research and Development Administration (except for Fossil Fuel and certain conservation programs) in Title I; for water resources development programs (including power) and related activities of the Department of the Army, Civil Functions--Army Corps of Engineers' Civil Works Program and the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Reclamation and power agencies in Titles II and III, respectively; and for related independent agencies and commissions, including the Appalachian Regional Commission and Appalachian Regional Development Programs, the Federal Power Commission, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Water Resources Council in Title IV. The bill recommended by the Committee which this report accompanies provides a total of $10,382,169,000 in new budget (obligational) authority. This is $195,423,000 more than the total of $10,186,746,000 passed by the House and $14,058,000 over the budget estimates of $10,368,111,000 submitted by the President. In subsequent budget recommendations to the Congress last February, the President initiated a review of ongoing water resource projects. After this review, the President announced on April 18, 1977 his decisions on Federal water resource programs and his specific decisions and recommendations on the 32 water projects which were subject to his review. Included in these specific decisions and recommendations were the deletion of funds for 18 projects, modification of 5 projects, and continuation of 9 projects. (MCW)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

79

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

80

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The obligation nation : America's involvement in the affairs of the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does America have an obligation, whether through foreign aid, military involvement, or by spreading democracy, to change the world? This thesis answers these above questions in intimate detail through the moral framework ...

Francel, Leif (Leif G.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surcharge on retail electricity rates, totaling over $300impact on retail electricity rates. The result has been thatlower VAT rates for renewable electricity, and exemption of

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

House Conference Report 108-401 FY 2004 Appropriations ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taken from House Conference Report 108-401 FY 2004 Appropriations billConsolidated Appropriations Act, 2004. REPORT LANGUAGE. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

House Conference Report 108-401 FY 2004 Appropriations ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taken from House Conference Report 108-401 FY 2004 Appropriations billConsolidated Appropriations Act, 2004. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

86

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: unfccc.int/home/items/5265.php Country: Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Cameroon, Central African Republic, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Costa Rica, Ivory Coast, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Gabon, Georgia (country), Ghana, India, Indonesia, Israel, Jordan, Madagascar, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Papua New Guinea, Peru, South Korea, Moldova, San Marino, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia

87

Renewable electricity, Feed-in-Tariff, Renewable Obligation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords JEL Classification The aim of this paper is to look at the UKs renewable energy policy in the context of its overall decarbonisation and energy policies. This will allow us to explore the precise nature of the failure of UK renewables policy and to suggest policy changes which might be appropriate in light of the UKs institutional and resource endowments. Our focus is on the electricity sector both in terms of renewable generation and to a lesser extent the facilitating role of electricity distribution and transmission networks. We will suggest that the precise nature of the failure of UK policy is rather more to do with societal preferences and the available mechanisms for encouraging social acceptability than it is to do with financial support mechanisms. Radical changes to current policy are required, but they must be careful to be institutionally appropriate to the UK. What we suggest is that current policies exhibit an unnecessarily low benefit to cost ratio, and that new policies for renewable deployment must pay close attention to cost effectiveness.

Michael G. Pollitt; Michael G. Pollitt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Energy and water development appropriations for 1984  

SciTech Connect

Part 6 of the hearing record covers appropriations for DOE programs, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). Shelby Brewer, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy and others from DOE reviewed programs in fission, fusion, waste management, defense, basic energy sciences, and the environment, as well as departmental administration. Chairman Nunzio Palladino and others from NRC reviewed their reduced budget request, its impact on research programs on unsolved safety problems, and the continuing problem of having Agency personnel widely scattered around the Washington area. DOE Secretary Donald Hodel led the discussion on alternative CRBR financing techniques. The testimony contains the budget justifications of 36 witnesses. (DCK)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Military Construction Appropriations and Emergency Hurricane Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2005 (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

H.R. 4837, The Military Construction Appropriations and Emergency Hurricane Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2005 [19], was signed into law on October 13, 2004. The Act provides for construction to support the operations of the U.S. Armed Forces and for military family housing. It also provides funds to help citizens in Florida and elsewhere in the aftermath of multiple hurricanes and other natural disasters. In addition, it authorizes construction of an Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DOE Takes Steps to Fulfill Obligation Under the Energy Independence and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Takes Steps to Fulfill Obligation Under the Energy Independence Takes Steps to Fulfill Obligation Under the Energy Independence and Security Act DOE Takes Steps to Fulfill Obligation Under the Energy Independence and Security Act July 27, 2010 - 4:19pm Addthis Seeks Comments on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Today, as required by Congress, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) soliciting comments from nuclear suppliers, nuclear insurance providers, and other stakeholders on the development of regulations to carry out section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), which implements the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC). The CSC provides for a world-wide approach to assure prompt and equitable compensation in the event of certain nuclear incidents, and features the

91

DOE Takes Steps to Fulfill Obligation Under the Energy Independence and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Takes Steps to Fulfill Obligation Under the Energy Independence Takes Steps to Fulfill Obligation Under the Energy Independence and Security Act DOE Takes Steps to Fulfill Obligation Under the Energy Independence and Security Act July 27, 2010 - 4:19pm Addthis Seeks Comments on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Today, as required by Congress, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) soliciting comments from nuclear suppliers, nuclear insurance providers, and other stakeholders on the development of regulations to carry out section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), which implements the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC). The CSC provides for a world-wide approach to assure prompt and equitable compensation in the event of certain nuclear incidents, and features the

92

Structural and regulatory reform of the European natural gas market : does the current approach secure the public service obligations?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The European natural gas market is in a state of flux. In order to better secure the public service obligations supply security, competitiveness and (more)

Spanjer, Abdelkader Rainaldo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Testimony Before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testimony Before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Testimony Before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development...

94

Idaho Spent Fuel Facility (ISFF) Project, Appropriate Acquisition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Spent Fuel Facility (ISFF) Project, Appropriate Acquisition Strategy Lessons Learned Report, NNSA, Feb 2010 Idaho Spent Fuel Facility (ISFF) Project, Appropriate Acquisition...

95

Revised Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2007, P.L. 110...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Revised Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2007, P.L. 110-5 Revised Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2007,...

96

Dynamic Reduction of a CH4/Air Chemical Mechanism Appropriate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamic Reduction of a CH4Air Chemical Mechanism Appropriate for Investigating Vortex Flame Interactions Title Dynamic Reduction of a CH4Air Chemical Mechanism Appropriate for...

97

Google, ou comment s'imposer comme un point de passage oblig 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google, ou comment s'imposer comme un point de passage obligé 1. Introduction Chaque jour des centaines de millions d'internautes utilisent Google gratuitement pour effectuer leurs recherches Google est devenu une véritable passerelle entre les ressources Internet et les internautes s'imposant à

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

98

House Conference Report 108-401 FY 2004 Appropriations ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... APPROPRIATIONS, 2004. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. Technology Administration. SALARIES AND EXPENSES. The conference ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

99

Transportation Treasury FY 2006 Appropriations 3.1 Percent ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Taken from FY 2006 Transportation, Treasury.Appropriations Act House Conference Report ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

100

House Conference Report 106-398, NIST Appropriations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taken from House Conference Report 106-398 FY 2000 Consolidated appropriations bill. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microsoft PowerPoint - 3_Obligations case study May 23 2013 - Brian Pete Jessica.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Foreign Obligations Case Foreign Obligations Case Study Thursday May 23rd Pete Dessaules Brian Horn Jessica Norles Background * On several occasions, we have been asked to participate in some discussion on tracking and reporting of nuclear materials * Some of the discussions have included speaking with working staff in other countries 2 Export observations * Variations in how export data is reported to NMMSS by U.S. industry 3 Simple case, #1 * Exporter statement - one fuel assembly #0001 - 350 kgs EU / 15kgs U-235 - No foreign obligations exported * Importer view - One fuel assembly #0001 - 350 kgs EU / 15 kgs U-235 - No foreign obligations on material 4 Simple case, #2 * Exporter statement - One fuel assembly, #0002 - 350 kgs EU / 15kgs U-235 - 15 kgs U-235 Obligated to Australia (#31) * Importer view

102

Financial and Activity Report - June 17, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

103

Financial and Activity Report - January 7, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

104

Financial and Activity Report - July 15, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

105

Financial and Activity Report - May 20, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

106

Financial and Activity Report - May 27, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

107

Financial and Activity Report - March 31, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

108

Financial and Activity Report - January 21, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

109

Financial and Activity Report - July 22, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

110

Financial and Activity Report - June 24, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

111

Financial and Activity Report - April 15, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

112

Financial and Activity Report - May 6, 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

113

Financial and Activity Report - July 29, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

114

Financial and Activity Report - June 10, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

115

Financial and Activity Report - March 11, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

116

DOE Financial and Activity Report - 12/10/2010 The Weekly Financial...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The...

117

Financial and Activity Report - June 30, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

118

Financial and Activity Report - April 22, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

119

Financial and Activity Report - January 14, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

120

Financial and Activity Report - February 18, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Financial and Activity Report - May 13, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

122

Financial and Activity Report - February 11, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

123

Financial and Activity Report - June 3, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

124

Financial and Activity Report - April 29, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

125

Financial and Activity Report - April 8, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

126

Financial and Activity Report - March 18, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

127

Financial and Activity Report - March 25, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

128

Financial and Activity Report - February 4, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

129

Financial and Activity Report - March 4, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

130

Financial and Activity Report - July 8, 2011 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major...

131

Financial and Activity Report - February 17, 2012 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

132

Financial and Activity Report - December 16, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

133

Financial and Activity Report - November 25, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

134

Financial and Activity Report - October 14, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

135

Financial and Activity Report - December 31, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

136

Financial and Activity Report - October 7, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

137

Financial and Activity Report - September 2, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

138

Financial and Activity Report - August 26, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

139

Financial and Activity Report - February 3, 2012 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

140

Financial and Activity Report - January 27, 2012 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Financial and Activity Report - September 23, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

142

Financial and Activity Report - March 16, 2012 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

143

Financial and Activity Report - September 30 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

144

Financial and Activity Report - November 11, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

145

Financial and Activity Report - September 16, 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements...

146

Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

147

NNSA Provides More Than $290 Million in Small Business Contract Obligations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Provides More Than ... Provides More Than ... NNSA Provides More Than $290 Million in Small Business Contract Obligations in FY 2012 Posted: December 18, 2012 - 11:45am In recognition of its commitment to working with small business partners, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced that it provided more than $290 million in small business obligations for federal prime contracts in fiscal year 2012. Almost 80 percent of new federal award actions went to small businesses. NNSA's Management & Operating (M&O) contractors provided an additional $1.65 billion to small businesses in FY 2012, equal to 49 percent of all money subcontracted by the M&Os. "Small businesses are the heart of the American economy, and we're proud of the strong partnerships we've forged as we work to implement the

148

Limitations on the obligation to provide access to electric transmission and distribution lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the limited availability of wheeling under the Federal Power Act, as amended by the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act. They demonstrate that the adoption of the essential facilities doctrine to determine possession of monopoly power may be a positive step toward more realistic analysis of refusals to deal by regulated companies. Without objective cost standards, however, to determine whether a facility is essential, this step may be counterproductive or even meaningless. In the context of requests to wheel, they identify the specific competition to be protected and the proper standards for determining whether a facility is essential. The obligation to wheel remains an uncertainty which the courts will resolve on a case-by-case basis. The scope of legitimate business conduct, however, can be clarified by the courts and, potentially, could be resolved to limit further a utility's obligation to wheel. 146 references.

Norton, F.L. IV; Early, M.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Moral obligation and the human germ-line gene therapy debate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

genetic engineering, there are few arguments made for a positive moral obligation to genetic intervention. This is especially so with respect to human germ-line gene therapy. Burke. K. Zimmerman makes one of the few arguments that society and the medical profession have a moral obligation to develop and use human germ-line gene therapy. However, Zimmerman's arguments are vague, and he misses some important points. It is the point of this thesis to criticize and buttress Zimmerman's arguments, and to show that philosophers have an important role to play, in conjunction with scientists, in the ethical debate surrounding genetic engineering. In addition to making suggestions for improvement of Zimmerman's argument, I will argue that the argument succeeds.

Clark, Alan B

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

FY 2006 Appropriations bill, House Report 109-272  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... House Report 109-272 - MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR SCIENCE, THE DEPARTMENTS OF STATE, JUSTICE, AND COMMERCE, AND ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

FY 2006 Appropriations bill report language, House Report ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... House Report 109-272 - MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR SCIENCE, THE DEPARTMENTS OF STATE, JUSTICE, AND COMMERCE, AND ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

152

1st FY 2001 Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taken from PL 107-38 1st FY 2001 Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act. An Act. Making emergency supplemental ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

153

Public Law 108-7 FY 2003 Omnibus Appropriations Bill ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for the nanocrystalline materials and biomass research initiative ... that the States of Washington ... to implement appropriate State fisheries management ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

154

PL 107-117, Making emergency supplemental appropriations ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Taken from PL 107-117 2002 Defense Appropriations - FEMA Emergency Supplemental section Federal Emergency Management Agency. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ecofys.com/com/publications/brochures_newsletters/documents/Report National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Screenshot References: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development[1] "Ecofys elaborated in several projects, concrete examples of NAMAs to understand the issues arising from this concept. This report summarizes the

156

Policy Flash 2014-05 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- 5 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III, and Division G, Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Pub. L. No. 113-6 Policy Flash 2014-05 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Implementation of Division F, Title I, Title II, and Title III, and Division G, Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Pub. L. No. 113-6 Questions concerning the policy flash should be directed to Barbara Binney at (202) 287-1340 or barbara.binney@hq.doe.gov for the AL or Richard Bonnell at (202) 287-1747 or at richard.bonnell@hq.doe.gov for the FAL. Policy flash 2014-05 CRA Appropriations AL FY2014.pdf More Documents & Publications Policy Flash 2014-04 Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 -- Congressional

157

Congressional House Senate Final Request Marks Marks Appropriation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2011 FY 2011 FY 2011 FY 2011 ($ in thousands) Congressional House Senate Final Request Marks Marks Appropriation FOSSIL ENERGY R&D Coal 403,850 400,100 452,000 389,688 Natural Gas Technologies 0 0 22,000 0 Unconventional Fossil Energy Technologies 0 0 26,000 0 Program Direction 152,033 152,033 170,300 164,725 Plant & Capital Equipment 20,000 20,000 20,000 19,960 Environmental Restoration 10,000 10,000 10,000 9,980 Cooperative Res. & Dev. 0 0 5,000 0 Congressional Directed Projects 0 3,750 19,950 0 Special Recruitment Program 700 700 700 699 Subtotal, Fossil Energy R&D 586,583 586,583 725,950 585,052 Use of prior year balances -11,000 Rescission of prior year balances -140,000 TOTAL FOSSIL ENERGY R&D 586,583 586,583 725,950 434,052 STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE

158

Testimony before the House Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

House Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on Energy House Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on Energy and Water | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Testimony before the House Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee ... Congressional Testimony Testimony before the House Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on Energy

159

Step 3. Identify the Appropriate Adoption Process and Framework...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3. Identify the Appropriate Adoption Process and Framework Description Once the code support infrastructure has established clear, measurable goals for a new energy code or update,...

160

Before the Senate Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Before the Senate Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies Before the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Microsoft PowerPoint - Federal Appropriations Process.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Appropriations Process Legal Process and Guidance Formulation Process OMB sets "targets" for agencies to meet for overall President's budget Agencies work internally...

162

Testimony before the House Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on Energy  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

House Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on Energy House Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on Energy and Water | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Testimony before the House Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee ... Congressional Testimony Testimony before the House Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on Energy

163

Appropriation of Water (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriation of Water (North Dakota) Appropriation of Water (North Dakota) Appropriation of Water (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting This section describes procedures for applications to appropriate water for beneficial uses, including irrigation, municipal, and industrial use. Once granted, water users must continue to seek permission for changes to their

164

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: IMPACTS OF FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS ON SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect

The US has a non-proliferation policy to receive foreign and domestic research reactor returns of spent fuel materials of US origin. These spent fuel materials are returned to the Department of Energy (DOE) and placed in storage in the L-area spent fuel basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The foreign research reactor returns fall subject to the 123 agreements for peaceful cooperation. These 123 agreements are named after section 123 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and govern the conditions of nuclear cooperation with foreign partners. The SRS management of these foreign obligations while planning material disposition paths can be a challenge.

Magoulas, V.

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

165

Cultural appropriation: information technologies as sites of transnational imagination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diverse ways in which technologies are modified and appropriated into local contexts are an important theme in CSCW research. Today, translocal processes such as the formation of international corporations and the movement of people and ideas across ... Keywords: cultural appropriation, globalization, imagination, multi-sited ethnography, politics, transnational

Silvia Lindtner; Ken Anderson; Paul Dourish

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1984  

SciTech Connect

Part 3 of the hearing record covers the testimony of nondepartmental witnesses on appropriations for various water and energy projects. The hearings were held in response to H.R. 3132, which authorizes appropriations for the year ending September 30, 1984. The witnesses included representatives from affected states, consumers, industry, and others. (DCK)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

PADS FY 2010 Annual Reports FY 2010 Obligations to Facilities Management Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C4N - SHELTERED WORKSHOP 1 831,263 C4N - SHELTERED WORKSHOP 1 831,263 C0L - LOCAL GOVT/MUNICIPALITY 2 125,000 B22 - LARGE BUSINESS 979 2,388,060,659 C3N - NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION 24 282,357,286 I0E - EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION 9 4,970,555 A00 - SMALL BUSINESS 1,890 1,921,241,548 C0F - FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 478 388,669,688 E1N - FOREIGN CONTRACTOR 1 -16,921,324 8 UNIQUE VALUES 3,384 4,969,334,675 Geographic Distribution of FY 2010 Obligations to Non-Facilities Management Awards STATE NUMBER OF AWARDS FY 2010 OBLIGATIONS NORTH DAKOTA (ND) 28 2,832,957 ILLINOIS (IL) 68 25,598,750 ARIZONA (AZ) 96 8,732,671 WISCONSIN (WI) 6 831,049 GEORGIA (GA) 34 5,300,948 NORTH CAROLINA (NC) 17 10,995,700 RHODE ISLAND (RI) 2 660,000 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA (DC) 770 524,559,400 PENNSYLVANIA (PA) 132 84,970,982

168

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony before the House Appropriations Committee,  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

House Appropriations Committee, House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony before the ... Congressional Testimony FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony before the House Appropriations Committee,

169

Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

170

Water Diversion and Appropriation (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diversion and Appropriation (Minnesota) Diversion and Appropriation (Minnesota) Water Diversion and Appropriation (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources is responsible for administering the use, allocation, and control of waters in the state, as well as the establishment, maintenance, and control of lake levels and

171

Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Burundia

172

Water Rights and Appropriation (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Appropriation (South Dakota) and Appropriation (South Dakota) Water Rights and Appropriation (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources All uses of water in South Dakota, with the exception of domestic water

173

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony before the House Appropriations Committee,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

House Appropriations Committee, House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony before the ... Congressional Testimony FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony before the House Appropriations Committee,

174

STI Software Appropriate for Announcement | Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Software Appropriate for Announcement Software Appropriate for Announcement Print page Print page Email page Email page Organizations and individuals who have developed and/or modified software during work supported by DOE or during work carried out for others at DOE facilities are required to announce the software with the appropriate announcement record to ESTSC, if the software meets the following criteria: the software meets the definition of STI; the software is known or expected to be useful inside or outside the DOE community, or is not specific to the originating site; and a stable, useable, documented version of the software exists (i.e., the software is not under initial development); the software has undergone all appropriate reviews for sensitivity and export control. Refer to the Software Best Practices document for more information on the

175

Fossil Energy FY 2014 Appropriations Hearing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2014 Appropriations Hearing FY 2014 Appropriations Hearing Fossil Energy FY 2014 Appropriations Hearing March 14, 2013 - 1:36pm Addthis Statement of Christopher Smith, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the House Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development. Mr. Chairman, Madam Ranking Member, and Members of the Committee, it is my pleasure to appear before you today to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) programs. Our fossil fuel resources are essential to the Nation's security and economic prosperity. The Office of Fossil Energy's primary mission is to ensure that the U.S. can continue to utilize those traditional fuel sources for clean, affordable, reliable energy. Technology development is critical to this mission. FE's Research and Development (FER&D) program

176

Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL) Green Jobs Calculator |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL) Green Jobs Calculator Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL) Green Jobs Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL) Green Jobs Calculator Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy Impacts Website: rael.berkeley.edu/greenjobs Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-and-appropriate-energy-labo Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This tool is an analytical job calculator for the U.S. power sector. It can be used to estimate how many jobs energy efficiency, renewable energy, and other low-carbon energy options, such as nuclear power and carbon capture and sequestration (CCS), will generate depending on proposed energy

177

UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the Energy Generation and End-Use Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy Generation and End-Use...

178

Appropriation or Use of Waters, Reservoirs, and Dams (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is state policy to control the use and appropriation of ground and surface waters of the state. A permit from the Department of the Environment is required prior to the construction or operation...

179

H.R. 933: Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home H.R. 933: Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Pub. L. 113-6, section 3003 H.R. 933: Consolidated and Further...

180

Subject: Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subject: Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel Subject: Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities Project Number: 689Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Letter, 9/10/10 Subject: Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities Project Number: 689Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Letter, 9/10/10 Enclosed for your review is a Nuclear Energy Institute white paper on the use of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) at U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-licensed recycling facilities. This paper is intended as an information source for the NRC and should serve as a foundation for discussion with industry representatives on the issue. This paper concludes that an ISA is a risk-informed, performance-based way of achieving and maintaining safety at fuel recycling facilities. As

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Rwanda

182

File:ApplicationtoAppropriate.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ApplicationtoAppropriate.pdf ApplicationtoAppropriate.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:ApplicationtoAppropriate.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 3 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:12, 13 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 18:12, 13 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 3 pages (75 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage There are no pages that link to this file.

183

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appropriate Energy Technology Resource Center .IX DOE Appropriate Energy Technology Pilot Program - PartOF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II C.

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

International Center for Appropriate & Sustainable Technology | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appropriate & Sustainable Technology Appropriate & Sustainable Technology Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Center for Appropriate & Sustainable Technology Name International Center for Appropriate & Sustainable Technology Address 8745 W 14th Ave Ste 200 Place Lakewood, CO Zip 80215 Sector Services Product Educating and Training Year founded 2002 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number 866.590.4377 Website http://www.icastusa.org/ Coordinates 39.7387749°, -105.094165° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7387749,"lon":-105.094165,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

185

THE UV-TUBE AS AN APPROPRIATE WATER DISINFECTION TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Tube, as the cost per liter of water produced decreases as water use increases. The water quality is regulatedi THE UV-TUBE AS AN APPROPRIATE WATER DISINFECTION TECHNOLOGY: An Assessment of Technical of contaminated drinking water ­ which causes so many deaths and so much illness ­ should have a simple technical

Kammen, Daniel M.

186

Appropriations and patterns in the use of group support systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a macro-level coding scheme to distinguish patterns that occur in groups using a group support system (GSS). The coding scheme has roots in adaptive structuration theory (AST) with its emphasis on how technology is appropriated or ... Keywords: GSS, adaptive structuration theory, coding scheme, discourse analysis, group support systems

Katherine M. Chudoba

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1984  

SciTech Connect

Part four of the hearing record contains the testimony of nondepartmental witnesses at two days of hearings on H.R. 3132, which appropriates funds for water and energy projects. The first day focused on flood control in the lower Mississippi Valley; the second on projects in the Great Lakes region, the Pacific states, and elsewhere. (DCK)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

189

UC Berkeley-Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Laboratory Energy Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UC Berkeley-Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory Name UC Berkeley-Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory Address 2621 Durant Ave Place Berkeley, California Zip 94704 Region Bay Area Coordinates 37.8682537°, -122.2558108° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8682537,"lon":-122.2558108,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

190

Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate Mitigation Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Europe and CIS Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low-Emission Development Strategies and Mitigation Actions: Europe and CIS Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: europeandcis.undp.org/home/show/96D0B2D4-F203-1EE9-B9A6CBCB9151BFFA UN Region: Central Asia, "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

191

Audit of the use of annual appropriations to fund contracts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this audit was to determine whether annual appropriations (annual funds) were being properly administered by the Department of Energy (Department). Specifically, we wanted to determine whether annual funds were being used to fund contracts beyond the year for which the funds were available. The Department receives more than $13 billion each year to finance its activities. The majority of this money is received through ''no-year'' appropriations, which can be retained by the Department until they are spent. About $80 million each year is received through annual funds, which are restricted to pay for the activities needed in the year for which the funds are provided. Unless specifically authorized by the Congress, annual funds not needed at the end of the year are to be returned to the Treasury.

1989-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Hill appropriators to decide future of SMES technology  

SciTech Connect

This article is a review of congressional appropriations activities related to funding for the Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage project. Without a pressing military mission, it appears that current funding for this project may be reallocated to other Defense Department initiatives. The electric utility industry, which has looked at SMES as a dual-use technology, has weighed in heavily in this debate in favor of continued funding.

Crawford, M.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Status of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Recipients' Obligations, OAS-RA-11-16  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Alert Management Alert The Status of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Recipients' Obligations OAS-RA-11-16 September 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 1, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Management Alert on "The Status of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Recipients' Obligations" IMMEDIATE CONCERN Because of the unprecedented level of funding provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) and the risks associated with spending such sums in a compressed period of time, the Office of Inspector General initiated a series of audits of the activities of the recipients of Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block

194

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

195

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

196

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

197

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

198

Video Installation Design: Appropriation and Assemblage As Projection Surface Geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This area of research focuses on the use of video projections in the context of fine art. Emphasis is placed on creating a unique video installation work that incorporates assemblage and appropriation as a means to develop multiple complex geometrical surfaces for video projection. The purpose of this research is to document a working process within a pre-defined set of guidelines that is influenced from my past work and the study of other artist?s prior work. Research includes the demonstration of the entire working process to create this original work and recommendations for future artists who wish to work in this medium.

Weaver, Timothy A.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

200

Statement of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on the Senate Appropriations Committee's Passage of the FY 2007 Energy and Water Appropriations Bill  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, DC - The following is a statement from Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on the Senate Appropriations Committee's passage of the FY 2007 Energy and Water Appropriations Bill:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy and water development appropriations for 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, Part 4  

SciTech Connect

The hearing of the House subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations addressed the Energy and Water Development appropriations for the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994. The document contains the Congressional Budget request of DOE for Atomic Energy Defense Activities.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Kenai, AK Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

203

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

204

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

205

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

206

Energy and water development appropriations for 1983. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session. Part 9  

SciTech Connect

Part 9 of the hearing record covers 1983 appropriations for energy and water development under DOE, the Civil Works Program of the Corps of Engineers, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Testimony for increasing the atomic weapons defense spending was heard in closed sessions so that some responses could be deleted from the public record; a supplemental funding of $97.4 million for FY 82 and a budget amendment for FY 1983 of $265.9 million additional were requested. DOE witnesses included Herman E. Roser, Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs, and Deputy Assistant Troy Wade. Other witnesses testified on budget requirements for the Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Program, the nuclear breeder program, and departmental administration. William R. Gianelli, Assistant Secretary, and others of the Army Civil Works Program presented proposals for nine new projects for construction starts in 1982 at a total capital cost of $982.5 million. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's estimates for fiscal year 1983 were $479.5 million, an increase of $14 million over FY '82. (DCK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan...

208

Energy and Water Development Appropriation Bill, 1985. Report submitted by Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

The House Committee on Appropriations summarizes the status of 1984 appropriations for 1984 and submits its estimates and recommendations for 1985 appropriations for the Departments of Defense (Civil), Interior, and Energy and for independent agencies. The estimated budget for Title I through IV items is $15.9 trillion, compared to $14.5 trillion in 1984. The committee recommends $15.5 trillion. The report reviews the budgets in each category and summarizes the hearings.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

210

Energy and Water Development Appropriation Bill, 1986. A report submitted to the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

The House Appropriations Committee report on H.R. 2959 recommends a total of $15.27 billion for water and energy projects of the Corps of Engineers, Departments of the Interior and Energy, and for independent agencies. The total is $7 million less than 1986 budget estimates and $217 million less than 1985 appropriations to date despite congressional recognition that public work projects are important to the nation's economy and level of employment. The report describes the status, budget estimations, and the committee's recommended budget for individual projects within the major categories.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

AN ANALYSIS OF THE ENERGY IMPACTS OF THE DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM: METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Region IX Appropriate Energy Technology Grants Programl___A_THE DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM:the DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM:

Lucarelli, Bart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

213

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) for 2005 - 2009 for over 230 countries and regions. ...

214

Energy and water development appropriations for 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

These hearings concern the Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1994, testimony heard by the Energy and Water Development Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations. Over 1,000 witnesses are listed including members of Congress and other interested individuals and organizations.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Town lattice truss : an appropriate bridge technology for developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Town lattice truss is proposed as an appropriate technology for the Tshumbe Diocese of the Democratic Republic of Congo. This proposal is made based on an understanding of rural transport and appropriate technology and ...

Radford, Todd C. (Todd Craig), 1977-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

FY 2004 House Report 108-221, FY 2004 CJS Appropriations ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Taken from FY 2004 House Report 108-221. FY 2004 CJS Appropriations Bill. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

217

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

218

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

219

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

220

Department of the Interior and related agencies appropriation bill, 1984. Report from the Committee on Appropriations, Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, Report No. 98-184  

SciTech Connect

Information relating to changes recommended for the $6.7 billion Department of Interior (DOI) Appropriations Bill, 1984 (HR 3363) by the Senate Committee on Appropriations emphasizes Congressional efforts to limit speeding and committee concerns over some DOI procedures, especially filing declarations of taking that have received excessive court awards. The report details line-item changes in the proposed appropriations, and compares them with budget estimates and House allowances. The commtitee recommends less than the budget estimate and more than the House allowance for the overall Title I and II budgets, but both the House and Senate recommend substantial increases in the proposed land and water conservation fund. (DCK)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

223

Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1995. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee of the Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, Part 5  

SciTech Connect

Testimony in this volume of hearings for 1995 energy and water development appropriations involve the following: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission; Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Secretary of Energy; Departmental Administration; Energy Research; Solar, Renewables, and Nuclear Energy; Commercial Waste Management.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy and water development appropriations for 1993. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, Part 8  

SciTech Connect

This document contains part 8 of the hearings on Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1993. Part 8 documents the testimony of members of Congress and other interested individuals and organizations. A list of witnesses is provided following the testimony.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Appropriations Questions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grantees should review the terms of their award agreement to determine when funds must be expended. If there are questions regarding deadlines within the award agreement, Grantees should consult...

226

M-13-22, Planning for Agency Operations during a Potential Lapse in Appropriations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C . 20503 THE DIRECTOR September 17, 2013 M-13-22 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM: Sylvia M. Burwq ~ Director SUBJECT: Planning for Agency Operations during a Potential Lapse in Appropriations Appropriations provided under the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013 (P.L. 113-6) expire at 11:59 pm on Monday, September 30. The Administration does not want a lapse in appropriations to occur. There is enough time for Congress to prevent a lapse in appropriations, and the Administration is willing to work with Congress to enact a short-term continuing resolution to fund critical Government operations and allow Congress the time to complete the full year 2014 appropriations. However, prudent management requires that

227

Combinatorial aspects of total positivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I study combinatorial aspects of an emerging field known as total positivity. The classical theory of total positivity concerns matrices in which all minors are nonnegative. While this theory was pioneered ...

Williams, Lauren Kiyomi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Total correlations and mutual information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In quantum information theory it is generally accepted that quantum mutual information is an information-theoretic measure of total correlations of a bipartite quantum state. We argue that there exist quantum states for which quantum mutual information cannot be considered as a measure of total correlations. Moreover, for these states we propose a different way of quantifying total correlations.

Zbigniew Walczak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Statement Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, Committee on Appropriations (3/16/2010)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, Committee on Appropriations, United States House of RepresentativesBy David Geiser, Director, Office of Legacy Management,...

230

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

231

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

232

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

233

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

234

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

235

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

236

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

237

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

238

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

239

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

240

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

242

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

243

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

244

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

245

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

246

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

247

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

248

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

249

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

250

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

251

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

252

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

253

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

254

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

255

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

256

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

257

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

258

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

259

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

260

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

262

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,000 to 79,999 80,000 or More Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

263

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators U.S. Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Energy Information...

264

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.7...

265

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC4.7...

266

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC8.7...

267

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East North Central West North Central Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

268

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

269

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

270

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

271

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump... 53.5...

272

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

273

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

274

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

m... 3.2 0.2 Q 0.1 Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 14.9 11.1 3.9 Cordless...

275

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

m... 3.2 0.9 0.7 Q Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 19.3 13.2 6.1 Cordless...

276

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q 0.5 Q Q Monitor is Turned Off... 0.5 N Q Q Q Q N Q Use of Internet Have Access to Internet Yes... 66.9...

277

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Four Most Populated States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four...

278

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

279

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

280

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 25.8 2.8 5.8 5.5 3.8 7.9 1.4 5.1 Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan Used All Summer... 18.7 4.2 4.9 4.1 2.1 3.4 2.4 6.3...

282

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Characteristics Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC5.4 Space Heating...

283

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.1 0.5 Q 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

284

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.3 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.7 0.5 Q Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

285

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.6 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.8 0.3 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

286

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.1 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.4 Q 0.2 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

287

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.4 0.4 0.4 0.7 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

288

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

289

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 34.3 1.2 0.9 2.2 2.9 5.4 7.0 8.2 6.6 Adequacy of Insulation Well Insulated... 29.5 1.5 0.9 2.3 2.7 4.1...

290

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

291

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

292

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

293

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

294

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

295

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

296

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

297

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

298

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

299

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

300

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

302

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

303

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

304

Ecofys-How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Ecofys-How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com/w/images/4/49/Ecofy How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Screenshot References: How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work[1] "This short paper identifies three types of issues as potential obstacles for NAMAs in this early stage of development. First, it highlights the importance of dealing with local ownership, which is quite time intensive.

305

GRR/Section 19-AK-c - Permit to Appropriate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 19-AK-c - Permit to Appropriate < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-AK-c - Permit to Appropriate 19AKCPermitToAppropriate.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Water Use Act Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19AKCPermitToAppropriate.pdf 19AKCPermitToAppropriate.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative In Alaska, water is declared a public resource belonging to the people of

306

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 1. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

This is part 1 of the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committee on appropriations, House of Representatives. This includes statements of witnesses from the Department of the Army, the Corps of Engineers, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works) and Chief of Engineers on topics of funding for the activities of these departments.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Energy and water development appropriations for 1994. Hearings before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, Part 3  

SciTech Connect

This document of part 3 of the hearings for the Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1994. This document contains the testimony of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Bureau of Reclamation, the Secretary of the Interior, Susquehanna River Basin Commission, Delaware River Basin Commission, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Tennessee Valley Authority, and Appalachian Regional Commission.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Energy and water development appropriations for 1996. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, Part 8  

SciTech Connect

The report covers hearings to authorize energy and water appropriations for fiscal year 1996 for the Department of Energy. The programs for environment, safety and health, energy research, geothermal, biomass, solar and renewable energy sources, nuclear energy and departmental activities are examined. Statements and documents provided for the record are included from government and industry officials.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 5. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

This is part 5 of the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committee on appropriations. Included are statements from witnesses of the Secretary of Energy, departmental administration, energy research, renewable energy, nuclear energy, Power Marketing Administration, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy and water development appropriations for 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session. Part 8  

SciTech Connect

Part 8 of the hearings for Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1994 contains the testimony of members of Congress and other interested individuals and organizations. The names of all witnesses providing testimony are indexed with relevant page numbers for reference at the end of this volume.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Energy and water development appropriations for 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, Part 7  

SciTech Connect

Presented here is Part 7 of the hearings on Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1994. This volume contains the testimony of members of Congress and other interested individuals and organizations. An alphabetical listing of witnesses is provided at the end of this document.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 3. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, On Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committed on appropriations, House of Representatives. The topics include the Bureau of Reclamation, testimony of the Secretary of the Interior, Appalachian Regional Commission, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The discussion is related to the funding of activities in these areas.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Energy and water development appropriations for Fiscal Year 1984. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Part I of the 1984 appropriations hearing record covers four days of hearings reviewing the programs and activities of the Corps of Engineers Civil Works, Department of Interior and Bureau of Reclamation, Tennessee Valley Authority, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Spokesmen for each agency explained their budget needs and responded to questions from the committee. (DCK)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

The hearings (H.R. 2445) address the Energy & Water Development Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1994. The Bonneville Power Administrations budget proposal were discussed. The need for cost cutting and a competitive rate structure were stressed. Statements and documents submitted for record by government officials are included.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 6. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

This is part 6 of the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committee on appropriations. Included are statements from witnesses of the Department of Energy, environmental management and commercial waste management, nuclear waste technical review board, atomic energy defense activities, naval reactors, and defense nuclear facilities safety board.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Energy and water development appropriations for 1996. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, Part 6  

SciTech Connect

The report covers hearings to authorize energy and water appropriations for fiscal year 1996 for the Department of Energy. The programs for defense, environment, power marketing, nuclear energy, waste management and departmental activities are examined. Statements and documents provided for the record are included from government and industry officials.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Energy and water appropriations, fiscal year 1999. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

These are hearings on H.R. 2203/S. 1004 an act making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1998. Witnesses before the committee were from the US DOE for atomic energy defense activities, Office of Energy Research; US DOD, civil; US Corps of Engineers, civil; and US DOI, Bureau of Reclamation.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Energy and water development appropriations for 1996. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, Part 5  

SciTech Connect

The report covers hearings to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1996 for the Department of Energy. The programs for environment, safety and health, energy research, solar and renewable energy sources, nuclear energy and departmental activities are examined. Statements and documents provided for the record are included.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Energy and water development appropriations, fiscal year 1998. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, US Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

These are hearings on H.R. 2203/S. 1004 an act making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1998. Witnesses before the committee were from the US DOE for atomic energy defense activities, the Bonneville Power Administration, environmental restoration and waste management; the US DOI, bureau of reclamation; US DOD, civil; and Corps of Engineers, civil.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Energy and water development appropriations for 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session. Part 6  

SciTech Connect

Part 6 of the Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1994 contains hearings for (1) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management; Environment, Safety, and Health; (2) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Budget Justifications; (3) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board; (4) Atomic Energy Defense Activities; and (5) Naval Reactors. Along with the budget requests, accomplishments and justifications for the proposed budgets are presented.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy and water development appropriations for 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Part 2 of the Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1994 contains the Department of the Army Corps of Engineers Budget Justifications and Status Reports of Division Engineers. The report is for the Lower Mississippi Valley Division, Mississippi River Commission of the US Army Corps of Engineers. The status report addresses Hurricane Andrew and different engineering programs (arranged according to location).

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 7. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committee on appropriations, House of Representatives. This is part 7 which includes the testimony of members of congress and other interested individuals and organizations. Discussion includes funding of various US DOE programs and projects relating to energy efficiency and other topics.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Energy and water development appropriations for 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session. Part 5  

SciTech Connect

Part 5 of the hearings for the Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1994 contains budget hearings for the Department of Energy. Contained in this volume is the statement of the Secretary of Energy and budget proposals and justifications for Departmental Administration, Energy Research, Nuclear Energy and Commercial Waste Management, Solar and Renewables, and Power Marketing Administrations.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

325

China Total Cloud Amount Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Total Cloud Amount Over China DOI: 10.3334CDIACcli.008 data Data image Graphics Investigator Dale P. Kaiser Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental...

326

AN ANALYSIS OF THE ENERGY IMPACTS OF THE DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM: METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ENERGY IMPACTS OF THE DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGYmanufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constituteTHE ENERGY IMPACTS of the DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

Lucarelli, Bart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Essays on obligation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the first chapter, "Supererogation and Defenses of Modest Moral Demands," I argue that a range of recent approaches to defending the "ordinary morality" view that the demands of morality are fairly modest make it hard ...

Finegan, Johanna Goth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

329

Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013

330

Technology Appropriation in Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning. Paper presented at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Studies in computer supported collaborative learning frequently under-expose the interaction between students and technology. To gain more insight in the way student groups interact with educational technology, we examine how students appropriate this technology. The notion of technology appropriation implies a process of social construction in which the actions and thoughts of the user are shaped by the technology, while the meaning and effects of the technology are shaped through the users actions. In this paper, we develop a problem analysis from theoretical findings, and work towards an initial, tentative concept of technology appropriation.

Maarten Overdijk; Wouter Van Diggelen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iisd.org/climate/de Program Start 2012

332

Energy and water development appropriations for 1988. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Part 2 of the hearing record covers testimony relating to appropriations for the Corps of Engineers, with separate sections on the North Pacific, North Central, North Atlantic, South Atlantic, New England, and Pacific Ocean divisions of the Corps and the Commissions for each of the Potomac, Delaware, and Susquehanna river basins. A list of witnesses appears at the beginning of each section. Descriptions of the various energy and water development programs and future plans, along with funding requirements, make up the testimony.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Energy and water development appropriations for 1983. Hearings before a Subcommittee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Part 2 of the hearing record covers the testimony of Corps of Engineers of the Missouri River, North Pacific, Ohio River, Pacific Ocean, South Pacific, and Southwestern Divisions, as well as the testimony of officials from the Delaware and Susquehanna River Basins and the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin. The committee received information on water projects pertinent to the 1983 budget appropriations. (DCK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

What is the appropriate way to show LED lighting in COMcheck...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series What is the appropriate way to show LED lighting in COMcheck? The following steps should be used to account for LED lighting in...

335

Appropriate Acquisition Strategy PMLL Identifier: PMLL-2011-NNSS-RFS-388 (Source: User Submitted)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriate Acquisition Strategy Appropriate Acquisition Strategy PMLL Identifier: PMLL-2011-NNSS-RFS-388 (Source: User Submitted) Validator: Kevin Thornton, NNSA/NSO Date: 2/14/2011 Contact: Robert Platoni/702-295-0815 Statement: The selection of an acquisition strategy that is appropriate for current market conditions, funding constraints, and project scope can result in more competitive bidding and lower bid prices. Discussion: The scope of this project was to construct two new fire stations to replace existing outdated facilities. The project was originally planned as two separate projects to be constructed in two different fiscal years using a design/bid/build acquisition strategy. The funding profile was appropriate for this type of strategy. In FY2004, Congress directed that the two projects be

336

Unintended effects of changes in NIH appropriations : challenges for biomedical research workforce development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. government doubled NIH appropriations between 1998 and 2003, aiming to significantly foster research activities in biomedicine. However, several indicators demonstrate not only that the impact of the budget increase ...

Gomez Diaz, Mauricio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Department of Housing and Urban Development-Independent Agencies Appropriation Act, 1984  

SciTech Connect

The budget appropriations for FY 1983 for the National Science Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Housing and Urban Development-Independent Agencies are presented.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Will Grant specializes in appropriations law, an area hes been...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Will Grant Will Grant specializes in appropriations law, an area he's been practicing for a decade now, the last five of which have been at the Department of Energy. Will also had...

339

A culture of appropriation : strategies of temporary reuse in East Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the possibilities of creative appropriation of existing spaces. It defines interstitial practices as both critical and imaginative forces that actively participate in the production of social space. ...

Heinemann, Michaela

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PILOT PROGRAM - PART I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ol8GY PILOT PROGRAM- PART I DOE APPROPRIATE ENERG c. w. , F.the Department of Energy- DOE), responding to the 1977 ERDAto a company or product name does not imply approval or

Case, C.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports...

342

Appropriations, budget estimates, etc., Volume 2: Statements. One Hundredth Second Congress, Second Session, January 3, 1992 to October 9, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Volume 2, of the Appropriations, Budget estimates and authorizing legislation are provided. The information is presented for supplemental appropriations, recessions, regular and continuing annual appropriations and analytical reports and comparisons. Agencies with appropriations involving energy and resource development and conservation are included. The legislative text is included.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Appropriations, budget estimates, etc., Volume 1: Statements. One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, January 3, 1992 to October 9, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Volume 1, of the Appropriations, Budget estimates and authorizing legislation are provided. The information is presented for supplemental appropriations, recissions, regular and continuing annual appropriations and analytical reports and comparisons. Agencies with appropriations involving energy and resource development and conservation are included. The legislative text is included.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Energy and water development appropriations for 1985. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 3 of the hearing record covers the testimony of Interior Secretary William Clark and witnesses from the Bureau of Reclamation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the Appalachian Regional Commission. Clark cited the accomplishments of the Bureau of Reclamation during his first three months in office and described the reorganization of the Department's 10 bureaus. His testimony on water policy covers cost sharing for flood control, irrigation, and other water projects. Questions directed to Clark and the other witnesses also dealt with resource development, program management, and the status and level of appropriations for specific projects of concern to committee members.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Energy and water development appropriations for 1986. Part 7. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 7 of the hearing record covers three areas of the DOE appropriations: Atomic Energy Defense activities, power marketing administrations, and departmental administration. Representatives of DOE and the US Army reviewed the nuclear defense mission and activities under the defense and arms control programs. The administrators of the Alaska, Bonneville, Southeastern, Southwestern, and Western Power Administrations and a representative of the Conservation and Renewable Energy division described programs and budget requirements, as well as estimates of power demands for their regions. Administrative personnel described DOE procedures and explained the budget requests. Supporting documentation accompanies the testimony of the 16 witnesses.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Energy and water development appropriations for 1986. Part 1. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of the hearing record covers the testimony of witnesses from the Corps of Engineers before the House Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development on appropriations for Corps activities in 1986. The first section of the record gives an overview of civil works programs in the context of the 1986 budget of $2.34 billion. Particular emphasis is on 60 proposed water projects. Separate sections cover testimony by the divisional representatives of the Missouri River, Ohio River, North Central, North Atlantic, New England, and Southwestern Divisions. Their testimony includes details of specific projects and supporting documentation for the projects as well as proposals for cost sharing and user fees.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Energy and water development appropriations for 1985. Part 2. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 2 of the hearing record covers testimony given by the Corps of Engineers on the Lower Mississippi Valley, Southwestern, North Pacific, South Pacific, and Pacific Ocean Divisions, and by the Delaware and Susquehanna River Basin Commissions and the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin. Representatives of the Corps' engineering, planning, and program development offices described projects in each of the divisions which relate to navigation, flood control, job development, and other matters. The Committee reviewed appropriation levels for each of the projects. The hearing record includes background and supporting documentation as well as the statements and testimony of the witnesses.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Energy and water development appropriations for 1980: Part 8. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, first session  

SciTech Connect

Hearings were conducted on March 20, 1979 with five power marketing administrations (Alaska Power, Bonneville Power, Southeastern Power, Southwestern Power, and Western Area Power Marketing Administrations) who sought appropriations of funds collected from power sales to operate and maintain the five administrations. On March 21, 1979, the hearing deals with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's request of $73.9 million to support a staff level of 1800 positions for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 1980. The March 22, 1979 hearing deals with the Department of Energy's 1980 budget request. The hearing on February 13, 1979 deals with a discussion of the proposed FY 1979 reprogramming of $22.7 million to correct a substantial funding shortage in the Department of Energy's services and benefits. This reprogramming action would increase the amount appropriated for program administration from $292.5 million to $313.6 million. The shortage centers around the fact that the FY 1979 budget requests were prepared on the basis of estimates from the individual agencies which were combined into the Department of Energy on October 1, 1977. Statements are included from many witnesses at these hearings. (MCW)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Authorizations and Appropriations What s the Difference | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Authorizations and Appropriations What s the Difference Authorizations and Appropriations What s the Difference Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Seeing Matter Scale of Things Chart Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources Authorizations and Appropriations What s the Difference Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page "Authorization laws have two basic purposes. They establish, continue, or

350

Step 4. Select the Appropriate Code for Adoption | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4. Select the Appropriate Code for Adoption 4. Select the Appropriate Code for Adoption Description To achieve the economic, environmental, and social benefits offered by energy codes, a state or jurisdiction must select the energy code that is most appropriate for their locale. States and municipalities generally choose to either adopt a model energy code or standard or create a state-specific or local energy code. States or municipalities may also select to adopt "stretch codes"-those that go beyond the minimum requirements of an adopted energy code to achieve greater energy efficiency. In addition, states and local jurisdictions may choose to adopt policies that implement a green building rating system or policies that apply to specific structures, such as state-owned or -funded buildings.

351

UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy Generation and End-Use Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy Generation and End-Use Sectors Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Sector Climate Focus Area People and Policy Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS Country Peru South America References UNDP - Latin America & the Caribbean[1] Contents 1 Program Overview 1.1 Program Focus 1.2 Environment and Sustainable Development 2 References Program Overview "Across Latin America and the Caribbean, UNDP helps countries build and share their own solutions to urgent development challenges, supporting coalitions for change and connecting individuals and institutions so they

352

Compact Totally Disconnected Moufang Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\Delta$ be a spherical building each of whose irreducible components is infinite, has rank at least 2 and satisfies the Moufang condition. We show that $\\Delta$ can be given the structure of a topological building that is compact and totally disconnected precisely when $\\Delta$ is the building at infinity of a locally finite affine building.

Grundhofer, T; Van Maldeghem, H; Weiss, R M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. Total 135,676 127,682 120,936 133,646 119,888 93,672 1936-2012 PAD District 1 78,197 73,348 69,886 88,999 79,188 59,594 1981-2012...

354

Department of Housing and Urban Development-Independent Agencies Appropriations Bill, 1985  

SciTech Connect

Federal aappropriations for the Department of Housing and Urban Development and for sundry independent agencies, boards, commissions, corporations, and offices are enumerated and discussed. Recommendations by the House Committee on Appropriations are given along with a detailed description of each program considered. Specific programs discussed include: urban research, urban development, urban planning, solar energy, environmental quality, space stations, space shuttle orbiters, scientific research and education, and selective service. This bill, H.R. 5713, makes appropriations for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1985.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation

356

Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies appropriations for 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

These hearings of the HR Subcommittee on the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Services, include appropriation considerations and testimony for the National Center for Human Genome Research under the National Institutes of Health appropriation.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Obligate Biotrophy Features Unraveled by the Genomic Analysis of the Rust Fungi, Melampsora larici-populina and Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici  

SciTech Connect

Rust fungi are some of the most devastating pathogens of crop plants. They are obligate biotrophs, which extract nutrients only from living plant tissues and cannot grow apart from their hosts. Their lifestyle has slowed the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying host invasion and avoidance or suppression of plant innate immunity. We sequenced the 101 mega base pair genome of Melampsora larici-populina, the causal agent of poplar leaf rust, and the 89 mega base pair genome of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat and barley stem rust. We then compared the 16,841 predicted proteins of M. larici-populina to the 18,241 predicted proteins of P. graminis f. sp tritici. Genomic features related to their obligate biotrophic life-style include expanded lineage-specific gene families, a large repertoire of effector-like small secreted proteins (SSPs), impaired nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways, and expanded families of amino-acid, oligopeptide and hexose membrane transporters. The dramatic upregulation of transcripts coding for SSPs, secreted hydrolytic enzymes, and transporters in planta suggests that they play a role in host infection and nutrient acquisition. Some of these genomic hallmarks are mirrored in the genomes of other microbial eukaryotes that have independently evolved to infect plants, indicating convergent adaptation to a biotrophic existence inside plant cells

Duplessis, Sebastien; Cuomo, Christina A.; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Aerts, Andrea; Tisserant, Emilie; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Joly, David L.; Hacquard, Stephane; Amselem, Joelle; Cantarel, Brandi; Chiu, Readman; Couthinho, Pedro; Feau, Nicolas; Field, Matthew; Frey, Pascal; Gelhaye, Eric; Goldberg, Jonathan; Grabherr, Manfred; Kodira, Chinnappa; Kohler, Annegret; Kues, Ursula; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Mago, Rohit; Mauceli, Evan; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Park, Robert; Pearson, Matthew; Quesneville, Hadi; Rouhier, Nicolas; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Selles, Benjamin; Shapiro, Harris; Tangay, Philippe; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Peer, Yves Van de; Henrissat, Bernard; Rouze, Pierre; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Zhong, Shaobin; Hamelin, Richard C.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Szabo, Les J.; Martin1, Francis

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

Energy and water development appropriations for 1987. Part 5. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 5 of the hearing record covers $12.1 billion in appropriations to DOE. Energy Secretary Herrington describes it as adequate to meet DOE's defense and civilian responsibilities and still contribute to the reduction of the national deficit. The budget emphasizes initiatives which would transfer power marketing and the Naval Petroleum Reserves to the private sector, places a moratorium on the Strategic Petroleum Reserve at 500 million barrels, and introduces a new waste disposal program and new cooperative research and development programs in which the federal government serves as a minority partner with industry. Herrington defended the increase in defense activities within the budget and the administration's privatization programs. The volume also includes the budgets for solar and renewable energy sources, magnetic fusion, and the environment; nuclear fission and commercial waste management; general science and Basic Energy Sciences; and uranium supply and enrichment.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Energy and water development appropriations for 1985. Part 1. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part I of the hearing record covers appropriations for six divisions of the Corps of Engineers. Testimony by William R. Gianelli, Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works), and officers in the Corps of Engineers reviewed the 1985 budget request of $2.491 billion, discussed the implications of pending legislation, and described the status of specific projects. They noted the limitations on construction and engineering preplanning because of disagreement on financing and the administration's efforts towards project cost sharing. Gianelli described the economic benefits of regulatory reforms that have made administration and permitting more efficient, partly because of the introduction of private and alternative financing. The testimony covers the Ohio River, Missouri River, North Central, North Atlantic, New England, and South Atlantic Divisions.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1985. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, US Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part I of the hearing record covers three days of testimony on energy and water development appropriations involving the Army Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. William Gianelli, Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works) reviewed the $2.49 billion budget and pending legislation that relates to it, as well as to a variety of issues including project productivity, ocean disposal of dredged materials, regulatory reform, private financing of public recreation, and the role of federal engineers. Secretary of the Interior William Clark reviewed the functions of the Bureau of Reclamation, and Commissioner Robert Broadbent discussed the $1.08 billion budget in more detail. Tennessee Valley Authority Chairman Charles Dean gave an overview of projects and budget requirements amounting to $117.5 million.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

On accurate orientation extraction and appropriate distance measure for low-resolution palmprint recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orientation feature has been demonstrated to be one of the most effective features for low resolution palmprint recognition. In this paper, using steerable filter, we investigate the accurate orientation extraction and appropriate distance measure problems ... Keywords: Distance measure, Feature extraction, Palmprint verification, Steerable filter

Wangmeng Zuo; Feng Yue; David Zhang

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Abstract--Substation data integration is facilitated by existence and appropriate connection of Intelligent Electronic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Abstract--Substation data integration is facilitated by existence and appropriate connection and substation topology transitions etc. Processed data may be used locally and/or communicated to remote sites (neighboring substations and/or control centers). The paper presents software that implements substation data

Kezunovic, Mladen

363

Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory -rael.berkeley.edu Innovations for Sustainable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.berkeley.edu Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards (30 states + DC) State Goal !PA: 18%! by 2020 !NJ: 22.5% by 2021 CT: 23Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory - rael.berkeley.edu Innovations for Sustainable Energy Daniel Kammen Chief Technical Specialist for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency, The World Bank

Kammen, Daniel M.

364

Excerpts from Senate Report 109-084 ENERGY AND WATER APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Department's missions in national security, energy security and economic security. Programs funded under the timely accomplishment of this important work. NUCLEAR PHYSICS Appropriations, 2005 $404,778,000 Budget recommends $419,741,000 for nuclear physics, an increase of $49,000,000 to ensure full utilization

365

Department of Housing and Urban Development, and certain independent agencies appropriations, 1984, part 2  

SciTech Connect

Appropriation hearings for the National Science Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation, and Department of Housing and Urban Development-Independent Agencies are presented. For individual titles, see N84-21440 through N84-21440.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Supporting the social context of technology appropriation: on a synthesis of sharing tools and tool knowledge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is an increasing spread of flexible software applications that can be modified by adding components (sometimes called plug-ins or add-ons). A popular example in the software development domain is Eclipse, a flexible development environment that ... Keywords: ad-hoc, appropriation, help giving, learning, peer-to-peer, software development, tailorability, workplace learning

Sebastian Draxler; Gunnar Stevens; Martin Stein; Alexander Boden; David Randall

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Conceptualization and appropriation: the evolving use of a collaborative knowledge management system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zephyr is an expanding software company that developed a knowledge management system designed to support the work of employees and provide management overview. Despite strong management support the system was not much used and instead employees themselves ... Keywords: appropriation, conceptualisation, design, knowledge management, participatory design, system development, tailorability, user involvement

Claus Bossen; Peter Dalsgaard

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

369

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

370

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

371

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

372

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

373

Abstract-The Chilean electricity regulation introduced in 2008 an obligation to contract 10% of renewable energy,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy in Chile, according to the National Energy Commission. Solar energy is not quantified given.000 Mini Hydro 2.600 Solar - Total 11.600 Table 1. Renewable energy estimated potential (National Energy energy, especially in mini hydro and wind farms, and in some degree of solar energy, especially

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

374

Energy and water development appropriations bill, 1999. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, June 16, 1998  

SciTech Connect

Mr. McDade, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted this report. The Committee on Appropriations submits the following report in explanation of the accompanying bill making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1999, and for other purposes.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

376

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

377

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

378

Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities Executive Summary This paper addresses why the use of an Integrated Safety Analysis ("ISA") is appropriate for fuel recycling facilities 1 which would be licensed under new regulations currently being considered by NRC. The use of the ISA for fuel facilities under Part 70 is described and compared to the use of a Probabilistic Risk Assessment ("PRA") for reactor facilities. A basis is provided for concluding that future recycling facilities - which will possess characteristics similar to today's fuel cycle facilities and distinct from reactors - can best be assessed using established qualitative or semi-quantitative ISA techniques to achieve and demonstrate safety in an effective and efficient manner.

379

Effective Use of Appropriations and Alternative Finance to Fund Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ESPC Technical Assistance Team eere.energy.gov ESPC Technical Assistance Team eere.energy.gov The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii Effective Use of Appropriations and Alternative Finance to Fund Energy Efficiency Projects John Shonder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN FUPWG Spring 2012 April 11, 2012 2 | ESPC Technical Assistance Team eere.energy.gov * Federal agencies are required to meet numerous energy management goals * Two main sources of funding to meet these goals - Energy management programs funded by Congressional appropriations - Private financing via UESC and ESPC (and others) * Agencies must use these two funding sources in the most effective manner to: - Maximize energy savings (and investment per P-1 memo) - Minimize life cycle cost Motivation for this study 3 | ESPC Technical Assistance Team eere.energy.gov

380

Appropriate technology for rural India to produce biogas from vegetative wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the huge amount (91%) of energy in rural India is used as domestic fuel. Forest wood constitutes half of this energy, which could be saved by providing an alternative kitchen fuel. Biogas provides the only viable alternative. While the basics of biogas production have been known for several decades, serious research efforts are required to evolve appropriate technology of biogas production for Indian villages. It is easy to design devices which work on the economy of large scale; it is a formidable task to achieve the same at down-to-earth level of economy. Considering the vast majority of small farmers, a cheap, manual, continuous fermentation straw gas plant is likely to offer appropriate technology. Efforts have continued since 1965 to develop such a plant: the latest model is quite competitive in all respects with the KVIC biogas plant, except for its stirring system. Efforts are being made to develop a suitable stirring system.

Goswami, K.P. (College of Agriculture, Gujarat Agricultural Univ., Anand (IN))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Mixing Appropriations and Private Financing to Meet Federal Energy Management Goals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares several strategies for mixing appropriations and private financing in a typical federal agency that has identified $100 million in required energy conservation measures (ECMs) at its facilities. The analysis shows that in order to maximize savings and minimize overall life-cycle cost, the best strategy for the agency is to use private financing to fund as many of the ECMs as possible within the statutory maximum 25-year project term, beginning with the ECMs with the shortest paybacks. Available appropriations should either be applied to a privately financed project as a one-time payment from savings (i.e., as a buydown ) or used to directly fund longer-payback ECMs that cannot be included in the privately financed project.

Shonder, John A [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Department of Housing and Urban Development-Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 1985  

SciTech Connect

The text of an act making apropriations for the Department of Housing and Urban Development and sundry independent agencies, boards, commissions, corporations, and offices for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1985 is given. Money is appropriated for rent supplements, housing counseling Solar Energy and Energy Conservation Bank, urban homesteadng, American Battle Monuments, Commission, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency, and other agencies and programs.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Projects from Federal Region IX: Department of Energy Appropriate Energy Technology Program. Part II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Details and progress of appropriate energy technology programs in Region IX are presented. In Arizona, the projects are Solar Hot Water for the Prescott Adult Center and Solar Prototype House for a Residential Community. In California, the projects are Solar AquaDome Demonstration Project; Solar Powered Liquid Circulating Pump; Appropriate Energy Technology Resource Center; Digester for Wastewater Grown Aquatic Plants; Performance Characteristics of an Anaerobic Wastewater Lagoon Primary Treatment System; Appropriate Energy/Energy Conservation Demonstration Project; Solar Energy for Composting Toilets; Dry Creek Rancheria Solar Demonstration Projects; Demonstration for Energy Retrofit Analysis and Implementation; and Active Solar Space Heating System for the Integral Urban House. In Hawaii, the projects are: Java Plum Electric; Low-Cost Pond Digesters for Hawaiian Pig Farm Energy Needs; Solar Beeswax Melter; Methane Gas Plant for Operating Boilers and Generating Steam; and Solar Water Heating in Sugarcane Seed-Treatment Plants. A Wind-Powered Lighted Navigation Buoys Project for Guam is also described. A revised description of the Biogas Energy for Hawaiian Small Farms and Homesteads is given in an appendix.

Case, C.W.; Clark, H.R.; Kay, J.; Lucarelli, F.B.; Rizer, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

385

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Energy and water development appropriations for 1983. Part 6. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 6 of the hearing record covers five DOE programs on atomic energy, defense, nuclear fission and civilian waste management, fusion energy and basic energy sciences, environmental, and departmental administration, as well as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Herman E. Roser, DOE Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs, began with an overview of nuclear weapons, safeguards technology, and security investigations, with a total budget of $5.5 billion. Witnesses describe the status of research and development in each program and the budget requirements to meet national goals. (DCK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1987. Part 4. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 4 of the hearing record provides highlights of the budget justifications, followed by detailed information and testimony relating to the budgets for: atomic energy defense; energy supply, research, and development; the Nuclear Waste Fund; general science and research; uranium enrichment; the Geothermal Resources Development Fund; power marketing administrations; DOE administration; and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The introductory summary highlights allocations of the total budget of $19 billion, the largest portion (36%) going for business enterprises, followed by 25% to defense production, 24% to research and development, 12% to waste activities, 2% to departmental management, and 1% to grants and other activities.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1993. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session on H.R. 5373  

SciTech Connect

The hearings on H.R. 5373, an act making appropriations for Energy and Water development for the Fiscal Year ending September 30, 1993. The hearing covered appropriations for: Bonneville Power Administration; Department of Energy; Department of Army - Corps of Engineers - Civil; and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Statements of witnesses in regarding to the committee questions are included, along with documents submitted for the record by officials of the agencies involved in supporting the appropriations requested.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Map Data: Total Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total Production Map Data: Total Production totalprod2009final.csv More Documents & Publications Map Data: Renewable Production Map Data: State Consumption...

390

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

391

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

392

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

393

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

394

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

395

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

396

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

397

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

398

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

399

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

400

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended with appropriations acts appended  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 provides for the development of repositories for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, to establish a program of research, development and demonstration regarding the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. Titles 1 and 2 cover these subjects. Also included in this Act are: Title 3: Other provisions relating to radioactive waste; Title 4: Nuclear waste negotiation; Title 5: Nuclear waste technical review board; and Title 6: High-level radioactive waste. An appendix contains excerpts from appropriations acts from fiscal year 1984--1994.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March 27, 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development to discuss the President's FY13 budget for the...

402

DOE O 137.1B, Plan for Operating in the Event of a Lapse in Appropriations  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order established plans and procedures for continuing operations during a lapse in appropriations. Cancels DOE O 137.1A

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

H.R. 2605: Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 2000  

SciTech Connect

Appropriations are made for the following purposes: (1) Corps of Engineers for general investigations, construction, flood control, operation and maintenance, regulatory program, general expenses, revolving fund, and administrative provision; (2) Dept. of the Interior for the central Utah project, Bureau of Reclamation, water and related resources, Central Valley project restoration fund, California Bay-Delta restoration, and administrative provisions; (3) Dept. of Energy for energy supply, non-defense environmental management, uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund, science, nuclear waste disposal, and departmental administration; (4) Atomic Energy Defense activities for weapon activities, defense environmental restoration and waste management, defense environmental management privatization, and defense nuclear waste disposal; (5) Power marketing administrations for Bonneville Power Administration fund, operation and maintenance of the Southeastern Power Administration, the Southwestern Power Administration, the Western Area Power Administration, Falcon and Amistad operating and maintenance fund, and salaries and expenses for FERC; (6) Independent agencies including Appalachian Regional Commission, Denali Commission, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Inspector General, Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, and the Tennessee Valley Authority fund. Certain appropriations are also rescinded.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

405

Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits: Developing an Appropriate Definition for a REC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES TRUST ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES TRUST Pioneering Markets to Improve the Environment Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits Developing an Appropriate Definition for a REC Patrick Leahy and Alden Hathaway April 2004 The Renewable Energy Certificate Market The past few years have witnessed the emergence of the Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) market as a viable model for the U.S. renewable energy industry. Once considered an esoteric topic for even the most ardent renewable energy expert, RECs have grown in popularity and exposure thanks to efforts of the renewable energy industry as well as several large purchases by high profile corporations and governmental organizations. Although still in its infancy, the Renewable Energy

406

Department of Energy Appropriate Energy Technology projects for the US Pacific Islands. Final report, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the status of 18 of the 33 Department of Energy (DOE) Appropriate Energy Technology (AET) Projects on the US Pacific Islands (excluding the Hawaiian Islands) as of August 1, 1982. The projects include: shallow lens water pumping on the Marshall Islands; hydroelectric power systems on Micronesia; hospital solar hot water system on Micronesia; wind and solar equipment for the Aramas Kapw school in Micronesia; sail powered fishing boat in Micronesia; wind electric power project in Micronesia; smokeless cooking stoves in the Marshall Islands; demonstration programs in the Mariana Islands; typhoon-proof greenhouse on Guam; evaporative cooling for buildings in Guam, solar photovoltaic refrigerator in Micronesia; and a solar dryer demonstration in Micronesia.

Case, C.W.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

First quarterly report to U. S. house and senate committees on appropriations  

SciTech Connect

This is the first of a series of quarterly reports to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations describing the progress of the Federal Energy Administration's (FEA) energy conservation programs and short- and long-term accomplishments in terms of the dollar and energy savings that result from the programs. Part A, Overview, of this report discusses the rationale underlying the selection and design of the programs, briefly describes the major programs, and summarizes the estimated short- and long-term dollar and energy savings and costs associated with the major programs. Part B, Highlights, reports the current status of the programs, including indicators of energy conservation achieved to date and major activities conducted during the quarter. Part C lists major publications.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Total Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grand total social cost of highway transportation Subtotal:of alternative transportation investments. A social-costtransportation option that has These costs will be inefficiently incurred if people do not fully lower total social costs.

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 2,550,203 FY2009 39,646,446 FY2010 64,874,187 FY2011 66,253,207 FY2012...

411

Fractionally total colouring Gn,p  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the fractional total chromatic number of G"n","p as p varies from 0 to 1. We also present an algorithm that computes the fractional total chromatic number of a random graph in polynomial expected time. Keywords: Fractional total colouring, Graph colouring, Random graphs

Conor Meagher; Bruce Reed

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Appropriate Response to Rising Fuel Prices Citizens Should Demand, Raise My Prices Now!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper evaluates policy options for responding to rising fuel prices. There is popular support for policies that minimize fuel prices through subsidies and tax reductions, but such policies harm consumers and the economy overall because they increase total fuel consumption and vehicle travel, and therefore associated costs such as traffic and parking congestion, infrastructure costs, traffic crashes, trade imbalances and pollution emissions. Fuel price reductions are an inefficient way to help low-income households; other strategies do more to increase affordability and provide other benefits. Because many transport decisions are durable, low fuel price policies are particularly harmful over the long term. This report identifies responses that maximize total benefits, including mobility management strategies that increase transport system efficiency, incentives to choose fuel efficient vehicles, and revenue-neutral tax shifts. With these policies fuel prices can significantly increase without harming consumers or the economy, while helping to achieve other planning objectives.

Todd Litman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Energy and water development appropriations for 1995. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, Part 6  

SciTech Connect

These are hearings on energy and water development appropriations. Included are the following areas: Environmental restoration and waste management; environment, safety and health; atomic energy defense activities; naval reactors; defense nuclear facilities safety board; power marketing administrations.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Energy and water development appropriations for 1983. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session. Part 5. Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect

Text is presented on energy and water development appropriations for 1983. Witnesses appeared from Department of Energy, Power Marketing Administrations; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and for general science activities as well as for Uranium Supply and Enrichment Activities. (PSB)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Energy and water development appropriations for 1984. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Part 2 of the hearing record covers testimony received from the Corps of Engineers, the Delaware and Susquehanna River Basin Commissions, and the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin. Representatives of the Corps of Engineers described the activities in each of the six divisions, and reviewed the need for additional appropriations to complete prpjects. Representatives of the two river basin commissions presented highlights of their appropriation requirements to finance development programs. (DCK)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

417

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

418

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

419

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

420

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

422

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

423

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

424

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

425

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

426

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

427

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

428

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

429

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

430

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

431

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

432

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

433

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

434

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

435

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

436

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

437

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

438

Analysis of fresh fuel critical experiments appropriate for burnup credit validation  

SciTech Connect

The ANS/ANS-8.1 standard requires that calculational methods used in determining criticality safety limits for applications outside reactors be validated by comparison with appropriate critical experiments. This report provides a detailed description of 34 fresh fuel critical experiments and their analyses using the SCALE-4.2 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. The 34 critical experiments were selected based on geometry, material, and neutron interaction characteristics that are applicable to a transportation cask loaded with pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel. These 34 experiments are a representative subset of a much larger data base of low-enriched uranium and mixed-oxide critical experiments. A statistical approach is described and used to obtain an estimate of the bias and uncertainty in the calculational methods and to predict a confidence limit for a calculated neutron multiplication factor. The SCALE-4.2 results for a superset of approximately 100 criticals are included in uncertainty analyses, but descriptions of the individual criticals are not included.

DeHart, M.D.; Bowman, S.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

THE APPLICATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF APPROPRIATE TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR COST-EFFECTIVE CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research projects is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas impacts. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: advanced videography testing; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas impacts. The research described in this report occurred between July 1, 2002 and June 30, 2003. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: remote sensing for carbon analysis; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Zoe Kant; Gilberto Tiepolo; Wilber Sabido; Ellen Hawes; Jenny Henman; Miguel Calmon; Michael Ebinger

2004-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface Technology Development Roadmap in Support of Grid Appropriate Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grid Appropriate Reactors (GARs) are a component of the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program. GARs have smaller output power (Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technology development roadmap emphasizing the specific characteristics of GARs [1]. This roadmapping effort builds upon and focuses the recently developed, more general nuclear energy ICHMI technology development roadmap [2]. The combination of the smaller plant size, smaller grids, and deployment in locations without extensive prior nuclear power experience presents particular infrastructure, regulation, design, operational, and safeguards challenges for effective GAR deployment. ICHMI technologies are central to efficient GAR operation and as such are a dimension of each of these challenges. Further, while the particular ICHMI technologies to be developed would be useful at larger power plants, they are not high-priority development items at the larger plants. For example, grid transient resilience would be a useful feature for any reactor/grid combination and indeed would have limited some recent blackout events. However, most large reactors have limited passive cooling features. Large plants with active safety response features will likely preserve trip preferential grid transient response. This contrasts sharply with GARs featuring passive shutdown cooling, which can safely support grid stability during large grid transients. ICHMI technologies ranging from alternative control algorithms to simplified human-interface system designs are key to enabling GARs to respond properly and thereby stabilize the grid during transients.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Upadhyaya, Belle R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; O'Hara, John [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Quinn, Edward L. [Longenecker & Associates; Miller, Don W. [Ohio State University

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st , 2005 and June 30th, 2005. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Jenny Henman; Zoe Kant; Gilberto Tiepolo; Tim Pearson; Neil Sampson; Miguel Calmon

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st , 2005 and June 30th, 2005. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Zoe Kant; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Gilberto Tiepolo; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Miguel Calmon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between January 1st and March 31st 2007. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1--carbon inventory advancements; Task 2--emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3--baseline method development; Task 4--third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5--new project feasibility studies; and Task 6--development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between October 1st and December 31st 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between January 1st and March 31st 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

APPLICATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF APPROPRIATE TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR COST-EFFECTIVE CARBON  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas impacts. The research described in this report occurred between July 1, 2002 and June 30, 2003. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: advanced videography testing; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Patrick Gonzalez; Brad Kreps; Gilberto Tiepolo

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

450

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

451

Quarterly report to U. S. House and Senate Committees on Appropriations (3rd). Quarterly report Jun-Sep 76  

SciTech Connect

This is the third in a series of quarterly reports to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations describing the process of the Federal Energy Administration's (FEA) energy conservation programs and short- and long-term accomplishments.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Energy and Water Development Appropriation Bill, 1987. Introduced in the Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, September 15, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Senate Appropriations Committee report on H.R. 5162 includes information pertaining to the bill as well as suggested amendments to the nearly $15.55 billion bill passed by the House. The four titles of the bill cover appropriations for the Army Corps of Engineers, the Departments of Interior and Energy, and independent agencies. Detailed budget items and committee recommendations make up the bulk of the report.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface Technology Development Roadmap in Support of Grid Appropriate Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Grid Appropriate Reactors (GARs) are a component of the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program. GARs have smaller output power (<~600 MWe), than those intended for deployment on large, tightly coupled grids. This smaller size is important in avoiding grid destabilization, which can result from having a large fraction of a grid s electrical generation supplied by a single source. GARs are envisioned to be deployed worldwide often in locations without extensive nuclear power experience. DOE recently sponsored the creation of an Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technology development roadmap emphasizing the specific characteristics of GARs [1]. This roadmapping effort builds upon and focuses the recently developed, more general nuclear energy ICHMI technology development roadmap [2]. The combination of the smaller plant size, smaller grids, and deployment in locations without extensive prior nuclear power experience presents particular infrastructure, regulation, design, operational, and safeguards challenges for effective GAR deployment. ICHMI technologies are central to efficient GAR operation and as such are a dimension of each of these challenges. Further, while the particular ICHMI technologies to be developed would be useful at larger power plants, they are not high-priority development items at the larger plants. For example, grid transient resilience would be a useful feature for any reactor/grid combination and indeed would have limited some recent blackout events. However, most large reactors have limited passive cooling features. Large plants with active safety response features will likely preserve trip preferential grid transient response. This contrasts sharply with GARs featuring passive shutdown cooling, which can safely support grid stability during large grid transients. ICHMI technologies ranging from alternative control algorithms to simplified human-interface system designs are key to enabling GARs to respond properly and thereby stabilize the grid during transients.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Upadhyaya, Belle R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; O'Hara, John [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Quinn, Edward L. [Longenecker & Associates; Miller, Don W. [Ohio State University

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

H. R. 4926: a bill to authorize appropriations to the Department of Energy for civilian energy programs for fiscal year 1987. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, June 4, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Civilian Energy Programs Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1987 authorizes appropriations for the operating costs of non-nuclear energy programs, nuclear energy and electric programs, plant and capital equipment, and both prior year and new construction. The bill reduces supporting research and technical analysis budgets by $66,303,000 for a total of $474,711,000. The authorization for general science and research totals $633,671,000, a reduction of $131,729,000. Title II authorizes funds for other activities, such as energy conservation and solar and nuclear energy research and development. Title III establishes a research and development program in advanced steel manufacturing technologies.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

456

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

457

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

458

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

459

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

460

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

462

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

463

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

464

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

465

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

466

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

467

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

468

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

469

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

470

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

471

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

472

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

473

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt...

474

Total Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions,...

475

Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series...

476

Total Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series...

477

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

478

Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Former ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Former Corporation/Refiner Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (bbl/cd)a New Corporation/Refiner Date of Sale Table 14. Refinery Sales During 2005

479

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

480

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","10312013"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appropriations total obligations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

What is the Appropriate Reference Condition for Optimizing Concentrator Cells? Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes Consensus standards for determining the efficiency of a concentrator cell or module that have not been developed. NREL, Sandia National Laboratory, the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy in Germany, and the Progress in Photovoltaics Efficiency Table authors have informally agreed upon concentrator-cell reference conditions. These conditions are 25C cell temperature, 1-sun=1000 W/m2 total irradiance, and the ASTM E891-87 direct-normal reference spectrum. Deficiencies in the direct reference spectrum are discussed, and a more representative reference spectrum for evaluating concentrator cells is proposed. The spectrum was generated by the SMARTS model, and the atmospheric parameters are as close as possible to the existing direct spectrum, with the exception that the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm is reduced from 0.27 to 0.085.

Emery, K.; Myers, D.; Kurtz, S.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Implementing Equipment Based Obligations Presentation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

for use in the Westinghouse TOTE code - TOTE results were processed through an in-house code, ISOTL, to further refine the results - The results from ISOTL were provided to...

483

JOM: Author Tools - Author Obligations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Once the Author Query Application has been completed, your article will be processed and you will receive the proofs. Open Choice In addition to the normal

484

Comparing Life-Cycle Costs of ESPCs and Appropriations-Funded Energy Projects: An Update to the 2002 Report  

SciTech Connect

A study was sponsored by FEMP in 2001 - 2002 to develop methods to compare life-cycle costs of federal energy conservation projects carried out through energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) and projects that are directly funded by appropriations. The study described in this report follows up on the original work, taking advantage of new pricing data on equipment and on $500 million worth of Super ESPC projects awarded since the end of FY 2001. The methods developed to compare life-cycle costs of ESPCs and directly funded energy projects are based on the following tasks: (1) Verify the parity of equipment prices in ESPC vs. directly funded projects; (2) Develop a representative energy conservation project; (3) Determine representative cycle times for both ESPCs and appropriations-funded projects; (4) Model the representative energy project implemented through an ESPC and through appropriations funding; and (5) Calculate the life-cycle costs for each project.

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Atkin, Erica [ORNL

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Department of transportation and related agencies appropriations for 1996. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, Part 1, 1996 budget justifications  

SciTech Connect

The hearing address appropriations for the transportation sector and related agencies. A primary focus is the safety of the nations system of gas pipelines which are under the jurisdiction of the Department of Transportation. Statements by government and industry officials and documents submitted for the record are included.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

486

Department of transportation and related agencies appropriations for fiscal year 1995. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

The hearing address appropriations for the transportation sector and related agencies. A primary focus is the safety of the nations system of gas pipelines which are under the jurisdiction of the Department of Transportation. Statements by government and industry officials and documents submitted for the record are included.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

487

Energy and water development appropriations for 2000. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, US House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session, March 25, 1999  

SciTech Connect

These hearings focus on what is happening in the Corps of Engineers and in the Bureau of Reclamation in regard to water supply and management issues in Florida, California, and Colorado. Details of the FY 2000 budget request for the Bureau of Reclamation are addressed. An estimated $2.2 billion will be provided in permanent appropriations.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1982. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Nineth-Seventh Congress, First Session on H. R. 4144. Part 4. Nondepartmental witnesses  

SciTech Connect

Part 4 of the hearing record covers the testimony of nondepartmental witnesses from both the public and private sectors on the 1982 appropriations. The witnesses described a variety of flood control, conservation, lumbering, dam construction, and other projects and activities affected by the federal budget that are related to developing and conserving the nation's water resources. (DCK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

490

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

491

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

492

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

493

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

494

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

495

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

496

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

497

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

498

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

499

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

500

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567